Posts Tagged ‘Georgia

17
Feb
13

2.17.13 … I was happy last night … I must have at least one snow a year …

Charlotte, snow:  I was happy last night … I must have at least one snow a year.

photo

photo 2 photo 1   photo 3

photo 4 photo 5

history, Lent: So, I am a Pharisee now …

Nevertheless, I was always taught, “If you gave something up for the Lord, tough it out. Don’t act like a Pharisee looking for a loophole.”

Over the years, modifications have been made to the Lenten observances, making our practices not only simple but also easy. Ash Wednesday still marks the beginning of Lent, which lasts for 40 days, not including Sundays. The present fasting and abstinence laws are very simple: On Ash Wednesday and Good Friday, the faithful fast having only one full meal a day and smaller snacks to keep up ones strength and abstain from meat; on the other Fridays of Lent, the faithful abstain from meat. People are still encouraged “to give up something” for Lent as a sacrifice. An interesting note is that technically on Sundays and solemnities like St. Josephs Day March 19 and the Annunciation March 25, one is exempt and can partake of whatever has been offered up for Lent.Nevertheless, I was always taught, “If you gave something up for the Lord, tough it out. Dont act like a Pharisee looking for a loophole.” Moreover, an emphasis must be placed on performing spiritual works, like attending the Stations of the Cross, attending Mass, making a weekly holy hour before the Blessed Sacrament, taking time for personal prayer and spiritual reading and most especially making a good confession and receiving sacramental absolution. Although the practices may have evolved over the centuries, the focus remains the same: to repent of sin, to renew our faith and to prepare to celebrate joyfully the mysteries of our salvation.

via History of Lent.

Lenten practice, Facebook, LOL:

Wonder what it says about FB that so many people are abstaining from it for Lent?

and one of his friend’s comment …

I’m Betting they cheat and look ..just not commenting.

via BW

Lent, Lenten devotionals: These jumped out at me …

Thursday February 14, 2013

Seeing the Beauty and Goodness in Front of Us

We don’t have to go far to find the treasure we are seeking. There is beauty and goodness right where we are. And only when we can see the beauty and goodness that are close by can we recognize beauty and goodness on our travels far and wide. There are trees and flowers to enjoy, paintings and sculptures to admire; most of all there are people who smile, play, and show kindness and gentleness. They are all around us, to be recognized as free gifts to receive in gratitude.

Our temptation is to collect all the beauty and goodness surrounding us as helpful information we can use for our projects. But then we cannot enjoy it, and we soon find that we need a vacation to restore ourselves. Let’s try to see the beauty and goodness in front of us before we go elsewhere to look for it.

via Daily Meditation: Seeing the Beauty and Goodness in Front of Us.

Indeed, the God of my rigid ideologies, of my complacent Theology; the God who validates my unwillingness to explore heresies, and rewards me for arrogantly dismissing them as sinful; the God who grounds my intellectual arrogance in His omniscience, and my politics in his omnipotence; the God who vanquishes all of His and my inquisitive foes, forever silencing their obnoxious questions with the fires of Hell; whose very Nature demands that humans separate and categorize the world into manageable divisions; the God who has made His Will known to us through Natural Law, and a Holy Book, every word of which we are to follow without hesitation or consideration; whose ethical character remains beyond discussion; whose decisions remain beyond the scope of human analysis; the God who grounds all Thought in his Being – this God, who is Himself nothing more than an idol of Modernism, is dead.

My goal for Lent is to remember this death, and to meditate on it in reverence, humility, and mystery. And to reflect not on the God who rules by power, but a god who leads by love; who identifies with the weak; whose foolishness upsets omniscience; a God who reveals Himself in many ways, who reveals Himself in a first century peasant named Jesus; a God who empties Himself of God, and offers Himself to his enemies in submission and servitude; who is concerned with the plight of widows and orphans, the least among us, and the disadvantaged; who sends Jesus to go after the marginalized and the misunderstood, and to bring back home again those who have been ostracized and forgotten.

I am giving up God for Lent to make room for God. I am prying open my fingers, and letting all of my theological idols crash to the ground. And I am lifting up my empty hands to Heaven in anticipation of God’s arrival, and quietly echoing the unsettling words of Meister Eckhart: “I pray God to rid me of God.”

via Brandon Ambrosino: Giving Up God For Lent.

Kneeling in Jerusalem,  Ann Weems, Lent:  Ann Weems’ book  Kneeling in Jerusalem is a great resource during Lent.

LENT

Lent is a time to take the time

to let the power of our faith story take hold of us,

a time to let the events

get up and walk around in us,

a time to intensify

our living unto Christ,

a time to hover over

the thoughts of our hearts,

a time place our feet in the streets of Jerusalem or to walk along the sea and listen to his word,

a time to touch his robe

and feel the healing surge through us,

a time to ponder and a time to wonder . . .

Lent is a time to allow a fresh new taste of God!

from Kneeling in Jerusalem by Ann Weems

clergywear, pastors, stoles, FPC-Charlotte, Lent,  fyi:

What Are Our Pastors Wearing Around Their Necks?

Of all the questions I have received since arriving as your pastor last September, the most popular has been about what we wear on Sunday during worship.

The name for what we wear around our necks is a “stole.” Stoles are worn by the clergy of many denominations – Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist, Lutheran, Episcopal, and Roman Catholic.

The shape of a stole is reminiscent of a yoke that symbolizes the yoke of Christ, which reminds those of us who wear the stole (and those who see us wearing it) of whom we serve. Stoles are a symbol of ordained ministry – and are often given as gifts to a pastor on his or her ordination to service in the Church.

You may have noticed that the stoles we wear even change colors! The color of our stoles follows the season of the Christian year: purple in Advent and Lent, white in Christmas and Easter, green in ordinary times, and red in Pentecost.

You’ll also notice that the color of our stoles coordinates with the materials that cover both the pulpit and the communion table. These materials are called “paraments.”

Christians follow a different calendar – defined by our salvation history – because as we are baptized into Christ’s death and resurrection, we are called to live a different kind of life.

Finally, most of your pastors’ stoles have a story – about where they were made or by whom they were given. Feel free to ask us about them sometime!

Pen

source: FirstNews

Camino de Santiago, Camino de Santiago Forum, bucket list: Thank you CCP for sharing this one.  One day …

Thoughts on Camino de Santiago – YouTube.

architecture, I.M. Pei, Gateway Towers, Singapore, optical illusion, Wired.com:  strangely two-dimensional …

Gateway

Gateway Towers, Singapore

Completed in 1990, the trapezoidal shape of I.M. Pei’s Gateway Towers in Singapore create an optical illusion when viewed from certain angles — the 37-story office buildings appear strangely two-dimensional.

via Wired’s Weekly Picks of Stunning Architecture | Wired Design | Wired.com.

uncreative writing, language, Digital Age, Brain Pickings:  subversive ..

The rest of Uncreative Writing goes on to explore the history of appropriation in art, the emerging interchangeability between words and images in digital culture, the challenges of defining one’s identity in the vastness of the online environment, and many other pressing facets of what it means to be a writer — or, even more broadly, a creator — in the age of the internet. Complement it with the equally subversive How To Talk About Books You Haven’t Read.

via Uncreative Writing: Redefining Language and Authorship in the Digital Age | Brain Pickings.

art, The Hobbit, J.R.R. Tolkien, Brain Pickings, 

Letters From Father Christmas:  Given that Tolkien’s

Letters From Father Christmas is one of my favorite Christmas books that I shared with my children …  and to a large extent because of Tolkien’s whimsical drawings, I know I would love this edition of The Hobbit.

A rare piece of cross-disciplinary creativity from the mind of one of modern history’s greatest creators, Art of the Hobbit is equal parts literary treasure and treat of art, exploring the notion of the author as designer — a particularly timely concept in the age of self-publishing and disciplinary cross-pollination in the making of books.

via Art of the Hobbit: Never-Before-Seen Drawings by J.R.R. Tolkien | Brain Pickings.

Every December an envelope bearing a stamp from the North Pole would arrive for J.R.R. Tolkien’s children. Inside would be a letter in a strange, spidery handwriting and a beautiful colored drawing or painting. The letters were from Father Christmas.

They told wonderful tales of life at the North Pole: how the reindeer got loose and scattered presents all over the place; how the accident-prone North Polar Bear climbed the North Pole and fell through the roof of Father Christmas’s house into the dining room; how he broke the Moon into four pieces and made the Man in it fall into the back garden; how there were wars with the troublesome horde of goblins who lived in the caves beneath the house, and many more.

via Letters From Father Christmas: J.R.R. Tolkien: 0046442512657: Amazon.com: Books.

Obamacare, Uninsurables Program: I thought this was one of the good things about ObamaCare … 😦

Enrollment around the country has been lower than expected, partly because some people could not afford the premiums. But individual cases have turned out to be costlier than originally projected.

In documents provided to the states, the administration said the program has spent about $2.4 billion in taxpayer money on medical claims and nearly $180 million on administrative costs, as of Dec. 31. Congress allocated $5 billion to the plan.

“From the beginning (the administration) has been committed to monitoring PCIP enrollment and spending closely and making necessary adjustments in the program to ensure responsible management of the $5 billion provided by Congress,” PCIP director Richard Popper wrote in a memo. “To this end, we are implementing a nationwide suspension of enrollment.”

via Obamacare ‘Uninsurables’ Program Quietly Winds Down As Funding Dries Up.

news, journalism, mobile journalism, end of an era, Poynter;  “News needs to solve problems” hmmm … ” We need to solve information problems for our users and drive measurable revenue for our advertisers. Mobile is not merely another form factor, but an entirely new ecosystem that rewards utility.  Flipboard is a classic example of solving a problem (tablet-based content discovery) while The Daily is an example of a product that did not.”

4. News needs to solve problems

A study by Flurry in November found that the news category only accounts for 2 percent of total time spent on mobile apps. Social apps gobble up 26 percent. Facebook alone accounts for 23 percent of all time spent with mobile apps, according to Comscore in December. That beats every news organization’s app combined by a long shot.

As Facebook (and Twitter) grow in time spent – and since both are populated with plenty of news – they’re increasingly competitive with news organizations’ mobile experiences by sheer volume.

As a result, simply extending a news organizations’ current coverage into mobile isn’t enough. We need to solve information problems for our users and drive measurable revenue for our advertisers. Mobile is not merely another form factor, but an entirely new ecosystem that rewards utility.  Flipboard is a classic example of solving a problem (tablet-based content discovery) while The Daily is an example of a product that did not.

“The key insight from thinking about your business this way is that it is the job, and not the customer or the product, that should be the fundamental unit of analysis,” said Clayton Christensen, David Skok and James Allworth in a Nieman report. “This applies to news as much as it does to any other service.”

“The way to get startup ideas is not to try to think of startup ideas. It’s to look for problems, preferably problems you have yourself,” explains Y Combinator’s Paul Graham. “By far the most common mistake startups make is to solve problems no one has.”

via 5 reasons mobile will disrupt journalism like the Internet did a decade ago | Poynter..

2013 Festival of Legal Learning, US Supreme Court, US Supreme Court Confirmation Process: One of my favorite lectures.  The speaker was a little dry, but I learned a great deal about the confirmation process from nomination to confirmation, vetting both by the White House and the Senate, the role of public relations and media, etc.  Once again, I have confirmed that I am a nerd.

Insider’s View of the Supreme Court Confirmation Process

Michael J. Gerhardt, Samuel Ashe Distinguished Professor in Constitutional Law and Director of the Center for Law and Government, UNC School of Law

this session will explore the nuances of the U.S. Supreme Court confirmation process. The speaker has significant experience in this arena. He advised several senators on the nomination of John Roberts as Chief Justice, testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the nomination of Samuel Alito Jr., and served as Special Counsel to Chair Patrick Leahy (D-vt.) as well as the Senate Judiciary Committee for the nominations of Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan to the Supreme Court.

via Festival of Legal Learning.

2013 Festival of Legal Learning,  Student Athletes, Penn State, caveat emptor:  You should always be ticked when the presenter starts off telling you that there will be very little about Penn State despite the fact that it is in the title.

Sex, Violence and Student Athletes: Penn State and Beyond

Barbara J. Osborne, Associate Professor, UNC Department of Exercise & Sport Science

this session will explain the 2012 U.S. Department of education’s Sexual violence guidance. Institutional liability will be discussed using recent situations involving student-athletes at the high school and college level, as well as the Office of Civil Rights’ complaint against Penn State for the Sandusky scandal.

Festival of Legal Learning.

Life With Dogs: Thank you, EWP,  for sharing this  Life With Dogs’s photo …

this is like one of those old-fashioned fox stoles that my grandmothers used to wear – EWP

Find Rufus Competition, corgies, visitlondon.com:  What is it with the Brits and corgies?

Can You Find Rufus The Corgi?

For your chance to win a romantic trip to London, use the clues to find Rufus in the map below. Remember, he’s only a little dog, so you might need to zoom in!

via Now See It For Yourself – Find Rufus Competition – visitlondon.com.

translation apps,  Google App,  NYTimes.com:  My husband downloaded an arabic translation app for his next trip to Kuwait.  We’ll see how that goes …

I’ve been watching Google’s translation tools improve over the years, but this trip would be a true test: could it really blunt the trauma of arriving in a country where the average American is instantly rendered illiterate, deaf and mute?The answer: yes, though knowing your way around it in advance will help. (United Nations interpreters need not fear for their jobs, at least not yet.) Here, then, are my tips, learned the hard way….

Pantomiming and phrasebooks have always worked for you in the past, and are more fun anyway? I hear you. But even if you want to stay old-school, the world is moving on without you. At least once a day during my trip, the Chinese broke out their own translation apps before I had a chance to break out mine. In other words, this train has already left the station. Or, to pick a cliché more appropriate to my trip, you don’t want to miss the boat.

via Lost in Translation? Try a Google App – NYTimes.com.

Carnival Cruise, Triumph Failure, Total PR Fiasco, bathrobes, twitter:  They may have tweeted too fast … bathrobe fiasco!

They may have been stranded aboard a busted cruise ship for five days with little food, broken sewage systems and no heat or air conditioning, but at least they’ll get to keep the bathrobe.

On Friday morning, as more than 3,000 tired and dirty customers finally disembarked from the stranded cruise ship Triumph, @CarnivalCruise tweeted, “Of course the bathrobes for the Carnival Triumph are complimentary.”

It was a remarkably tone-deaf finish to a week-long public relations fiasco that began Sunday night when an engine fire crippled the Caribbean-bound ship and set it adrift in the Gulf of Mexico. Nonstop news coverage and social media chatter brought the public vivid images of the fetid conditions aboard the Triumph. Reports from passengers included details about overflowing toilets, hours-long waits to get food and flooded rooms during the five days they were stranded at sea.

via Carnival Cruise Tells Passengers They Can Keep The Bathrobes In Total PR Fiasco.

The Art of Kissing: A 1936 Guide for Lovers, kith/kin, high school, Westminster Schools, memories, Brain Pickings: I had a friend in high school who got a hold of this.  I never laughed so hard as I did one night … Can anyone guess who possessed this “pamphlet”?

Between Edison’s scandalous footage of the first kiss in cinema in 1896 and Bill Plympton’s quirky animated guide to kissing a century later, the public image of lip-locking underwent some radical transformations. In 1936, the year my grandmother was born, a man named Hugh Morris penned a small illustrated pamphlet titled The Art of Kissing (public library), in which he guided young lovers through the techniques, tricks, and “approved methods of kissing,” including such varieties as “the spiritual kiss,” “the nip kiss,” “the pain kiss,” “the surprise kiss,” “the eyelash kiss,” and “the French soul kiss,” as well as tips on how to prepare for a kiss and how to approach a girl. Delightfully dated in its assumptions about love, heterosexuality, and marriage, it’s as much a charming time-capsule of a bygone era as it is a sure source of a good chuckle.

THE ‘VACUUM’ KISS

Here you start off by first opening your mouth a trifle just after you have been resting peacefully with closed lips. Indicate to your partner, by brushing her teeth with the tip of your tongue, that you wish for her to do likewise. The moment she responds, instead of caressing her mouth, suck inward as though you were trying to draw out the innards of an orange. If she knows of this kiss variation, your maid will act in the same way and withdraw the air from your mouth. In this fashion, in a very short while, the air will have been entirely drawn out of your mouths. Your lips will adhere so tightly that there will almost be pain, instead of pleasure. But it will be the sort of pain that is highly pleasurable. That may sound odd, but nevertheless it is a fact. Pain becomes so excruciating as to become pleasurable.

via The Art of Kissing: A 1936 Guide for Lovers | Brain Pickings.

Valentine’s Day memes, follow-up:  Since I was off FB for VD … I enjoyed a belated FB experience this morning.  Some are nice … some,  not so nice …

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Valentine’s Day, Valentine’s Day gift, StoryCorps:  I think I’ll suggest this one to my husband for next year.  LOL

Looking for a thoughtful Valentine’s Day gift? Grab your sweetheart and head to StoryCorps at the AHC to record your love story! Appointments are available this Saturday! http://ow.ly/hHctG

StoryCorps is pleased to be in partnership with the Atlanta History Center and Public Broadcasting Atlanta to record, preserve, and share the stories of communities in Atlanta.

via Atlanta, GA | StoryCorps.

StoryCorps is an independent nonprofit whose mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives. Since 2003, StoryCorps has collected and archived more than 45,000 interviews with nearly 90,000 participants. Each conversation is recorded on a free CD to share, and is preserved at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. StoryCorps is one of the largest oral history projects of its kind, and millions listen to our weekly broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition and on our Listen pages.

We do this to remind one another of our shared humanity, strengthen and build the connections between people, teach the value of listening, and weave into the fabric of our culture the understanding that every life matters. At the same time, we will create an invaluable archive of American voices and wisdom for future generations.

In the coming years we will build StoryCorps into an enduring institution that will touch the lives of every American family.

via About Us | StoryCorps.

Downton Abbey, The Dowager Countess, quotes, LOL: : )

‎”I do think a woman’s place is eventually in the home, but I see no harm in her having some fun before she gets there.”

Georgia, Yumion – the Vidalia Onion, Vidalia GA, kitschy, corporate mascots:  I must admit, I would go out of my way to see Yumion … I have done so to see the Oscar Mayer Weinermobile and the Famous Idaho® Potato Truck …

Explore Georgia

Be sure to look for Yumion, the Vidalia Onion, when you visit Vidalia, Georgia! http://budurl.com/Vidalia

Tiffanys,  Costco, knockoffs, retail, knockoffs, icons, iconic jewelry, blue boxes, diamond rings,  ABC News:  If I were a bride, I’d be ticked …

Speaking of retail, a wild story. A big fight between tiffany’s and costco. Tiffany’s wants the big box store to knock off the knockoffs, selling fake versions of its iconic jewelry.

Here’s abc’s tanya rivero. Reporter: It’s the little blue box, versus the big box retailer. On valentine’s day, as lovers everywhere snuggled,iffany and co.

Slapped costco with a lawsuit. These pictures allegedly show tiffany koffs inside a california costco. Tiffany sent someone in, bought one of the rings.

They were not made by tiffany. They are not tiffany rings. They have nothing to do with tiffany.

Reporter: Being sold at a fraction of what real tiffany rings cost. Everybody would love a deal on a tiffany ring. And unfortunately, it just doesn’t happen.

Tiffany diamonds are never on sale. Reporter: Tiffany alleges costco had been selling the fakes for years. Hundreds, maybe thousands, of engagement rings were sold using the tiffany trademark.

Reporter: A rep for costco told abc news, we will be making no comment on this story as it involves pending litigation. Court papers say an unnamed consumer blew the whistle, contacting a tiffany store to complain. She was offended by the fact that tiffany would be selling engagement rings in costco.

In this particular case, there’s enormous room for confusion among consumers because costco does sell a of big brands at deep discounts. Reporter: Shoppers at tiffany’s flagship store weighed in. You think you’re buying into a brand.

And you find out it’s a rip-off. When you buy a tiffany diamond, you’re buying into the row mant schism and there’s only one place to get it. Costco has removed all tiffany labels.

But tiffany is a suing for additional mary damages. And whether customers will sue remains to be seen. If you have any doubt about a tiffany’s item you own, you can bring it into a tiffany’s store.

They’ll tell you if it’s the real thing. Diamonds are never on sale.

via Tiffanys Battles Costco Over Knock Off Diamond Rings | Video – ABC News.

 weddings,  trends, gold, The Huffington Post:  I am pretty traditional … but  I really like the gold …

Beyond emerald and yellow, one of the fastest growing color trends this year in weddings is gold. For a while, gold had become passé as platinum gained in popularity and silver made a resurgence. However, gold is back, and here to stay. With sequins so popular (we’re on board!), and because this color can be paired with so many options from pink to black and white, all that glitters is GOLD for 2013.

With the help of patterns and rose gold, check out our favorite golden wedding ideas in the gallery.

via Kellee Khalil: 2013 Wedding Color Trend: Gold.

Twitter, David Boreanaz, Playmobil, adult play, random: So if I were to create a scene using playmobil figures, what would I create?

You see my photo!!!! Playmobil Bones!!!!!!!! pic.twitter.com/Zb55U6pA

Twitter / lauris_dm: @David_Boreanaz You see my ….

elephants, internet videos, random:

VALUE9.com India

most happiest elephant in the world

via most happiest elephant in the world.

Marine Corps,  Chesty the Recruit, WSJ:

The Marine Corps on Friday unveiled their future mascot. If all goes as planned, Chesty the Recruit will become Private First Class Chesty XIV later this year, replacing Sgt Chesty XIII.

Chesty XIII became one of the most storied dogs in the long history of Marine Corps mascots when he faced off last year with Bravo, the Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta’s golden retriever.

As chronicled in The Wall Street Journal, the growling confrontation earned Chesty a promotion to Sergeant and raised the bulldog’s reputation among many of the enlisted and officers at the Marine Corps barracks. But it didn’t sit too well with some of the officer’s wives.

Some of the women viewed Chesty the XIII as crotchety and ill-mannered to guests. (Check out the video here.)

The Marines rolled out the red carpet for 9-week old Chesty the Recruit Thursday night at the Home of the Commandants at the Washington, D.C., Marine Barracks. Bonnie Amos, the wife of Marine Corps Commandant James Amos, met the latest Chesty Thursday night.

via Marines Roll Out Red Carpet for Chesty the Recruit – Washington Wire – WSJ.

short stories, literary genres, publishing, book industry, NYTimes.com.

The Internet may be disrupting much of the book industry, but for short-story writers it has been a good thing.

Story collections, an often underappreciated literary cousin of novels, are experiencing a resurgence, driven by a proliferation of digital options that offer not only new creative opportunities but exposure and revenue as well.

“It is the culmination of a trend we have seen building for five years,” said Cal Morgan, the editorial director of Harper Perennial Originals, who until last year ran a blog called Fifty-Two Stories, devoted to short fiction. “The Internet has made people a lot more open to reading story forms that are different from the novel, and you see a generation of writers very engaged in experimentation.”

via A Good Fit for Small Screens, Short Stories Are Selling – NYTimes.com.

03
Jan
13

1.3.13 We’ve settled in for a long winter’s nap … “live your life, live your life.”

favorites, authors, Maurice Sendak, atheism:  WOW …

great interview …  “almost certainly I’ll go before you go, so I won’t have to miss you”.

“live your life, live your life.”

An Illustrated Talk With Maurice Sendak (Drawings by Christoph Niemann) – YouTube.

winter, home:  We’ve settled in for a long winter’s nap …These were taken New year’s but they will look like this til spring.  They are hibernating.
Photo: Only the dog in the chair has changed.  :)
Photo: The other basset ... Wild night at Chez Teague. :)
Tolkien, happy birthday, authors:  

 

Tolkien ’bout my generation. Happy Birthday to the master.

Photo: Tolkien 'bout my generation. Happy Birthday to the master.

12 days of Christmas: 

On the 10th day of Christmas my true love sent to me Ten Lords A-leaping. The ten commandments: 1) You shall have no other gods before me; 2) Do not make an idol; 3) Do not take God’s name in vain; 4) Remember the Sabbath Day; 5) Honor your father and mother; 6) Do not murder; 7) Do not commit adultery; 8) Do not steal; 9) Do not bear false witness; 10) Do not covet. (Exodus 20:1-17)

via (2) Advent.

waste: cord tacos … I think I can do this cheaper!

5 Pack of Assorted Cord Tacos Uncovet.

Davidson basketball:  Since I promised to report back … First half was fun … 😦

Davidson managed a 29-29 tie at halftime, a testament to its game plan and aggressiveness despite the prolonged absence of center Jake Cohen, who picked up his second foul 2 minutes, 38 seconds into the game and spent most of the half on the bench.

De’Mon Brooks’ relentlessness on the boards (he finished with 12 rebounds) allowed Davidson to stay even through the first 20 minutes but that was as good as it would get for the Wildcats (7-6).

Duke scored the first 12 points of the second half, its offense finally finding a rhythm against the Wildcats’ defense. Cook, Kelly and Thornton were instrumental in the run, which left the Wildcats in an increasingly desperate situation.

The Wildcats, who missed eight of 10 3-point attempts in the first half, found a brief spark in the second but could get no closer than eight.

They will remember the uncommonly high number of point-blank shots they missed against the Blue Devils.

“Coach kept telling us we had to fight for 40 minutes. That stretch in the second half killed us,” said Davidson guard Tyler Kalinoski, who finished with nine points.

via Duke Blue Devils shake Davidson Wildcats; win 67-50 | CharlotteObserver.com.

Georgia,  Cloudland Canyon, bucket list:  This one is close to home …

Pictured: Cloudland Canyon in Rising Fawn, Georgia.

Photo Credit: Sussman Imaging

.Photo: "Like" this photo if you plan to Explore Georgia in 2013!</p> <p>Pictured: Cloudland Canyon in Rising Fawn, Georgia.<br /> Photo Credit: Sussman Imaging

via Explore Georgia

 Starbucks, recycling, not waste:

Starbucks Corp. (SBUX), the world’s largest coffee-shop operator, began selling reusable plastic cups for $1 at its U.S. and Canadian stores today.

The white plastic cup has the Starbucks logo on it and holds a tall or grande size drink, Haley Drage, a Starbucks spokeswoman, said in an e-mail. The Seattle-based brewer already offers a 10-cent discount to its customers who bring in a reusable mug.

Starbucks served 1.9 percent of drinks in customers’ personal tumblers in its global company-owned stores in 2011, according to its latest global responsibility report. It wants to serve 5 percent of beverages in reusable cups by 2015, the report shows.

via Starbucks Sells $1 Reusable Cups at U.S. Locations – Bloomberg

.Starbucks to send 'cliff' message on cups

products I like: 🙂

MUG SOMEONE: Our “And also with y’all” coffee mugs are another way to have serious fun or start The Conversation. They are not on our website yet, but you can order on the phone.

Photo: MUG SOMEONE:  Our "And also with y'all" coffee mugs are another way to have serious fun or start The Conversation.  They are not on our website yet, but you can order on the phone.

Northern Lights, Finland, bucket list:  

Northern Lights Season Is Starting !! Are you Ready ?!!

Renting a glass igloo in Finland to sleep under the Northern Lights.

Aurora season has been in high gear for nearly a month in Abisko, and it looks as though this year could be something very, very special, We are entering the peak of the solar maximum, and if history is any indicator we should see a marked increase in aurora activity.

Photo: Northern Lights Season Is Starting !! Are you Ready ?!!</p> <p>Renting a glass igloo in Finland to sleep under the Northern Lights.</p> <p>Aurora season has been in high gear for nearly a month in Abisko, and it looks as though this year could be something very, very special, We are entering the peak of the solar maximum, and if history is any indicator we should see a marked increase in aurora activity.

05
Sep
11

9.5.2011 … Happy Labor Day … highly recommend The Conspirator … if you are into historical (not hysterical) drama …

The Conspirator, movies, Mary Surratt, Frederick Aiken, history, kith/kin:  Two movie nights with the Trobs make for a fine Labor Day Weekend … and what fun it is that they too like to follow-up with a little research on the internet.  and Joni is very good.  As for the Conspirator, I loved it.  It was intense.

So here are my questions:

1) Where is the picture they were obviously setting up to take of the hanging?

 

 

Execution of Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold and

George Atzerodt at Washington Penitentiary on 7th July, 1865.

via Mary Surratt.

2)What happened to Mary Surratt’s children?

Anna Surratt moved from the townhouse on H Street and lived with friends for a few years, ostracized from society.[218] She married William Tonry, a government clerk.[218] They lived in poverty for a while after he was dismissed from his job, but in time he became a professor of chemistry in Baltimore and the couple became somewhat wealthy.[218] The strain of her mother’s death left Anna mentally unbalanced, and she suffered from periods of extreme fear that bordered on insanity.[218] She died in 1904.[216][219] After the dismissal of charges against him, John Surratt, Jr. married and he and his family lived in Baltimore near his sister, Anna.[218] Isaac Surratt also returned to the United States and lived in Baltimore (he never married).[218] He died in 1907.[216][220] Isaac and Anna were buried on either side of their mother in Mt. Olivet Cemetery.[218] John Jr. was buried in Baltimore in 1916.[218] In 1968, a new headstone with a brass plaque replaced the old, defaced headstone over Mary Surratt’s grave.[221]

Mary Surratt’s boarding house still stands, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.[222] Citizens interested in Mary Surratt formed the Surratt Society.[218] The Surrattsville tavern and house are historical sites run today by the Surratt Society.[181] The Washington Arsenal is now Fort Lesley J. McNair.[181] The building that held the cells and courtroom, and the brick wall seen in back of the gallows, are all gone (the courtyard where the hanging occurred is now a tennis court).[181]

via Mary Surratt – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

What happened to the Frederick Aiken? See Colonel Frederick A. Aiken biography | thisweekinthecivilwar.

 

Artisan Social Designer, shopping, Paris, France, artisan:  There is that artisan word again. 🙂

Artisan Social Designer, a new gallery and concept store in a converted grocery store in Paris, is giving traditional craft a makeover.

The shop was created by a freshly graduated fine artist couple, Rémi Dupeyrat and Naïs Calmettes, with the aim of showcasing young “artists with an artisan’s approach and vice-versa,” said Mr. Dupeyrat.

All the pieces on display, which are sold exclusively at the boutique (68, rue des Gravilliers; 33-1-4996-5605; http://www.artisansocialdesigner.fr), were handmade according to traditional techniques, or ones developed by their creators: tables made out of sea salt and resin, chairs of softened wood following an age-old architectural method, vases of traditionally blown glass.

The shop also takes a hard ethical line: only local materials are used, and all the pieces are limited to series of 20. “We don’t want a micro-factory-type production,” Ms. Calmettes said. “The artist should stop when he/she is bored.”

The space will also hold quarterly exhibitions, timed for the beginning of each new season. The first, “2011 Automnes,” running from Sept. 23 to Oct. 8, will have a theme of wood and tools. The group show will include shoes of carved wood by Simona Vanth and Manon Beuchot, photography by Irwin Barbé and an special installation by the shop’s founders.

via In Paris, a New Shop Where Art Meets Wares – NYTimes.com.

Georgia, history:  Wonder why?

September 5, 1774

Georgia was the only colony not represented at the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia.

via Atlanta History Center, September 5, 1774.

colleges, college ranking, US New & World Report:  History of the rankings is very interesting.

He’s also one of the most powerful wonks in the country, wielding the kind of power that elicits enmity and causes angst.

Morse runs U.S. News & World Report’s annual Best Colleges guide, the oldest and best-known publication to rank America’s premier colleges.

The annual release of the rankings, set for Sept. 13 this year, is a marquee event in higher education. Some call it the academic equivalent of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue.

Colleges broadcast U.S. News rankings on Web sites and in news releases, tout them in recruiting pamphlets, alumni magazines and “Dear Colleague” letters, and emblazon them on T-shirts and billboards. Institutions build strategic plans around the rankings and reward presidents when a school ascends.

“U.S. News doesn’t advertise the rankings,” Morse said in a recent interview at the publication’s headquarters. “The schools advertise for us.”

Morse, 63, has endured for two decades as chief arbiter of higher education’s elite.

No one can stake a credible claim to academic aristocracy without a berth on the first page of a U.S. News list. He is to colleges what Robert Parker is to wine.

The rankings have changed the way colleges do business. Critics see their influence every time an institution presses alumni for nominal donations, coaxes noncommittal students to apply or raises the SAT score required for admission.

Twenty-eight years after the release of the first U.S. News lists, Morse and his publication dominate the college-ranking business they spawned. Last year’s publication drew more than 10 million Internet hits on launch day.

via U.S. News college rankings are denounced but not ignored – The Washington Post.

Google Fiber, technology:  100x faster …

Google has changed the way people search on the internet. Now it’s changing the way some people surf the web.

Hundreds of lucky residents in the San Fransisco Bay area are now accessing Google’s one-gigabyte broadband service, which is being touted as the fastest internet connection in the world.

CBS affiliate KCBS tested the Google Fiber internet service, which is being offered for free in a neighborhood just south of Stanford University.

According to the station, a 95-megabyte high-definition movie trailer downloaded in about nine seconds.

Download speeds on the network were up to 300 Mbps, with an upload speed of 150 Mbps. Comcast’s cable service, which has an average speed of 13Mbps, is about 1/20th the speed of Google Fiber.

Kansas City is the only other place to receive Google Fiber. It’s part of an experiment involving as many as half a million homes to improve ways to build the network, to see what apps people invent and how it would change the way we use the internet.

via Google Fiber world’s fastest broadband service, 100 times faster than norm – Tech Talk – CBS News.

President Obama, politics, Great Recession:  bottom line – we are in a mess.

Liberal critics of Obama, just like conservative critics of Republican presidents, generally want both maximal partisan conflict and maximal legislative achievement. In the real world, those two things are often at odds. Hence the allure of magical thinking.

via What the Left Doesn’t Understand About Obama – NYTimes.com.

twitter, Jim Cramer, banks, The Government: We have a long road ahead of us.

Jim Cramer (@jimcramer)
9/4/11 6:16 PM
As for the banks, i have to tell you, the government isn’t going to let them lift. Even the great ones are getting killed. Bad sign…
9/11 Memorial, architecture:

Mr. Arad, who started designing a memorial before there was even a competition, was invested from the start in making what he called a “stoic, defiant and compassionate” statement. Born in London, he had grown up all over the world as the son of an Israeli diplomat who was once ambassador to the United States, and has lived in New York since 1999. He watched the second plane hit the World Trade Center from his roof on the Lower East Side and saw the south tower fall from a few streets away.

“I think my desire to imagine a future for this site came out of trying to come to terms with the emotions that day aroused,” he said.

Like everything else about ground zero, the story of how the memorial got back on track is complicated, and involves many players. But it is also at least partly the story of Mr. Arad’s evolution from a hot-headed 34-year-old novice whose design bested some 5,200 others to the more sanguine and battle-tested — if still perfectionist — architect he is today. It’s a tale that surprises many of those associated with the project, not least Mr. Arad himself.

“When I started this project, I was a young architect,” said Mr. Arad, 42, as he toured the site during the summer. “I was very apprehensive about any changes to the design. Whether I wanted to or not, I learned that you can accept some changes to its form without compromising its intent. But it’s a leap of faith that I didn’t want to make initially — to put it mildly.”

“I had a dual role: designer and advocate,” said Mr. Arad (pronounced ah-RAHD), who comes across as thoughtful and intense.

The memorial occupies about half of the 16-acre World Trade Center site, which is a busy place these days, with four towers in various stages of construction. It includes a plaza with more than 400 swamp white oak trees, an area that will serve as a green roof over an underground museum designed by Aedas Architects with an entrance pavilion designed by the Norwegian firm Snohetta. (The budget for both memorial and museum is now down to $700 million.)

Most significantly, the footprints of the original World Trade Center towers have been turned into two square, below-ground reflecting pools, each nearly an acre, fed from all sides by waterfalls that begin just above ground level and bordered by continuous bronze panels inscribed with the names of those who died there and in Washington and Pennsylvania.

via How the 9/11 Memorial Changed Its Architect, Michael Arad – NYTimes.com.

Jesus Daily, Facebook, social network, define: church:  All in all an interesting article.

A North Carolina diet doctor has come up with a formula to create the most highly engaged audience on Facebook in the world, far surpassing marketing efforts by celebrities and sports teams. He draws on the words of Jesus and posts them four or five times a day.

The doctor, Aaron Tabor, 41, grew up watching his father preach at churches in Alabama and North Carolina, and his Facebook creation is called the Jesus Daily. He started it in April 2009, he said, as a hobby shortly after he began using Facebook to market his diet book and online diet business that includes selling soy shakes, protein bars and supplements.

For the last three months, more people have “Liked,” commented and shared content on the Jesus Daily than on any other Facebook page, including Justin Bieber’s page, according to a weekly analysis by AllFacebook.com, an industry blog. “I wanted to provide people with encouragement,” said Dr. Tabor, who keeps his diet business on a separate Facebook page. “And I thought I would give it a news spin by calling it daily.”

Facebook and other social media tools have changed the way people communicate, work, find each other and fall in love. While it’s too early to say that social media have transformed the way people practice religion, the number of people discussing faith on Facebook has significantly increased in the last year, according to company officials.

Over all, 31 percent of Facebook users in the United States list a religion in their profile, and 24 percent of users outside the United States do, Facebook says. More than 43 million people on Facebook are fans of at least one page categorized as religious.

But the increase in the number of people finding faith communities via social media platforms provokes the question of what constitutes religious experience and whether “friending” a church online is at all similar to worshiping at one.

Although Pope Benedict acknowledged in a recent statement that social networks offered “a great opportunity,” he warned Roman Catholics that “virtual contact cannot and must not take the place of direct human contact with people at every level of our lives.”

via Jesus Daily on Facebook Nurtures Highly Active Fans – NYTimes.com.

Great Recession, movies, Hollywood:  Well, it’s not my fault.  I go to no more than 4-5 theater movies a year.  I am actually up for the year. Hollywood spends an enormous amount of money and produces little of real worth.  Maybe they need to rethink.

From the first weekend in May to Labor Day, a period that typically accounts for 40 percent of the film industry’s annual ticket sales, domestic box-office revenue is projected to total $4.38 billion, an increase from last year of less than 1 percent, according to Hollywood.com, which compiles box-office data.

The bad news: higher ticket prices, especially for the 18 films released in 3-D (up from seven last summer), drove the increase. Attendance for the period is projected to total about 543 million, the lowest tally since the summer of 1997, when 540 million people turned up.

Hollywood has now experienced four consecutive summers of eroding attendance, a cause for alarm for both studios and the publicly traded theater chains. One or two soft years can be dismissed as an aberration; four signal real trouble.

via Summer Movie Attendance Continues to Erode – NYTimes.com.


history, technology, John Donne:  Technology can be amazing.

Gipkin-Pauls-Cross.jpg

With a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, professors John Wall and David Hill and architect Joshua Stephens are working to virtually replicate the architecture of the old St. Paul’s Cathedral to recreate what early modern Londoners would have heard on that day. Their model of the structure is based on the work of John Schofield, an archaeologist who works for St. Paul’s, who has surveyed the foundation of the old cathedral, which is still in the ground though partially underneath the existing cathedral.

To recreate the experience of hearing Donne’s sermon, linguist and historian David Crystal is working with his son, the actor Ben Crystal, to craft a reading that will follow the specific accent and style of 17th-century London English. Ben will make his recording in an anechoic (or acoustically neutral) chamber. Wall, Hill, and Stephens — together with Ben Markham, an acoustic simulation specialist in Cambridge, Massachusetts — will then be able to mash up that recording with the architectural design to simulate how Donne’s voice would have traveled when he stood in the churchyard. They are also mixing in ambient sounds that would have been common in London at that time, such as neighing horses, barking dogs, and running water.

By the end of 2012, Wall plans to have the recreation up and running as a website, where people can go to hear Donne’s sermon. They’ll be able to adjust the sound for different locations on the grounds and crowd sizes. The only thing missing are the delightful aromas of 17th-century London. Some things are perhaps better left in the past.

via Travel Back in Time (Virtually) to Hear John Donne Preach – Rebecca J. Rosen – Technology – The Atlantic.

history, history myths:  Fun resource!

Washington’s Myths, Legends, and Tall Tales—Some of Which are True

By Mollie Reilly, Washingtonian, August 29, 2011

This week, Washingtonian magazine corrected misconceptions about why buildings in D.C. were given a height limit in 1899, whether D.C. traffic circles were designed to stop an invading army, the symbolism of D.C.’s equestrian statues, and more.

Myths of the American Revolution

By John Ferling, Smithsonian, January 2010

Read this careful examination of the American Revolution by historian John Ferling and shed beliefs you may have acquired in grade school, but which are “not borne out by the facts.”

Lincoln Myths

The National Park Service has posted a page specifically on Lincoln Memorial Myths to answer questions like, “Is Lincoln buried at the Lincoln Memorial?” The official blog of President Lincoln’s Cottage lists “10 Myths about President Lincoln”: that he owned slaves, that he wrote the Gettysburg Address on an envelope, and so on.

What history myths can you debunk? Let us know in the comments.

via AHA Today: U.S. History Myths.

Apple, Android, smartphones:  just out of curiosity, does anyone ever talk about how much they love their android phone?

New data from Nielsen paints a revealing, if not all that unexpected, picture of the current smartphone market here in the U.S.

While earlier this year we saw Android’s lead over both RIM and Apple’s iOS continue to grow, many (including us) expected that extraordinary growth to curb.

Well that didn’t happen.

According to this latest data, Android now accounts for an intimidating 40% of the overall smartphone market, versus 37% just in May. As for Apple’s iOS? It saw a mere 1% increase from 27% to 28% over the same period.

via Guess How Big Android’s Lead Over Apple Is Now – Techland – TIME.com.

Great Recession, careers, free-lance:  

The country’s freelance nation has always been a diverse lot, some of whom were pushed out of full-time jobs and others who actively pursued this pathway with entrepreneurial zeal. But the recession has forced a growing number of people to grudgingly pursue this path. Do some of them end up “loving it”? Of course. Will some devote their extra free time to creative pursuits, perhaps to become indie rock darlings? Sure. But those who want to pursue the freelance life to support themselves full time are having a far harder time doing so.

via Has the recession created a freelance utopia or a freelance underclass? – Ezra Klein – The Washington Post.

foreign languages, language learning, humiliation:  I just have to open my mouth and they know I am foreign!

A few weeks before that, in the course of work, I visited a school in Complexo do Alemão, a notorious conglomeration of favelas, or slums, in Rio. The head teacher, Eliane Saback Sampaio, did what good teachers everywhere do: she turned the occasion into a learning experience. She brought me from class to class, introducing me as a visitor—but a visitor with a difference. “Listen to our visitor speak,” said Ms Sampaio said each time (in Portuguese), “and tell me whether you think she was born in Brazil.” Thus set up, I gamely said, “Boa tarde, meninos,” (Good afternoon, children)—and in every room, immediately faced a forest of flying hands as the children called out: No, No! She’s foreign! “That’s right,” said Ms Sampaio, happily. “Doesn’t she sound strange?”

The children guessed I was American, European, Spanish, Argentinian—and then came the next humiliation, trying to explain where and what Ireland is. (Brazilians universally think I’m saying I’m from Holanda, not Irlanda. There are strong trade links with the Netherlands, and Brazil is one of the few places in the world with hardly any Irish emigrants.) I really enjoyed the school visit—Complexo do Alemão was until recently run by drug-dealers, and it was inspiring to see a school doing such great work there. Too bad it came at my expense.

via Language learning: No, she’s foreign! | The Economist.

children, play, signage, preschool:  I hope my children will remember me for letting them play!

 yet as i prepare to start a year with a stated goal of “better preparing children for kindergarten,” i don’t want to forget the necessity of play. it is cause to celebrate!

via c is for caution {or celebration} | preschool daze.

twitter, Conan O’Brien, taxes:  🙂

Conan O’Brien (@ConanOBrien)
9/4/11 12:05 PM
Just taught my kids about taxes by eating 38% of their ice cream.
media, print v. paper, Amazon, e-readers, magazines, serendipity:  “And magazine buyers tend to enjoy the serendipity of stumbling upon something that turns out to be fascinating.”
I agree with this comment about the serendipity of stumbling … but I do that with twitter by following a whole host of magazines and bloggers.  hmmm
The more general question, however, is whether publishers like Amazon (and particularly Amazon) represent a threat to the older magazine model, in which a variety of articles are bundled together and sold for a price that, even on the newsstand, is lower than what a reader would expect to pay if buying everything piecemeal. Part of the reason readers buy magazines is because they are comfortable outsourcing some of the decision-making about content delivery, and welcome the fact that magazines curate the news. The last issue of the New Yorker, for example, included articles about Mr Perry, the gold standard, tarot cards, Wikipedia, Syria, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife Virginia, and Rin Tin Tin.

Few readers are interested in every article, but most will enjoy several of them. And magazine buyers tend to enjoy the serendipity of stumbling upon something that turns out to be fascinating. I don’t think I’ve read anything serious about tarot cards, for example, but I am more likely to read about it the New Yorker than I am to buy something a la carte, given that the subject never interested me before. It may be that e-publications will eat up part of the magazine market, but brands with a strong editorial line and loyal readers should fair pretty well.

via E-readers and magazines: It’s still good to have gatekeepers | The Economist.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, former Vice President Dick Cheney, politics:  OK, he is officially getting on my nerves.

Hillary Rodham Clinton isn’t president, but Dick Cheney says that if she were in the White House rather than Barack Obama, then things might be different today in the country.

Cheney isn’t getting into specifics, but he does think that “perhaps she might have been easier for some of us who are critics of the president to work with.”

The former vice president tells “Fox News Sunday” that it’s his sense that the secretary of state is “one of the more competent members” of the Obama administration and it would be “interesting to speculate” about how she would have performed as president.

Clinton lost the 2008 Democratic nomination to Obama, who went on to beat Republican John McCain in the general election. Obama named Clinton as the country’s top diplomat.

via Dick Cheney: Hillary Clinton As President Would Have Made Different U.S..

education, reading, digital v. paper:  No surprises here.

British kids are more likely to read texts, e-mails and Web sites than books, according to a new study.

Almost 60 percent of the 18,000 8- to 17-year-olds who were part of the study said they had read a text message in the past month; half said they had read on the Web. That compares with 46 percent having read a fiction book and 35 percent having read a nonfiction book.

Does that surprise you?

Here are some other findings about kids and reading from the survey, which was done by England’s National Literacy Trust.

● About one in five kids surveyed had never been given a book for a present.

● About 30 percent of children said they read every day. But 13 percent say they never read at all.

● Boys are almost twice as likely as girls to say they never read.

The survey findings called for kids to be challenged to read 50 books a year, or about one a week. Do you read more or less than that? Go to kidspost.com to vote in our online poll. (Always ask a parent before going

via Study: Kids read Web sites more than books – The Washington Post.


18
Jan
11

1.18.2011 … return to normal routine … kinda nice …

faith, mountaintop experience:  I have asked my kids if they have had a mountaintop experience.  They look at me like I am crazy.  I like this bloggers description of the experience.

The Mountaintop Experience

At some moments we experience complete unity within us and around us. This may happen when we stand on a mountaintop and are captivated by the view. It may happen when we witness the birth of a child or the death of a friend. It may happen when we have an intimate conversation or a family meal. It may happen in church during a service or in a quiet room during prayer. But whenever and however it happens we say to ourselves: “This is it … everything fits … all I ever hoped for is here.”

This is the experience that Peter, James, and John had on the top of Mount Tabor when they saw the aspect of Jesus’ face change and his clothing become sparkling white. They wanted that moment to last forever (see Luke 9:28-36). This is the experience of the fullness of time. These moments are given to us so that we can remember them when God seems far away and everything appears empty and useless. These experiences are true moments of grace.

via December 19, 2010 – The Mountaintop Experience.

followup, education, college:  lack of rigor … I think this book/study will be given lots of attention.

“How much are students actually learning in contemporary higher education? The answer for many undergraduates, we have concluded, is not much,” write the authors, Richard Arum, professor of sociology and education at New York University, and Josipa Roksa, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Virginia. For many undergraduates, they write, “drifting through college without a clear sense of purpose is readily apparent.”

The research findings at the core of the book are also being released today by their sponsor, the Social Science Research Council. (Esther Cho of the council is a co-author on that paper.)

The main culprit for lack of academic progress of students, according to the authors, is a lack of rigor. They review data from student surveys to show, for example, that 32 percent of students each semester do not take any courses with more than 40 pages of reading assigned a week, and that half don’t take a single course in which they must write more than 20 pages over the course of a semester. Further, the authors note that students spend, on average, only about 12-14 hours a week studying, and that much of this time is studying in groups.

via News: ‘Academically Adrift’ – Inside Higher Ed.

corporations, Wal-mart, South Africa:  Will be interesting to see if Wal-Mart is successful.  After spending 2 weeks in South Africa … I saw poverty, not a growing middle class.  But the poverty is so great, that maybe I did not look around the corners to see the successes.

A South African chain’s shareholders have overwhelmingly accepted Wal-Mart’s offer to buy 51 percent of their company, the chief executive said Monday, paving the way for the giant U.S.-based retailer to enter Africa.

Massmart said the proposal was approved by 97 percent of shareholders who voted Monday — 75 percent had been needed. Wal-Mart offered 148 rand (about $20) per share in a 17 billion rand (about $2 billion) deal. (See 10 perfect jobs for the recession — and after.)

The deal will have to be approved by South Africa’s anti-monopoly regulators.

Massmart CEO Grant Pattison said once the deal goes through, Massmart will continue to operate the stores and continue to be listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, while Wal-Mart will be the main owner. Massmart runs about 290 big box, pharmacy, electronics and other stores in 14 African countries.

“They are a great retailer and we really are looking forward to learning something from them, and teaching them something about Africa,” Pattison told The Associated Press. “We’re excited because they’re coming as our partners.”

Wal-Mart, based in Bentonville, Arkansas, has 8,692 stores in 15 countries, among them Brazil, China and India. But it has not until now ventured into Africa.

South Africa has the most developed economy on a continent slowly emerging from grinding poverty, and one that fared better than other parts of the world during the global recession. Consulting firm McKinsey & Company has concluded that global business cannot afford to ignore Africa’s potential, or its growing middle class. The World Bank has said the continent is finally seeing the results of years of market reforms and investment in education and health care.

Business here has welcomed Walmart’s arrival as recognition of the potential of the continent’s economy, and of the reach South African retailers have throughout Africa.

via South Africans Accept Walmart Bid – TIME.

tv, documentary v. docudrama, v. historical fiction:  I can’t see how this can be done when some of the players are still alive.

But people familiar with the discussions of the History board say that when it convened at the end of 2010, its unease about the accuracy of “The Kennedys” was more than sufficient to turn it against the project.

Neither Mr. Dallek nor Mr. Gillon felt the mini-series met History’s standards. The board was also said to be strongly influenced by memos from the historians detailing remaining factual inaccuracies and errors, a board member said. When the final votes were tallied, “The Kennedys” had lost its United States broadcaster.

Michael Prupas, president and chief executive of Muse Entertainment, said the mini-series was “based on the truth, and if anything is a positive, very positive presentation of the Kennedy family.” In a joint statement with Muse, Asylum Entertainment said it was proud of the “painstaking efforts that went into creating a drama that is compelling while rich in historic detail.”

Whatever happens with “The Kennedys,” Mr. Reeves offered a prediction about America’s fascination with that family:

“People thought it would end with a certain generation, and it won’t end because they are cultural figures. The Kennedys are never going away.”

via History Channel’s Decision to Forgo ‘The Kennedys’ – NYTimes.com.

random, Jane Austen: Just enjoyed this interview with Alison Steadman who portrayed Mrs. Bennet in the 1995 BBC Pride & Prejudice.

Alison Steadman

The first time I saw a fox as a child I was beside myself with joy. I still have the same sense of delight now. The news stories about urban foxes upset me. Let them dig up your bulbs.

Abigail’s Party never goes away. Nor does Mrs Bennet from Pride and Prejudice. And now taxi drivers shout “Pamelaaaaa!” [from Gavin & Stacey] across the street.

You can’t knock things being popular, particularly with young kids. I walked past this gang of boys on bikes and someone said: “Hey, it’s Pamela!” They all raced up saying: “Please, miss!” They were so enthusiastic – it was really nice.

via m.guardian.co.uk.

random, twitter, woman cave:  What would you have in your woman cave?  Actually the concept of a female version of a “man cave” seems impossible.

@kabster728 Katie Boehret

I now know two friends who created “woman caves” in their houses. I love this trend! Ladies, what would you put in your woman cave?

via Twitter / @Katie Boehret: I now know two friends who ….

“bridge to nowhere”, Perry GA, Georgia:  Oops … looks like Perry GA has a “bridge to nowhere” …

Every weekend, Michael Morris and his 2-year-old son, Jacob, visit this small town’s enormous new $14 million fishing museum. They watch bream and bass swim in aquarium-size tanks. They play with an interactive model of a fishing boat and try to catch fish on a computer simulation using a rod and reel connected to a video screen.

Georgia faces $1.6 million a year in bond payments and operating costs as it considers cuts to scholarships and health care. More Photos »

And because the museum, the Go Fish Georgia Educational Center, is primarily financed by the state, their father-and-son outings cost only $5.

“It’s amazing,” said Mr. Morris, a car salesman and recreational fisherman. “When Jacob gets old enough, I hope this will be part of what makes him really get into fishing.”

But not all Georgia taxpayers are so thrilled. Even before the museum opened in October, “Go Fish” had become shorthand in state political circles for wasteful spending. Republicans and Democrats alike groaned over $1.6 million a year in bond payments and operating costs. And even supporters concede that the museum would never have gotten financed in 2007 if the legislature knew where the economy was headed.

“Hindsight is 20/20, but we should have seen this one coming,” said State Senator George Hooks, an Americus Democrat on the budget-writing Appropriations Committee.

via New Fishing Museum Becomes Symbol of Waste in Georgia – NYTimes.com.

random, archaeology, lists:  interesting list … Top Ten Archaeological Discoveries of 2010 | History Today.

Starbucks, BIG:  Why is bigger always better?

Hey, caffeine addicts, Starbucks has a new size for you if your decaf Venti soy almond cappuccino simply isn’t cutting it–it’s the Trenta, and it’s going to supersize your much needed fix in the morning.

(Read about how Starbucks reacted to McDonald’s introduction of coffee.)

But there’s a catch: it’ll only be available for iced coffee, iced tea and iced tea lemonade drinks. The Trenta is seven ounces bigger than the Venti, and will cost about 50 cents more than the currently-priced Venti drinks. Starbucks also promises that the drinks will be kept to less than 230 calories, nipping all those calorie increase concerns in the bud.

via Supersize Your Coffee: Starbucks Debuts the “Trenta” – TIME NewsFeed.

random, James Earl Jones, icons:  Loved this article … his name even sounds like his voice sounds … Isn’t that an onomatpoeia?  “iconic voice” … loved that … who else has an iconic voice?

Sometimes, it’s easy to forget that James Earl Jones is an actual person with a head and arms and legs rather than just the disembodied voice he so often seems to be. Jones, who turns 80 today, has acted for over five decades in theater, television, and film. But it’s his voice — low, resonating, authoritative — that lingers in the minds of audiences. That steady bass, behind such memorable lines as “Luke, I am your father” and “This is CNN,” is easily among the most iconic in history.

via A Brief History of James Earl Jones’ Voice – TIME.

Starbucks, business model: Seems like a stupid fight for a lot of bad press.

Each year since 2008, members of the Industrial Workers of the World Starbucks Workers Union had demonstrated on Martin Luther King’s Birthday, protesting that the company’s baristas who worked on the holiday were not given holiday wages.

On Monday, members of the organization held a roving demonstration in Lower Manhattan that they said was organized to celebrate Starbucks’ new policy to pay its employees – called “partners” by the company – time and half for working on the King holiday. Workers said that beginning Starbucks employees are paid around $9 to $10 an hour in New York, which is higher than the minimum wage in the state.

“It took three years to get time-and-a-half pay on Martin Luther King Jr. Day,” a Starbucks worker and group member who gave her name as Liberty Locke announced to the crowd in front of a Starbucks at Union Square East. “It took a lot of marches in New York City and a lot of actions in other cities, petitions, partner surveys, mission reviews, demand letters, calling and calling and calling.”

via Starbucks Workers Celebrate, and Protest – NYTimes.com.

Apple, Steve Jobs: Interesting  bios on other key players at Apple.

Earlier, I wrote about how while Steve Jobs’ second medical leave may be unfortunate, it isn’t likely to derail Apple, because the company has a strong executive roster. It’s not exactly clear who would be first in line to fill Jobs’ shoes in the eventuality that a permanent replacement becomes necessary, but a shortage of good candidates is the least of Apple’s worries. Here’s a detailed look at those candidates.

via The Current Succession Picture at Apple: Apple News, Tips and Reviews «.

Apple, Steve Jobs: Quick recovery for Steve Jobs.

Tomorrow, AAPL stock will get repeatedly kicked in the face. It’ll be down 10–20% because of idiots don’t realize that Apple’s not the same company it was 20 years ago and ignoring the upcoming iPad 2 and iPhone 5, among other things. It will thrive in the next two to three years, thanks to the current product pipeline.

Apple now has plenty of capable people, and although Jobs is a visionary, it’s not like he’s alone in dreaming up Apple products and then refining them for prime-time in his office. Tim Cook, Jonathan Ive, Phil Schiller and others are ‘Apple’ too, and Cook’s already been a great ‘acting CEO’ for the company before.

Apple is not, and never has been, just Steve Jobs. The company is so big now, it’s like 10 separate business — tablets, phones, digital media, retail stores — and they are all brilliantly run. As analyst Charlie Wolf told the New York Times, Apple’s executive team is the one of the greatest in American business.

As I argue in my book about Jobs, Inside Steve’s Brain, he has managed to turn his personality into Apple’s business processes. His perfectionism, obsessive drive for excellence, his instinct for simplicity and great design, have all become hallmarks of how Apple does things.

For example, Apple’s ability to create innovative products springs directly from Job’s relentless striving for perfection.

Jobs’ perfectionism, for example, has created at Apple a unique product development process that is based on the rigorous prototyping of new products.

via Why Apple Will Be OK Without Steve Jobs [Opinion] | Cult of Mac.

Sarah Palin, politics: And why are we all so fascinated with Sarah Palin?

And so, to Mr. Douthat’s chicken-and-egg dilemma — which came first: Ms. Palin or the media’s sometimes obsessive coverage of her? — we might want to add a third actor: the audience.

It’s clear that Ms. Palin triggers great interest among the public. When Ms. Palin was first announced as John McCain’s running mate in 2008, her Wikipedia page received 2.5 million views on the day of the announcement, as compared to 0.7 million for Joe Biden. Her most recent book, America By Heart, debuted at #2 on the New York Times’ Best Seller List (just behind Mr. Bush’s). Her reality show got almost 5 million viewers in its debut — a huge number for a cable program — although its viewership subsequently declined.

Coverage of Ms. Palin may also not be quite as disproportionate as it might seem: according to a study by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, only 0.04 percent of the coverage in major newspapers, and 0.2 percent of coverage on the network news, was devoted to Ms. Palin in 2010 — although the figure was much higher for MSNBC (1.6 percent) and for Fox News (1.1 percent).

All of this, needless to say, makes Ms. Palin’s task very challenging. In delivering comments like the ones she did on the Tucson tragedy last week, she must consider their effect on at least four different audiences: Republican base voters who will vote in next year’s primaries; independent and moderate voters who will vote in next year’s general election; Republican elites — in Washington and elsewhere — who are growing more skeptical about her electoral viability; and the news media itself, which will scrutinize, amplify, and analyze her words, in different ways and in greater volumes than they would for any other politician.

via Sarah Palin and the Media Symbiosis – NYTimes.com.

31
Dec
10

‎12.31.2010 I’ll be singing … “Auld Lang Syne” …

New Year’s, music, history:

“Auld Lang Syne” (Scots pronunciation: [ˈɔːld lɑŋˈsəin]: note “s” rather than “z”)[1] is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in 1788[2] and set to the tune of a traditional folk song (Roud # 6294). It is well known in many English-speaking (and other) countries and is often sung to celebrate the start of the New Year at the stroke of midnight. By extension, its use has also become common at funerals, graduations, and as a farewell or ending to other occasions.

 

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind ?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and old lang syne ?

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll buy your pint cup !
and surely I’ll buy mine !
And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have run about the slopes,
and picked the daisies fine ;
But we’ve wandered many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine ;
But seas between us broad have roared
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

And there’s a hand my trusty friend !
And give us a hand o’ thine !
And we’ll take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

via Auld Lang Syne – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

New Year’s, music, history, Peggy Noonan:  It is not often Peggy Noonan and I are not on the same wavelength.

Christmas, technology, YouTube: fun … but who has time to do this? YouTube – THE DIGITAL STORY OF THE NATIVITY.

technology, lists:  Some good ideas here. 10 Ways to Get the Most Out of Technology – NYTimes.com.

New Year’s Resolutions, marketing, Great Recession:  last year Molly gave up soda … and I am trying. Obviously it has had little effect on soda sales. 🙂

Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc. Chief Executive Larry Young says retail soda-price increases have started to stick after a summer of steep discounts, but consumers are still being frugal.

via Dr Pepper Sees Sticky Prices Sweetening Profits – WSJ.com.

random, prostate cancer, health:

A new study found that men whose index finger is longer than their ring finger are at lower risk to develop prostate cancer, according to the British Journal of Cancer.

via Research Report: Linking Index Finger Length to Prostate Cancer Risks – WSJ.com.

random, movies: Very interesting … YouTube – Banksy’s Exit Through The Gift Shop.

random, travel, Jekyll Island GA, Georgia:  I just liked this one … maybe I’ll visit and find one.

During the months of January and February, Jekyll Island commissions a group of highly skilled artisans from across the U.S. to create an array of stunning, hand-worked glass globes. Then, during this 2 month long program, “Beach Buddies” hide these floats along Jekyll Island’s beaches for lucky visitors to find. For the lucky ones that find an Island Treasure, it is theirs to take home.

via Island Treasures – Georgia Events – Overview – Explore Georgia.

12
Aug
10

8.12.2010 … it’s a Gray day! … ET packs …

events, kith/kin, Gray: My nephew is heading off to GCSU and I am really excited that the State of Georgia has made the decision to invest in a small public liberal arts college.  All the press goes to UGA.  But really its about the education.  Take a look …

Classes are small at Georgia College. Better yet, 100 percent of them are taught by men and women who love teaching. Some 80 percent have Ph.D.s from top universities.

You can choose from more than 40 majors from the liberal arts to business, from health sciences to education to pre-professional programs.

We combine classroom knowledge with real-world experience. So, learning doesn’t stop after class. In fact, it has just begun at that point. Service learning, study abroad, internships, undergraduate research, and leadership organizations are some of the ways we bring together knowledge and life.

Academically motivated students are encouraged to seek external scholarships, fellowships, and grants to pursue their longer term academic and professional goals. Successful scholarship applications early in one’s college career can be used to leverage future scholarship and other opportunities.

via Academics Overview | Georgia College.

anthropology, blog:  Since Jack is now considering majoring in anthropology, I have decided that I need to understand what it is and what he will be able to do with it.  I enjoyed this student’s blog post.

Anthropology’s enormous scope has its greatest appeal as it also has its greatest setback. How could one subject possibly study humans not only in the present but through the past as well? Anthropology endeavors to and uses a four-field, holistic approach incorporating archaeological, linguistic, biological, and cultural sub-disciplines. The breadth of the anthropology major is incredibly appealing to me as a mostly indecisive individual who finds it troublesome to stay loyal to one subject when university offers an array of painfully fascinating courses.

Anthropology is not just a discipline of study, but it is one of application as well. Watching many films exposing the hardships of human beings locally and globally due to ecological, social, economic, political or various other factors has struck and continues to strike at my empathetic core. Learning of the dismal literacy rates, food insecurity, malnutrition, social, political, and religious subjugation and exploitation of peoples, especially among females, around the world was particularly shocking during my first course in anthropology. Over several semesters of anthropology courses I was moved to tears repeatedly due to the plight of humans in lesser developed countries as well as developed countries. Watching was simply not enough for me and I felt a silent call to action in the classroom a few weeks into my introductory course. But before I could delve into any sort of real world application, I knew I had to obtain a proper education in what I wanted to pursue.

The discipline of anthropology is now and from now on will be a permeating influence in my life and career. Anthropology is no longer a concept bound by classroom walls; it has transferred itself to my daily life and my relationships with family, friends, and strangers. The exact point in which this happened is unclear, but I was made aware of how fused I was with what I have learned from this major and how I wish to apply it most clearly midway through my final spring semester at university. Before this moment of clarity, it was unconsciously active in the way I approach understanding the other as well as the self. Hopefully, my anthropological studies will not end here.

via A Self-Reflexive Review As An Anthropology Major « Jenka Potente’s meandering mind..

movies, art: Jack taught me to like Jackson Pollack’s work.  I have been meaning to watch this movie and ran across Ebert’s review.  Anyone seen it?

Reporter from Life magazine: “How do you know when you’re finished with a painting?” Jackson Pollock: “How do you know when you’re finished making love?” Pollock was a great painter. He was also miserable and made everyone around him miserable a lot of the time. He was an alcoholic and manic-depressive, and he died in a drunken car crash that killed an innocent woman. What Ed Harris, in an Oscar-nominated turn, is able to show in “Pollock” is that when Pollock was painting, he got a reprieve. He was also reasonably happy during those periods when he stopped drinking. Then the black cloud would descend again.

via Pollock :: rogerebert.com :: Reviews.

literature, chick lit:  Interesting analysis of the genre.

Let me suggest that Chick Lit is what we used to call the “Beach Book” and that it is its own genre, like mysteries or sci-fi: interesting to a specific audience primarily because of the nature and form of the genre itself. Some good stuff, some bad, no doubt. As in all genre writing, you come across an Ed McBain every now and then. But crossover is not the point, if the targeted reader simply wants a light little fantasy with some kissing scenes and a few pairs of Jimmy Choos.

Still, if Tom Wolfe had written “The Recessionistas,” he would have noted the brands of shoes, the Birkin bags and the personal trainers. And he would have been praised for his attention to detail. That Lebenthal’s book or my book were not intended to be seen as Chick Lit just makes the gulf between books by men and women more personal. At least to me.

But my concern is larger, for the issue is insidious: the way Chick Lit has been used to denigrate a wide swath of novels about contemporary life that happen to be written by women.

via Chick Lit? Women’s Literature? Why Not Just….Literature? | Head Butler.

history, archeology: very interesting…

JERUSALEM (AFP) – A rare gold coin dating back more than two millennia to the year 191 BC has been found at a dig in northern Israel, the antiquities authority said on Wednesday.

“The coin is beautiful and in excellent preservation. It is the heaviest gold coin with the highest contemporary value of any coin ever found in an excavation in Israel,” Dr Donald T. Ariel, head of the authority’s coin department, said in a statement.

The coin weighs almost one ounce (27.71 grams), whereas most ancient gold coins weighed 4.5 grams, he added.

It was minted in Alexandria, Egypt during the reign of Ptolemy V in 191 BC and bears the name of the wife of Ptolemy II, Arsinoe Philadephus (II).

via 2,200-year-old gold coin found in Israel – Yahoo! News.

random: Q: Why does the SyFy channel have wrestling on at 10 pm … or at any time for that matter?

postsecret, blogs:  I love PostSecret (although I get tired of the emphasis on sex), and this is a great blog post by the former mail carrier for Frank Warren, the creator of PostSecret.

While casing one of Frank’s post cards one fell out of my hands and landed upside down on the floor. I gasped when I read in huge bold letters I LIKE TO HAVE SEX WITH STRANGERS. You can imagine my shock. That’s all it said. It had bright coloring underneath the letters. I’ll never forget it. I immediately ran around showing my close friends what I had found in the mail. One guy was so shocked he said, “Did a girl write it?” I was like, “how the heck do I know, who cares?” I looked on the address side of the card and read the preprinted instructions next to Frank’s address. It invited you to participate in a group art project by writing a secret (that no one else knows) on the other side of the card and mailing it anonymously to the printed address. I don’t have to tell you that I pulled the few postcards that were in his address slot that day and began reading them immediately! From that day forward, me, (and a few friends at work who I had showed the postcard to) began reading all the cards daily. I still didn’t really know what was going on, but was intrigued.

via fromUKtoUSwithlove.

to good to be true:  But fun while it lasted.  Really funny is that this great hoax was trumped by the JetBlue real life story …

Resig still has another media announcement planned for 10 a.m. PDT tomorrow. And he is not sad that the meme is essentially dying with this post, “A hoax has two lives, the initial hoax and the story of how it happened. Even though this is a hoax, people want to see a walking/talking Jenny, the people want Jenny.“

via Confirmed: HOPA Dry Erase Girl Is A Hoax, Identity Revealed.

random:  Remember AAA Triptiks … I just ordered them for et and his travel buddy … plus maps from AAA. GPSs are great, but I still like to hold a map!

politics, Georgia, Palin:  Georgia’s Republican supporters of Ms. Handel would have preferred Sarah Palin stay in Alaska.

Of the candidates Palin has already endorsed, 15 of them still have upcoming primary elections. And as November draws closer, she’ll be expected to hit the campaign trail again for those mama and papa grizzlies who are still around for the general election. On top of all of this, there is little reason to believe that Palin is close to quitting the endorsement game, as much as some might like her to. Be prepared to see a growing list of Palinites, and with it, most likely a continuing rollercoaster ride of successes and failures.

Take a look back at some of Sarah Palin’s most spectacular flops and vote on the biggest fail.

Despite a last-minute campaign appearance by Sarah Palin, former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel conceded her primary battle for Georgia governor to Rep. Nathan Deal Wednesday after a close race.

Deal will meet Democrat Roy Barnes in November.

via Sarah Palin’s Endorsement FAILS Of The 2010 Election Season.

technology, Apps: Game changer?

The founding of the iPhone App Store set off an earthquake in the tech world. Suddenly, the humble cellphone could be just about anything — a game, a store, a musical instrument, a strobe, a pet, a database, a medical tool. A new portable-computing era was born, along with a thriving tech economy.

Last month, Google promised to shift the tech landscape again with Android App Inventor. It’s a software kit that’s supposed to let average people, not just programmers, create their own apps for the growing number of phone models that use Google’s Android software.

“You can build just about any app you can imagine with App Inventor,” says Google in its announcement. “You do not need to be a developer. App Inventor requires NO programming knowledge. This is because instead of writing code, you visually design the way the app looks and use blocks to specify the app’s behavior.”

Do-it-yourself software? You just drag building blocks around? That would change everything. No wonder this tech-news item made headlines even in general-interest newspapers like this one.

If App Inventor delivers, it would give wings to thousands of people with great ideas but no coding chops.

via State of the Art – Call It ‘Creating Apps for Dummies’ – NYTimes.com.

Great Recession, politics, quotes:  “JetBlue election” = “Everyone’s hurling invective and they’re all taking the emergency exit.”

Underpinning the gloom: Nearly two-thirds of Americans believe the economy has yet to hit bottom, a sharply higher percentage than the 53% who felt that way in January.

Mr. Hart said the 2010 contest is being pulled by the sentiment associated with the JetBlue flight attendant who fled his plane via the emergency chute after an altercation with a passenger. Calling it the “JetBlue election,” Mr. Hart said: “Everyone’s hurling invective and they’re all taking the emergency exit.”

“The Republicans don’t have a message as to why people should vote for them, but it’s pretty clear why you shouldn’t vote for the Democrats,” said poll respondent Tim Krsak, 33, a lawyer from Indianapolis and independent who has been unemployed since January. “So by default, you have to vote for the other guy.”

via Picture Darkens for Americans, Poll Finds – WSJ.com.

business, management:

Tom says that if you’re really interested in engaging your workforce, you’ll use four simple words.

………………………………………..What do you think?

tompeters! management consulting leadership training development project management.

random, NC:  Back to SHCOOL!

Photo: N.C. road crew misspells SCHOOL – CharlotteObserver.com.

college: We have a lot of shopping to do!

From Twin XL Sheets, to the Best Computers, What a College-Bound Teen Should Bring

via Your College Dorm Room Shopping List.

movies, Children’s/YA lit, events, google doodles:  I cannot think of this movie without thinking of my Dad.  He always cried when he watched it!

Happy Anniversary, The Wizard of Oz!

Today’s Google doodle celebrates The Wizard of Oz, which had its first premiere screening 71 years ago today.

Google’s scene depicts the Cowardly Lion, the Scarecrow, Dorothy and the Tin Man heading down the yellow brick road to Emerald City. The word “Google” is written into the landscape. The artwork is similar to a scene depicted below.

via Happy Anniversary, The Wizard of Oz! – TIME NewsFeed.

politics, Georgia:  Well said, brother, well said.

A Time to Heal — and to Unite!

Dear Fellow Republicans and Friends:

As a long time friend of Karen Handel, I congratulate Congressman Nathan Deal on his hard fought campaign in the runoff. If the automatic recount confirms his victory, he will be my Republican Party’s nominee for Governor. So be it. It will be a hard pill for some to swallow after such a difficult campaign, but we must unite behind our nominee for Governor– and the rest our ticket — in order to prepare for the upcoming fall battle.

The people are counting on us to move Georgia forward along the sure path of sound fiscal policy and personal responsibility. To do that, we simply cannot allow the Democratic Party to turn the clock back to the failed policies of the Roy Barnes’ regime, or to allow his Democratic allies in the Georgia General Assembly to place the future of this great state in peril.

Let’s take a moment and look at the facts.

….

via Facebook | Edward Lindsey.

Fall, Back to School, quotes:  I  love buying school supplies … and so I have always loved this movie quote.

“Don’t you love New York in the fall? It makes me wanna buy school supplies. I would send you a bouquet of newly sharpened pencils if I knew your name and address. On the other hand, … this not knowing has its charms.”

Anyone know who said it? What movie?

30
May
10

5.30.2010 … sunday, sunday … Is no one curious as to what an egg piercer is?

random, way too much information:  So I asked the question, “Is no one curious as to what an egg piercer is?” about an hour ago on Facebook and one dear friend responded. … So here is what it is … I found an egg piercer in my mom’s junk drawer a few years ago, and we have been using it successfully ever since … … you put a tiny hole in a egg before boiling it so it doesn’t crack. As I walked into our great all purpose hardware/variety store, Blackhawk, I overheard and elderly woman and her older daughter (daughter was 60ish) saying if anyone had one they would have it. I introduced myself, and the three of us started looking … I went and asked and voila the nice older British clerk found it … saying she thought they were new in this country. The three of us laughed since I am sure my old one is 45+ years old.  Here is a picture …

new, blogs, random: I’ve added it to my daily list … some just make me laugh.

Now, a new Web site is connecting real people and literary characters. Since early May, “Letters with Character” has been publishing letters submitted by readers to the likes of Goneril of “King Lear” (“I always thought you had the ugliest name….”), Stuart Little (“Turn the car around. She went south.”) and Raskolnikov of “Crime and Punishment” (“Kill her; don’t kill her. Confess; don’t confess. But for the love of god, STOP WHINING!”). In about three weeks, the site has received about 250 letters, 90 of which have been published.

Dearest Edward,

Have you gone mad, Bear?

via An Open Letter to People Who Don’t Read Letters – Speakeasy – WSJ.

glass ceiling, irony:

When my son was in kindergarten, I spoke at career day along with a male nurse who had a child in the class. Afterward, he and I discussed our parallel experiences in the work world. The teacher asked my son, “When you grow up, do you want to be a contractor like your mother and build sports facilities and schools?” My son said, with disdain, “No, that’s women’s work.”

via The Boss – Keep Opening Doors – NYTimes.com.

tv, gLee: Enjoy … final on 6/8 …

Glee – Clip from Regionals : Faithfully – Glee Forum. The Fansite and Forum for FOX’s Glee.

literature, Harper Lee, Jane Austen, quotes:

Soon after Mockingbird appeared, Lee said, only half-jokingly, “All I want to be is the Jane Austen of south Alabama,” and she began work on a second Southern novel, but its progress was slow. This in itself was not surprising: Mockingbird had not exactly fallen fully formed from Lee’s brain. She had turned out essays, humor pieces and short stories for campus publications during her one year at Huntingdon College in Montgomery and her years at the University of Alabama (where she studied law), but writing did not come easily to her.

via Harper Lee’s Novel Achievement | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine.

sports, perfection: Perfect Game … Congrats, Halladay of the Phillies!

Now he has mastered the National League with his new team, the Philadelphia Phillies, and on Saturday he reached the pinnacle of pitching greatness.

Halladay pitched the 20th perfect game in major league history with a 1-0 victory over the Florida Marlins at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens, Fla. He struck out 11, finishing by getting Ronny Paulino, the third Marlins pinch-hitter in a row, on a groundout to third baseman Juan Castro.

via Phillies 1, Marlins 0 – Roy Halladay Pitches Baseball’s 20th Perfect Game – NYTimes.com.

random, education, tradition:  Do they every really say anything … does anyone listen? Famous Graduation Speakers 2010 – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

architecture, history, Georgia, Savannah: Interesting bit of history.

In December 1817 Jay arrived in Savannah as the city’s premier architect and one of the best-trained architects in America. The Richardson-Owens-Thomas House (1819), a commission he received through a family connection, was the first of a series of neoclassical-style mansions Jay designed and features a Regency-style side porch supported by foliated consoles (leaf-shaped decorative brackets).

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society
Bulloch House, Savannah

The interior plans of the William Scarbrough House (1819), which later became the headquarters for the Historic Savannah Foundation, and the Alexander Telfair House (1819), which later became the Telfair Museum of Art, are configured in circular, oval, and elliptical shapes. In the Bulloch House (1818-19) Jay called for a dramatic spiral stair surrounded by Corinthian columns. Jay’s last commission in Savannah was the Bank of the United States (1821), an early Greek revival–stylebuilding dominated by a hexastyle (six-columned) Doric portico. During the years he worked in Savannah, Jay also practiced in South Carolina. In 1820 he was appointed architect of the South Carolina Board of Public Works, for which he provided designs for district courthouses and jails.

New Georgia Encyclopedia: William Jay (ca. 1792-1837).

movies, chick flicks: Well, I liked Kate and Leopold. The Ugly Truth – Top 10 Worst Chick Flicks – TIME.

museums, NYC: Another exhibit I would like to see.

What chance did the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen ever have? Yes, he won the race to the South Pole in 1911, as an engrossing exhibition opening on Saturday at the American Museum of Natural History reminds us, leaving his British rival, Robert Falcon Scott, far behind. Yes, he made his way over uncharted Antarctic territory to the pole, taking 57 days to do what Scott, beginning from previously mapped terrain, could only do in 81. And yes, Amundsen attained the glory offered every pioneer in that waning era of exploration, without having lost a single man and with 39 of his sled dogs still alive, while Scott and his party, well …

Young visitors try on polar jackets at “Race to the End of the Earth.” The exhibition includes artifacts lent by the Scott Polar Research Institute

But what chance did Amundsen have, after nearly a year of living in triumph and delivering lectures on his great feat, when the bodies of Scott and two other members of his expedition were finally discovered in 1913 by a search party, frozen dead in their sleeping bags in a tent?

via Exhibition Review – Race to the South Pole at Museum of Natural History – NYTimes.com.

Apple iPad, media:  As a gift to myself I will periodically try a iPad version of a magazine … this month Popular Science or Wired … Wired I think!

And as PaidContent points out, the new loot from the new platform comes on top of 63,000 paid iPhone and iPad apps for GQ. (They also point out that some digital titles are more alluring that others: While Wired sits atop the iPad app kingdom, Vanity Fair ranks 90th. Guess iPadians find rich media content of gadgets doing backflips far sexier than winsome portraits of Emma Watson.)

via Wired Magazine’s App Gets a Jolt in Debut – Media Decoder Blog – NYTimes.com.

disasters, BP Oil Spill, irony:

BP was drilling to tap an oil reservoir it had identified called Macondo, the same name as the cursed town in Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s novel “One Hundred Years of Solitude.” As on many past projects, BP hired a drilling rig from Transocean, the largest deep-water driller. Workers from Transocean and other contractors did most of the work, under the supervision of BP employees on the rig and in Houston.

via BP Decisions Made Well Vulnerable – WSJ.com.

random, Jane Austen: A man who evaluates women in light of  Jane Austen’s heroines … that’s a new one!

Jay McInerney, novelist and ladies’ man, describes his serial crushes on Jane Austen’s heroines – and how they shaped his romantic life

via Beautiful Minds: Jane Austen’s Heroines – Telegraph.




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