Posts Tagged ‘Greenwich Village

10
Feb
13

2.10.13 … in this world, but not of this world …

FPC, worship, sermon Transfiguration, epiphany,  labyrinth walks, “Solvitur ambulando” – it is solved by walking, Almetto Howie Alexander Labyrinth:  IMG_5491As I left FPC today (did anyone else notice the tulip trees blooming!), I headed to one of my favorite labyrinths.  I had a heavy heart, despite a very excellent sermon by Kirk Hall about  Transfiguration entitled,  “A Glimpse of Glory.”  I was also quite struck by the affirmation of faith …

We believe Christ gives us and demands of us lives in pilgrimage toward God’s kingdom. Like Christ we may enjoy on our journey all that sustains life and makes it pleasant and beautiful. No more than Christ are we spared the darkness, ambiguity, and threat of life in the world. We are in the world, but not of the world. Our confidence and hope for ourselves and other people do not rest in the powers and achievements of this world, but in the coming and hidden presence of God’s kingdom. Christ calls each of us to a life appropriate to that kingdom: to serve as he has served us; to take up our cross, risking the consequences of faithful discipleship; to walk by faith, not by sight, to hope for what we have not seen. (Declaration of Faith, 9.5) http://www.firstpres-charlotte.org/bulletins/bulletin.pdf

But even my drive was uplifting …

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And the walk was wonderful.  I came away feeling much better …

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I love the quote of Ms. Alexander painted at the “foot” of the labyrinth.

“With patience persistence and prayer, a God-filled spirit can bring a seed to fruit.” – Almetto Howie Alexander 2011

And so this afternoon, I  did a little research on the labyrinth …

.Labyrinth

Activities are often thought of as group-oriented, competitive sports, skill-oriented, performance or even pressure. The labyrinth provides a balancing activity, one which may best be pursued alone, in one’s own time of need, searching, or desire for peace and focus. Experiencing the solace of journey provided by a labyrinth brings peace, healing, and enlightenment — mental health — appropriate for people of any age. The labyrinth itself is a beautiful monument to heritage and history. The spiritual and actual presence of the labyrinth will fulfill the dreams of its founder — a person who spent her life working for her community in education and civil rights — and will offer the benefits and reminders of this continuing journey to the community’s next generations.

via Almetto Howie Alexander Labyrinth: The Labyrinth.

The study, design and installation of labyrinths has become an essential part of my work as an artist. From our research, we believe this may be the first Afro-Centric Labyrinth in the United States. This particular project has all the potential to become a great source of healing and education within the smaller community of Washington Heights as it interacts with the larger community of Charlotte. The unique design pays homage to the nearly lost origins of the labyrinth, and offers each individual the opportunity to metaphorically walk their life’s journey along a pattern that echoes the journey and philosophy of Mrs. Alexander.

— Tom Schulz

via Almetto Howie Alexander Labyrinth: The Labyrinth.

“Solvitur ambulando” – it is solved by walking:  I also did a little research on the term “solvitur ambulando.” I found this very interesting.

Solvitur ambulando (pron.: /ˈsɒlvɪtər ˌæmbjʊˈlændoʊ/)[1] is a Latin term which means:

it is solved by walking

the problem is solved by a practical experiment

Diogenes of Sinope, also known as “Diogenes the Cynic,” is said to have replied to the argument that motion is unreal by standing up and walking away.

The phrase appears early in Lewis Carroll’s “What the Tortoise Said to Achilles”. Achilles uses it to accentuate that he was indeed successful in overtaking Tortoise in their race to empirically test one of Zeno’s paradoxes of motion. This passage also appears in Douglas Hofstadter’s book Gödel, Escher, Bach.

The phrase appears in Dorothy L. Sayers’s “Clouds of Witness”. During the Duke of Denver’s trial before the House of Lords, the Lord High Steward suggests (to laughter) solvitur ambulando to determine whether the decedent crawled or was dragged to a different location, as this was a matter of dispute between the prosecution and the defense.

The phrase is also cited in “Walking” by H.D. Thoreau and in “The Songlines” by Bruce Chatwin in its first meaning.

The phrase is discussed multiple times and at some length in The Tao of Travel by Paul Theroux.

The phrase was the motto of the Royal Air Forces Escaping Society.

via Solvitur ambulando – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Momastery, blog, meme: I loved this graphic and I enjoyed her blog as well.

You’re not screwing it up. Your baby is just completely wicked awesome.

via Momastery.

I’ve been both a “working” and a “stay-at-home” mom so I’ve experienced both sides of the internal and eternal debate moms endure all day, every day. When I worked outside my house, Mommy Guilt rode shotgun with me each morning, chiding me for dropping off my sick boy at day care instead of keeping him home and for rocking him the night before instead of preparing for work. When I got to work each day Mommy Guilt whispered that a good mom would still be at home with her son and when I returned home she’d insist that a better teacher would have stayed at work longer. When I’d visit girlfriends who stayed home, Mommy Guilt would say “See… this lady’s doing it right. Her kids are better off than yours are.” And Mommy Guilt certainly had a lot to say when Chase’s day care provider admitted that he had taken his first steps while I was working. Every night when I finally got Chase to sleep, finished grading papers, and collapsed into the couch, Mommy Guilt would snuggle up next to me and sweetly say “shouldn’t you spend some quality time with your husband instead of checking out?” And finally, before I fell asleep each night, Mommy Guilt would whisper in my ear, “YOU KNOW, THE ONLY WAY YOU’RE GOING TO BE A GOOD MOTHER AND WIFE IS IF YOU QUIT YOUR JOB AND STAY HOME.”

And so now I’m a stay-at-home mom. And the thing is that Mommy Guilt stays home with me.

via Momastery.

Davidson College basketball, Nik Cochran, multitasking, live blogging: Another great day to be a Wildcat (fan)!  Congrats to Nik.  I think it is great that I can multitask and pay attention to a game.  I often put on the live blog, even when I am watching a game.

Cochran Hits 1,000 Career Points; Wildcats Roll to Eighth Straight Win

Nik Cochran became the 44th player in program history to hit the 1,000-point plateau and Davidson shot 53.6 percent in a convincing 87-52 victory over Appalachian State in front of 5,090 fans Saturday evening at Belk Arena.

via Davidson College Athletics.

Davidson College Athletics – Live Blog for Tonight’s Men’s Basketball Game vs. ASU.

Davidson College, Baker Athletic Center, The Davidsonian:  So many things to be done …

“Baker was designed 25 years ago when athletes had one season of intensive practice and play. Now all sports practice year round,” Jim Murphy, Director of Athletics, explains. “This building [Baker] has had an incredible demand put on it. There are students in this building almost around the clock.”

With additional men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball practice courts, as well as a dance center with two studios, office space, and storage, the extra space will alleviate scheduling constraints, reducing the current inconvenience of athletes missing study groups, regular dinner hours, and extracurricular activities.

In addition to benefiting varsity athletes, this extra space will increase student participation in club and intramural sports by 60%, as well as accommodate an expanding academic and extracurricular dance program.

Not all of the additions will be about scheduling, however. Some are merely ways to improve both the athlete and the spectator experience. The renovation will include new locker rooms, team rooms, film rooms, and administrative offices for men’s and women’s basketball. All athletes will appreciate the expanded Basil Boyd Training room, and students, faculty, and staff will benefit from a new cardio/fitness room, as well as a classroom for health and wellness instruction. Baker currently sees 90,000 patrons annually. A new ticket office with internal and external windows and a new game day entrance facing the parking lot will streamline the spectator experience.

The planned Baker renovations are a reflection of Davidson’s impressive expansion over the past quarter century. “Being able to respond so positively to the growth we’ve seen in the student population is the most exciting aspect of this project,” says Murphy.

via $15 M renovation of Baker slated to begin in April – The Davidsonian – Davidson College.

Stonewall Riots, President Obama,  1.21.13 Inauguration Speech, Stonewall Inn, Greenwich Village, Christopher Park, public art, legal history, same-sex marriage, LGBTQ rights, 2013 Legal Festival of Learning, hetero-normative society:  Three weeks ago, if you asked me what I knew about the Stonewall Riots, I would not have been able to tell you anything, and when you told me about them, I would have had to admit that I really do not remember ever learning about the event. Well, President Obama referred to the riots in his 1.21.13 Inauguration Speech, I saw the Stonewall Inn on my 1.28.13 tour of Greenwich Village and the statues dedicated to the riots in Christopher Park (the park facing the Inn), and l learned about them in the context of the legal history of same-sex marriage and LGBTQ rights at the Legal Festival of Learning on 2.9.13 (Same-Sex Relationships: Recent U.S. Developments by Maxine Eichner and Holning S. Lau). Sometimes I am amazed at how un-knowledgeable I am, and wonder if my education will ever be complete. As a lawyer and lover of history, now I at least feel like I can enter into an honest and educated conversation of the topic.”

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I had not witnessed the use of the acronym LGBTQ ….

When most people see the acronym “LGBTQ” they are fairly certain what the first four letters stand for. “L,” of course, stands for “lesbian;” “G” is for gay; “B” stands for “bisexual” and “T” means “transgender.” But the “Q,” which represents the word “queer,” is harder to define.

So what exactly does it mean to be “queer?”

“Personally, I think ‘queer’ encompasses ALL in the community, whereas ‘gay’ is primarily used for only the homosexual male segment of the community,” says Kate Sherry, the editor of Queer Life News. “However, there some of us who do identify strictly as ‘queer’ instead of ‘lesbian’ or ‘trans,’ etc.”

Originally, the word “queer” meant unusual or strange, and later, it became a derogatory term for someone who is gay. At the end of the 20th century, members of the gay community reclaimed the word and in doing so, recycled the meaning once again, this time with the goal of empowerment.

The “grayness” of the word is part of its power because it breaks down the ability to label and categorize lifestyles that unfairly generate hate and oppression. Activists, people who strongly reject traditional gender or sexual identities, or anyone who feel oppressed by the pressure to conform to the heterosexual lifestyle often use the word.

According to Bill Serpe, the executive director of Senior Action in a Gay Environment (SAGE), “queer” is a catchall word for anyone who is outside the societal norm, not just those who identify themselves as part of the gay community.

“Someone is queer when they have realized that they are not straight, heterosexual or born in the wrong body. Not all people who might fall in this category like being called queer, but would agree that they are living a lifestyle that is different from what is considered the social norm,” says Serpe.

So, can a straight person be queer? Sure. For some, the “Q” stands for “questioning,” which includes people living the straight lifestyle but questioning their sexuality, someone who isn’t sexual at all because they are unsure of their identity or a person who is sexual, but doesn’t fit into any particular box.

“Anyone who feels they don’t or can’t conform to a hetero-normative society are eligible for queer status!” says Sherry.

via OnMilwaukee.com Milwaukee Buzz: What does the “Q” in LGBTQ really mean?.

2013 Northeast Blizzard , Storm Nemo, Nemo memes:  It is amazing th pictures and videos that are coming out of the NE.  Apart of me would love to be there and a part is glad I am looking at tulip tree blossoms! FYI —  10 Things To Know About The Northeast Blizzard. I just love this picture of Beacon Hill from the WSJ …

EASTON, Mass.—A historic blizzard pummeled the Northeast, dumping up to three feet of snow across New England and knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of customers in New England.

via Storm Sweeps Through Northeast U.S. – WSJ.com.

And then there are the Nemo memes. 🙂

The 15 Funniest Blizzard Nemo Memes

The 15 Funniest Blizzard Nemo Memes

Nemo in the Snow | Complex.

Cool Tools, Boing Boing: Just found this  interesting …

We’ve already come up with a lot of ideas for Cool Tools projects, and some are very ambitious. As Kevin said, “Let’s turn Cool Tools into a butterfly, not just a better caterpillar.” That’s a terrific goal to have, and it’s one that can be achieved while staying true to Cool Tools’ original statement of purpose:

Cool tools really work. A cool tool can be any book, gadget, software, video, map, hardware, material, or website that is tried and true. All reviews on this site are written by readers who have actually used the tool and others like it. Items can be either old or new as long as they are wonderful. We only post things we like and ignore the rest.

I love learning about what people make and do, and the tools they use. Do you have a tool you love? Tell us about it at Cool Tools.

via Mark joins Cool Tools – Boing Boing.

Mason-Dixon Knitting.

 English grammar,  NFL,  Tweets, Chris Culliver, Wes Welker, 2d graders: 🙂

A class of 2nd Graders show off their corrections to a number of tweets from top NFL sports stars, including this one by San Francisco 49ers' Chris Culliver.

A group of 2nd graders have corrected  a number of NFL tweets; handing out a lesson in spelling and grammar to a number of top NFL stars.

The second grade students from Elmwood Franklin Elementary in Buffalo, N.Y. were given a challenge by faculty at the school to correct the grammar and spelling mistakes in a number of Twitter postings from top NFL players.

The young children went to work on tweets from Chris Culliver, Wes Welker and Titus D Young Sr. on Friday, correcting errors in grammar the stars had made in the world of Twitter.

In one tweet by Chris Culliver in which the San Francisco 49ers player tweeted, “I pray to God I’m never dieing broke”

Chris Culliver has been in the news a lot this week as the San Francisco 49ers prepare to take on the Baltimore Ravens in New Orleans this Sunday for Super Bowl 47.

However, despite the pressure that must be on Culliver in preparing for the big game, the kids were still unforgiving on his spelling and grammar.

via 2nd Graders Correct NFL Tweets: Chris Culliver, Wes Welker Twitter Accounts Given English Lesson.

blogs, knitting:  I don’t knit, but I liked the blog because of the dialogue between the two writers … Mason-Dixon Knitting.

weddings, destination weddings, Travel + Leisure: When I first started hearing about destination weddings (and I will attend my first this spring), I asked my teenage daughter  if she would ever want a “destination wedding” … the beach where she grew up going, for example.  She looked at me like I was crazy … so I was astounded to read this article  …  “For many couples, I think, it’s the weirder the better.”

“People don’t want their big day to be cookie-cutter,” says Anja Winikka, editor of TheKnot.com, a popular wedding-planning website. “First, the crazy new thing was destination weddings”—which these days represent about 20 percent of ceremonies. “And now, just in the past five years, we’re noticing many more couples seeking unusual settings, from treetops to airplane hangars. For many couples, I think, it’s the weirder the better.”

via Worlds Strangest Places to Get Married – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

twitter, HuffPostHome:  HuffPostHome … I will not trust you again.  This one was really stupid and definitely not  “one of the coolest things … ever seen.”

HuffPost Home 

@HuffPostHome

This laundry trick is one of the coolest things we’ve ever seen huff.to/12BrQFE

01
Feb
13

2.1.13 … “Nobody likes a pity-party-having-ass-woman” …

Oscars, Beasts of the Southern Wild:  Hard to watch, but worth the struggle.  I thought the line … “Nobody likes a pity-party-having-ass-woman” was pivotal … My friend Bob says it so much more elegantly:

Watched “Beasts of the Southern Wild” tonight. Really liked it–challenging, with interesting perspectives on a lot of themes–family, loyalty, community, freedom, mans place in nature. Easy to dismiss as “too out there”, but worth meeting it on its own terms.

via Bob Trobich.

NYC, Jefferson Market Courthouse Library,  New York Womens House of Detention , Greenwich Village, Ethel Rosenberg, Agela Davis, Davidson College: A little followup research to my Big Onion Tour … Very interesting coincidence that Angela Davis will be speaking at Davidson this month.

Ruth E. Collins was the first superintendent at the prison.[9] She embraced the design of the prison, labeling it “a new era in penology”. Her mission was to effect the moral and social rehabilitation of the women in her charge, giving them a chance for “restoration as well as for punishment”. She commissioned a number of art works as part of her mission to uplift the women and treat them all as individuals. Among the Womens House of Detentions most famous inmates were Ethel Rosenberg, Polly Adler, and Evelyn Nesbit.[10][11]In its later years, allegations of racial discrimination, abuse and mistreatment dogged the prison. Angela Davis has been outspoken about the treatment she witnessed.[12] Andrea Dworkins testimony of her assault by two of the prisons doctors led to its eventual closing.[13]

via New York Womens House of Detention – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Davidson College is announcing that noted political activist and academic Angela Davis will present its annual Wearn Lecture on Tuesday, February 12, 2013.

Davis will speak on the subject “Political Activism and Protest from the 1960s to the Age of Obama” beginning at 8 p.m. in Duke Family Performance Hall. The talk is open to the public, and no tickets or reservations are required.

via Lifelong Activist Angela Davis Will Deliver Davidson’s Wearn Lecture on February 12

Sesame Street, Downton Abbey, Upside Downton Abbey, Downton Arbys, LOL:  And the parodies continue … 🙂

[http://tv.yahoo.com/video/sesame-street-clip-01312-230611944.html]

You know you’ve arrived when “Sesame Street” decides to poke fun at you. So PBS’s red-hot import “Downton Abbey” should consider itself honored when this cute Muppet parody of “Downton” airs during “Sesame’s” upcoming Season 43. The sketch won’t officially air until new episodes resume Monday, February 4 — but we’ve got an exclusive first look at it right here.

via ‘Sesame Street’ takes on ‘Downton Abbey’ with ‘Upside Downton Abbey’ [Exclusive video] – Yahoo! TV.

And here is another …

[http://youtu.be/NMykqW9ibiY]

Downton Arby s – YouTube.

2013 Super Bowl, San Francisco Forty Niners, religion, Grace Cathedral – San Francisco:  Separation of church and … football. Guess not!

Grace Cathedral in SF lit red for the #49ers. Clergy will wear red & gold vestments on Sunday. #QuestforSix

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Oscars, short films, Disney, Paperman, piracy:  As my young friends say … ohmygod its so cute

[http://youtu.be/aTLySbGoMX0]

Paperman – Full Animated Short Film – YouTube.

And one friend asked how it could be posted … answer is

Disney Posts Oscar Nominated “Paperman” Online In Its Entirety

via Disney Posts Oscar Nominated “Paperman” Online In Its Entirety.

 

NYC, Grand Central Terminal – 100th Anniversary:

A century ago, rail travel was at its peak in the U.S., and New York City built the massive Grand Central Terminal to accommodate the growth. Built over 10 years, gradually replacing its predecessor named Grand Central Station, the Grand Central Terminal building officially opened on February 2, 1913. The terminal and the surrounding neighborhood thrived. However, in the latter half of the 20th century, rail travel declined sharply, and Grand Central Terminal fell into disrepair, threatened several times with demolition. The MTA was able to undertake a huge restoration in the 1990s, and Grand Central remains a New York City icon today, 100 years after it first opened. Full entry: http://theatln.tc/14vkguA

via Grand Central Terminal Turns 100.

RIP, Mayor Koch:  I always liked Mayor Koch. Rest in peace …

The grave marker is inscribed with words spoken by Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl before he was killed by militants in Pakistan: “My father is Jewish, my mother is Jewish, I am Jewish.”

via At Ed Koch’s Grave, Words From WSJ’s Daniel Pearl – Metropolis – WSJ.

cute, photography:  Where the wild things are … So cute!

Photo: SO CUTE !!!!

 

Samsung, LOL, 2013 Super Bowl ads: Agree, Tim. Absolute must see!!!

[http://youtu.be/Xoe5Vjl90-o]

Bear surprises Samsung crew on washing machine shoot – YouTube.

 Paris, Notre Dame:
Photo: © JB Gurliat / Mairie de Paris

Arrivée des nouvelles cloches à Notre-Dame de Paris

Dans le cadre du 850e anniversaire de Notre-Dame de Paris, un nouvel ensemble de neuf cloches est arrivé par convoi exceptionnel à Paris. Revivez en photos l’impressionnante arrivée de Gabriel, Anne-Geneviève, Denis, Etienne et les autres, sous les vivats de la foule.

Plus d’infos : http://bit.ly/11rtQLP

via Arrivée des nouvelles cloches à Notre-Dame de Paris.

 

2013 Budweiser Super Bowl Ad, The Clydesdales: “Brotherhood” , YouTube: OK … I’m a sap![

 2013 Budweiser Super Bowl Ad — The Clydesdales: “Brotherhood” – YouTube.

 

28
Jan
13

1.28.13 … happy birthday P&P … a day in the big onion …

Jane Austen,  Pride and Prejudice’s 200th Birthday, Janeites:  Happy birthday, P&P!

This week marks an important milestone for anyone who swoons at the very mention of Mr. Darcy. Pride and Prejudice is turning 200, and to celebrate its bicentennial, cartoonist Jen Sorensen drew up an illustrated version of the classic.

via ‘Pride And Prejudice’ Turns 200: A Cartoon Celebration : NPR.

We, Janeites, are a strange people …

Blogs and forums dedicated to Austen and Austen-style fan fiction abound across the internet. The Jane Austen Society of North America (Jasna) boasts 4,500 members and no fewer than 65 branches.

In October 2012, more than 700 Janeites – many attired in bonnets and early 19th Century-style dresses – gathered in Brooklyn, New York for a Jasna event that incorporated three days of lectures, dance workshops, antique exhibitions, a banquet and a ball.

It’s a curious phenomenon when one considers that Austen won little fame in her own lifetime, dying aged 41 in 1817 with only six novels to her name.

While she may be regarded as one of the greatest writers in English literature, it’s difficult to imagine a similar level of fandom emerging around a novelist like, say, Charles Dickens.

For all that her stories can be by turns bleak and waspish, however, it’s the romance of Austen’s world that many Janeites say drew them in.

via BBC News – Janeites: The curious American cult of Jane Austen.

My novels Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict and Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict could have been considered semi-autobiographical had they not involved time travel and body switching. I believe that every lady should have her very own Austen hero and every man his Austen heroine.

When not engaged in new time travel adventures (aka working on the third Austen Addict novel or turning my short story  Intolerable Stupidity into a novel), I can be found on Jane Austen Addict.com (and so can loads of quizzes, games, the Sex and the Austen Girl web series, Austen parody videos, a blog, and lots more time-wasting fun!).

via Jane Austen Addict • About Jane Austen Addict.

NYC, winter, Big Onion Tours, Greenwich Village:  Looking pretty grim on our arrival …

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My tour … with a few photos and comments …

Stroll through one of New York’s most picturesque neighborhoods as we explore the unique and legendary home to artists, writers and radicals.   Our walk has a special emphasis on the history and architecture of the Village. Stops could include: Jefferson Market Courthouse, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, the “hanging elm”, the Stonewall Inn, and sites associated with Stanford White, Aaron Burr, Edith Wharton, John Sloan, Evelyn Nesbit, Jimi Hendrix, and Tom Pain

via Greenwich Village | Big Onion.

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1.  Marie’s Crisis … Thomas Paine who wrote Common Sense and The Crisis Papers died here …   That is the “crisis.” And Marie … Gypsy bohemian. 1920s  had a tea room … That is the “Marie.”

To walk downstairs into this old West Village bar is to step out of time a bit. As an amicable regular might tell you, the room first opened in the 1850s as a prostitutes’ den, became a boy bar by the 1890s, and lasted through Prohibition, when it was known as Marie’s (the “Crisis” came from “The Crisis Papers,” by Thomas Paine, who died in the same house). For the past 35 years, it’s plowed through as a piano joint in which neighboring gay men and musical theater performers gather round the keys nightly and sing solo—numbers like “Stranger in Paradise” or “You’re the Top”—to create a mood of both giddiness and longing.

via Marie’s Crisis Cafe – – West Village – New York Magazine Bar Guide.

There’s a lot of history attached to Marie’s Crisis, a West Village bar named after The Crisis Papers by Thomas Paine, who supposedly died in the same house.  The bar had its beginnings as a brothel in the 1850s, speakeasy-ed its way through Prohibition, and finally found its way to the gays, who have been belting out Les Miserables in the basement ever since.

Best NYC Gay Bars For Straight People.

2.  Northern Dispensary 1827 – Served “worthy poor” .. Most famous worthy poor was Edgar Allen Poe. Free clinic until  1980. … Gay HIV aids were patients.  Lawsuit drove into bankruptcy. It’s been closed 15 years.  Deed restrictive  … so no use.

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According to Terry Miller’s “Greenwich Village and How It Got That Way” (Crown, 1990) the dispensary refused treatment to AIDS patients in 1986 and, after trouble with New York City’s Human Rights Commission, closed in 1989. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York arranged with the trustees to take over the building for an AIDS clinic, but now would like to turn it over to the nonprofit organization, BRC Human Services, for conversion into a 15-room single-room-occupancy structure with a community kitchen for homeless people with AIDS.

via Streetscapes/The Northern Dispensary; Plan to House Homeless With AIDS Stirs a Protest – New York Times.

3.  NW Corner Washington Square Park

 Originally Potter’s field … 10000 + buried. Also, dueling and hangings … Hanging Tree see pic of squirrel.  When Lafayette  did victory tour they  hung 22 people in his honor.
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A marsh. A cemetery. A parade ground. A gathering spot for avant-garde artists. A battleground for chess enthusiasts. A playground for canines and children. Washington Square Park has served various roles for its community throughout the years, adapting to meet its needs. Well-known for its arch, honoring George Washington, the man for whom the park is named, and its fountain, the arch’s elder by 43 years and a popular meeting spot, Washington Square Park also houses several other monuments and facilities.

via Washington Square Park : NYC Parks.

4. 1830’s townhouses
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5  1850s NYU .. Now unofficial campus quad …

The center of NYU is its Washington Square campus in the heart of Greenwich Village. One of the city’s most creative and energetic communities, the Village is a historic neighborhood that has attracted generations of writers, musicians, artists, and intellectuals. NYU, in keeping with its founder’s vision, is “in and of the city”: the University – which has no walls and no gates – is deeply intertwined with New York City, drawing inspiration from its vitality.

via About NYU.

6. Washington Square arch 1889 to honor 100th Anniversary of George Washington’s of first  inauguration. The first arch was  temporary. Neighborhood wanted permanent. Recreated first on smaller scale.   Some thought this an affront to poor on south side of park.  It was built anyway in 1895.  Sanford White designed the arch.  And then there is the Beanpot Rebellion … John Sloan “ash can school” was a leader.
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The Arch at Washington Square Park was originally built in wood half a block away from its current location for the Centennial of George Washington’s Presidential inauguration in 1889. It was then commissioned in marble and completed in its current location at Fifth Avenue in the early 1890’s. The community came together to raise funds to build the permanent Washington Square Arch which was designed by noted architect Stanford White. The sculptures which adorn the ‘legs’ of the Arch — Washington At War and Washington at Peace, described in this previous blog entry — were not completed until 1916 and 1918.

Stanford White died in 1906 (he was murdered atop the 2nd version of Madison Square Garden, since demolished, a building he also designed) and did not see the two Washington sculptures completed and adorning the Arch.

Judson Memorial Church, another building White designed, can be seen through the Arch – as White intended.

via The Washington Square Arch: Some Additional History.

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Around Washington Square: An Illustrated History of Greenwich Village – Luther S. Harris – Google Books.

One snowy night in January 1917, the painters Marcel Duchamp, John Sloan and four friends climbed the arch in Washington Square, built a bonfire in a bean pot and, firing cap pistols in the air, drunkenly proclaimed Greenwich Village, ”a free and independent republic.”

They had come to Greenwich Village along with an unprecedented number of young artists and writers in rebellion against the strictures of 19th-century small-town Protestant culture. Together they helped put an American face on European modernism and almost every contemporary social movement that galvanized the country, then and later: feminism, socialism, gay liberation, Marxism, Freudianism. Not since Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, Emerson and Thoreau made their homes in Concord, has one location harbored so much American artistic energy

via BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Before It Was Hip to Be Hip, There Was Greenwich Village – New York Times.

7. Washington Mews was originally carriage houses for townhouses on the square. Artist John Sloan lived here as did critic Edmund Wilson …

Edmund Wilson (1895-1972) is widely regarded as the preeminent American man of letters of the twentieth century. Over his long career, he wrote for Vanity Fair, helped edit The New Republic, served as chief book critic for The New Yorker, and was a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books. Wilson was the author of more than twenty books, including Axel’s Castle, Patriotic Gore, and a work of fiction, Memoirs of Hecate County.

via Edmund Wilson | The New York Review of Books.

8. Mabel Dodge‘s home on . 5th avenue … Artist and thinkers came to her salon.  Ex Margaret Sanger   … women described as wearing their hair bobbed and wearing  mannish clothes.  Men wore dinner attire or artsy clothes.
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Mabel Dodge’s bohemian salons in the Village

Greenwich Village in the teens was a forward-thinking place, populated by artists and writers, anarchists and free-love practitioners, labor leaders and birth-control proponents. Bringing them together each week in her apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue was 33-year-old Mabel Dodge.

Was she really interested in new ideas, or just a celebrity hound? It’s hard to say; she simply proclaimed that she “wanted to know everybody.”

In New York, now divorced, Mabel decided to gather the city’s “movers and shakers” together during weekly salons, where ideas could be presented and debated.

Mabel’s salons were legendary. Anarchist Emma Goldman talked to poet Edward Arlington Robinson, while Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger chatted up artist Alfred Stieglitz.

Writer John Reed, who later became her lover, also was a regular. She held nights devoted to  ”dangerous characters,” “sex antagonism,” and “evenings of art and unrest.”

The salons came to and end after a few years. Mabel wrote for various publications and put out her memoirs in the 1930s. By then she was living in Taos, New Mexico, with her fourth husband. She died there in 1962.

via Mabel Dodge’s bohemian salons in the Village « Ephemeral New York.

8. CVS before a famous bar old Cedar Tavern.  It was painter’s bar … ex Jackson Polkack

The famous Cedar Tavern was the number one hangout for New York School artists like Pollock, de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko, and Franz Kline, just to name a few.  They gathered here at least every other night to drink, socialize, and discuss art.  In fact, it is often said that it was here that Abstract Expressionism was born and bred.    The tavern changed locations several times, but in 1945 it moved to 24 University Place, where it experienced its heyday.  Pollock and the like were fond of the Cedar for its cheap drinks (15 cents a beer, to be exact) and unpretentious location on then off-the-beaten-track University Place.

via Jackson Pollock’s Old Stomping Grounds.

Also poets’ bar …

The Scottish poet Ruthven Todd introduced Dylan Thomas to the bar, and the great Welsh bard was soon quaffing oceans of ale in the Horse’s back room. Thomas made the place his headquarters on his tumultuous stateside forays, and soon tourists were lining up eight deep at the bar to watch him carouse. Today a plaque on the wall commemorates the November night in 1953 when the poet, still only 39, downed one last shot, staggered outside and collapsed. After falling into a coma at the nearby Chelsea Hotel, he was whisked to St. Vincent’s Hospital where he died.

Thomas’ boozy soirees inevitably attracted other writers. Novelists Norman Mailer and James Baldwin drank at the White Horse. Vance Bourjaily (his The End of My Life was an influential novel of the period) organized a regular Sunday afternoon writer’s klatch. Anais Nin was one of the few notorious women writers who hung out at the Horse. Seymour Krim, the now all-but-forgotten early Village Voice writer whose collected pieces, Views Of A Near-Sighted Cannoneer, helped spawn the “New Journalism” of the late ’60s, hung out there. Village Voice staffers came over from their original offices on nearby Sheridan Square. Delmore’s publisher, James Laughlin of New Directions, kept an apartment for visiting writers nearby.

While Jack Kerouac was living in a dilapidated Westside townhouse with the model Joan Haverty, writing On The Road on a roll of teletype paper, he used to drink so heavily at the White Horse that he was 86’d a number of times. In his book Desolation Angels he describes discovering “Go Home Kerouac” scrawled on a bathroom wall. Like Delmore, Kerouac also put in time at the Marlton Hotel — where he wrote Tristessa, a bittersweet re

via PBS Hollywood Presents: Collected Stories – On Writing – Greenwich Village.

9.  NYU history … Different mission not religious … Main building built with Sing Sing prison labor … Tradesman fought “Protest with rocks ‘.

More than 175 years ago, Albert Gallatin, the distinguished statesman who served as secretary of the treasury under Presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, declared his intention to establish “in this immense and fast-growing city … a system of rational and practical education fitting for all and graciously opened to all.” Founded in 1831, New York University is now one of the largest private universities in the United States. Of the more than 3,000 colleges and universities in America, New York University is one of only 60 member institutions of the distinguished Association of American Universities.

via About NYU.

10. Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire 1911
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The fire spread quickly — so quickly that in a half hour it was over, having consumed all it could in the large, airy lofts on the 8th, 9th and 10th floors of the Asch Building, a half block east of Washington Square Park.

In its wake, the smoldering floors and wet streets were strewn with 146 bodies, all but 23 of them young women.

The Triangle shirtwaist factory fire, as it is commonly recorded in history books, was one of the nation’s landmark disasters, a tragedy that enveloped the city in grief and remorse but eventually inspired important shifts in the nation’s laws, particularly those protecting the rights of workers and the safety of buildings.

The tragedy galvanized Americans, who were shaken by the stories of Jewish and Italian strivers who had been toiling long hours inside an overcrowded factory only to find themselves trapped in a firestorm inside a building’s top floors where exit doors may have been locked. At least 50 workers concluded that the better option was simply to jump.

Triangle was one of the nation’s largest makers of high-collar blouses that were part of the shirtwaist style, a sensible fusion of tailored shirt and skirt. Designed for utility, the style was embraced at the turn of the century by legions of young women who preferred its hiked hemline and unfettered curves to the confining, street-sweeping dresses that had hobbled their mothers and aunts.

via Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire (1911) – The New York Times.

11.  Edward Hopper  painting of the Judson men church est. 1892 baptist.
12 Site of NYU LAW SCHOOL
Papa dare sky boarding house …
Almost free … Famous  …Eugene I Neil

■ 38 Washington Sq. South (SE corner of Macdougal and Fourth Street) is where Eugene O’Neill lived in a boarding house in 1916, when he was having an affair with Louise Bryant (Mrs. John Reed). The earlier building was replaced by the NYU School of Law’s Vanderbilt Hall in 1951.

via New York City: Walking Tour of Greenwich Village.

Resident wrote poem … 42 Washington Sq

42 Washington Square By John Reed

The gas isn’t all that it should be, It flickers – and yet I declare There’s pleasure or near it, for young men of spirit At Forty-Two Washington Square.

In winter the water is frigid, In summer the water is hot; And we’re forming a club for controlling the tub For there’s hardly one bath to the lot.

You shave in unlathering Croton, If there’s water at all, which is rare– But life isn’t bad for a talented lad At Forty-Two Washington Square.

Nobody questions your morals And nobody asks for the rent- And there’s no one to pry if you’re tight, you and I, Or demand how our evenings are spent.

The furniture’s ancient but plenty, The linen is spotless and fair, 0 life is a joy to a broth of a boy, At Forty-Two Washington Square

13 MacDougal  St.  …Marxist … Folk music (Dylan). I. 1950s  Robert Moses … Park district commissioner made his goal to make the city more car friendly and decided to run a highway right through the park …Jane Jacobs gets fight fighting highway, Eleanor Roosevelt, too. And also the Folk Musicians. Moses banned the musicians from park retreat to Judson Church.  Ban lifted 1963 …
14. Eleanor Roosevelt apartment … Moved because she could not have black friends come through front door.
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After F.D.R. died in 1945, Eleanor stopped writing her nationally syndicated column — for four days. She packed her suitcases and left the White House. Eight months later, President Harry Truman asked her to be a delegate to the U.N.’s first session in London. She accepted — and immediately began to cram. “I knew that as the only woman, I’d better be better than anybody else. So I read every paper,” she said later. “And they were very dull sometimes, because State Department papers can be very dull.”

The delegates elected her to chair the committee drafting a Universal Declaration of Human Rights. She worked 18-hour days and traveled the world. She joined the board of the NAACP, and right-wing newspapers dropped her column because of her views on civil rights.

In 1962, Eleanor, 78, died of tuberculosis in her New York City apartment. She’d stopped writing her column just six weeks before. Her last dispatch contemplated the problems of poverty, education and housing. After more than three decades in public life, she still held out hope.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1906802_1906838_1906798,00.html #ixzz2JKkw4itP

The Relentless Mrs. Roosevelt – The Legacy of F.D.R. – TIME.

15. Jefferson Market Courthouse Library … Famous murder trial … Women’s prison on same block now torn down  Angela Davis _____ and incarcerated there
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It follows the chronology of the Jefferson Market Courthouse and library from 1876 to the present. The 1876 structure is actually the oldest building in NYPL (the Schwarzman Building at 42nd and 5th was begun in 1902).  The archive not only covers the history of this building, but provides glimpses into the history of Greenwich Village as well. The papers and photographs that had been stuffed into a filing cabinet are now preserved in 18 acid-free boxes. If anyone wishes to develop their knowledge of Greenwich Village history, they might want to take a look at this unique collection.

There is so much fascinating history just in this site alone!

Jefferson Market began life as a traditional marketplace. A courthouse was erected on the site in 1876. The courthouse received a lot of attention in 1906 when it was used for the Harry K. Thaw / Stanford White murder trial. Later, the women’s house of detention, situated where the garden is now, achieved a certain degree of notoriety.

We have a print of the old market stalls adjacent to the wooden fire tower that perversely burned down; copies of the hand-drawn pen and ink courthouse floor plans; a print of a painting by John Sloan, owned by The Whitney, that shows Jefferson Market in the shadow of the El train that ran up 6th Avenue.

via The Jefferson Market Courthouse/Library Archive: A Sneak Peek with Barbara Knowles-Pinches | The New York Public Library.

16. Stonewall club riot.
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Just after 3 a.m., a police raid of the Stonewall Inn–a gay club located on New York City’s Christopher Street–turns violent as patrons and local sympathizers begin rioting against the police.

Although the police were legally justified in raiding the club, which was serving liquor without a license among other violations, New York’s gay community had grown weary of the police department targeting gay clubs, a majority of which had already been closed. The crowd on the street watched quietly as Stonewall’s employees were arrested, but when three drag queens and a lesbian were forced into the paddy wagon, the crowd began throwing bottles at the police. The officers were forced to take shelter inside the establishment, and two policemen were slightly injured before reinforcements arrived to disperse the mob. The protest, however, spilled over into the neighboring streets, and order was not restored until the deployment of New York’s riot police.

The so-called Stonewall Riot was followed by several days of demonstrations in New York and was the impetus for the formation of the Gay Liberation Front as well as other gay, lesbian, and bisexual civil rights organizations. It is also regarded by many as history’s first major protest on behalf of equal rights for homosexuals.

via The Stonewall Riot — History.com This Day in History — 6/28/1969.

And President Obama even referenced the Stonewall Inn Riots in his Second Inaugural Speech, January 21. 2013

But Obama’s reference was very likely lost on many in the generations that have come of age long after gay men resisted police harassment at the Stonewall Inn gay bar in New York City.

Their five days of riots in the summer of 1969 kindled the nation’s gay-rights movement, which Obama placed in the heart of the nation’s civil rights struggles in Monday’s speech. Obama said:

“We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths — that all of us are created equal — is the star that guides us still, just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great Mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone, to hear a King proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on Earth.”

So, what was Stonewall?

To get the story from someone who was part of the nascent gay-rights effort, and who has written extensively about Stonewall’s role as the galvanizing event of the movement, we turned to Martin Duberman.

via Stonewall? Explaining Obama’s Historic Gay-Rights Reference : It’s All Politics : NPR.

All  in all a very good tour … Thanks, Big Onion!

NYC, dinner, El Quinto Pino : At the recommendation of my tour guide,I tried a tapas restaurant in Chelsa … All by my lonesome … John’s doing the big beef meal at Del Frisco .., tapas for me at El Quinto Pino … Wish me luck … . Tiny little place in Chelsea  … And my blast from the past friend dropped by before we meet tomorrow … Thanks CW … great recommendation!

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Tapas

Salmorejo: Gazpacho’s “thicker cousin,” chopped egg, taquitos of Spanish ham • 9

Tortilla de Gambas: Shrimp wafers • 5

Habitas con Jamón: Favas beans, serrano ham • 8 Pinchos Morunos: Marinated Lamb skewer • 8

via El Quinto Pino.

NYC, subway:  Just what i saw today …

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Paris, bonne anniversaire, la Tour Eiffel:

Jour anniversaire, le 28 janvier 1887 débutait la construction de la Tour Eiffel !

Photo: Un jour, une photo. Aujourd’hui ©Katty Domingos / http://on.fb.me/VrmKtw . Pour proposer à votre tour une photo, rendez-vous sur Paris à l'Oeil Ouvert</p> <p>Jour anniversaire, le 28 janvier 1887 débutait la construction de la Tour Eiffel !

via (1) PARIS.

23
Jan
13

1.23.13 … BINGO and congealed salad … great day …

BINGO, Lenbrook, kith/kin, sleep, wellness:  Wednesday night Bingo at Lenbrook.  And despite the fact that my mom fell asleep during the first coverall BINGO game, she won it due to her beloved daughters … teamwork.

 

“Sleep is part of what I call the ‘wellness triangle,’ along with fitness and nutrition,” says Nancy Rothstein, a sleep expert who consults with corporations on the topic. “And when you’re exhausted, you’re less likely to exercise and less likely to eat well. That’s why I put sleep at the top of the triangle.”

via Give It a Rest: Tips for Improving Your Sleep – At Work – WSJ.

Lenbrook, Ladies of Lenbrook, congealed salad: I totally enjoy my time in the place where they still have a “congealed salad of the day.” As always the company is delightful and am looking forward to a day with my mom and dinner and. BINGO with the Ladies of Lenbrook.

weather, global warming, kith/kin:  E wins the high temp award today … Boulder – 64. About the same in Davidson, Vail , Charlotte and Atlanta. A little colder in Louisville!

LOL:

This made us smile today. Window washers at Children’s Hospital in Pittsburgh dressed up as super heroes ♥ http://ow.ly/h1Kuy

 

NYC, travel,  The High Line, El Anatsui, Big Onion Walking Tours, Greenwich Village:  Heading to NYC next week … Suggestions? I want to walk the High Line Park and find a labyrinth … Other than that I’m pretty open.

The High Line is a public park built on an historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. It is owned by the City of New York, and maintained and operated by Friends of the High Line. Founded in 1999 by community residents, Friends of the High Line fought for the High Line’s preservation and transformation at a time when the historic structure was under the threat of demolition. It is now the non-profit conservancy working with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation to make sure the High Line is maintained as an extraordinary public space for all visitors to enjoy. In addition to overseeing maintenance, operations, and public programming for the park, Friends of the High Line works to raise the essential private funds to support more than 90 percent of the park’s annual operating budget, and to advocate for the preservation and transformation of the High Line at the Rail Yards, the third and final section of the historic structure, which runs between West 30th and West 34th Streets.

via Park Information | The High Line.

 

High Line Art presents Nigeria-based artist El Anatsui’s Broken Bridge II, the largest outdoor installation ever by the artist. A monumental sculpture made of pressed tin and mirrors, the work will hang on an outdoor wall next to the High Line, between West 21st and West 22nd Streets, and will be visible from the park and the street below it. Broken Bridge II will be on view from November 21, 2012 through Summer 2013.

via EL ANATSUI, BROKEN BRIDGE II | The High Line.

Stroll through one of New York’s most picturesque neighborhoods as we explore the unique and legendary home to artists, writers and radicals.   Our walk has a special emphasis on the history and architecture of the Village. Stops could include: Jefferson Market Courthouse, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, the “hanging elm”, the Stonewall Inn, and sites associated with Stanford White, Aaron Burr, Edith Wharton, John Sloan, Evelyn Nesbit, Jimi Hendrix, and Tom Paine.

via Greenwich Village | Big Onion.

Charlotte,  free history program 2/5/13,   Charlotte On The Cheap:

Interested in learning more about our local history? Here’s a free program on Tuesday, February 5th, 2013. Read on for more details.

The Mecklenburg Historical Association Docents invite visitors who are interested in learning about and sharing history to attend their upcoming program on Tuesday, February 5th, in the Fellowship Hall of Sugaw Creek Presbyterian Church, West Sugar Creek Road at North Tryon Street.  Refreshments are available at 9:30 a.m.  The business meeting will follow at 10:00, with the program beginning at 11:00.

The program will be presented by Ann and Jim Williams, local historians and reenactors, who have conducted extensive research on three generations of the Davidson family, who made their home at Rural Hill in Huntersville.  From a vast array of primary family papers, family stories, wills, estate papers, court records, etc. they have produced a unified narrative.  The title of the program is “It Ain’t Necessarily So – Rewriting Site History Using Primary Sources.”  This study revealed much about antebellum Mecklenburg County, including some surprises.  Slides will illustrate the talk.

via Free history program 2/5/13 » Charlotte On The Cheap.

Hillary Clinton, Benghazi, Rand Paul, Benghazi Hearings, Politics, truth:  I  try to form educated opinions on political controversies.  But I don’t believe either side anymore.  What is the truth?

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) criticized Secretary of State Hillary Clinton Wednesday during the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing over the terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

“I’m glad that you’re accepting responsibility,” said Paul. “I think ultimately with your leaving that you accept the culpability for the worst tragedy since 9/11. And I really mean that.”

“Had I been president and found you did not read the cables from Benghazi and from Ambassador Stevens, I would have relieved you of your post. I think it’s inexcusable,” he said, referencing Clinton’s comments that she had not read all of the documentation surrounding the attack.

“I think we can understand you’re not reading every cable,” Paul said. He added that he didn’t suspect Clinton of “bad motives” but said that it was a “failure of leadership.”

Clinton responded, “I am the Secretary of State. And the [Accountability Review Board] made very clear that the level of responsibility for the failures that they outlined was set at the Assistant Secretary level and below.”

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) rebuked Paul in the next exchange. “If some people on this committee want to call this tragedy the worst since 9/11, it misunderstands the nature of 4000 plus Americans lost in the War in Iraq under false pretenses.”

via Rand Paul To Hillary Clinton: ‘I Would Have Relieved You Of Your Post’.

Pride & Prejudice 200, Jane Austen, bucket list:

Two hundred years after the publication of Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s most famous (and arguably her best) novel is as popular as ever. The descriptions of England in Pride and Prejudice and her other novels continue to provide a quintessential image of the country for locals and visitors alike. To celebrate this special anniversary we’ve ‘taken a turn’ around places associated with Austen herself and with her characters which can still be enjoyed today.

via Jane Austen’s England: a traveller’s guide to finding Mr Darcy – travel tips and articles – Lonely Planet

Join us as we take a step back in time visiting the haunts of Jane Austen. On this journey we’ll visit the homes and estates of Jane Austen and her family, including Godmersham Park, Chawton House Library, and Chawton Cottage (where Jane Austen wrote her mature masterpieces); tour the seaside towns of Lyme Regis, Ramsgate, and Portsmouth; walk The Cobb; explore Oxford and Winchester; then on to Bath to participate in the beginning of the world famous Jane Austen Festival!

via A Jane Austen Tour: — Seascapes and Landscapes.

travel, adventure travel, bucket list: Cuba!

With 2012 now behind us, we’ve tallied up the Top 12 National Geographic Expeditions of the year based on the number of travelers who joined us, and the list spans the gamut from Alaska to Antarctica, and from wildlife adventures to photography workshops.

via Top 12 Trips of 2012 | Field Notes.

2013 SuperBowl Ads:  You can vote … Coke Chase 2013 Ad – YouTube.

 

 




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