Posts Tagged ‘historical preservation

30
Dec
10

12.30.2010 … Since all the stores tell me to get organized for 2011 … as they do for every other year … here I go …

RIP, end of an era: Rest in Peace, Kodachrome!  Oh, how I do hate change …

That celebrated 75-year run from mainstream to niche photography is scheduled to come to an end on Thursday when the last processing machine is shut down here to be sold for scrap.

In the last weeks, dozens of visitors and thousands of overnight packages have raced here, transforming this small prairie-bound city not far from the Oklahoma border for a brief time into a center of nostalgia for the days when photographs appeared not in the sterile frame of a computer screen or in a pack of flimsy prints from the local drugstore but in the warm glow of a projector pulling an image from a carousel of vivid slides.

In the end, it was determined that a roll belonging to Dwayne Steinle, the owner, would be last. It took three tries to find a camera that worked. And over the course of the week he fired off shots of his house, his family and downtown Parsons. The last frame is already planned for Thursday, a picture of all the employees standing in front of Dwayne’s wearing shirts with the epitaph: “The best slide and movie film in history is now officially retired. Kodachrome: 1935-2010.”

via For Kodachrome Fans, Road Ends at Photo Lab in Kansas – NYTimes.com.

vocabulary, faith, acts of God:  Another one to make you think:

First, during a period of wonderful, calm, sunny weather we do not read of Nature’s “love” or “mercy” or that we are being “blessed” or “rewarded.” The good we take for granted, as our due. The bad we assume is wrathful and punishment of some kind.

I do not want to make too much of this, but my simply drawing attention to it makes the point. It seems almost natural (!) to refer to the storm as “wrath” and “punishing” while it would be strikingly odd to read a weather report referring to a sunny day as “merciful.”

Why is this? Is it because we assume we deserve everything to be perfect or at least unchallenging? That the norm for us is bland perfection? That somehow we deserve grace and favor, which, of course, is a contradiction?

In short, “who do we think we are?” Maybe we simply don’t think!

via Grapes of wrath? « Hopelens Blog.

Davidson, history: Andrew Carnegie, a 19th century Bill Gates”  … interesting to think that Andrew Carnegie would need to be defined.

With the prospect of a new year ahead, the last blog of 2010, will celebrate the 100th anniversary one of the loveliest buildings on campus.  Now known as the Carnegie Guest House, it was dedicated on September 10, 1910 as the Carnegie Library.Interior of Carnegie Library from Cornelia Shaw scrapbookThe name comes from Andrew Carnegie, a 19th century Bill Gates – who took some of the monies made by his companies and helped build libraries across the nation. Most were public libraries but a number of colleges, including Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, received funding as well.

via The Davidson College Archives & Special Collections blog — Around the D.

historical preservation, Atlanta, memories:  The golden grandeur of the Fox Theatre is not diminished one bit in knowing that it is plaster, aluminum and paint!

While they appear to be made from exquisite metals, most of the ornate decor in the Fox Theatre is actually plaster. The Restoration Department identifies damaged or worn pieces and recreates each piece using a historic mold.

Once the plaster has been poured, set, and hardened, a fine, adhesive glue called “size” is applied. The plaster and size will sit untouched for 8-12 hours until it achieves a high level of stickiness.

The artisans then gild the plaster pieces using a paintbrush and extremely thin sheets of aluminum leaf or imitation gold leaf, also known as Dutch metal. The process is repeated until the plaster is concealed.

After the metal has been applied, a piece of cheese cloth is used to burnish or smooth out the creases. Finally, the aluminum is treated with orange shellac and a burnt umber glaze to give the appearance of gold. The imitation gold leaf is treated with a burnt umber glaze to deepen the appearance and add age.

via The Fox Theatre, While they appear to be made from exquisite….

random:  Don’t you just wonder who buys theses things?

Now, Harlan Ellison, a self-identified blue-collar fantasist who has written over 1,000 short stories, screenplays, essays, and criticisms, has listed his Remington noiseless portable for $40,000. Ellison penned “I, Robot,” “Soldier,” which James Cameron drew from for “The Terminator” and “The Outer Limits,” to name just a few. Speakeasy spent some time on the phone with Ellison, who dominated the conversation with anecdotes and allusions of times past.

..

No it’s all tied up in the fact that I’m 76 and I’m very ill and like a sage old dog I can smell when certain signs are there. We are trapped in a medical eddy, this mad meat house of medicine where we cannot get the help we need. I’m not a bag lady, I live in a particularly good house that I’ve been living in since 1966, but we don’t have anywhere near the chance of getting Marcus Welby to fix my problems. As a consequence we have to get some money and as time goes by you get more and more famous and less and less wealthy. I literally have to start eating my past and turning into the actually dollar all of the artifacts that have made me who I am. I am eating my past.

via Would You Pay $40,000 For An Antique Typewriter? – Speakeasy – WSJ.

technology, trends, stocks, Apple, Google, Facebook, Twitter: So if Walt Mossberg is right, I should be buying Apple, Google, Facebook and Twitter.

It has been a big year in personal technology, from the debut and early success of Apple’s iPad, to the rise and continuous improvement of Google’s Android smart phone platform, to the continued surge in social services led by Facebook and Twitter.

via Walt Mossberg’s What’s In Store for Technology in 2011 | Walt Mossberg | Personal Technology | AllThingsD.

Apple, technology:

If patents are to be believed, Apple is working on the creation of the world’s first glasses-free 3D display that would produce holographic images using a screen made up of “pixel-sized domes” that would be read differently by the human eye depending on where they’re viewing from.

via Is Apple Planning A Holographic 3D TV? – Techland – TIME.com.

New Year’s Resolutions, me: #1 – Get organized.




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