Posts Tagged ‘friendship

02
May
14

5.2.14 … Delicious Trumps, Pretense Stinks, Comfort Feels Good …

Local Three Kitchen & Bar – Atlanta:

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So I first heard of Local Three last week here in Charlotte.  Chef Chris Hall was in Charlotte for Charlotte Food and Wine.  I enjoyed him, so I sought his restaurant out in Atlanta.  My experience was very good.  The Vidalia Onion Soup and the Hoppin John  were both excellent.  But the cost was excessive for lunch.  So although I would recommend the food (it was delicious!), I would not recommend the restaurant unless you are on an expense account.

Creamy Vidalia Onion Soup: Cabot Cheddar, Thyme, Garlic Croutons $4.53/$6.53

Hoppin’ John $4.93

Pimento Cheese Grits $4.93

Carolina Mountain Trout: Anson Mills Rice Grits, “Succotash”, Lobster Saffron Broth $19.93

via Local Three Kitchen & Bar – Atlanta Restaurant.

Their restaurant Local Three represents a shared philosophy on food, drink, hospitality and how to do business. That philosophy is straightforward: People Matter Most, Local Is Priority, Seasonal Makes Sense, Authenticity Rules, Quality Governs, Delicious Trumps, Pretense Stinks, Comfort Feels Good, Appreciation Tastes Better, Prudence Sustains It All.

via Local Three Kitchen & Bar – Atlanta Restaurant.

Daily Meditation by Henri Nouwen, friends:

One friend may offer us affection, another may stimulate our minds, another may strengthen our souls. The more able we are to receive the different gifts our friends have to give us, the more able we will be to offer our own unique but limited gifts. Thus, friendships create a beautiful tapestry of love.

via Daily Meditation: May 2, 2014 | Daily Meditation by Henri Nouwen.

Do or Di, blogs, Westminster classmates:  I have always loved Di’s humor and joie de vie.  It shows in her new blog.  Enjoy!

Do or Di | fixed on the horizon; happily distracted by the present

fixed on the horizon; happily distracted by the present

via Do or Di | fixed on the horizon; happily distracted by the present.

Andy Baio @waxpancake, Kickstarter:

Andy Baio @waxpancake,

Kickstarter turned five today, and the team made a video looking back at its crazy history: youtube.com/watch?v=qcR_UH…

29 Apr

 

On April 28th 2009 at 4:27 pm EST, Kickstarter went live. To celebrate the past five years, we put together this history of Kickstarter.

via ▶ A Brief History of Kickstarter – YouTube.

Freshman Shames Ivy League College with His Personal Story About ‘White Privilege’, Princeton University: Worth reading and thinking about …

My exploration did yield some results. I recognize that it was my parents’ privilege and now my own that there is such a thing as an American dream which is attainable even for a penniless Jewish immigrant.

I am privileged that values like faith and education were passed along to me. My grandparents played an active role in my parents’ education, and some of my earliest memories included learning the Hebrew alphabet with my Dad. It’s been made clear to me that education begins in the home, and the importance of parents’ involvement with their kids’ education—from mathematics to morality—cannot be overstated. It’s not a matter of white or black, male or female or any other division which we seek, but a matter of the values we pass along, the legacy we leave, that perpetuates “privilege.” And there’s nothing wrong with that.

Behind every success, large or small, there is a story, and it isn’t always told by sex or skin color. My appearance certainly doesn’t tell the whole story, and to assume that it does and that I should apologize for it is insulting. While I haven’t done everything for myself up to this point in my life, someone sacrificed themselves so that I can lead a better life. But that is a legacy I am proud of.

I have checked my privilege. And I apologize for nothing.

via Freshman Shames Ivy League College with His Personal Story About ‘White Privilege’.

A friend posted the above  and another mutual friend responded with this.  I have to admit I laughed.

via ▶ Louis CK – Being White – YouTube.

Uploaded on Nov 27, 2008

From his latest stand-up “Chewed Up” – Louis CK tells people why it’s great being a white male. It’s advantages and it’s futuristic disadvantages.

via ▶ Louis CK – Being White – YouTube.

18 Things to Eat, Buy, and Do in Puerto Rico, KieroCoco Coconut Water, food & drink:  I loved Puerto Rico, so I thought I would share this list.

Fresh coconut juice is one of the great, unsung pleasures in life, and I’m not ashamed to say I marched around El Mercado cradling a giant coconut pierced with a frilly cocktail umbrella. At the KieroCoco stand, from whence it came, you select your coconut (rounder ones are juicier; browner ones are sweeter), and then drill into it with the help of a hand-cranked doohickey attached to a mobile cart.

via 18 Things to Eat, Buy, and Do in Puerto Rico

2.4.13 … Becoming Kind … | Dennard’s Clipping Service:  Everyone once a while I notice repeated returns to one post.  With this post, originally it was because of the cone of shame cartoon.  But later, I am not sure what has drawn the interest to this 2.4.13 … Becoming Kind …  I then laughed at myself because a post that is entitled, “Becoming Kind,” leads with a cartoon referenced as “cone of shame.”

New Yorker Cartoons, The New Yorker, cell phones, cone of shame, LOL:  I deserve a cone of shame  …

 Downton Abbey, Dowager, quotes:  The Dowager, she gets all the good quotes!

Albert Schweitzer, quotes, A Mighty Girl:  A Might Girl is one of my favorite source for quotes.

 

“Do something wonderful, people may imitate it.” — Albert Schweitzer

via A Mighty Girl.

just a thought …, Henri Nouwen, Tolstoi, kindness:

Here is the great challenge: All people, whatever their color, religion, or sex, belong to humankind and are called to be kind to one another, treating one another as brothers and sisters. There is hardly a day in our lives in which we are not called to this.

via Daily Meditation: Becoming Kind.

Nothing can make our lives, or the lives of other people, more beautiful than perpetual kindness. – Leo Tolstoy in A Calendar of Wisdom

via Nothing can make our lives, or the lives of other… • literary jukebox.

when bad things happen …, What Gives 365:  From one of my favorite blogs …

I went to church this morning wanting to thank the universe for sparing us … but that assumes, of course, that the universe would have been punishing us had things turned out differently. And therein lies the shame and guilt when bad things happen. The truth is a terrible accident can happen to anyone, at any time, and often there is nobody to blame. But that reality is awfully terrifying to admit; we want our universe to make more sense than that and we want to feel as if our good intentions and conduct will spare us from tragedy.

via Up in smoke. | What Gives 365.

E.B. White, quotes, LOL:

source: Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership..

via 2.4.13 … Becoming Kind … | Dennard’s Clipping Service.

 

13
Apr
13

4.13.13 … Aristotle and friendship …

Rev. James Howell,  Sabbatical, Aristotle, friendship, marriage equality:  I  really like James’ musings …

Interestingly, on the same long drive north toward the sacred isle of Iona, we discussed the contemporary issue of gay marriage.  Randy insisted that we need to define marriage.  We spoke of things like “two people committed to one another” – and without getting into what else we explored on that topic, we did reflect on the curious fact that, as lifelong friends, we are irrevocably committed to one another.  We never took vows.  We have never even brought up the subject to one another.  How lovely to realize the commitment was surely made, and was as enduring (or even more durable) than even a marriage – yet with no formality, no legal documentation, not even the simple act of saying to each other “Hey, we’re in this forever.”

via Rev. James Howell: Sabbatical musings 1: Aristotle and friendship.

29
Jan
13

1.29.13 … it’s not all about me … but I did have a great day … :)

2013 birthday, NYC, The Cloisters, MTA, High Line Park, Chelsea, bucket list, foo dogs: First Stop The Cloisters … A bucket list item.

First thing I noticed this morning was this beautiful set of foo dogs in the window … $35,000 for the pair. 🙂

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Next stop … The Cloisters.  I view getting there as part of the adventure.

Subway 6 to Grand  Central  … Subway 7 to Times Square … Love the artwork in the Times Square Station.  There are small tile pictures of New Year’s Eve revelers embedded in the standard white subway tiles. But there are also a MILLION ads for new movie Hansel and Gretel … Kills the interest … No cell service in Times Square Station … BUT a very  nice policeman tried to help … However,  he had never heard of the Cloisters  and kept trying to tell me where the Met was …

Subway A to 190th … Got on Express so I may have to backtrack at some point. Strange to roar through stations. The stations become less and less interesting. No art, not even nice big colorful tile insets identifying the station. Nice fellow passengers assure me it stops at 190th.

187th Yeshiva University is a little cleaner with several men with yarmulkes.

190th St. Station … very strange … like a prison … except great posters in the elevator!

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Half mile walk to the Cloisters … Along the Hudson. Gorgeous!

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THE CLOISTERS!

The Cloisters is a modern building (1930s) built to hold  to medieval art … as if Benedictine monastery … 1938 … “built as evocation of the Middle Ages “
moustached lion
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bestiary dragon
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Doorway … headless angels, Jesus, Mary, Clovis and son
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Chapel
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View from the Porch
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Cuxa Cloister
Capitals … One  with monkeys
Cloister means closed but is open to the world at the same time
Planted in garden … Rue, lavender, limes and aloe
Arch with fantastic beasts

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Pontaut Chapter House
Early Gothic Hall
Virgin
Panels from destroyed Lady Chapel at St. Germaine
Seven Sleepers of Ephesus
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Tapestries
9 heroes
Julius Caesar, Alexander the great or hector of troy, Arthur (pic), King David & Joshua
Unicorns
(But I really loved the dogs!)
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The Cloisters was well worth the visit.  I shall return!  And the return walk to the 190th St. Station was lovely … Although I wish the kind policemen driving through the park had given me a lift.  🙂

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NYC, Chelsea, High Line Park, kith/kin:  Now to Chelsea and a visit with a long-lost, but much-loved childhood friend …

6 train from 190th to 14 th …

190th – like a prison, but the elevator art in the other elevator was equally amusing.

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175th – grim …
Woman with bike who was not amused by the singing cowboy!
Posters all advertising “The Lion King”  again, all= overkill
168th –  better, red stripe
BTW never get a raspberry scone at Starbucks … So dry I would not eat it but now am starved!
145th –  yellow stripe, but nothing special
Cowboy playing … …. Singing in Spanish 🙂
135th – no stop
125th –  green stripe,  no art,  express …  Am I on the right train? … Bumpy as we pass other trains … Very bumpy …
110th –  no stop …   96th –  some decor, but no stop …
81st – no stop, but know that is the stop for museum of natural history … 72nd –  clean, no stop, blue stripe …
59th – big stop, blue stripe, kiosks on the platform, transfers …
42nd – purple stripe … train was getting crowded,  but emptying now …
34th Penn Station red stripe — Interesting iron work
23rd – no stop
14th – Out into the sun …

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NYC, Chelsea, Bonsignour, Organic Avenue:  Now to find Catherine and lunch … Please note … some pictures are the property of CW.  You can probably tell the difference.  🙂
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OK, I get off the subway and walk a few blocks … and I decide on Bonsignour on Jane St.  Biggest turkey and avocado sandwich I have ever seen …
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This little takeout shop in Greenwich Village is just the sort of place to visit when food becomes boring. It’s not that Bonsignour offers many unusual preparations, it’s that everything, even familiar dishes, tastes the way you imagine it should. That means cool poached salmon in a tart sauce of dill, capers and chopped tomatoes, and savory roast chicken breast cooked with scallions and thyme that is moist yet crisp on the outside and covered in herbs. You will also find unusual combinations that work, like lasagna made with chicken, spinach, roasted peppers and pesto. For dessert, Bonsignour offers rich, fudgy walnut brownies, flaky lemon walnut pastries and luscious raspberry linzer torte squares. — Eric Asimov

via Bonsignour – West Village – New York – Restaurants Search – The New York Times.

… then caught up  Catherine and “enjoyed” Splendid Sweet Green Juice and Cauliflower Cleanse Salad.  CW says Organic Avenue is the next Starbucks … I think they need some help with their product names. 🙂
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Organic Avenue is the leading provider of organic cold pressed juices, raw food cleansing programs, snacks, superfoods, truly natural beauty products, healthy lifestyle education and community building events. The company helps people learn how to transition and maintain a healthy lifestyle that is pleasurable and sustainable, while also friendly to people, animals and the environment.

Organic Avenue is controlled by Weld North, an investment company concentrating on education, health and wellness, consumer services and marketing businesses. In partnership with KKR, a leading global investment firm, Weld North seeks to make control investments in businesses with high potential for long-term growth in cash flow. With strong and highly motivated management teams, the firm looks to accelerate growth through an obsessive focus on enhancing the customer experience, operational excellence, marketing expertise, and strategic and disciplined management.

via Organic Avenue – About Us.

NYC, Chelsea, Meatpacking District, High Line Park, public art, El Anatsui, kith/kin, friendship: At one point while Catherine and I were walking and talking, she said something to the effect that it was so wonderful that the friends you made were you were little were often the truest … and could survive 35+ years apart.  Children do instinctively bond based on personality, etc. and not on social hierarchy, looks, school, etc. She was right … and I loved reconnecting on a very personal level with a great deal of trust.
As we walk toward the Meatpacking District and the High Line park, we noticed this building being “painted” to look like it has been in a bad fire.  It is for a Michael J. Fox tv show (see… NBC Picks Up Michael J. Fox’s New Comedy Series.)  Kinda cool …
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Next up was a little window shopping, but no buying.  Really liked Michael Angelo’s Wonderland Beauty Parlor | ART.BEAUTY.DESIGN.STUDIO ~ 212.524.2800. for gifts (it’s a salon) and the FIG & OLIVE Restaurant – Kitchen Tasting Bar and Olive Oil Store.  Then into The Standard, High Line – Boutique Hotels New York City | Hip Hotels Manhattan NYC for a look around.  Great looking restaurant – THE STANDARD GRILL,  ice skating rink, unisex bathroom and artsy fun lobby …
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LINE IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN’S MEATPACKING DISTRICT STUNNING VIEWS OF NEW YORK AND THE MIGHTY HUDSON RIVER THE STANDARD GRILL GERMAN BIERGARTEN LIVING ROOM LOUNGE THE STANDARD ICE RINK WITH ITS OWN RINK-SIDE KAFFEEKLATSCH SERVING APRÈS SKATE DRINKS & SNACKS PRIVATE DINING ROOMS AND EVENT SPACES 24-HOUR ROOM SERVICE 24-HOUR GYM LE BAIN DISCOTHÈQUE SEASONAL ROOFTOP BAR AND CRÊPERIE NON-STANDARD SHOPPING IN THE STANDARD SHOP COMPLIMENTARY BIKES FREE WIFI EVERYWHERE

via The Standard, High Line – Boutique Hotels New York City | Hip Hotels Manhattan NYC.

Now on to the High Line
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(Did I tell CW I always take a picture of my feet?)
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Meatpacking District, our first encounter on the Highline… fun guy, a little on the short side!

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The El Anatsui …
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High Line Art presents Nigeria-based artist El Anatsui’s Broken Bridge II, the largest outdoor installation ever by the artist. A monumental sculpture made of pressed tin and mirrors, the work will hang on an outdoor wall next to the High Line, between West 21st and West 22nd Streets, and will be visible from the park and the street below it. Broken Bridge II will be on view from November 21, 2012 through Summer 2013.

via EL ANATSUI, BROKEN BRIDGE II | Friends of the High Line.

And very interesting to me and CW was the work of David Everitt-Carlson,

“I Think Outside My Box” (ITOMB) was born on 6 October, 2011 in Zuccotti Park, Manhattan as a performance art and community outreach vehicle supporting Occupy Wall Street.

As a solution to signs he had made being constantly blown away or rained upon in the park, artist David Everitt-Carlson settled upon using a box instead of flat cardboard whilst sitting inside and painting. ITOMB was first featured in the Wall Street Journal on 7 October, 2011.

Over the course of the next 48 days, he painted all of 12 panels, each with a different theme and began to branch out into individual smaller signs that could be used by other participants for a small donation.

via I think outside my box: iTOMB HISTORY.

Here is my artwork … very poor … and here it is posted on his site … iTOMB Interactive 2013 – Google+.

 

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Off to Lower Manhattan … to find the Labyrinth in Battery Park …
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But after a walk alongside Ground Zero, St. Paul’s Chapel and Trinity Church, we can’t find the labyrinth.  It was destroyed by Sandy and has not been restored.  Next time …

Camino de Paz Labyrinths in collaboration with the Battery Conservancy and the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation created the Labyrinth for Contemplation situated in the Jerusalem Grove at Battery Park, Manhattan.

The Labyrinth for Contemplation enables the families of those who lost relatives and friends, visitors, local residents and workers, with an interactive tool for reflection, grieving, honoring, and healing. The Labyrinth transforms the existing Jerusalem Grove of 11 cedar trees into a place of pilgrimage by providing all visitors with the opportunity of actively offering respect through walking the path.

via Camino de Paz Labyrinth for Contemplation in Battery Park – Virtual Globetrotting.

NYC, Subway:  6 train all the way home …
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NYC, dinner, SEO:  When in Rome … Eat Asian! Birthday dinner — at SEO Japanese Restaurant. Overall, pretty good meal.  I really liked John’s calamari salad … Calamari Salad, Miso Soup, Sushi And Sashimi Combination, Pear and Banana dessert

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NYC,  The Waldorf Astoria, Secret Train Platform, FDR, history: On the way back to the hotel from dinner, John and I looked down on the train tracks that run directly under the Waldorf Astoria and remembered this little bit of historical trivia – that  FDR had a private entrance from the tracks to the hotel.  One of the bell men overheard us and did a great job telling us about what he knew including that the platform had also been used to get workers in passed picket lines during strikes.

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Over the weekend we had a chance to visit the long-abandoned Waldorf-Astoria train platform, which allowed VIPs to enter the hotel in a more private manner—most famously it was used by Franklin D. Roosevelt, possibly to hide the fact that he was in a wheelchair suffering from polio. The mysterious track, known as Track 61, still houses the train car and private elevator, which were both large enough for FDR’s armor-plated Pierce Arrow car. Legend has it that the car would drive off the train, onto the platform and straight into the elevator, which would lead to the hotel’s garage. Trainjotting has some more history regarding the platform, known as Track 61, and notes that the quest for it “has become a holy grail for many urban explorers.”

Some fun facts regarding the timeline of the tracks: It was first used by General Pershing in 1938, and less than 30 years after that, in 1965, it was the venue for a party thrown by Andy Warhol (fittingly called The Underground Party).

via Photos: Visiting The Secret Train Platform Beneath The Waldorf-Astoria – Democratic Underground.

And a few thoughts on the Waldorf … when I stayed here two years ago, it was not in good shape.  Well, this time, the public areas look great and our room was quite nice, large with wonderful fixtures.  The service was very good, but not excellent, however.  One thing I missed was turn down service … and the reason is because someone needs to pull the shades down and close the curtains … a great deal of city light and noise comes in at night.  Otherwise, we had an excellent stay.

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UNC President Tom Ross, Gov. Pat McCrory, liberal arts education: I’m with you, Tom Ross!

“The University’s value to North Carolina should not be measured by jobs filled alone. Our three-part mission of teaching, research, and public service requires that we prepare students with the talent and abilities to succeed in the workforce, because talent will be the key to economic growth. We must also continue to serve the state through our agricultural and industrial extension programs, our Small Business and Technology Development Centers, our Area Health Education Centers, and through the many other ways our faculty and students are engaged in our communities. Higher education plays a key role in ensuring a higher quality of life for all North Carolinians.”

via UNC president responds to McCrory radio remarks | CharlotteObserver.com.

Dan Cathy, Chick-fil-A, LGTB Controversy, Christianity, culture:  What a nice twist to this story …

This is why, after discussions with Dan and Chick-fil-A, Campus Pride suspended our campaign. Like Dan, we had faith. It took time to be proven publicly.

Now it is all about the future, one defined, let’s hope, by continued mutual respect. I will not change my views, and Dan will likely not change his, but we can continue to listen, learn and appreciate “the blessing of growth” that happens when we know each other better. I hope that our nation’s political leaders and campus leaders might do the same.

In the end, it is not about eating (or eating a certain chicken sandwich). It is about sitting down at a table together and sharing our views as human beings, engaged in real, respectful, civil dialogue. Dan would probably call this act the biblical definition of hospitality. I would call it human decency. So long as we are all at the same table and talking, does it matter what we call it or what we eat?

via Shane L. Windmeyer: Dan and Me: My Coming Out as a Friend of Dan Cathy and Chick-fil-A.

07
Jan
12

1.7.2012 … Rest in Peace, Nancy Wells Johnson … There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray, love, remember … Another labyrinth walk at the African American themed labyrinth at Charlotte’s McCorey YMCA … The Debt …

Nancy Wells Johnson, RIP, Celebration of Life, rosemary, Shakespeare:

There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray, love, remember …

from Hamlet

Quote given with a sprig of rosemary at the celebration of life of Nancy Wells Johnson.

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labyrinth, Almetto Howie Alexander Labyrinth:  Very nice labyrinth … and unique.  Another labyrinth walk at the African-American themed labyrinth at Charlotte’s McCorey YMCA.

With patience persistence and prayer, a god-filled spirit can bring a seed to fruit. – Almetto Howey Alexander 2011

In 2002, Almetto Howey Alexander — a lifelong educator who served her community and received repeated recognition for her efforts for civil rights — was first inspired to build a labyrinth in her neighborhood of Washington Heights in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Having spoken with people who benefited from the healing, focus, spiritual meditation and peace of mind engendered by walking a labyrinth, she searched for a way to bring this source of peace to her community. She sought help in bringing her vision to fruition, reaching to the people she had always served and to other community leaders with whom she had worked.

Response from The McCrorey Family YMCA was enthusiastic, resulting in approval to install a labyrinth at its location on Beatties Ford Road in Charlotte, North Carolina.

In November 2007, Almetto Alexander attended the opening of the Jack Matney Memorial Labyrinth Courtyard, where she met Tom Schulz, the artist who designed and built the labyrinth and prayerwall located at Presbyterian Hospital’s center courtyard.

Mrs. Alexander established the Almetto Howey Alexander Labyrinth Foundation to raise the funds to build the labyrinth and its surrounding environment as a gift to her community. Although we still have a way to go inraising the funds (see “donate” for a current report), we are making progress and invite you to be part of it! There are many ways to donate and treat yourself to a representation of this important project in culture and history.

via Almetto Howie Alexander Labyrinth.

French, YouTube, LOL:  I’m not even good at faking it!  How To Fake French – YouTube.

The Debt, movies:  very enjoyable …

friendship, faith and spirituality:

The Gift of Friendship

Friendship is one of the greatest gifts a human being can receive. It is a bond beyond common goals, common interests, or common histories. It is a bond stronger than sexual union can create, deeper than a shared fate can solidify, and even more intimate than the bonds of marriage or community. Friendship is being with the other in joy and sorrow, even when we cannot increase the joy or decrease the sorrow. It is a unity of souls that gives nobility and sincerity to love. Friendship makes all of life shine brightly. Blessed are those who lay down their lives for their friends.

via Daily Meditation: The Gift of Friendship.

media, print media, digital media, design:  Maybe not gone yet ….

Danny Miller, the 31-year-old managing director of cutting-edge publishers the Church of London, surveys the completed pages. They capture a love of print that runs through his company’s illustrated film magazine Little White Lies and its surf, snow and skate bimonthly Huck. That passion is so infectious, digital giants like Google and Sony PlayStation have asked Miller’s team to help them make statements in this supposedly moribund medium. “Print certainly isn’t dead,” Miller says. “It’s just that you have to work harder and make something better and more beautiful for it to get noticed.”

The best place to feel the buzz of the new print scene is Printout, a regular event held at London’s Book Club bar that attracts a large crowd of 20-somethings in vintage glasses and skinny jeans. Speakers share tips on distribution and when to quit your day job. The event is organized by blogger Leslie and Steve Watson, founder of Stack, which sends subscribers a different new mag each month — from Dubai’s stereotype-defying style guide Brownbook to Melbourne’s quirky Wooden Toy Quarterly.

New York City will soon have its own Printout-style event organized by Jamin Brophy-Warren of Kill Screen magazine and Andrew Losowsky, Huffington Post books editor and Stack America’s curator. Losowsky is also planning magCulture exhibitions with Leslie for New Delhi and other cities. The Internet, he says, has simply forced would-be publishers to think harder. “It’s the best thing that ever happened because it means print can now focus on what it does well.”

via Think Ink: Why Print is Being Embraced By Designers – TIME.

15
Dec
11

12.15.2011 … CLS Half-way There Party a hit! Now to get ready for Christmas … and Edward’s home … just one little one still out …

CLS, Half-way There Party, Winter Break:  Half-way There Party a hit! Now to get ready for Christmas …

kith/kin, travel: Edward’s home … just one little one still out …

Christopher Hitchens, RIP, Cancer victimhood, living dyingly, friendship:  So the answer is … be there for your friends … that is what matters.

“Cancer victimhood contains a permanent temptation to be self-centered and even solipsistic,” Hitchens wrote nearly a year ago in Vanity Fair, but his own final labors were anything but: in the last 12 months, he produced for this magazine a piece on U.S.-Pakistani relations in the wake of Osama bin Laden’s death, a portrait of Joan Didion, an essay on the Private Eye retrospective at the Victoria and Albert Museum, a prediction about the future of democracy in Egypt, a meditation on the legacy of progressivism in Wisconsin, and a series of frank, graceful, and exquisitely written essays in which he chronicled the physical and spiritual effects of his disease. At the end, Hitchens was more engaged, relentless, hilarious, observant, and intelligent than just about everyone else—just as he had been for the last four decades.

“My chief consolation in this year of living dyingly has been the presence of friends,” he wrote in the June 2011 issue. He died in their presence, too, at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. May his 62 years of living, well, so livingly console the many of us who will miss him dearly.

via In Memoriam: Christopher Hitchens, 1949–2011 | Blogs | Vanity Fair.

Christmas, shopping, retail: Black Friday, Sofa Sunday, Cyber Monday, Red Tuesday, Mobile Sunday, Green Monday,  Free Shipping Day and Super Saturday … oh my!

A sharp drop in shopping since Thanksgiving weekend has prompted worried retailers to slash prices, extend specials, stay open later — and rewrite the calendar.

Usually one of the most heavily discounted shopping days of the year, the Saturday before Christmas — it falls on Dec. 24 this year — is too crucial to retailers’ holiday sales to be left in the hands of procrastinating Christmas Eve shoppers. Instead, many of the promotions pegged to “Super Saturday,” as the day is known in the retail industry, are now scheduled for this Saturday — a full eight days before Christmas.

“If you wait until the 24th, you have no time to recover,” said Michael McNamara, vice president of research and analysis for MasterCard Advisors SpendingPulse, which tracks consumer spending.

But not all stores are making the switch. And that is creating a good amount of confusion in the retail world.

The dueling Saturdays might seem like a lot of consternation about nothing to consumers weary of faux shopping events: Black Friday, Sofa Sunday, Cyber Monday, Red Tuesday, Mobile Sunday, Green Monday and Free Shipping Day (Friday this year, for those keeping track).

But the worries are real for retailers who are seeing the season slip away from them, and the potential effects on the economy are considerable.

via Stores Shuffle a Saturday in Hopes of Saving the Season – NYTimes.com.

tweet of the day, PostSecret, criminal acts:  What gives!

Kendra Wells (@kkendrawellss)12/8/11 4:42 PM At our local bookstore, they keep the @postsecret books locked up because people often steal them.

 journalists, authors,  tips:  Never thought about this …

Writers embarking on their first book-length project respond to the challenge in different ways. Some panic, staring blankly at their screen as fine beads of sweat form on their foreheads. Some luxuriate in the expanse of real estate and begin wandering to and fro around their subject, leaving no random thought unexpressed. Some try to take a 3,000-word piece and inflate it to 300 pages.

via When journalists become authors: a few cautionary tips – Nieman Storyboard – A project of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard.

really stupid, criminal acts, butt dialing:

Madison police say two men in their late 20s stole DVDs and computer games from a Target store Tuesday and discussed their plans to fence the goods while driving away.

Investigators say the duo didn’t realize one of them had accidentally pocket-dialed 911. A dispatcher listened in for nearly an hour as they discussed what they had stolen and where they might sell it. Police say they even described their vehicle.

Madison police spokesman Joel DeSpain says the pair decided to sell their goods at a video store. When they pulled into the store’s parking lot, officers surrounded their vehicle with guns drawn.

via Police: Thieves pocket-dial 911, leading to arrest  | accessAtlanta.

The Price Check, Amazon, apps:  I’d be angry, too.

“The Price Check by Amazon app is primarily intended for customers who are comparing prices in major retail chain stores,” an Amazon spokesman said Thursday. “The goal of the Price Check app is to make it as easy as possible for customers to access product information, pricing information, and customer reviews, just as they would on the Web, while shopping in a major retail chain store,” he said.

The Price Check app features prices from Amazon and its many third-party sellers, he added.

An Amazon spokesperson told the New York Times this week that the promotion was not aimed at small competitors, but rather big box stores.

Sen. Olympia Snowe (R., Maine), the ranking member of the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, had recently likened that to “incentivizing consumers to spy on local shops,” calling it “an attack on Main Street businesses.”

via Why Amazon.com’s New App Is Creating a Stir – WSJ.com.

25
Oct
11

10.25.2011 … ‎1 scoop Pistachio Gelato with 1 scoop Nutella Gelato on the streets of Paris is possibly one of the most enjoyable dessert experiences I have ever had. 1 scoop of store-bought Pistachio Gelato actually comes pretty close and is a lot cheaper.

home, Ciao Bella Pistachio Gelato:  This stuff is really good … but still not as good as that served at  Amorino in Paris … but you can find it at HT!

Discover. Savor. Share. Ciao Bella.Following more than a decade of success in New York City, Ciao Bella opened its first San Francisco location 15 years ago on Harrison Street before moving to the famed Ferry Building, as an inaugural tenant in 2003.   To celebrate its Bay Area history and new design, Ciao Bella will highlight flavors that source ingredients from local vendors, such as Pistachio Gelato and Peach Ginger Sorbet.

via Ciao Bella Gelato & Sorbet blog.

Muammar Gaddafi, RIP/End of an Era: … weird, creepy … makes for a good Halloween costume … see next entry. 🙂

Long before his end, Muammar Gaddafi had become the weird, creepy, certainly criminal uncle who showed up, because he was really rich, at reunions of world leaders. He did not begin that way. How a young man from deep poverty in a rural North African town rose to become one of the West’s most intractable foes, and then one of its most critical political and economic partners, is an extraordinary political saga.

Gaddafi was scarcely destined for power. Born in 1942 into a tribal Bedouin family near the coastal town of Sirt, he was raised in a country still digging out from the ravages of World War II and a long struggle against Italian colonialism. The giant oil reserves that lay beneath the Libyan desert were years away from being explored. In fact, Libya was barely a nation at all. Gaddafi was 9 years old when the country finally gained its independence from France and Britain (which administered it jointly after the war’s end) and became a monarchy under King Idris al-Sanusi.

Like many provincial boys with little education, Gaddafi joined the army. He became a captain, then trained at Britain’s elite Sandhurst Academy, before returning home as an officer in the Signal Corps. It was in that position, at just 27, that he led a group of junior officers in a bloodless coup, toppling King Idris and declaring himself colonel. In the museum glorifying Gaddafi’s “people’s revolution,” set within the high stone walls of the fortress in Tripoli’s Green Square, one of the main exhibits was a battered sand-colored jeep with open sides, in which Gaddafi, according to his own legend, rode into the city, victorious on Sept. 1, 1969, to present himself as Libya’s leader to a people hungry for popular leadership.

via The End of Muammar Gaddafi: The Colonel’s Long, Weird Ride – TIME.

Muammar Gaddafi,  Halloween 2011, costumes:

rebecca black

What you’ll need:

• An unruly black wig (or this mask)

• Unkempt mustache and goatee

• Gaudy sheets, drapes or pajamas

• Matching kufi or brimless hat

• Dark, square sunglasses

• Female bodyguards (optional)

via Muammar Gaddafi – The 10 Best (Topical) Halloween Costumes for 2011 – TIME.

Vatican, global oversight, economy, supranational authority, global economy:  When has the Vatican been known for democratic and ethical principles?

The Vatican called on Monday for an overhaul of the world’s financial systems, and again proposed establishment of a supranational authority to oversee the global economy, calling it necessary to bring more democratic and ethical principles to a marketplace run amok.

In a report issued by the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, the Vatican argued that “politics — which is responsible for the common good” must be given primacy over the economy and finance, and that existing institutions like the International Monetary Fund had not been responding adequately to global economic problems.

The document grows out of the Roman Catholic Church’s concerns about economic instability and widening inequality of income and wealth around the world, issues that transcend the power of national governments to address on their own.

“The time has come to conceive of institutions with universal competence, now that vital goods shared by the entire human family are at stake, goods which the individual states cannot promote and protect by themselves,” Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson, the president of the pontifical council, said as he presented the report on Monday. “That is what pushed us.”

The language in the document, which the Vatican refers to as a note, is distinctively strong. “We should not be afraid to propose new ideas, even if they might destabilize pre-existing balances of power that prevail over the weakest,” the document states.

The message prompted comparisons with the rallying cries of protest movements that have been challenging the financial world order, like the indignados in Madrid and the Occupy Wall Street protesters in New York City. Still, Vatican officials said the document was not a manifesto for disaffected dissidents.

via Vatican Calls for Global Oversight of the Economy – NYTimes.com.

Polaroid, Edwin Land,  dreaming, success, inventing, Insisting on the Impossible, books, quotes:

In the fall of 1943, a little girl asked her father why she couldn’t see a photograph immediately after it was taken — a blasphemous proposition in the era’s photographic paradigm. Fortunately, her father happened to be Edwin Land, the iconic inventor and founder of Polaroid Corporation. So rather than dismissing the question as an impossibility, he took it as a challenge, then made history — in February of 1947, the world’s first Polaroid camera hit stores and unleashed one of the most creative movements in the history of the static image.

via Polaroid Inventor Edwin Land on the 5000 Steps to Success | Brain Pickings.

“If you dream of something worth doing and then simply go to work on it and don’t think anything of personalities, or emotional conflicts, or of money, or of family distractions; if you just think of, detail by detail, what you have to do next, it is a wonderful dream even if the end is a long way off, for there are about five thousand steps to be taken before we realize it; and start making the first ten, and stay making twenty after, it is amazing how quickly you get through those five thousand steps.”

~ Edwin Land to Polaroid employees, December 23, 1942

via If you dream of something worth doing – benrmatthews.

electric mini cupcake maker, random:  I have been known to buy some useless items … but this tops the cake … no pun intended!

How it actually works: The cupcakes themselves tasted fine, and except for some tunneling where steam created holes, their texture was fine, too. But compared to the 12 minutes it took to bake a full dozen mini cupcakes in the oven, this machine was no time-saver.

Good to know: It cleaned up easily; however, we had to struggle a bit to wash and rinse it without getting the machine too wet.

Best for: It might be fun as an activity with children, but most kids would probably become bored with waiting before the second half-dozen cupcakes are done, and you’d be trapped, baking off the rest of the batter, tiny batch after tiny batch.

Overall: Would we buy this? No. We’ll stick with the oven, where we can bake a couple dozen mini cupcakes in the time it takes this machine to steam seven.

via World’s Fastest Electric Mini Cupcake Maker (It Exists!) | The Feed.

animated short film, greed, Tout Rien (“All Nothing”): Beautiful! Tout Rien animation – YouTube.

But most striking of all are his animated short films. In 1978, his Tout Rien (“All Nothing”), a delicate and pensive 11-minute animated allegory set to the music of Igor Stravinsky about how our human greed is stealing the happiness of our species, earned him an Oscar nomination. It tackles, with remarkable elegance and sensitivity, our tragic tendency towards anthropocentricity in a world we share with countless

via AAll Nothing: Poetic 1978 Animated Allegory about Mankind’s Greed | Brain Pickings.

corporate social responsibility (“csr”), soda companies:  Interesting … flies in the face of csr, don’t you think?

The soda industry hit a new low this year. In 2010, Philadelphia’s mayor and health commissioner had both supported an SSB tax and came within one vote of having the tax passed by the city council. In 2011, when the mayor made it clear he would reintroduce the tax, the industry created an organization called Foundation for a Healthy America, which gave a gift of $10 million to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia for research and prevention of childhood obesity. Would the hospital accept money from a tobacco company to study anti-smoking programs? The hospital tried to give some of the money to the city to run obesity programs through city health centers, but the mayor refused on the grounds it was funded by the beverage industry.

Over time, the tobacco companies were outed for their dirty tactics and the nation reacted with a series of public policies that cut smoking in half in the U.S. The beverage industry has been successful thus far in fighting off significant taxes through heavy lobbying, questionable tactics, and the attempt to appear public-health minded, but they, too, are likely to be embarrassed as light shines upon them. As they scramble to protect their profits, their actions may ultimately hurt their cause and pave the way for the very government actions they seek to prevent.

via Kelly Brownell on the Dirty Tactics of Soda Companies | TIME Ideas | TIME.com.

live and work in the present, lifestyles, universal truths: “Why drag around a chain of regrets like the ghost of Jacob Marley?” … Some good things to think about here. “Perhaps a better way of describing this goal than “getting to clear” is the Quaker notion of finding “peace at the center”—a state of serenity or stillness of spirit in which one is no longer worried about the past or the future. In other words, stop trying to “get” anywhere, just “be clear now,” not next May, or 20 years from now, when you retire, because things won’t be different then, either.”

For reasons I will explain, I call this process “getting to clear.”

I first heard that phrase about 20 years ago from a friend—let’s call him Steve—who worked in multilevel marketing (or sales careers based on recruiting other sellers). He attended a lot of motivational seminars and listened repeatedly to recordings of books such as How to Win Friends and Influence People and The Power of Positive Thinking. For a while he was into Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology. As I understood it, the big idea in that book was to remove all your painful memories because they sap your energy and prevent you from being effective and happy.

Steve kept saying that he was “getting to clear,” which is Scientology lingo that meant, more and more, he was fully in the moment, and not only that, the moment was increasingly subject to his mental control. Working from a table outside a shopping mall, Steve could push cellphone accounts on passers-by with a manic, smiling intensity that was almost frightening to behold. He could switch it off, too, like some kind of Tesla-inspired, anti-gravity device, to explain what he was doing so that I could imitate it and earn more commissions.

Reality was something created by our minds, Steve said. Once he was “clear”—and living fully in the present moment—he would be able to “manifest” anything he desired. He said he could visualize customers lining up, and they simply would appear, in greater and greater numbers. In sales, you just have to believe, and then you can have anything you want, developing your mental powers—the will to succeed—by increments.

That belief struck me as odd at the time, and it still does. Sort of like thinking you could learn to fly like Superman by leaping out of airplanes with smaller and smaller parachutes.

On the other hand, some of those ideas seem to descend from respected thinkers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Friedrich Nietzsche. Following Emerson’s gospel of self-reliance, Steve was on his way to becoming an Übermensch among the Willy Lomans. Of course I think that acting like the material world is a mental construct—and that people are manifestations of your will—is going too far, but who can doubt the value of liberating yourself from the past so you can be more effective in the present? Why drag around a chain of regrets like the ghost of Jacob Marley? Once you have completed your overdue obligations and done your best to repair the “errata” of your life, as the printer Benjamin Franklin called them, why not embrace the present, completely. As counterculture gurus said back in the ’60s, if you want to be happy, you need to “Be here now!”

But one of my colleagues here at Hope College—let’s call her Natalie (for that, happily, is her name)—said something to me that I’ll never forget: “You can’t spend your career looking forward to doing something else.”

In other words, once September arrives, instead of embracing the academic year, the return of the usual routine, we feel like divers inhaling deeply before a plunge into dark water. We look forward to surfacing with the return of summer, but then summer comes, and we find that nothing has really changed: just a new configuration of responsibilities. It’s never going to be perfect, but you have to find a way to make the most of what you are doing today.

Perhaps a better way of describing this goal than “getting to clear” is the Quaker notion of finding “peace at the center”—a state of serenity or stillness of spirit in which one is no longer worried about the past or the future. In other words, stop trying to “get” anywhere, just “be clear now,” not next May, or 20 years from now, when you retire, because things won’t be different then, either.

via ‘Getting to Clear’ – Advice – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

TEDxCharlotte, dream makers, risk takers,  bucket list:  To go to a TED presentation is on my short bucket list … who has been?

Every presenter — whatever their particular passion and mission — was inspiring, motivating and engaging. The day was a composite of live speakers, videos, entertainers and art offered to spark deep discussion and connections. In addition to the daylong conference, there is an accompanying art exhibition up through Thursday, Nov. 3 that highlights some dream makers and risk takers in the art world. This show is in the Max L. Jackson Gallery in the Watkins Building and is open weekdays, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and weekends, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

via Dream makers and risk takers come out for TEDxCharlotte | Knight Arts.

Elizabeth Eckford, Hazel Bryan, iconic photos, Civil Rights Movement, history, reconciliation, friendship:  How horrible to be branded in the world’s memory as a person filled with racial hatred … very moving story.

Sometime in 1962 or 1963—no cameras recorded the scene, and she didn’t mark anything down—Hazel, sitting in the trailer in rural Little Rock in which she and her family now lived, picked up the Little Rock directory, and looked under “Eckford.” Then, without telling her husband or pastor or anyone else, she dialed the number. Between sobs, she told Elizabeth that she was that girl, and how sorry she was. Elizabeth was gracious. The conversation lasted a minute, if that. In the South, in the ’60s, how much more did a white girl and a black girl have to say to one another?

Still, Hazel never stopped thinking about the picture and making amends for it. She severed what had been her ironclad ties to an intolerant church. She taught mothering skills to unmarried black women, and took underprivileged black teenagers on field trips. She frequented the black history section at the local Barnes & Noble, buying books by Cornel West and Shelby Steele and the companion volume to Eyes on the Prize. She’d argue with her mother on racial topics, defending relatives who’d intermarried.

Secretly, Hazel always hoped some reporter would track her down and write about how she’d changed. But it didn’t happen on its own, and she did nothing to make it happen. Instead, again and again, there was the picture. Anniversary after anniversary, Martin Luther King Day after Martin Luther King Day, Black History Month after Black History Month, it just kept popping up. The world of race relations was changing, but to the world, she never did.

Finally, on the 40th anniversary of Central’s desegregation in 1997, Will Counts returned to Little Rock and arranged for Elizabeth and Hazel to pose for him again. Hazel was thrilled, Elizabeth, curious. Their first meeting was predictably awkward, but the new picture, showing the two women smiling in front of Central, revealed only the barest hint of that. It all but took over the next day’s Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, and very nearly upstaged President Clinton’s speech the next day, in which he worked in a reference to them both. Soon, a poster-sized version of the picture was available: “Reconciliation,” it said. Everyone rejoiced; Thanks to Elizabeth and Hazel, Little Rock, maligned for 40 years, bathed in instant absolution.

Ultimately, it grew too much for Hazel. She cut off ties with Elizabeth—for her, Sept. 11, 2011 marked another anniversary: 10 years had passed since they’d last spoken—and stopped making public appearances with her. Her interviews with me—granted only with great reluctance—will, she says, be her last. When I asked the two women to pose together one last time (Elizabeth turned 70 last Tuesday; Hazel will in January) Elizabeth agreed; Hazel would not. Hazel was poised to vote for Obama in 2008; after all, even her own mother did. But so deep was her hurt that she found some excuse not to.

So the famous photograph of 1957 takes on additional meaning: the continuing chasm between the races and the great difficulty, even among people of good will, to pull off real racial reconciliation. But shuttling back and forth between them, I could see that for all their harsh words—over the past decade, they’ve only dug in their heels—they still missed one another. Each, I noticed, teared up at references to the other. Perhaps, when no one is looking—or taking any pictures—they’ll yet come together again. And if they can, maybe, so too, can we.

via Elizabeth Eckford and Hazel Bryan: What happened to the two girls in the most famous photo of the Civil Rights Era..

global population,  7 Billion Day:  I had no idea we were approaching 7 billion!

My print column examines the numbers underlying the designation by the United Nations of Oct. 31 as 7 Billion Day — the day when the world population will hit that milestone number.

Unlike its approach to the equivalent milestone 12 years and a billion people ago, the U.N. won’t be naming the seven billionth inhabitant of the planet. Instead, the agency is calling for hundreds of newborns to take the mantle, by encouraging all countries to identify their own seven billionth baby. The Canadian magazine Maclean’s recently tracked down Adnan Nevic, the designated No. 6,000,000,000, who receives attention each year on his birthday for his achievement but whose Bosnian family has trouble making ends meet.

Hospitals around the U.S. named competing children as No. 300 million when the U.S. Census Bureau estimated the country passed that threshold five years ago. But Census itself stays mum. “Would it be someone born, or an immigrant?” asked Census spokesman Robert Bernstein. “You don’t know which component of change” is responsible for the last bit of population growth.

The world tacked on its most recent billion in as much time as the prior billion, which means the growth rate is slowing, easing some of the fears of Thomas Malthus’s intellectual descendants. And the population milestone isn’t necessarily a one-time-only event: The world could cross back under seven billion if deaths overtakes births. “We may pass that mark several times,” Nico Keilman, a demographic modeler at the University of Oslo, wrote in an email, outlining a morbid scenario. (Keilman has studied the accuracy of past population projections.) “Suppose the world counts exactly seven billion on or around 31 October. Suddenly there is an earthquake or some other natural disaster with many people killed. This may lead to a population less than seven billion. In other words, whereas the U.N. (and others) predict a smooth path for population development, reality is volatile.”

via 7 Billion Day: The Uncertainty of Counting and Projecting Global Population – The Numbers Guy – WSJ.

 The New York Times,  Angry Birds,  corrections: 🙂

An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated the premise of “Angry Birds,” a popular iPhone game. In the game, slingshots are used to launch birds to destroy pigs and their fortresses, not to shoot down the birds

via Regret the Error» The New York Times offers an amusing Angry Birds correction.

McRib, McDonald’s, cult following, social media:  Just funny!

NEW YORK — The McRib, the elusive sandwich that has inspired a cult-like following, is back.

McDonald’s Corp. announced Monday that the boneless barbecue pork sandwich, usually available in only a few stores at a time, will be sold at all U.S. locations through Nov. 14.

Most of the time, it’s up to local franchises to determine when and if they want to sell the McRib — except in Germany, the only place where it’s available perennially. But McDonald’s said the response was so great last November when it made the McRib available nationally for about three weeks that it decided to bring it back this year. The company, which previously hadn’t sold the McRib nationally since 1994, declined to give specific sales numbers.

The sandwich, which is dressed with onions, pickle slices and barbecue sauce, was introduced nationally in 1982. With 500 calories and 26 grams of fat, it’s slightly trimmer than the Big Mac, which has 540 calories and 29 grams of fat. And just like the Big Mac, the McRib has become a popular McDonald’s offering.

If the McRib is so popular, why not just offer it all the time? McDonald’s likes to stoke the enthusiasm with an aura of transience.

“Bringing it back every so often adds to the excitement,” said Marta Fearon, McDonald’s U.S. marketing director, who added that she’s not sure if the McRib will reappear in stores every fall.

And how can it be called a McRib if it doesn’t have any bones? Said Fearon: “That gives it this quirky sense of humor.”

via The elusive pork sandwich is coming back, briefly; a barbecue without the bones – The Washington Post.

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Jun
10

6.26.2010 … still hot … Lovely to have my girl home (she absolutely adored camp, AGAIN.) …

travel, Dublin, literature, random: OK … so the doubledecker tour bus driver told us to look for this in the crypt!

While visiting the Crypt of Christ Church Cathedral, you will come across a unique artifact in the church’s history. The mummified remains of a cat and a rat are on display. The theory is the cat chased the mouse into an organ pipe and both became stuck.

The existence of the mummified remains of the duo struck a chord with James Joyce and he made reference to them in his, also unique, novel “Finnegan’s Wake.”

The sign at Christ Church Cathedral reads:

THE CAT & THE RAT

The one, presumably chasing the other, became trapped in an organ pipe in the 1850s and were mummified. They are referred to in James Joyce’s “Finnegan’s Wake” where someone is described as being “…As stuck as that cat to that mouse in that tube of that Christchurch organ…”

via The Cat and the Rat of Christ Church Cathedral – Dublin, Ireland – Weird Story Locations on Waymarking.com.

friendship, culture, faith: Cary and I have been having a great dialogue about friendships and faith … this seemed to fit our discussion.

When the flesh – the lived human experience – becomes word, community can develop. When we say, “Let me tell you what we saw. Come and listen to what we did. Sit down and let me explain to you what happened to us. Wait until you hear whom we met,” we call people together and make our lives into lives for others. The word brings us together and calls us into community. When the flesh becomes word, our bodies become part of a body of people.

via June 26, 2010 – A Courageous Life.

science, medicine:

In the long run, it seems likely that the genomic revolution will pay off. But no one can be sure. Even if the genetic roots of some major diseases are identified, there is no guarantee that treatments can be found. The task facing science and industry in coming decades is as at least as challenging as the original deciphering of the human genome.

via Editorial – The Genome, 10 Years Later – NYTimes.com.

Charlotte, history, end of an era:

Thompson, 88, of Charlotte, was grocery shopping for the last time at Reid’s in uptown Friday, as the store plans to close at 8 p.m. today.

The original store opened in Myers Park on Providence Road in 1928, in a building a few doors down from the Manor Theatre. Reid’s in Seventh Street Station uptown opened in 1998. The owner says Reid’s will reappear but wasn’t specific.

via Loyal customers say goodbye to Reid’s – CharlotteObserver.com.

culture:

Women make up only 17 percent of political leaders today, and the White House Project’s most recent research, “Benchmarking Women’s Leadership,” shows that across 10 sectors of American culture, women on average are only 18 percent of its leaders. If the full range of health, economic and safety options is not supported by the women who advance, then they will pull the ladder up behind them.

via Letters – Today’s Feminist – A Different Breed? – NYTimes.com.

Apple Apps:

They set out to build a game that included a rabbit jumping up a screen trying to collect carrots. They soon realized that a collection of doodles they had sketched out to test the game were visually fun. And so Doodle Jump was born.

On Friday, the two brothers announced that Doodle Jump, which sells for 99 cents in the iTunes store, has now sold more than five million copies. Although Apple doesn’t disclose competitor numbers, the brothers believe this is the first iOS4 application to reach the five million download mark.

via Doodle Jump Reaches Five Million Downloads – Bits Blog – NYTimes.com.

politics, the President:

In this environment, the rage against Obama for not doing more, now, faster, becomes at least somewhat understandable. It’s not that he hasn’t done a great deal for liberals during his 18 months in office. It’s that liberalism itself may be running out of time.

via Op-Ed Columnist – The Agony of the Liberals – NYTimes.com.

Apple:

Companies like Google and Adobe have accused Apple of unfairly using its clout to exclude their technologies from the iPhone and iPad. And some application developers are fretting under Apple’s tight control of those devices, even though many of them built their fortunes on the popular gadgets.

But perhaps in the clearest sign that Apple has emerged as an industry superpower, government regulators are beginning to scrutinize its every move.

via Is Apple a Victim of Sour Grapes? – NYTimes.com.

architecture, Chicago:

Amid the neo-Gothic quads of the University of Chicago, Helmut Jahn’s futuristic domed library is getting ready for take-off.

Here’s a sneak peek from Tribune photographer William DeShazer, who attended a hard-hat tour this week.

The building, known as the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library and located next to the Regenstein Library (left), flaunts a steel-lattice dome that will shelter aboveground uses including a grand reading room.

via Cityscapes | Chicago Tribune | Blog.

architecture, the economy, Louisville: Design looks interesting … financing?

In an effort to help jumpstart the financing of the stalled Museum Plaza skyscraper, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear said the state will apply for a $100 million federal loan typically associated with creating jobs for low-income residents.

Beshear made the announcement Friday morning at the Museum Plaza construction site near Seventh and Main streets.

Beshear called the loan effort a “first step” to help advance the project but cautioned that there’s no certainty that the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will approve it.

via Museum Plaza developers seek $100 million HUD loan | courier-journal.com | The Courier-Journal.

design, food/wine:


A box of wine is portable, but not classy. Stemware is classy, but not portable. But in a stroke of mad genius, inventor James Nash has combined the two to revolutionize drinking on the go. Cheers! Meet the Tulip.

via Single Serving Wine Glass Drowns Your Multiple Sorrows.

Kagan nomination: Interesting analysis … A Second Chance for Joshua – Opinionator Blog – NYTimes.com.

The Supreme Court, followup: Like I said, a conservative becomes a liberal and a liberal can become a conservative.

Consider that the two great “liberal” justices who retired from the Supreme Court most recently — David Souter in the spring of 2009 and John Paul Stevens a year later — were conservatives. Not only were both appointed by Republican presidents, but both also subscribed loosely to the adage “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” With a handful of exceptions, neither favored identifying new constitutional rights where none existed before. Their status as liberals came from the fact that, as the court on which they served tilted to the right, they held their ground as moderate Republicans, consistently voting to sustain the constitutional rights that were discovered by the Supreme Court before they were on it.

via Magazine Preview – Imagining a Liberal Court – NYTimes.com.

quotes:

During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act — George Orwell

via Al Fin.

history, Davidson:

It is known now as the Town Green but in 1920 the lawn at the corner of Main and Concord held tennis courts. Those courts provided a perfect place for a Chautuaqua tent.  The Chautauqua movement started in the 1870s as summer camps, the traveling version started in 1904 and lasted into the mid-1920s.

Davidson hosted its first Chautauqua in September 1920. The September 17, 1920 Davidsonian reported that “A group of representative citizens of Davidson have brought this Chautuaqua to Davidson without profit to themselves, for all proceeds go to a worthy local charity. The main committee was mostly comprised of local businessmen and faculty but several local men and women participated as well. Lester Hannah and Hugh Hovis served on the mill division committee. Mrs. P. A. Stough chaired the Cornelius subcommittee, Miss Lizzie Young headed the ticket committee for “the section of town north of Scofield corner” [corner of Main and Depot], Mrs. T.E. Lothery and Rev. Mr. Woolsy headed the ticket committee for the “section of town from Carter’s Garage on the east side of South Main Street, and Mrs. L. R. Brady headed the ticket committee from Carter’s Garage on the West Side of South Main Street.  Mrs. L. E. Johnston, Mrs. W.R. Grey and Miss Carraway made up the committee for the children’s hour.

via Let Me Entertain You – Around the D.

culture, technology: And to think we just had CB radios to raise a quick crowd … now called a flash mob …

Flash mobs are increasingly common, as social networks such as Facebook and Twitter make it easy for anyone to summon large crowds. It’s designed as harmless social networking fun: a group of people come together at a set time and place, perform some unusual act in unison, and then disperse.

A group called Charlotte Flash Mob has more than 700 people listed as members on its Facebook page. In April, the group planned to celebrate International Pillow Fight Day by holding its own pillow fight at Freedom Park, according to its Twitter page.

Despite their benign origins, police say the spontaneous crowds they attract can be a problem, especially when word spreads so widely through social networks that the groups turn out in huge numbers. Last month, for instance, when N.C. State students marked the start of finals week with a flash mob, as many as 3,500 people showed up. About 35 officers blocked off intersections as they moved toward the Capitol. Police eventually told them to disperse.

Kee said police are asking that teens keep safety in mind when they consider using social networks to organize “manhunt” games or flash mobs – especially at night or in neighborhoods.

“It was a poor choice,” he said of the time and place for Tuesday’s game. “It’s enough of a concern to us that we want to get the word out … Somebody could get hurt.”

via Huntersville police concerned about ‘flash mobs’ chaos – CharlotteObserver.com.




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