Posts Tagged ‘ice cream

15
Apr
13

4.15.13 … all natural Breyer’s vanilla bean is still my favorite! …

ice cream, Breyer’s, all natural, kith/kin, childhood:  I love this not so much for the investigative journalism but for the capturing life when I was a kid.  Breyer’s was magical …

Back then, we knew something was up if our mother returned from ShopRite with a half-gallon of Breyers ice cream. It meant that another 8-year-old first communicant had feigned an understanding of transubstantiation. It meant that someone was celebrating her first birthday, or that someone had seen his last.

Most of all, it meant a reprieve from the cheaper fake version of ice cream that usually defiled our freezer, a store-brand ice milk that tasted like nothing so much as frozen sadness. Ice milk represented dessert as punishment.

Things have changed.

First, as part of typical trompe l’oeil packaging, the cartons now hold 48 ounces, not the half-gallon’s 64. (The good news is that your hands have not become freakishly large; the bad news is that you’re not suddenly much stronger.) Second, that age-old Breyers boast of “All Natural” has been replaced with “Quality,” which is one of those impressive words that loses impact the more you think about it.

Lastly, not all Breyers is what we once understood the name to mean. A Breyers carton in the store’s freezer might be ice cream, but the Breyers carton right beside it, identical in nearly every way, might be something called “frozen dairy dessert” — which, when translated from the original Orwell, means: not ice cream.

Why, Breyers, why?

Before Häagen-Dazs, before Ben & Jerry’s, before ice cream became an artisanal product that could not be fully appreciated unless you had personally squeezed Elsie’s udder — there was Breyers. So: why?

Breyers natural vanilla ice cream: milk, cream, sugar, tara gum, natural flavor. Period.

Breyers extra-creamy vanilla frozen dairy dessert: milk, sugar, corn syrup, cream, whey, mono and diglycerides, carob bean gum, guar gum, carrageenan, natural flavor, annatto (for color), vitamin A palmitate, tara gum.

Granted, the ingredients in Breyers frozen dairy desserts do not include plutonium, or motor oil, or Kraft Singles American Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product. And granted, this is a big country: some people out there might be demanding more corn syrup, less cream, in their frozen treats.

But something more than ice cream is melting away. This is what I brood about, late at night, as I apply basic ice cream to my psychic wounds.

via Remembering When Ice Cream Was, You Know, Ice Cream – NYTimes.com.

14
Mar
11

3.14159 … oops … 3.14.2011 … Happy pi day!

events, pi day, recipes, apple pie:  And below I have selected what i think looks like a pretty good pi day recipe!

Celebrate Pi Day!

Pi, Greek letter (π), is the symbol for the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. Pi Day is celebrated by math enthusiasts around the world on March 14th. Pi = 3.1415926535…

With the use of computers, Pi has been calculated to over 1 trillion digits past the decimal. Pi is an irrational and transcendental number meaning it will continue infinitely without repeating. The symbol for pi was first used in 1706 by William Jones, but was popular after it was adopted by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in 1737.

via Pi Day.

A simple, old-fashioned dessert called apple pandowdy promises apple pie appeal with none of the fuss. Is it time for an apple pie makeover?

via Rethinking Apple Pie – Cooks Illustrated.

internet, Groupon, new:  I have fallen in love with Groupons … it is a great way to learn about local restaurants and new products ….   i saw this today … didn’t buy it … but  thought about it … Dali Decals Deal of the Day | Groupon Charlotte.

Chalkboard :: Dali Wall Decals.

favorites, recipes, French Onion Soup:  I have loved Cook’s Illustrated ever since Zach Smith left an early issue in the break room and they had brining turkey recipe for the November issue … which we still do twenty years later … this sounds really good to me!

Sweet onions, such as Vidalia or Walla Walla, will make this recipe overly sweet. Be patient when caramelizing the onions in step 2; the entire process takes 45 to 60 minutes. Use broiler-safe crocks and keep the rim of the bowls 4 to 5 inches from the heating element to obtain a proper gratinée of melted, bubbly cheese. If using ordinary soup bowls, sprinkle the toasted bread slices with Gruyère and return them to the broiler until the cheese melts, then float them on top of the soup. We prefer Swanson Certified Organic Free Range Chicken Broth and Pacific Beef Broth. For the best flavor, make the soup a day or 2 in advance. Alternatively, the onions can be prepared through step 1, cooled in the pot, and refrigerated for up to 3 days before proceeding with the recipe.

via Best French Onion Soup – Cooks Illustrated.

ice cream, follow-up, Jeni’s, artisan foods, Charlotte:  The other day I mentioned Jeni’s … 3.10.2011 … If they call it “artisan,” I will come … especially if it involves ice cream or chocolate … or both … « Dennard’s Clipping Service. … Well the only place in NC tat has Jeni’s is Dean & DeLuca at Phillips Place … very close to my house … so I stole away for a secret dessert for the evening and they had two flavors … I was not in a brave/adventurous/artisan mood … next time …

RIESLING POACHED PEAR SORBET

The striking aroma, pure flavor and delicate, buttery texture of whole poached Bartlett pears in perfect harmony with sweet Riesling wine. One of Jeni’s Signature Flavors, it’s completely refreshing every day of the year.

via Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams / Buy Now / Swanky Sorbets / Made in Columbus Ohio.

Olive Oil with Sea-Salted Pepitas

Sicilian single-estate olive oil. Sea salted pumpkin seeds. Jeni has just returned from Sicily where she helped press the very oil that flavors this grassy, verdant ice cream. Very clean, bright notes with the nutty crunch of toasted, sea salted pepitas. The combination of high-caliber olive oil, butterfat and cream melts in your mouth and opens up beautifully. A graceful tribute to Old World flavors.

via Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams / Flavors / Seasonal / Made in Columbus Ohio.

March Madness, fundraisers, great ideas, Chicago:  OK, I want a t-shirt ….

It’s Draft Madness! Don’t sit on the bench and miss the best event in town. Join the Young Professionals of Chicago and ChicagoBIGTEN alumni for a night of basketball and brews at the hottest venue in Chicago – Public House. For only $10, attendees will receive complimentary appetizers and drink specials, as well as a $10 gift certificate to Public House to use on your next visit!

For an additional $15 ($25 total), you will also get a t-shirt (tanktop for girls) to show your spirit around town. These shirts are sweet (click here for a picture)! Just include your gender and t-shirt size in the comment section of the registration form. Space is limited, and this event will sell out – get your ticket today!

Additional information: 64 Teams. 64 Beers. Public House introduces its beer centric March Madness concept. 64 beers will be randomly paired with each of the 64 March Madness teams. As teams accelerate, the price of the beer goes down. Prices will decrease proportionate to the beers price. All beer and team pairing will be chosen at random at “The Draft of Drafts”.

Draft “hosts” will be invited from participating schools to “draft their draft”. Many of these hosts either graduated from, played for or have a personal connection to the schools they’re representing. This will ensure the draft picks are chosen fairly and the draft can’t be manipulated in any way. Once a draft is chosen, the host will assign that beer to its partner team.

Celebrity draft hosts include:

Ryan Johnson (Chicago Blackhawks) – University of Arizona

Jason Franklin (Founder/President Sportiqe apparel) – University of Wisconsin

Ed Swiderski (former star of ABCs the bachelor) – Michigan State

Jarrett Payton (host of the Jarrett Payton Show) – Duke

Lindsey Schendel & Leah Berman (Loop Rock Girls 2010 & 2011)

Cameron Croft (President of the ChicagoBIGTEN) – Illinois

Jackie Kaweck (VP Gibson Consulting) – Florida

Ryan Preuett (VP of the ChicagoBIGTEN) – Michigan

Laura Faith – Purdue

Anderson Bell (CEO FanFueled.com) – Georgetown

Best of all, it’s for a great cause. 100% of apparel sales and entrance to the draft ($10) will benefit Alumni for Public Schools (http://facebook.com/APSChicago ) thanks to generous donations from our sponsors:

Gibson Consulting Group – looking for top talent interested in a consulting career

Goose Island 312

Sportiqe Apparel

Stella Artois

Event brought to you by: Public House, Chicago BIGTEN Alumni, Young Professionals of Chicago and Alumni for Public Schools.

via Draft Madness » Young Professionals of Chicago – Networking, Professional Development, Volunteerism.

quotes:

“Keep your tongue from evil, your lips from speaking deceit. Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.”
— Psalms 34: 12-14

health, diet, coffee:  Even smelling it is good for you!

There’s no need to feel guilty about your morning cuppa joe. On the contrary: Women who drink a cup or more of coffee daily have up to a 25 percent lower stroke risk than those who sip the dark stuff less often, according to a new study reported today in the journal Stroke. Researchers followed nearly 35,000 women ages 49 to 83 for an average of 10 years and found the reduced risk held up even after accounting for such factors as BMI, high blood pressure, diabetes risk, and smoking habits — indicating that coffee’s stroke-lowering ability was independent of these known heart disease risk factors.

But this study is hardly the first one touting good news for java junkies. “Coffee is incredibly rich in antioxidants, which are responsible for many of its health benefits,” says Joy Bauer, RD, nutrition and health expert for Everyday Health and The Today Show. Its caffeine content may also play a protective role in some health conditions, but many of coffee’s health perks hold up whether you go for decaf or regular.

Beyond lowering stroke risk, you may be surprised to learn that coffee can also decrease your odds of developing the following health issues:

1. Diabetes. Women who drank four cups of caffeinated coffee daily were nearly 60 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than non-drinkers, UCLA researchers found. The beverage is rich in the minerals magnesium and chromium, which may help control blood sugar levels.

2. Skin cancer. Rutgers University researchers found that when sunburnt mice drank caffeinated water and then exercised in a running wheel, their risk of developing skin cancer decreased. The caffeine-and-cardio combo caused damaged skin cells to die before they had a chance to become cancerous, explain study authors. Capping off your sweat session with a cup of coffee (iced works too) may help protect your skin from sun damage.

3. Stress. You know how the mere aroma of a rich French roast seems to wake you up on a sluggish morning? Turns out that whiff can help minimize the effects of too little sleep on your body. Researchers found that when stressed-out, sleep-deprived rats simply smelled coffee, it triggered gene activity known to protect nerve cells from stress-related damage.

4. Cavities. Although this doesn’t mean you can ditch your dental floss, coffee may even help fight cavities. According to research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, coffee’s compound trigonelline (responsible for its flavor and aroma) has antibacterial properties that may keep cavity-causing germs, such as Streptococcus mutans, from invading tooth enamel.

5. Parkinson’s disease. Here’s some good news if Parkinson’s disease runs in your family: People with a family history who drank coffee were less likely to develop the debilitating neurological disease, according to Duke University Medical Center researchers. Although scientists are still trying to understand why, evidence suggests that the caffeine in coffee (as well as caffeinated tea) may act on a gene called GRIN2A to help lower risk.

6. Breast cancer. Women who drank boiled Scandinavian coffee, which is similar to stronger French press or Turkish or Greek varieties, more than four times a day had a reduced risk of breast cancer compared to women who had it less than once a day, found a study in the journal Cancer Causes & Control. An important point: Because the coffee wasn’t filtered, it contained up to 80 times as many coffee-specific fatty acids, which have been linked to slower growth of cancerous cells.

7. Heart disease. Dutch researchers found that people who drank coffee in moderation — two to four cups a day — lowered their heart disease risk by 20 percent, compared to those who had more or fewer cups. Coffee’s antioxidants may have a protective effect, says Keri M. Gans, RD, spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

8. Head and neck cancers. Although some of the data on coffee’s cancer-fighting capabilities have been mixed, Italian researchers found that the caffeinated kind guards against head and neck cancers. Compared with coffee abstainers, those who drank about four or more cups daily reduced their risk of certain mouth and throat cancers by nearly 40 percent.

via 9 Healthy Reasons to Indulge Your Coffee Cravings – Diet and Nutrition Center – Everyday Health.

10
Mar
11

3.10.2011 … If they call it “artisan,” I will come … especially if it involves ice cream or chocolate … or both …

Lent: I like the discipline idea of Lent .. rather than the giving up … But I will do both … I will give up using my right arm (it will heal much more quickly) and will discipline myself to pray rather than complain or be judgmental.  I am not giving up ice cream … read on … 🙂

foods – desserts, artisan foods, ice cream:  If they call it “artisan,”  I will come … especially if it involves ice cream or chocolate … or both …

You’ve heard this story before: tiny company makes wonderful product using method alien to evil corporate rival; tiny company vows to keep at it even if it never makes a dime. There’s usually a twee, antiquarian sensibility about it, maybe you grow a handlebar moustache and print a label with an ancient letterpress. Painstakingly (and conspicuously) sourced ingredients, laborious production methods and most importantly a supportive circle of buyers — preferably in somewhere like Brooklyn or Portland, Ore. — completes the picture. There’s just one universal law: you can’t be expected to make any real money. As a recent article in food-snob bible Edible Brooklyn boasted of its subjects, “none of these entrepreneurs is looking to be the next Mrs. Fields or Ben & Jerry’s. Part of what sets this artisan boomlet apart from other start-ups is that the goal is to make a living — not a killing.” Real profit, in this narrative, needs be ceded to the corporations.

Jeni Britton Bauer, on the other hand, has never done anything but work on ice cream, think about ice cream and take ice cream to places where it has never gone. If she can become a success, and it looks like she can, there may yet be hope for all those tiny, perfect products — the micro-distilled spirits, the handmade cheeses, the bean-to-bar chocolates — that currently exist only in gourmet ghettos. After all, there was a time when gelato was unknown in America’s supermarkets too.

via In Ohio Ice Cream Chain’s Success, Hope for Other Artisans – TIME.

Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams / Made in Columbus Ohio.

globalization, USA, Fareed Zakaria: “The Rise of the Rest” … I think this is one of the best articles  I have read in a while.

Despite the hyped talk of China’s rise, most Americans operate on the assumption that the U.S. is still No. 1.

But is it? Yes, the U.S. remains the world’s largest economy, and we have the largest military by far, the most dynamic technology companies and a highly entrepreneurial climate. But these are snapshots of where we are right now. The decisions that created today’s growth — decisions about education, infrastructure and the like — were made decades ago. What we see today is an American economy that has boomed because of policies and developments of the 1950s and ’60s: the interstate-highway system, massive funding for science and technology, a public-education system that was the envy of the world and generous immigration policies. Look at some underlying measures today, and you will wonder about the future. (Watch TIME’s video “Why Cities Are Key to American Success in the 21st Century.”)

The following rankings come from various lists, but they all tell the same story. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), our 15-year-olds rank 17th in the world in science and 25th in math. We rank 12th among developed countries in college graduation (down from No. 1 for decades). We come in 79th in elementary-school enrollment. Our infrastructure is ranked 23rd in the world, well behind that of every other major advanced economy. American health numbers are stunning for a rich country: based on studies by the OECD and the World Health Organization, we’re 27th in life expectancy, 18th in diabetes and first in obesity. Only a few decades ago, the U.S. stood tall in such rankings. No more. There are some areas in which we are still clearly No. 1, but they’re not ones we usually brag about. We have the most guns. We have the most crime among rich countries. And, of course, we have by far the largest amount of debt in the world.

The changes we are currently debating amount to rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic.

But reducing funds for things like education, scientific research, air-traffic control, NASA, infrastructure and alternative energy will not produce much in savings, and it will hurt the economy’s long-term growth. It would happen at the very moment that countries from Germany to South Korea to China are making large investments in education, science, technology and infrastructure. We are cutting investments and subsidizing consumption — exactly the opposite of what are the main drivers of economic growth.

It’s not that our democracy doesn’t work; it’s that it works only too well. American politics is now hyperresponsive to constituents’ interests. And all those interests are dedicated to preserving the past rather than investing for the future.

The founders loved America, but they also understood that it was a work in progress, an unfinished enterprise that would constantly be in need of change, adjustment and repair. For most of our history, we have become rich while remaining restless. Rather than resting on our laurels, we have feared getting fat and lazy. And that has been our greatest strength. In the past, worrying about decline has helped us avert that very condition. Let’s hope it does so today.

via U.S. Decline in Global Arena: Is America No Longer No. 1? – TIME.

YA/children’s lit, Shel Silverstein, bookshelf:  I may have to buy it just for the memories!

Nearly a dozen years after his death, Shel Silverstein will once again hit the shelves with a new book of poems called Everything On It.

Silverstein gained fame for penning children’s classics like The Giving Tree, Where the Sidewalk Ends and The Light in the Attic. Members of his family selected the poems and illustrations in Everything On It from his archives, and took care to make sure the content echoed his past work.

via Posthumous Poems: New Shel Silverstein Book Hits Stores in September – TIME NewsFeed.

Facebook, technology, culture, Good Samaritan, suicide prevention: If it saves lives … but …

Facebook is launching a system that allows users to report friends who they think may be contemplating suicide.

The feature is being run in conjunction with Samaritans, which said several people had used it during a test phase.

Anyone worried about a friend can fill out a form, detailing their concerns, which is passed to the social networking site’s moderators.

It follows reports of several cases where Facebook users announced their intention to commit suicide online.

The reporting page asks for the address (URL) of the Facebook page where the messages are posted, the full name of the user and details of any networks they are members of.

Suicide-related alerts will be escalated to the highest level, for attention by Facebook’s user operations team.

via BBC News – Facebook adds Samaritans suicide risk alert system.

news, South Africa, hate crimes, new terms:  corrective rape?

Gaika is a rarity in South Africa, indeed in all of Africa, as an openly gay woman. And since her attack, which took place in 2009, she has become something of an icon in the battle against the South African phenomenon called “corrective rape.” Virtually unknown to the rest of the world at the time of Gaika’s ordeal, corrective rape has since become a hot issue. Through online campaigns, nearly a million people have joined local activists in demanding that the South African government recognize corrective rape as a hate crime. But with so few cases of homophobic violence resulting in trials — and of those, almost none ending in conviction — the activists have a long fight ahead of them.

via South Africa’s Corrective Rape: Activists Battle Violence – TIME.

09
Nov
10

11.09.2010 … Isaiah (BSF) … Revelation (Circle) … Prophetic Day

mementos, talisman, memories, Think Pink, culture: Great article … I collect some stupid things … but they bring back great memories for me … If I needed a talisman … what would it be?

Mimi Ritzen Crawford for The Wall Street Journal

In a study released this year, Ms. Stoberock and a team of social psychologists found that people are more likely to attach superstitions to items during moments of uncertainty—when they’re under high stress and low levels of perceived control.

The researchers conducted several experiments in which subjects performed better on memory and dexterity tests if they had personal talismans with them, whether stuffed animals, childhood blankets or inherited jewelry.

The ‘healing wig’ worn by Nicole Rowe when she lost her hair amid chemotherapy treatments. Now, the wig is being sent to another woman who will be receiving breast-cancer treatments.

“It’s the talisman placebo effect,” says Scott Sandage, an American history professor at Carnegie Mellon University who has studied success and failure in America. “There’s a desire to have a physical token of a wish. It’s tangible, and if it worked for someone else, you think it’s more likely to work for you. It has a track record.”

Why do human beings attach such great power to objects that are given to them, especially in times of crisis? For thousands of years, civilizations have embraced the mystical possibilities in amulets and talismans. Now science is explaining how these items actually work, and why, in today’s digital age, they often take on even more significance.

“It’s not voodoo,” says Barbara Stoberock, a researcher at the University of Cologne in Germany. “It can be explained. If you have a lucky charm, and believe it helps you, there’s a psychological mechanism. It lifts your beliefs in your own capabilities, and gives you a boost.”

In a study released this year, Ms. Stoberock and a team of social psychologists found that people are more likely to attach superstitions to items during moments of uncertainty—when they’re under high stress and low levels of perceived control.

via One Wig’s Sentimental Journey – WSJ.com.

Not a ‘McMoment’

Given the pace of technology today, “everything is so fleeting,” says Ms. Bosak, who dismisses much of our online interactions as “McMoments.” “These McMoments don’t feed our spirits. Kids, especially, need a sense of rootedness. They have a real need for lasting family keepsakes.”

via One Wig’s Sentimental Journey – WSJ.com.

colleges, admissions, technology, our kids:  “black hole of admissions”

How did technology become both my new BFF and my arch-enemy? I find myself lusting for any iGadget that I can afford, wouldn’t think of going on vacation without my Kindle, and tell students how lucky they are to be able to Google their college searches. Life is good and clean and quick and secure when it’s online.

But then I find myself longing for the feel of paper, miss the smell of musty college catalogs on my bookshelf and love reading college essays that are printed out.

Students send their applications to the new black hole of admissions – the Common Application Web site – and their transcripts zip off electronically at the press of a button (and the charge of a credit card). They may never speak to anyone along the way. Life is bad and messy and cumbersome and scary when it’s online.

via College Admissions Advice – The Choice Blog – NYTimes.com.

media, journalsim, New Journalism, ethics: One of my issues … I miss you Walter Cronkite.

In the old days, you might have thought you knew the political mind of many journalists, but it was not necessarily so. They were quite careful not to imbue their reporting with their personal biases. If they didn’t they tended to get fired in much the way Mr. Williams was by NPR.

Call it wishful thinking or a bias of unfounded conceit, but it is human nature to ascribe our personal perspective to those we watch, hear or read. At least it is until they give us incontrovertible evidence to the contrary.

Spurred by the emergence of talk radio’s Rush Limbaugh in the 80’s, opinion became profitable. Then Roger Ailes’s particular genius saw that one could parade opinion as fact, and Fox News, a sister product to The Wall Street Journal in the News Corporation panoply, was born, signaling in turn the birth of a new, at least on a mass market scale, brand of journalism that wears its heart on its sleeve.

He knew very well that he could not stand with one foot in the fact-based world of journalism and the other in the opinion-based world. This day was bound to come. There is a new line and the ethical implications are just dawning.

via NPR: Most Recent Casualty of the New Journalism by Jon Sinton | LikeTheDew.com.

food, ice cream, science: Interesting … but I don’t think I really care why I like it … I guess the real question is would I like it shaped like a turkey? … See next entry 🙂

Why people prefer certain foods over others depends largely on a combination of taste and texture. While taste sensations are fairly well understood, scientists are just beginning to unravel the mystery of food texture

.

F. Martin Ramin for The Wall Street Journal
Starch is added to many foods like pudding, ice cream and chocolate to make them more palatable.

Now, researchers at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia have found that an enzyme in saliva called amylase, which breaks down starch into liquid, could play a key role in determining the appeal of various textures of food. A new genetic study shows that people produce strikingly different amounts of amylase, and that the more of the enzyme people have in their mouth the faster they can liquefy starchy foods.

Scientists think this finding could help explain why people experience foods as creamy or slimy, sticky or watery, and that this perception could affect our preference for foods. For the numerous foods that contain starch, including pudding, sauces and even maple syrup, what can feel just right to some people is experienced as too runny or not melting enough for others because they produce different amounts of the enzyme.

via The Science Behind Why We Love Ice Cream (and Other Things Creamy) – WSJ.com.

random, holidays, food, Thanksgiving:  It won’t let me copy the image … so just click for a good laugh … and enjoy Hendrix/McDaniel Family. 🙂

Glazed Turkey Cake

Masterfully glazed, our Turkey Cake (including sugar cone turkey legs!) is sure to wow them! Serves 12–16.

via Baskin-Robbins Thanksgiving Cakes.

bookshelf, children’s/YA literature:  Two things — I like that the writer distinguishes that there are many Southern accents … and I think her question is a  good question … I would add Scout to the list.

Prior to the release of book #3 all the YouTube commenters could talk about was Collins’s choice to give Katniss an Appalachian accent.

“Are there any other books starring kickass girls with southern accents out there?”

via Why Can’t Katniss Have an Accent?: The Role of the Southerner in American Children’s Literature « A Fuse #8 Production.

bookshelf, Nora Ephron:  I just like Nora Ephron and her humor.  I would like to meet her one day.

The point is that for a long time, the fact that I was divorced was the most important thing about me.

And now it’s not.

Now the most important thing about me is that I’m old.

via Nora Ephron: The D Word.

travel, places, Cape Town, South Africa:  Did I mention Cape Town may be my favorite city now … definitely my favorite city in the Southern Hemisphere.

Few cities contain a wonderful national park at their heart or provide the broad range of adventurous activities that take full advantage of it. Accentuating this natural majesty is Capetonians’ creative flair with design and colour. From the brightly painted facades to the contemporary Afro-chic décor of its guesthouses, restaurants and bars, this is one handsome metropolis.

This year Cape Town had to prepare for its biggest party since the first democratic elections of 1994. For the 2010 World Cup, the city made a bold architectural statement in the new Green Point Stadium, complemented by improved infrastructure to host the hundreds of thousands of participants.

via Falling in love with Cape Town – travel tips and articles – Lonely Planet.

skiing, places, Lake Tahoe, followup:  This is near our Wasabi reunion … I am going back … beautidul.

Kirkwood Mountain, California

Bay Area skiers know that while the party may be in South Lake Tahoe, the powder is an hour south at down-home Kirkwood. This massive mountain gets buckets of snow (up to 600 inches a year) and has steep chutes sure to please intermediates and experts. Best of all, lift tickets cost 10 percent less than those at resorts farther north. Intermediate snowboarders should take advantage of Kirkwood’s backcountry courses, the only West Coast powder-instruction program accredited by Burton. kirkwood.com, adult passes from $74.*

via Top 10 Ski Deals This Season – Budget Travel.

places, Chicago, bucket list:  Add it to the list … sounds fun, doesn’t it?

After opening in January, Longman & Eagle became one of Chicago’s most sought-after restaurants, known for rich comfort food like house-made pork sausage and ricotta pasta. But it was missing a crucial ingredient: a place to crash after dinner. Last month, Longman’s owners solved the issue by unveiling six guest rooms upstairs—done in the same cozy decor as the pub. longmanandeagle.com, from $75.

via World’s Best New Boutique Hotels Under $150 – Budget Travel.

travel, travel tips: I roll my clothes … It works.

Rolled clothes are less likely to wrinkle, and they create a flat surface for layering everything else. —Inga Carmack, Port Orchard, Wash.

via The Ultimate Packing Guide – Budget Travel.

google doodles: OK, I just like them and I learn a little history at the same time. X-Rays Google Doodle Honors The X-Ray’s 115th Anniversary.

 




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