Posts Tagged ‘hashtags

24
Aug
19

8.24.19 … “our lives, our all” … “Let that sink in.”

Several weeks ago, I had a face book post that garnered many comments. It was about taglines:

I’ve always enjoyed tag lines … whether they be associated with a brand or a movie/tv show. I think I was always aware of them because my dad always recited them, especially newspaper taglines. Recently, I’ve noticed a few friends using a tag line here, and I smile or chuckle. I’m trying to decide what mine will be.

What Is a Tagline?

Taglines (also called straplines, tags, slogans, or brand lines) can be inspirational, like a product philosophy, or they can be something fun and memorable. While some can impel you to be better, do more, or go further, others are simply a fun play on words.

Here are a few of mine:

“Just do it!”

“Open Happiness”

“Covers Dixie Like the Dew”

“All the News That’s Fit to Print”

“Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee”

“And that’s the way it is.”

In my senior high school annual, we could post a favorite quote. Mine was … “I was gratified to be able to answer promptly, and I did. I said I didn’t know.” -Mark Twain

And yesterday I heard a Dan Fogelberg song, so I shot Elizabeth a note because I knew she liked his work back in the day. She shot back that her senior yearbook quote was “lessons learned are like bridges burned, you only need to cross them but once…” ❤️🤓

I guess that’s what got me thinking along these lines.

Also, modern day hashtags serve a similar function. Every bride and groom has a hashtag associated with their wedding day for folks to post and tag on social media. Branding of a wedding … interesting.

We also always tried to figure out what tv and radio station call letters meant …

WGN Television’s call letters are also derived from the [Chicaog Tribune] “World’s Greatest Newspaper” slogan.

https://www.oddee.com/item_99983.aspx

But I had to rethink this in light of this article I read today:

Today, I saw this … And I always enjoy a good bumper sticker. But this article made me rethink the taglines conversation …

“Imagine if instead of wearing our beliefs on the back of our cars or on the front of our baseball caps, we set out to try to discern together God’s hopes for one another, for the world, for all of creation? None of which can be contained in a few sentences of our own making. All of which demand our energy, intelligence, imagination and love — or, to put it succinctly enough for a bumper sticker: our lives, our all. Such deep engagement in such an angry time as this requires every ounce of Christian charity we can muster. Such deep engagement in such an angry time as this might be the gift of grace disciples of Jesus Christ can offer a culture enamored with not only winning, but punishing those we desperately want to see lose. Let that sink in.”

Source: Bumper sticker theology – The Presbyterian Outlook
https://pres-outlook.org/2019/08/bumper-sticker-theology/

8.24.19

06
Oct
13

10.6.13 … This and That …

 

This and That:

 

“It was on a bright day of midwinter, in New York. The little girl who eventually became me, but as yet was neither me nor anybody else in particular, but merely a soft anonymous morsel of humanity—this little girl, who bore my name, was going for a walk with her father. The episode is literally the first thing I can remember about her, and therefore I date the birth of her identity from that day.”

 

– Edith Wharton, A Backward Glance

 

The Happiness Project.

 

 

 

via ▶ “#Hashtag” with Jimmy Fallon & Justin Timberlake – YouTube.

 

Justin Timberlake and Jimmy Fallon, comedy skit best friends and the human couple equivalent of a pair of colorful striped socks, teamed up yet again to shed light on a disease that’s been plaguing phone-connected humans for years now: the ridiculous overuse of hashtags.

 

That pound sign—which was probably once the least pressed button on a phone’s dial pad—has now infiltrated every single social network, every form of text communication and will eventually, override the spoken English language. We need to stop this immediately.

 

Timberlake and Fallon hilariously recreated a normal human conversation… but with the ridiculousness of hashtags hastily appended to every statement. This is how we all sound like on Twitter. Or on Facebook. Or on Instagram. Or in life. #DIE #YOLO [Jimmy Fallon]

 

via Justin Timberlake Shows Us How Dumb We Sound When We Use Hashtags.

 

Duke Ellington Arriving in Kabul, 1963.  CU Collection Box 345:10.  Special Collections, University of Arkansas Libraries, Fayetteville

Fifty years ago this week, Duke Ellington and his band played in a concert he later called one of the most memorable of his life. The performance was in Kabul, in Afghanistan, and even though Ellington was at the height of his fame, almost all traces of it have been lost.

For the organiser, Faiz Khairzada, and hundreds of Afghans in the audience, the concert was a high point of the early 1960s. “It was very exciting for me to have him in Kabul,” says Khairzada, then head of Afghanistan’s cultural affairs organisation.

It was he who met Ellington at the airport and drove him on a golden afternoon across Kabul, then a small city, to the stage he’d built at the Ghazi stadium. Khairzada was a jazz fan and they chatted on the way about Louis Armstrong and about plans to make home-grown Afghan films. “You make the movie, kid – and I’ll do the music for it,” Ellington offered, and in the Kabul of 1963, all that seemed possible.

Duke Ellington talks to Michael Parkinson in 1973 about his Kabul concert, and plays a number with the house band

Tickets were free and around 5,000 people made their way to the stadium to hear what to them was the new and strange sound of jazz. Ellington opened with Caravan, followed by Don’t Get Around Much Anymore. Khairzada remembers that between numbers Ellington would come to the edge of the stage and chat to the audience.

“Of course the people didn’t understand. This kind of music – blues and jazz – was very little known,” he says. “But they loved the style. When the trumpets and saxophones came out and did their solos, people were awed – not so much by the sound, but the performance.”

 

Ellington’s 1963 State Department tour

The tour began on 6 September 1963, when Ellington and his orchestra flew from New York to Damascus, Syria

Over the next two-and-a-half months they played in Jordan, Lebanon, Afghanistan, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Iran, Iraq and Turkey

 

Ellington was puzzled when, halfway through the concert, the audience appeared to leave. But Khairzada explained that it was the hour of prayer, and the seats soon filled up again. King Zahir and the royal family came over to shake hands with the band after the concert.

Ellington remembered “riding round all night long” after the concert, listening to Afghan music in cafes. “They have their own thing going on there, and it’s good,” he told BBC chat show host Michael Parkinson in 1973.

The Kabul concert was part of a longer tour sponsored by the US State Department – jazz diplomacy playing out against the backdrop of the Cold War.

via BBC News – When Duke Ellington played Kabul.

Then, in August, and doubtless to Yale\’s astonishment, the \”activists\” the university had worked so desperately to placate got around to reading one of the Spangler reports. Unfortunately, the university changed one term. In her August 2013 report, Spangler dropped references to \”intimate partner violence\” and instead described how several Yale students had been found guilty of \”non-consensual sex\”–a term that many readers, quite unsurprisingly, interpreted as interchangeable with rape. The report noted that all students so convicted had been punished, but none had been expelled. Since none of these students, it appears, had actually committed a rape, Yale selected punishments that were appropriate for their offenses. But to the critics, the university was allowing rapists to walk around campus with little more than a slap on the wrist.

Yale\’s Response

This week the university produced a document, first reported by the Yale Daily News, which tried to explain its approach. (Of course, the obvious explanation–that Yale erred by redefining sexual assault to include a wide variety of actions that are not, in fact, sexual assault–was ignored.) The document listed eight \”scenarios\” that fit under the university\’s extraordinarily broad conception of \”non-consensual sex.\” A few of these \”scenarios\” clearly constituted criminal conduct–yet in the myriad reports that Spangler has produced, there\’s no reference to even one criminal investigation of sexual assault against a Yale student since 2011. It\’s unclear why the school\’s p.r. document contained scenarios irrelevant to the issue at hand.

via The Anti-Male Craziness at Yale.

streetart47.

The best examples of street art in 2012 (48 pictures) | memolition.

This Couple’s Epic And Nerdy And Awesome Engagement Photos Make Everyone Else’s Look Like Crap

These photos were posted by Reddit user hamburgersandwiches, titled “Fuck it. I’m getting married Saturday. Here are my crappy engagement photos.”

But two Han Solo tributes.

 

His crappy engagement photos, however, are PERFECT.

via This Couple’s Epic And Nerdy And Awesome Engagement Photos Make Everyone Else’s Look Like Crap.

12
Jun
11

6.12.2011 … summer wind by Frank Sinatra … I love old Frank Sinatra tunes …

PT, humerus break, followup:  Yesterday, I commented that PT (physical therapy, not poptarts :)) is addictive.  On the days I go to PT I feel better all day … even though it hurts while I am there.  Maybe it is the ice wrap with electrode therapy!  Woo hoo …

slime bags, women in politics, good question:  I wondered the same thing …

There was a collective rolling of the eyes and a distinct sense of “Here we go again” among the women of the House of Representatives last week when yet another male politician, Representative Anthony D. Weiner, confessed his “terrible mistakes” and declared himself “deeply sorry for the pain” he had caused in sexual escapades so adolescent as to almost seem laughable.

“I’m telling you,” said Representative Candice Miller, a Michigan Republican, “every time one of these sex scandals goes, we just look at each other, like, ‘What is it with these guys? Don’t they think they’re going to get caught?’ ”

Ms. Miller’s question raises an intriguing point: Female politicians rarely get caught up in sex scandals. Women in elective office have not, for instance, blubbered about Argentine soul mates (see: Sanford, Mark); been captured on federal wiretaps arranging to meet high-priced call girls (Spitzer, Eliot); resigned in disgrace after their parents paid $96,000 to a paramour’s spouse (Ensign, John)  or, as in the case of Mr. Weiner, blasted lewd self-portraits into cyberspace.

It would be easy to file this under the category of “men behaving badly,” to dismiss it as a testosterone-induced, hard-wired connection between sex and power (powerful men attract women, powerful women repel men). And some might conclude that busy working women don’t have time to cheat. (“While I’m at home changing diapers, I just couldn’t conceive of it,” Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, the New York Democrat, once said.)

But there may be something else at work: Research points to a substantial gender gap in the way women and men approach running for office. Women have different reasons for running, are more reluctant to do so and, because there are so few of them in politics, are acutely aware of the scrutiny they draw — all of which seems to lead to differences in the way they handle their jobs once elected.

via Why Women Don’t Get Caught Up in Sex Scandals – NYTimes.com.

e-mail, technology:  I hope no one thinks I fall in this category …

Three years ago this week, I posted this checklist, in the naive hope that it would eliminate (or perhaps merely reduce) the ridiculous CC-to-all emails about the carpool, the fake-charity forwards, the ALL CAPS yelling and the stupid PR spam.

A guy can hope, can’t he?

Feel free to send this to those that need to read it:

via Seth’s Blog: Email checklist (maybe this time it’ll work!).

music, Frank Sinatra, summer: YouTube – Frank SINATRA – Summer Wind Reprise® 68.

business cards, technology, end of an era:  Yes or no to business cards?  I agree … “I think, culturally, you’re real and you have a real job if you have a business card,” Ms. Trapani said. “There’s something about that card that means you’re kind of official.”

Not everyone has given up tradition. FedEx Office, the office services chain, still sees a “steady growth” in business card sales, a spokeswoman said.

One explanation could be the status attached to the company card. “I think, culturally, you’re real and you have a real job if you have a business card,” Ms. Trapani said. “There’s something about that card that means you’re kind of official.”

Image notwithstanding, the business card has a logistical advantage: universal ease of exchange. Swapping information mid-conversation or in a noisy crowd can be more cumbersome than pressing paper to palm. And not everyone owns a smartphone, or has the same applications for sharing.

The paper business card is evolving to bridge those gaps. The modern card may contain only a name with a Twitter handle; so-called smart cards are emblazoned with quick response (or QR) codes that can be scanned with a smartphone using applications like CardMunch.

The Hashable site integrates social networking functions similar to some of those on Facebook and Twitter along with digital calendars and more versatile features for easier face-to-face sharing. Users can scan QR codes into the Hashable network or, with some phones, exchange contacts by holding phones together (much like the traditional handoff).

It may prove the closest thing to a business-card killer yet. Erick Schonfeld, an editor of TechCrunch, a popular blog, said the ideas behind Hashable seem to be resonating with its users, and that he had stopped using business cards.

via Paperless Business Cards – Noticed – NYTimes.com.

twitter, hashtags, culture:  I am so behind on this one…

With a simple Twitter phrase, #winning, known in the parlance of social media as a hashtag, Mr. Sheen underscored one of the newest ways technology has changed how we communicate.

Hashtags, words or phrases preceded by the # symbol, have been popularized on Twitter as a way for users to organize and search messages. So, for instance, people tweeting about Representative Anthony D. Weiner might add the hashtag #Weinergate to their messages, and those curious about the latest developments in the scandal could simply search for #Weinergate. Or Justin Bieber fans might use #Bieber to find fellow Beliebers.

But already, hashtags have transcended the 140-characters-or-less microblogging platform, and have become a new cultural shorthand, finding their way into chat windows, e-mail and face-to-face conversations.

This year on Super Bowl Sunday, Audi broadcast a new commercial featuring a hashtag, #ProgressIs, that flashed on the screen and urged viewers to complete the “Progress Is” prompt on Twitter for the chance to win a prize. Then, in Canada’s English-language federal election debate in April, Jack Layton, the leader of the New Democratic Party, set the Canadian Twitterverse aflame when he attacked Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s crime policies, calling them “a hashtag fail.”

To deftly deploy a hashtag, after all, you need to understand the culture, said Susan Herring, a professor of information science and linguistics at Indiana University-Bloomington.

There is also the unofficial Hashtag Mafia, people who flash one another the hashtag sign — crossing their index and middle finger of one hand over the same two fingers of their other hand to create a physical hashtag. #IronicGesture #WeHope

“I have pictures of people actually using the actual hashtag symbol, and it’s like they’re flashing a gang sign, but they’re doing a hashtag,” Ms. Wilcox said. “That gets really geeky.”

Mr. Messina takes a more philosophical, albeit lighthearted, view. “The great thing about hashtags is that anyone can join the Hashtag Mafia by using hashtags,” he said. “You’re not really in the mafia unless you do air hashtags.”

via Hashtags, a New Way for Tweets – Cultural Studies – NYTimes.com.

google doodle, Les Paul, followup:  There are some creative folks out there.

The interactive instrument, created to honor what would have been the 96th birthday of electric guitar legend and innovator Les Paul, was such a hit, Google even gave the doodle an encore and left it up on its website for an extra day.

Not so musically inclined? If your guitar chops are in need of a little tuning, take a few lessons with our quick tutorial on how to master this digital instrument.

Or maybe you already have what it takes to rock out with the best of the best? Here’s a round-up of the best Google guitar licks from around the Web.

via The Les Paul Google Guitar Greatest Hits: Hear The Best Songs (VIDEO).

Leonard Stern, Mad Libs, RIP,  Conan O’Brien, LOL, followup:  OK, Conan is just funny.

Conan O’Brien (@ConanOBrien)
6/11/11 4:30 PM
R.I.P. the _________creator of the always__________ Mad Libs.



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