Posts Tagged ‘iPad

13
Jan
13

1.13.13 … ooo…oh…ooo…oh…

Nora Ephron, tributes, cultural icons:  OK, It took me a minute to get what was going on … and then I really laughed.

Conceptual artist Rachel Perry Welty recreates Meg Ryan’s soliloquy from Nora Ephron’s When Harry Met Sally in a collage using letters cut from Ephron’s obituary in The New York Times, in one of several visual tributes to cultural icons we lost in 2012.

Conceptual artist Rachel Perry Welty recreates Meg Ryan’s soliloquy from Nora Ephron’s When Harry Met Sally in a collage using letters cut from Ephron’s obituary in The New York Times, in one of several visual tributes to cultural icons we lost in 2012.

via Explore – Conceptual artist Rachel Perry Welty recreates Meg….

Twitter,  AstroMarshburn, Davidson ’82:  My favorite martian, umm,  astronaut, tweets from the ISS!  He also send back pictures.  You rock, Tom!

Embedded image permalink

@AstroMarshburn

Where desert and mountains meet – we’re over the edge of the Gobi.

via Twitter / AstroMarshburn: Where desert and mountains ….

body language, TED Talks: Good to know …

In her TEDTalk (above), social psychologist Amy Cuddy shares an easy way that anyone can change not only others’ perceptions of them, but the way they feel about themselves — spending two minutes “power posing” with their arms or elbows out, their chin lifted and their posture expansive. Cuddy’s research, done in collaboration with Dana Carney, has shown that adopting the body language associated with dominance for just 120 seconds is enough to create a 20 percent increase in testosterone and a 25 percent decrease in the stress hormone cortisol. In other words, adopting these postures makes a person feel more powerful.

via Amy Cuddy: Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are.

word of the year,  The Economist: #hashtag … really???

Finally, the Word of the Year to beat all words of the year, the word that truly summed up 2012.  Are you ready?

#hashtag

via Word of the year: And the winner is… | The Economist.

Davidson,The Watson Fellowship, 2012-13 Watson Fellows:  I was looking over a friend’s daughters’ blog (sara bates | sara bates … watson adventures) when I wondered if any 2012 Davidson grads received Watsons … The answer is yes … and they are excerpted below.  But If you are interested all of the Watson Fellows are doing amazing things.

Audrey Gyurgyik, Davidson College

Body and Soul: A Holistic Approach to Actor Training

Tibet, Brazil, Serbia, Italy

I will explore the following questions: In what ways does the physical body serve as a vehicle to access emotion, free-flow of impulses, and the subtler soul? How do different cultures explore this notion? And how is this work then translated for or useful to actors- to those interested in effectively communicating the human condition to an audience? I will travel to Tibet, Brazil, Serbia and Italy to learn about different physical-spiritual practices and the ways in which certain theatre companies have incorporated them as an integral part of their creative processes.

via The Watson Fellowship: Our Fellows

Alexis Valauri-Orton, Davidson College

Thinking Outside the Lab: Discovering the Human Toll of Ocean Acidification

Norway, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Peru, Mauritius

Ocean acidification, a consequence of CO2 pollution, threatens reefs and fisheries worldwide. On my Watson, I will live with communities in five countries that are particularly vulnerable to acidification. I will learn how their livelihoods and cultures are dependent upon marine resources, discovering the human stake in this environmental crisis. Each narrative of acidification will be shaped by different dependencies, cultures, and crises, and together they will provide me with a global, human narrative that demands action.

via The Watson Fellowship: Our Fellows.

resolutions, living life in the moment:

Saturday January 5, 2013

Living the Moment to the Fullest

Patience is a hard discipline. It is not just waiting until something happens over which we have no control: the arrival of the bus, the end of the rain, the return of a friend, the resolution of a conflict. Patience is not a waiting passivity until someone else does something. Patience asks us to live the moment to the fullest, to be completely present to the moment, to taste the here and now, to be where we are. When we are impatient we try to get away from where we are. We behave as if the real thing will happen tomorrow, later and somewhere else. Let’s be patient and trust that the treasure we look for is hidden in the ground on which we stand.

via Daily Meditation: Living the Moment to the Fullest.

iPad,  apps: Another best list … I already have most of these … but I thought Paper looked fun.

Below, we’ve got 13 of our absolute favorite apps for iPad and iPad Mini: The essentials, the best of the best. These aren’t the only apps you need for your new Apple tablet, but they are certainly a good start. Let’s get downloading.

Paper (FREE)

Apple’s iPad App of the Year is a content-creation machine, allowing you to draw, take notes, sketch and color in between (or outside of) the lines. Worth a try for any creative types out there, or anyone who wants to use a new iPad or iPad Mini to replace a laptop.

via iPad Mini Apps: The 13 Best Apps That Any New iPad Or iPad Mini Owner Should Download Immediately.

X-Rays, technology,  Davidson College. Davidson College Archives, trivia:

The first X-ray taken at Davidson College by Eben Hardin, Pender Porter, and Osmond L. Barringer. [1896]

The first X-ray taken at Davidson College by Eben Hardin, Pender Porter, and Osmond L. Barringer. [1896]

In January 1896, Dr. Henry Louis Smith, a physics professor at Davidson Colllege, read about Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen’s discovery of x-rays in an associated press bulletin. He realized that Davidson College possessed the right equipment to repeat Roentgen’s experiments. Dr. Smith told his physics class about Roentgen’s discovery of x-rays, and Smith’s planned experiments with them.

Shortly afterwards, three Davidson juniors, eager to test Smith’s theories, snuck into his lab on the evening of January 12, 1896. Eben Hardin, Pender Porter, and Osmond L. Barringer collected various objects to photograph with the x-ray machine: a cadaver finger (taken from the North Carolina Medical College) stuck with two pins and wearing a ring (borrowed from Barringer’s girlfriend); a rubber covered magnifying glass; a pill box containing two 22 cartridges, one pin, two rings, and six Strychnine pills (commonly used by students at that time to stay awake during finals); and an egg that been emptied and had a button placed inside.

via X-Rays | Davidson College Archives & Special Collections.

Audi, technology, robotic valet:  Robotic Valet Overlords!

Audi has built the robotic valet of the future, a car that parks itself. We got to play with it, and it’s freaking amazing.

via We Welcome Our Robotic Valet Overlords | Autopia | Wired.com.

Americans, death age, statistics: Ouch!

Americans live sicker and die younger than people in other wealthy countries — and the gap is getting worse over time, a new report shows.

Men in the USA have shorter lives than men in 16 developed nations. American women also fall near the bottom of the list, living 5.2 fewer years than Japanese women, who live the longest.

Americans “have a long-standing pattern of poorer health that is strikingly consistent and pervasive” over a person’s lifetime, says the report, from the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council, independent, non-profit groups that advise the federal government on health.

“The tragedy is not that the United States is losing a contest with other countries,” the report says, “but that Americans are dying and suffering from illness and injury at rates that are demonstrably unnecessary.”

via Americans die younger than others in rich nations.

We the People, White House,  Death Star:  I had no idea that the We the People  site existed … enjoyed the tongue in cheek response.

Enemies of the Pentagon will not witness the power of a fully operational battle station anytime soon.

Last month an online petition to the White House site We the People that called for the construction of the Death Star from the “Star Wars” movies surpassed the 25,000 signature threshold required to initiate an official response.

Citing national security and the number of jobs the initiative would create, the petition gained 34,000 signatures.

On Friday Paul Shawcross of the Office of Management and Budget, showed he was up for satire and responded in kind, issuing a tongue-in-cheek address to the demand for a space station capable of obliterating entire planets.

via White House Declines Death Star Undertaking, Cites Budget Constraints – ABC News.

Paris, blogs:  Just liked this one.

Guide to Paris: Insight to the Famed City of Lights

At Aeon Tours, we strive to create walking tours of the famed City of Lights that showcase the many faces of Paris. From her hidden side streets to her iconic international attractions, you can be sure that we have a tour that caters to you. To learn more about us, visit us at AeonTours.com

via Guide to Paris: Insight into the Famed City of Lights.

youtube, video blogs, LOL:  i . 🙂

http://www.buzzfeed.com/donnad/the-best-fcking-cruise-ship-tour-youll-ever-take?sub=1956541_793702

Greg from Mediocre Films 2 went on a cruise to Hawaii with his family. As a vlogger, he decided to document his voyage.

via The Best F*cking Cruise Ship Tour You’ll Ever Take.

Davidson Basketball:  Another great day ….

Mann hits 20 as Davidson men top Furman, 81-73

via Mann hits 20 as Davidson men top Furman, 81-73 | Sports.

Nordstrom Rack, Psycho Bunny, men’s clothing:  I saw a polo with this weird logo at Nordstrom Rack.   Psycho Bunny …

Interesting brand logo??

Psycho Bunny Regular Fit Piqué Polo | Nordstrom.

devotionals, urban legends:  I am not sure what this is but I found it uplifting.

Photo: One day a farmer's donkey fell down into a well. The animal cried piteously for hours as the farmer tried to figure out what to do. Finally, he decided the animal was old, and the well needed to be covered up anyway; it just wasn't worth it to retrieve the donkey.</p> <p>He invited all his neighbors to come over and help him. They all grabbed a shovel and began to shovel dirt into the well. At first, th<br /> e donkey realized what was happening and cried horribly. Then, to everyone's amazement he quieted down.</p> <p>A few shovel loads later, the farmer finally looked down the well. He was astonished at what he saw. With each shovel of dirt that hit his back, the donkey was doing something amazing. He would shake it off and take a step up.</p> <p>As the farmer's neighbors continued to shovel dirt on top of the animal, he would shake it off and take a step up. Pretty soon, everyone was amazed as the donkey stepped up over the edge of the well and happily trotted off!</p> <p>MORAL :<br />  Life is going to shovel dirt on you, all kinds of dirt. The trick to getting out of the well is to shake it off and take a step up. Each of our troubles is a steppingstone. We can get out of the deepest wells just by not stopping, never giving up! Shake it off and take a step up.</p> <p>Remember the five simple rules to be happy:</p> <p>1. Free your heart from hatred - Forgive.</p> <p>2. Free your mind from worries - Most never happens.</p> <p>3. Live simply and appreciate what you have.</p> <p>4. Give more.</p> <p>5. Expect less from people but more from yourself.</p> <p>You have two choices... smile and close this page,<br /> or pass this along to someone else to share the lesson .

One day a farmer’s donkey fell down into a well. The animal cried piteously for hours as the farmer tried to figure out what to do. Finally, he decided the animal was old, and the well needed to be covered up anyway; it just wasn’t worth it to retrieve the donkey.

He invited all his neighbors to come over and help him. They all grabbed a shovel and began to shovel dirt into the well. At first, th

e donkey realized what was happening and cried horribly. Then, to everyone’s amazement he quieted down.

A few shovel loads later, the farmer finally looked down the well. He was astonished at what he saw. With each shovel of dirt that hit his back, the donkey was doing something amazing. He would shake it off and take a step up.

As the farmer’s neighbors continued to shovel dirt on top of the animal, he would shake it off and take a step up. Pretty soon, everyone was amazed as the donkey stepped up over the edge of the well and happily trotted off!

MORAL :

Life is going to shovel dirt on you, all kinds of dirt. The trick to getting out of the well is to shake it off and take a step up. Each of our troubles is a steppingstone. We can get out of the deepest wells just by not stopping, never giving up! Shake it off and take a step up.

Remember the five simple rules to be happy:

1. Free your heart from hatred – Forgive.

2. Free your mind from worries – Most never happens.

3. Live simply and appreciate what you have.

4. Give more.

5. Expect less from people but more from yourself.

You have two choices… smile and close this page,

or pass this along to someone else to share the lesson .

via Dennard Lindsey Teague.

06
Jan
12

1.6.2012 … We three kings … Enjoy Epiphany, y’all!

Epiphany: So much for the southern Presbyterian in me … And having the tree down by new year’s day … Mine is coming down post epiphany!

Christmas Carols – We Three Kings – YouTube.

college life, stressbusters, massage:  innovative … I sure would love a free massage!

Cardenas is the student coordinator of Stressbusters, a group of undergraduates who provide classmates with a healthy way to manage the pressures of exams, papers, and College life in general. She and her cohorts bring free back rubs to students who have neither the time nor the money for professional massage — or who simply wake up with a stiff neck after huddling over a laptop for 10-12 hours at a stretch — in dorms and Houses across campus.

“Our goal is to bring relaxation and happiness to the Harvard community,” Cardenas said. “We want to alleviate students’ stress and promote the importance of self-care and of being physically and mentally healthy.“

Stressbusters was created in 1996 by Jordan Friedman when he was director of Columbia University’s health education program, and has grown into a national initiative that trains college students in stress prevention and management. The program came to Harvard in 2009 when Jeanne Mahon, director of the University’s Center for Wellness, saw the impact that it was having at other schools. Friedman’s own website claims that Stressbusters “now connects nearly 200,000 students and staff with stress reduction and wellness information” at campuses around the country.

via Calming influence | Harvard Gazette.

epigraphs, literature:  i am fascinated by a writer’s choice of an epigraph.  I really like to look back and figure out why the quote was chosen.

Lawyers, I suppose, were children once. — Charles Lamb

(from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee)

Behind every great fortune there is a crime. — Balzac

(from The Godfather by Mario Puzo)

via Flavorwire » The 25 Greatest Epigraphs in Literature.

Uptown Downstairs Abbey, Red Nose Day, Comic Relief, mashups, LOLUptown Downstairs Abbey Part 1 – YouTube.

apps, Behance Network: Creative Portfolios & Galleries:  Another one to help in my goal for 2012.

Use Behance Network for iPhone to explore millions of creative projects by the world’s top creative talent. The app also offers the ultimate mobile portfolio that seamlessly syncs with your Behance projects.

via App Store – Behance Network: Creative Portfolios & Galleries.

diaries, anthologies, Andy Warhol, Mark Twain, 400 Years of New York Diaries, books:  Sounds interesting …

What Jack Kerouac’s existential divide has to do with earmuffs, 9/11, and Edison’s “mechanical mind.”

For the past four centuries, New York City has been courted, confabulated, and cursed, in public and in private, by the millions of citizens who have called it home. New York Diaries: 1609 to 2009 is a remarkable feat of an anthology by Teresa Carpenter, culled from the archives of libraries, museums, and private collections to reveal a dimensional mosaic portrait of the city through the journal entries of the writers, artists, thinkers, and tourists, both famous and not, who dwelled in its grid over the past 400 years — easily the most dynamic and important depiction of the city since E. B. White’s timeless Here Is New York.

In an ingenious touch, Carpenter arranges the entries by day of the year, rather than chronologically, which brings to the foreground certain common patterns of daily life that appear to shape our experience of the city, be it in 1697 or 1976. At its heart, however, the collection exudes a certain unflinching quality of the city, unshakable solid ground that stands tenacious beneath the tempestuous weather patterns of great wars and great loves and great losses that swirl over.

Every century produces a diarist who laments, ‘This is the worst catastrophe ever to befall New York!’ Surely it seems that way at the moment. The city takes the blow, catches its breath, then moves along to the insistent rhythm of the tides. New York, as it emerges from these pages, is by turns a wicket city, a compassionate city, a muscular city, a vulnerable city, an artistic wonder, an aesthetic disaster, but forever a resilient city — and one loved fiercely by its inhabitants.” ~ Teresa Carpenter

via From Andy Warhol to Mark Twain, 400 Years of New York Diaries | Brain Pickings.

iPad, solutions:  Should I try this … converting dvds to show on my iPad …

BreneBrown (@BreneBrown)

1/6/12 8:39 PM

I’ll try. RT @dpitkin: Install HandBrake to convert them to files and AirVideo to stream and convert them for your iPad, it works awesome!

 

12
Dec
11

12.12.2011 … I’m up to my ears in cupcake balls! …

holidays, food – desserts:  I’m up to my ears in cupcake balls! Cake Balls « bakerella.com.

.

Apple’s iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, marketing, Middle East, North Africa:

Apple’s iPhone, iPad and iPod touch are huge in the Middle East and North Africa, where they account for 55 percent of mobile Internet traffic, according to a new survey by Dubai-based Effective Measure. The iPhone and iPad in particular are doing well, splitting top device honors among the countries covered in the study.

During the month of October, Apple iPhone accounted for 29.6 percent of traffic from mobile devices, with the iPad accounting for 24.1 percent. The iPod touch added another two percent to the total for Apple devices. Apple’s iPhone was the most popular device overall, and the iPad second. RIM’s BlackBerry devices came in third, with 7.6 percent combined.

via Apple devices winning big in the Middle East and North Africa — Apple News, Tips and Reviews.

iPad:  iPad 3 on the way?

Now that Citi analyst Richard Gardner has kicked the rumor mill up a notch for those awaiting the next iPad, the speculation will likely being flying fast and furious.

Digitimes is reporting that the next Apple tablet will be coming out in three to four months — right about in line with Apple’s normal schedule for iPad releases. The Taiwanese tech site, which has a spotty record when it comes to predicting Apple’s next moves, has tapped into its supply line sources once again and reported that Apple will begin cutting back on iPad 2 production ins the first quarter of 2012. Why? To make way for the next generation, of course.

Apple is infamous for the control it exercises over its image — especially its retail stores. Customers often know Apple stores at a glance, since the company’s storefronts often employ the same stark, simple lines as its products while also reflecting the character of their surroundings.

Apple is known for having many successful product launches. But it had some unsuccessful ones too.

The report says that new iPads are expected to reach 9.5 to 9.8 million production units in early 2012.

The rumors could have a negative effect on Apple’s holiday sales, as consumers expecting an iPad3 to come soon may decide not to take the plunge and buy an iPad 2 now.

There was definitely some buyers’ remorse out there when Apple released the iPad 2 last March, adding cameras and slicing down the thickness. And, yes, there are some rumored features for the next iPad that would be nice to have, such as an HD screen and LTE connectivity. But, as is the nature of these kinds of rumors, there’s no guarantee than any of them is accurate.

via Report: New iPad coming this spring – The Washington Post.

 myths, all women’s colleges, lists:

1. We are all major feminists who are concerned with women’s issues

3. For fun, we have late night pillow fights in our underwear

5. We are all lesbians

via Top ten myths about all women’s colleges | USA TODAY College.

Penn State Scandal, Mike McQueary:  Key Witness’ Story Changes …

Mon, Dec 12, 2011 9:00 AM EST – ABC News 2:33 | 4,558 views

Questions raised about Mike McQueary

Penn State Scandal: Key Witness’ Story Changes

Questions raised about Mike McQueary, an eyewitness in the case.

via News Videos – Yahoo!.

‘What to Expect When You’re Expecting’, movies,  pregnancy handbook, romantic comedy:  Movie adapts pregnancy handbook into romantic comedy … go figure!

Lionsgate has released a trailer for the romantic-comedy adaptation of the pregnancy handbook, What to Expect When You’re Expecting.

We’ve embedded the trailer in the video above–what do you think?

Here’s more from Indiewire: “[Pregnancy] makes Elizabeth Banks hysterical, Dennis Quaid embarassed and Brooklyn Decker…well, she stays hot. Cameron Diaz, Anna Kendrick, Chris Rock, Matthew Morrison, Rodrigo Santoro, Chace Crawford, Jennifer Lopez, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Tom Lennon and Rob Huebel all round out the cast on this one.”

The film reportedly also contains celebrity cameos from Black Eyed Peas musician Taboo, reality starlet Whitney Port and UK singer Cheryl Cole. Director Kirk Jones helmed the project. Heather Hach and Shauna Cross wrote the script. The movie hits theaters in May 2012.

via ‘What to Expect When You’re Expecting’ Trailer Released – GalleyCat.

 La Rochefoucauld, quotes, happiness:

“We are so accustomed to disguising our true nature from others, that we end up disguising it from ourselves.”
 La Rochefoucauld

lawyers, careers, Great Recession, internet, websites, Shpoonkle: A new site lets jobless young lawyers underbid their more-experienced competitors for work! Welcome to Shpoonkle! Where Lawyers and Clients Connect..

New Lawyers Hang a Shingle on Shpoonkle, to Some Colleagues’ Chagrin

via Recent Law Graduates Offer Cheap Legal Counsel on Web Site, to Lawyers’ Chagrin – Students – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

websites, cooking, Cooking with Caitlin:  Another fun one…

Cooking with Caitlin (CWC) began Mother’s Day 2007, on Molly’s front porch, over a bowl of cherries. Caitlin was a brand new wife and mom, and had recently returned to Cincinnati having completed culinary school in Chicago. Molly and Kelly also had moved back to Cincinnati recently. Together they hatched a plan to be their own bosses in a food-focused business built around their growing families. The initial idea was simple: catering. A nights-and-weekends company that would give Caitlin the opportunity to play with food, Kelly would plan the parties, Molly would promote the business, and they would come together to make the events happen.

via Cooking with Caitlin.

toys,  retailing, Christmas:  No hit toys … another sign of the Great Recession?

With Christmas less than two weeks away, the toy industry has no runaway hit — leaving many toy shoppers bored and complicating how stores sell holiday inventory.

“We are not seeing people clamor for any single item,” Stephanie Lucy, vice president for toys at Target, said by e-mail.

The hitless season has retailers stocking less, leaning on classic items rather than new ones and possibly discounting less in the final days before Christmas. And with no Tickle Me Elmo or Zhu Zhu Pets to draw crushing crowds to the toy aisles, most retailers are being careful not to get stuck with unsold toys.

“As retailers look at consumer confidence numbers, they are skeptical about consumers’ willingness to spend this holiday season, and they are trying to avoid getting caught with too much inventory,” said Josh Green, chief executive of Panjiva, a supply-chain data company.

LeapFrog LeapPad Explorer, Hot Wheels Wall Tracks, Lalaoopsy Silly Hair dolls and some Lego sets are sold out or hard to find in many parts of the country, but that is mainly because of consistent demand rather than growing waves of frenzied shoppers.

via No Hit Toy to Brighten Retailers’ Christmas – NYTimes.com.

Christmas, Go-To Gift, Soul by Ludacris:  Since I have never heard of SOUL … must not be that big of a hit.

SOUL by Ludacris headphones are featured as the perfect gift for the audiophile in Newsweek Magazine‘s December article, “Tech for One, Tech for All: Stocking Stuffers for the Gadget Guru” by Brian Ries.  Along with SOUL he plugs the iPad 2 and Kindle Fire as this season’s go-to gifts.  (on newsstands now)

via Newsweek Magazine’s, “This Season’s Go-To Gift” [feature] | Soul by Ludacris.

science, biology, leaproach:  Yuck … Leaping cockroach discovered!

Cockroach haters beware: scientists have discovered a roach that jumps.

The newly discovered leaproach, which looks like a cockroach but acts like a grasshopper, is described in the journal Biology Letters.

via Leaping Cockroach Discovered – NYTimes.com.

Zoran Milich, NYC, photojournalism, Gothamatic, LIFE :  I love how LIFE has returned on the web!

Gothamatic: 12.12.11 – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

law school, education, practical applications:  Very well written … “The emphasis on practical short-term payoffs has already laid waste to the traditional project of the liberal arts, which may not survive. Is the law next? The law is surely a practice but it is also a subject, and if it ceases to be a subject — ceases to be an object of analysis in classrooms and in law reviews — its practice will be diminished. When a Times editorial declares that “[l]aw is now regarded as a means rather than an end, a tool for solving problems” rather than something of interest in its own right, one wants to say more’s the pity.”

This week marks the last sessions of my Yale law school class on law, liberalism and religion. In the course of the semester my students have learned how to read religion clause cases against the background of long-standing debates in philosophy and theology about the relationship between religious imperatives and the obligations of democratic citizenship. They have become adept at recognizing the arguments behind the arguments the justices are making explicitly. They can see how a case ostensibly about vouchers or school prayer or Christmas trees on courthouse steps is really about whether principle or history should inform a court’s decisions. They can see how a case about head coverings or beards in the military (a topic that has surfaced once again) turns on the distinctions set down in John Locke’s “Letter Concerning Toleration” (1689), a tract the justices may never have read. They can see how the majority and dissenting opinions in a free exercise case often reflect a tension between negative and positive liberty as these terms are defined by Isaiah Berlin, an author the justices will likely not have referenced. They can see how the entire history of religion-clause jurisprudence at once illustrates and is an extended critique of John Rawls’s attempt in “Political Liberalism” to devise a form of government that will be fair to religion while at the same time keeping it at arm’s length.

The question asked by an article and an editorial published recently in this newspaper is whether what my students have learned will be of any help to them when they enter practice. At first glance the answer seems to be “no,” if only because Berlin, Locke, Rawls, Hobbes, Kant, Unger and Rorty (writers whose work took up half the semester) are not currency in legal arguments; citing them in front of a court or in a memorandum is likely to be regarded at best as window dressing and at worst as showing off. (Not to mention the fact that few practicing attorneys are likely to be engaging with religion-clause issues anyway.)

In his response to Segal’s essay, Brian Leiter, a professor of law at the University of Chicago, rejects the question of whether what one learns in law school is of any help: “The criterion of scholarly inquiry is whether it makes a contribution to knowledge and understanding, not whether it ‘helps.’” Leiter adds that what he calls “genuine” knowledge often does help with “a host of concrete and practical problems.” But he refuses (rightly, I think) to justify the academic study of law on that basis, for, he explains, “it is the central premise of a research institution that the measure of its achievement is the quality of the scholarship, i.e. its contribution to knowledge — whether of law or biology or literature — not its practical payoff in the short-term.”

The emphasis on practical short-term payoffs has already laid waste to the traditional project of the liberal arts, which may not survive. Is the law next? The law is surely a practice but it is also a subject, and if it ceases to be a subject — ceases to be an object of analysis in classrooms and in law reviews — its practice will be diminished. When a Times editorial declares that “[l]aw is now regarded as a means rather than an end, a tool for solving problems” rather than something of interest in its own right, one wants to say more’s the pity.

via Teaching Law – NYTimes.com

Christmas, Christmas album, Christmas traditions, history:  Love this …

I’m a Christmas music traditionalist. Whereas I happily seek out new bands and explore new music throughout the year (and not just because it’s my job), around the holidays I become so conservative, so unyielding in my song choices — it’s Bing Crosby and Dean Martin or nothing — that the very mention of a contemporary Christmas album confuses and alarms me. Michael Bublé’s new Christmas record? Why don’t you just shave off Santa’s beard while you’re at it.

I just don’t approach Christmas songs the same way that I do regular ones. I’m not looking to broaden my musical horizons with a new rendition of “Jingle Bells.” I just want to listen to the same old songs (and watch the same old movies and drink the same old eggnog) that I always have. I’m probably doing it in a futile attempt to recapture some sense of childhood wonder. Isn’t that what Christmas is all about? Besides watching the A Christmas Story marathon on TV, that is.

But this year marks the first time that I’ve fallen for a new Christmas collection: A Very She & Him Christmas. The album — which came out in October because bandmembers Zooey Deschanel and M. Ward have fallen prey to the diabolical “Christmas creep” marketing machine — is a compilation of classic Christmas tunes that have been stripped down and injected with just the right amount of contrived nostalgia to trick me into into thinking that I’ve been listening to it all my life. Their version of the Beach Boys’ “Little St. Nick” deserves to be a new holiday standard. I’ve finally entered the world of the annual Christmas album and what a big, scary world it is. I have a lot of catching up to do, so I might as well start at the beginning.

Christmas music as we know it today didn’t really get going until the Victorian era, when Queen Victoria married her German cousin, Prince Albert. Suddenly, England had an excuse to adopt all of Germany’s fun Christmas traditions, like that of the decorated tree laden with presents. The customs were also picked up by the United States, which had only recently invented the concept of Santa Claus. All of this newfound holiday cheer helped revive the practice of group caroling. Carols had existed for centuries, though their popularity waxed and waned as different governments and religious movements periodically declared them sinful. (I’m look at you, Puritans). But in the 1800s they finally had their heyday. Between 1840 and 1870, the following carols were written: “Good King Wenceslas,” “Jingle Bells,” “Up on the Housetop,” “Away in a Manger, and “We Three Kings.” Those are just the ones that have stuck around; there are plenty of others that have long been forgotten.

via Music Monday: The Rise of the Christmas Album | Entertainment | TIME.com.

Steve Jobs,  Computer History Museum: Wonderful retrospective!

The “Blue Box” was a simple electronic gizmo that bypassed telephone company billing computers, allowing anyone to make free telephone calls anywhere in the world. The Blue Box was illegal, but the specifications for hacking into the telephone network were published in a telephone company journal and many youngsters with a flair for electronics built them. The “two Steves” had a great deal of fun building and using them for “ethical hacking,” with Wozniak building the kits and Jobs selling them—a pattern which would emerge again and again in the lives of these two innovators. (Wozniak once telephoned the Vatican, pretended to be Henry Kissinger and asked to speak to the Pope—just to see if he could. When someone answered, Woz got scared and hung up.)

via Computer History Museum | Steve Jobs: From Garage to World’s Most Valuable Company.

Illustrated Histories and the American Imagination, 1840-1900, online exhibition:  So much neat stuff out there!

In this online exhibit, explore and contrast the production histories of two mid-19th-century pictorial history projects.

Through interactive graphics, magnified images and text, come to understand the personal agendas and the two-way and three-way collaborations at work in the making of pictorial histories; that is, the relationships among publishers, artists and historians.

via Clio: Picturing the Past – American Illustrated Histories Online Exhibit.

Christmas, Christmas traditions, Christmas feast, recipes, history:  A Victorian Christmas Feast!

“Nothing pushes the nostalgia button at Christmastime more than Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, with its warming images of a candlelit tree and Victorian plenitude. Yet prior to the 19th century, Christmas was a very different holiday, and it was only in the Victorian era that our concept of Christmas as a child-centered family holiday arose. After reviewing the evolution of Christmas holidays, we will use 19th-century English cookbooks, such as Charles Francatelli’s The Modern Cook and Eliza Acton’s Modern Cookery for Private Families, to create a groaning board of Victorian delights, including Jerusalem Artichoke Soup; Lobster Fricassée; Baked Goose with Chestnuts; Roasted Filet of Beef à l’Anglaise; Endives with Cream; Christmas Pudding; Gingerbread; and Twelfth Night Cake.”

Cathy continued, “This is upper class food that we’re making tonight, that took a large staff in the kitchen to prepare, with no expenses spared, using the most luxurious ingredients. It’s also infusion cuisine made with expensive stocks, showing the French influence in this period. There’s also a fair amount of cream in many dishes with a touch of cayenne pepper, an influence of the British colonials in India. The French at this time would have just used nutmeg. There were many women cooks in the kitchens of the wealthy in England, and in France there were more men in the kitchens.”

via A Victorian Christmas Feast « Jane Austen’s World.

websites, design, Colossal:
If you haven’t seen Colossal, don’t worry: you will. It’s an art and design blog which is, well, what it says it is. It’s getting mentioned everywhere, including here on Hyperallergic. It so happens that the blog’s creator, Chris Jobson, and I have known each other for years, and we live about three blocks from each other on Chicago’s north side. So I thought I would see if the guy who’s responsible for bringing such cool stuff to the world’s attention would overcome his modesty and talk about himself for a few minutes.via An Interview with Chris Jobson, Creator of the Art and Design Blog Colossal.
 Zombie Borders, Germany, history:  My favorite article of the day … Read on …
Now defunct by just over two decades, the border between the two Germanys already seems like a surreal relic from a much more distant past. Was there really ever a 540-mile Strip of Death separating the two halves, from the Czech border to the Bay of Lübeck? There was – and it was quite hermetical, and very deadly [2] – but today a visitor might be forgiven for thinking otherwise.

These days, the so-called innerdeutsche Grenze is almost completely erased from the landscape, marked only by the occasional memorial placard along the Autobahn. The fences, the spotlights, the guard dogs and the tanks have all been withdrawn. But that doesn’t mean it’s gone. The line that separated the Federal Republic of (West) Germany from the (East) German Democratic Republic is a zombie border: it’s been dead a few times in the past, and that hasn’t stopped it coming back. The line between east and west existed long before the postwar split.

The Iron Curtain that divided Europe (and Germany) is gone. The European Union now includes much of Eastern Europe, and indeed some bits of the former Soviet Union. In Angela Merkel, Germany has its first chancellor raised in the former East Germany. Although many socio-economic indicators for the ex-GDR are still not up to par with the western half of Germany, the border itself has been thoroughly erased from the landscape.

So is that the end of Henry the Fowler’s thousand-year-old border? Maybe not. Erased borders are like phantom limbs – sometimes it feels like they’re still there, even when they’re manifestly not.

via Zombie Borders – NYTimes.com.

29
Nov
11

11.29.2011… Planning the half-way there luncheon for my high school senior … and for the magabus tomorrow …

grammar, LOL:


‎7 walking-into-a-bar jokes for grammar geeks… http://is.gd/1hDsvf

Eloise, The Plaza, NYC, Christmas trees:

At first glance, it’s easy to forget that Johnson’s creation is a Christmas tree. There’s barely a hint of green in the 18-inch high creation, but instead, vibrant pink decorations everywhere, which is befitting the designer’s aesthetic. “It’s filled with girly stuff—pink feathers, sparkles, foldout Eloise paper dolls,” Johnson says. “There’s three quarters of me that’s six years old and it comes out.”

via Betsey Johnson Unveils ‘Eloise’ Christmas Tree at Plaza Hotel | NewsFeed | TIME.com.

abseiling, rapp jumping, South Africa, adventure travel, South Africa:

It’s only recently that abseiling has become an activity in its own right. Really it’s just the method climbers use to get off mountains – or special services forces use to descend deserted buildings into enemy territory in adventure movies – but it’s fun, and so it’s become available as an activity in its own right.

You can hang out high over Cape Town abseiling from Table Mountain. The “long drop” is 112m high – and about a kilometre above the city – making it the world’s highest commercial abseil.

via Abseiling & rapp jumping in SA – SouthAfrica.info.

Advent Calendars, chocolate, history:  The Germans again … 🙂

Like most Christmas traditions, Advent Calendars date back to early 19th-century-Germany. Religious families counted down the days to Christmas by drawing lines in chalk on their doors and, later, lighting candles and hanging religious images on their walls each day to mark Advent’s passing. The first Advent Wreath was hung in December 1839.

Historians believe the first hand-made Advent Calendar, an extension of the Wreath tradition, was produced in 1851. The date of the first printed Advent Calendar, however, is uncertain. But we do know that it was some time in the first decade of the 1900s.

Gerhard Lang, a Swabian, began printing Advent Calendars in Munich around this time, and created at least 30 different calendar designs, mostly consisting of little paper images stuck to a piece of cardboard, before his company folded in the 1930s. Other companies picked up the practice, which grew in popularity until cardboard was rationed during the Second World War.

Post-WWII, many companies picked printing back up again, including Richard Sellmer, who was the first to recreate Advent Calendars in 1946. His company produces yearly calendars to this day.

The first chocolate-filled calendar was created in 1958 and—obviously—the trend stuck.

via The History of Chocolate and the Advent Calendar — Gourmet Live.

The Physics Book: An Illustrated Chronology of How We Understand the Universe, books:

Einstein famously observed that the most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it’s comprehensible. In The Physics Book: From the Big Bang to Quantum Resurrection, 250 Milestones in the History of Physics, acclaimed science author Clifford Pickover offers a sweeping, lavishly illustrated chronology of comprehension by way of physics, from the Big Bang (13.7 billion BC) to Quantum Resurrection (> 100 trillion), through such watershed moments as Newton’s formulation of the laws of motion and gravity (1687), the invention of fiber optics (1841), Einstein’s general theory of relativity (1915), the first speculation about parallel universes (1956), the discovery of buckyballs (1985), Stephen Hawking’s Star Trek cameo (1993), and the building of the Large Hadron Collider (2009).

The book, which could well be the best thing since Bill Bryson’s short illustrated history of nearly everything, begins with a beautiful quote about the poetry of science and curiosity:

As the island of knowledge grows, the surface that makes contact with mystery expands. When major theories are overturned, what we thought was certain knowledge gives way, and knowledge touches upon mystery differently. This newly uncovered mystery may be humbling and unsettling, but it is the cost of truth. Creative scientists, philosophers, and poets thrive at this shoreline.” ~ W. Mark Richardson, ‘A Skeptic’s Sense of Wonder,’ Science

via The Physics Book: An Illustrated Chronology of How We Understand the Universe | Brain Pickings.

Three as Four, fashion collective, Islam, Judaism:  Very interesting …

On Sunday night, the fashion collective Three as Four opened its highly anticipated exhibition “Insalaam Inshalom” at the Beit Ha’Ir Center for Urban Culture in Tel Aviv, bringing to fruition a project over two years in the making. Covering the walls of the four-story building in fabric printed with their spring collection’s central motifs, which are made of a mix of Muslim and Jewish symbols, the designers Gabi Asfour, Adi Gil and Ange Donhauser invited 10 artists to show works that relate to the project’s central notion: that Judaism and Islam can live side by side. “We’ve accumulated the energy of artists and performers who are like-minded,” Asfour said. “We tried to balance things from all sides, though it’s always difficult.”

via Come Together – NYTimes.com.

Apple, iPad:  Chatter, chatter … Apple Chatter: New iPad, iPhone Soon? – TheStreet.

Africa Through a Lens, photography, Africa:

These images, from The National Archives, have been added to Flickr so that you can comment, tag and share them easily.

Do you recognise anything or anyone in the photographs and do they provoke any personal memories? Perhaps you have a similar picture from your own travels? If you do, post us a link. Let us know of any inaccuracies in the descriptions and help us to map the images we don’t have locations for.

For more information please see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/africa

The CO 1069 series is a diverse collection of images with a rich variety of content. In many instances we know little about the people or contents of the photographs and this is one of the reasons why we have published them online and asked people to comment and share their knowledge.

Please note the pictures and the captions attached to them are representative of the time they were taken. They frequently use terms that would not be used today. However, our role is to preserve the integrity of the historic public record, which is why they have been preserved and presented as originally captured.

via Collection: Africa Through a Lens.

nature, Atlanta, coyotes:

Emma Millican Park remained closed Thursday due to the wild animals.

Resident LaTanya Grant said she feared the worst when she saw the yellow caution tape stretched across the park across the street from her home.

Tuesday, she said she walked across Lynnhave Drive to read the yellow notice posted at the park. Turns out, there wasn’t a crime at all. But there is a den of coyotes living near the park, according to the notice posted by the city of Atlanta.

“I read it twice because the first time I didn’t believe it,” Grant told the AJC. “They’re probably just as scared of us, but my guard is going to be up.”

Joyce Shepherd, a member of the Atlanta City Council, told Channel 2 Action News the coyotes have become more aggressive recently, even eating a neighbor’s chickens and a goat.

via ‘Coyote’ trapped near park turns out to be dog  | ajc.com.

Chiquita, Charlotte,Twitter war, Cincinnati:  War!

Determined to stop Chiquita’s exodus, Cincinnati residents started a hashtag on Twitter, #NoCincyBananaSplit, to keep the global fruit and vegetable distributor around. Within days, Charlotte lovers had come up with their own rival hashtag, #Bananas4CLT, certain they could win the battle for Chiquita’s heart. Prolific tweeter and Chiquita CEO Fernando Aguirre encouraged the faceoff, and Charlotte restaurants soon joined in.

Today, Chiquita announced its decision: It would, as planned, move its headquarters to Charlotte. But Cincinnati didn’t go without a fight. Here is how the Twitter war went down:

via Chiquita’s new world headquarters in Charlotte decided with help from a Twitter war – BlogPost – The Washington Post.

cake balls, holiday desserts: 🙂

I first tasted these two years ago at a Christmas party and immediately had to have the recipe. It’s based on a mix, but I imagine you can follow the same directions substituting from scratch cake and frosting (I’ll try that one day). You can also try it with other cake combinations.

via Red Velvet Cake Balls « bakerella.com.

04
Sep
11

9.4. 2011 … Today would be my dad’s 84th birthday … for 11 months of the year he was my mom’s “gigolo” … it took me a long time to get the joke. :)

‎!♪♫•*¨*•.¸¸♪♪¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪
Happy Birthday, Dad!

1927 -2003
♪♫•*¨*• .¸¸♪♪¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪

Labor Day Weekend, End of an Era (Summer), kith/kin, EHL sr., Shakespeare, mixtape:  Labor Day Weekend is poignant.  My dad’s birthday always falls near it, if not on it (it is today 9/4), and the end of the summer always meant one last vacation at the beach.  It was Jekyll Island GA as a child and then DeBordieu SC as an adult with my children. When my last graduates, we will find our next phase end-of-the-summer beach.  And it will be wonderful.  I love this New Yorker “mixtape” of poems and prose about the end of the summer. Funny, even Shakespeare captured it …

“And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.”

via The Book Bench: Literary Mixtape: Summer’s End : The New Yorker.

“If”, Rudyard Kipling, kith/kin, poetry, favorites:  Just like with music, if a friend recommends a poem, i will read it.  Bob T. recommended “If, ” by Rudyard Kipling (“I love this poem. I don’t always follow its advice, but it reminds you to just keep plugging.”)  “If” is a Lindsey family favorite as well. So much so that my sister offered all her children and nieces and nephews $100 if they would memorize “If” for their 13th birthday.

If

If you can keep your head when all about you

Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;

If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,

But make allowance for their doubting too:

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,

Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies,

Or being hated don’t give way to hating,

And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;

If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim,

If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster

And treat those two impostors just the same:.

If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken

Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,

Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,

And stoop and build’em up with worn-out tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings

And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,

And lose, and start again at your beginnings,

And never breathe a word about your loss:

If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew

To serve your turn long after they are gone,

And so hold on when there is nothing in you

Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,

Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,

If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,

If all men count with you, but none too much:

If you can fill the unforgiving minute

With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,

Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,

And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

via If by Rudyard Kipling.

A history of the World in Six Glasses, bookshelf, lists:  This book comes highly recommended by Allison B. I can’t wait to get to it on my list.

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Standage starts with a bold hypothesis—that each epoch, from the Stone Age to the present, has had its signature beverage—and takes readers on an extraordinary trip through world history. The Economist’s technology editor has the ability to connect the smallest detail to the big picture and a knack for summarizing vast concepts in a few sentences. He explains how, when humans shifted from hunting and gathering to farming, they saved surplus grain, which sometimes fermented into beer. The Greeks took grapes and made wine, later borrowed by the Romans and the Christians. Arabic scientists experimented with distillation and produced spirits, the ideal drink for long voyages of exploration. Coffee also spread quickly from Arabia to Europe, becoming the “intellectual counterpoint to the geographical expansion of the Age of Exploration.” European coffee-houses, which functioned as “the Internet of the Age of Reason,” facilitated scientific, financial and industrial cross-fertilization. In the British industrial revolution that followed, tea “was the lubricant that kept the factories running smoothly.” Finally, the rise of American capitalism is mirrored in the history of Coca-Cola, which started as a more or less handmade medicinal drink but morphed into a mass-produced global commodity over the course of the 20th century. In and around these grand ideas, Standage tucks some wonderful tidbits—on the antibacterial qualities of tea, Mecca’s coffee trials in 1511, Visigoth penalties for destroying vineyards—ending with a delightful appendix suggesting ways readers can sample ancient beverages.

via Amazon.com: A History of the World in 6 Glasses (9780802715524): Tom Standage: Books.

See also – The World in a Glass: Six Drinks That Changed History.

Marthame Sanders, i feast therefore i am, favorite blogs, faith and spirituality, definition: religion:  Quite a while back I posted a sunday school  discussion on the definition of religion. 2.27.2011 … thinking about how we define things … from Sunday School … “religion.” How do you define “religion?” « Dennard’s Clipping Service.  I love Marthame’s definition and where he takes us from there.

And that, in my opinion, is what the conversation offers us as people of faith, whether we define ourselves as “spiritual” or “religious”. For the author, the important distinction is between private spirituality and religious community.

The word “religion” itself is all about connection – re-ligio, as in ligament, a re-connection. Listen to what the author writes:

Being privately spiritual but not religious just doesn’t interest me. There is nothing challenging about having deep thoughts all by oneself. What is interesting is doing this work in community, where people might call you on stuff, or heaven forbid, disagree with you. Where life with God gets rich and provocative is when you dig deeply into a tradition that you did not invent all for yourself.

In an odd way, the very thing that happened on Facebook was just that: people were calling each other on stuff and having an honest conversation.

Being Jesus’ disciple, following Christ faithfully, means doing so in community.

This is such a crucial point to make in 2011. We have the world before us in ways that we never had. Technology has given us more access to information than ever. Gutenberg’s printing press doesn’t hold a candle to the internet. Not even language is a barrier, as pages written in other languages can be translated with the click of a mouse.

And yet, the irony is that we are becoming more and more isolated by virtue of the same technology which holds such promise. There are more places to get information than ever before. And yet the tyranny of choice usually means that we self-select for those sources that agree with what we already say. Whether we choose Fox News or MSNBC, it is so much more comforting to listen to those who will confirm our self-satisfaction rather than challenge it.

And even places of apparent neutrality choose for us, and we don’t even know it. A Google search is now based not only on the term you are looking for, but also your history as an internet user. Two people looking for the same thing will get different results based on what they prefer, meaning a further narrowing of the information we get. And Facebook, which prompted this whole conversation today, slowly removes updates from your friends whom you rarely click on, meaning the ones who challenge your thinking will cease to be a part of your social media experience.

In many ways, we see this siloing of opinion at work in the partisan absurdities inWashington, and in the news channels competing to see who can have more people on screen at the same time screaming at each other. But I’m not convinced this is anything new and peculiar to this day and age; it just has a different flavor, and it gives the church a crucial role.

Do you want an experience that will tell you how right you already are? There are plenty of those out there, and you can pretty much do that on your own. Do you want a place that convinces you of your own self-righteousness? There are plenty of organizations and, yes, even churches that will do just that.

Or are you looking for a community where you will be welcomed as you are and celebrated for you who are and, at the same time, challenged to grow and stretch as you confront the world as it really is? Then we just might be the place for you.

I’d like us, as we close, to consider the prayer that the author uses in her article:

Dear God, thank you for creating us in your image and not the other way around.

Amen.

via We Can Work It Out « i feast therefore i am.

kith/kin, family art: I love it!  However, I feel like I am the hippopotamus and my little bird has outgrown me … That’s my interpretation.  Molly says she is just making whimsy of reality.  Her grandmother GoGo was looking for something much deeper … the bird survives the mammal.  What do you see?  That is what makes art fun!

PostSecret, apps, review:  I think it will be nice for some to send in via the internet … but the homemade postcards were more personal.  And I loved the relationship between the mail carrier and Frank, the site’s creator (see below).  Oh, and I hope Frank’s dad is wrong.

PostSecret (@postsecret)
9/3/11 1:57 PM
My dad believes that when the PostSecret App goes live tonight, the Blog will die because no one will mail me postcards anymore.

However, as time went on the postcards began to more than just trickle in. We at the post office were having a blast reading them every day. There were silly, funny, serious, sad, lonely, hateful, every kind of emotion you could imagine on these little postcards. The exceptionally funny ones were passed around the office for everyone to share. One of my co-workers said she couldn’t believe that this person lived on MY route. She said, “of all people to get this on their route, YOU!” I took it to mean that she knew I was thoroughly enjoying it and maybe she was a tad jealous! I have to say that it was fun and a great conversation topic, but despite all that, I began to learn from it. There are many many sad and lonely people out there and some of these postcards would break your heart. Suddenly the problems that I or my friends might have, seemed small in comparison to the ones I was reading. It certainly made me take a look at my life and realize how lucky I was. I just wanted to reach out and help but they were always anonymous except for the postmark you hadn’t a clue where the card came from.

via fromUKtoUSwithlove: POSTSECRET August 6, 2010.

blog scrapers, Goggle:  I hope no one ever thinks I am a blog scraper …If you think I have taken something without citing it, please contact me …

Scaper sites have stolen content from writers for years, building spam websites that copy and paste your writing into a new online location. Now Google needs your help to weed out these sites that clog search results and pirate content.

Check it out: “Google is testing algorithmic changes for scraper sites (especially blog scrapers). We are asking for examples, and may use data you submit to test and improve our algorithms. This form does not perform a spam report or notice of copyright infringement. Use [this link] to report spam or [this link]  to report copyright complaints.”

These phantom websites sometimes score higher than the original content in Google search results, frustrating thousands of writers. The data you share with Google will help the search giant block these online pests. (Via Jose Afonso Furtado)

via How to Report Scraper Sites to Google – GalleyCat.

twitter, Kathy Reichs, ads, LOL:  Ok I assumed she was taking me to a Bones ad! Great ad. 🙂

Kathy Reichs (@KathyReichs)
9/3/11 12:53 PM
What’s the ad for? Guess before it ends.http://t.co/XgjDDY7

Sir Conan Doyle, Sherlock Homes, literary afterlife:  I have often commented on Jane Austin’s nine lives. Other writers with similar afterlives are certainly Dickens, Shakespeare and Sir Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes.  Can you think of others?

A Study in Sherlock: Stories Inspired by the Holmes Canon

Edited by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger. Bantam, $29.95 (350p) ISBN 978-0-8129-8246-6

King (The Beekeeper’s Apprentice and 10 other Mary Russell novels) and Klinger (The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes) have not stuck to the usual suspects for this stellar anthology of 16 new short stories that pay homage to the great detective. Perhaps the highlight is S.J. Rozan’s “The Men with the Twisted Lips,” a particularly clever alternate take on a canonical Holmes story. Phillip and Jerry Margolin provide a fair-play whodunit centering on the purported discovery of evidence of a Holmes story written exclusively for Queen Victoria in “The Adventure of the Purloined Paget.” Colin Cotterill takes a humorous approach in his illustrated selection, “The Mysterious Case of the Unwritten Short Story,” while Charles Todd’s “The Case That Holmes Lost” convincingly recreates Doyle himself, grappling with a lawsuit aimed at his most famous creation. Other contributors include Lee Child, Neil Gaiman, Laura Lippman, Margaret Maron, and Jacqueline Winspear. (Nov.)

via Fiction Review: A Study in Sherlock: Stories Inspired by the Holmes Canon by Edited by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger. Bantam, $29.95 (350p) ISBN 978-0-8129-8246-6.

iPad, Ipad commercial use:  I have never seen one used in business (other than in the Apple Store).  I promise I will tell you the first time I do.

We’ve all been there; wandering aimlessly up and down the grocery aisles, silently screaming, “My kingdom for an iPad dock on this shopping cart!”

One supermarket chain in the U.K. is looking to do the unthinkable by rolling out (pun intended!) shopping carts—or “trolleys” as they’re charmingly called across the pond—with built-in iPad docks.

The supermarket chain, Sainsbury’s, will be testing the carts in one of its West London stores and if everything goes well, the project may be extended to the rest of its locations across the U.K. No word on whether we’ll see something like this in the U.S., but this is America. Go start your own supermarket chain and order some of these if you want them that badly.

via Supermarket Rolls Out Shopping Carts with Built-in iPad Docks – Techland – TIME.com.

The future of flight attendant luggage may end up being even smaller than those tiny carry-on bags you often see them wheeling around as they roam airports in flight attendant packs; British Airways is testing to see whether iPads will make cabin crews helpful and more productive during loading and flights.

100 cabin crew members will be given the tablets as part of a pilot program to see how they impact in-flight service, replacing printed charts, timetables and other material they normally carry.

via British Airways Flight Attendants to Be Outfitted with iPads – Techland – TIME.com.

la guerre des Post-It, Post-It wars, Only in France, LOL:  If someone sees this in the US, let me know.

 Just when it seemed like Ubisoft Montreuil had won the French Post-It War with their three-story Ezio from Assassin’s Creed, a new challenger appears.

Société Générale Bank has trumped both Ubisoft and their rivals at BNP Bank with this 11,000-note creation.

Sorry, other Post-It teams. You just got Asterixed.

via Post-It War Update of the Day – TDW Geeks.

28
Aug
11

8.28.2011 ‎… Have i mentioned that the man can cook … :)‎… Heading to Amelie’s to see if American-made French macaroons are worthy of the drive … Scratch that, Amelie’s is always worth the drive :)

home, food, kith/kin, Amelie’s, Charlotte, macaroons:  Last night John tried an old favorite (which I buy frozen) Chicken Cordon Bleu.  The kids actually rebel and call it Chicken Cordon Bleh … well, homemade by Chef JBT is definitely better.  And then today Molls and I headed to  Amelie’s French Bakery and Cafe for macaroons … they were good … but not as good as Parisian macaroons … pistachio was definitely better than raspberry.  I guess we are still on a French food kick. 🙂

Dr. Martin Luther King, Rep. John Lewis (D-GA):  I have never been a great fan of John Lewis.  I respect what he did during the civil rights movement, but in some ways he historically has ignored his white constituents in Atlanta … not completely, but that is another issue.  Nor have I ever thought he spoke well … too vituperative. But his commentary here is excellent.  And even if you do not agree, this is worth reading because it sums up MLK’s dream.

Among those leaders, I know he would take a special interest in President Obama — not only because he is the first African-American to sit in the Oval Office, but because Dr. King recognized the power of one man to transform a nation. He would say that the president has the capacity to unify America, to bring us together as one people, one family, one house.  He would say that a leader has the ability to inspire people to greatness, but that to do so he must be daring, courageous and unafraid to demonstrate what he is made of.

As a minister, never elected to any public office, Dr. King would tell this young leader that it is his moral obligation to use his power and influence to help those who have been left out and left behind.  …

Dr. King would say that a Nobel Peace Prize winner can and must find a way to demonstrate that he is a man of peace, a man of love and non-violence.

He would say that Obama’s election represents a significant step toward laying down the burden of race, but that this task is not yet complete. The election of 2008 was a major down payment on Dr. King’s dream, but it did not fulfill it. When one member of Congress calls the president a “tar baby” on a radio show and when another cries out “You lie!” during a State of the Union address, it is more than clear that we still do not understand the need to respect human dignity despite our differences.

Dr. King would tell this young president to do what he can to end discrimination based on race, color, religious faith and sexual orientation. He would say that righteous work makes its own way. … The people of this country recognize when a leader is trying to do what is right. Take a stand, he would say. Go with your gut. Let the people of this country see that you are fighting for them and they will have your back.

There will be opposition, and it might become ugly. … He often quoted the notion that “the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” And the reason it does is because of the central goodness of humankind.

Martin Luther King Jr. believed that once people heard the truth, their tendency to bend toward what is right would pave the way for goodness to prevail. And it still can.

via What would MLK say to President Obama? – The Washington Post.

Libya Uprising, Qaddafi, Middle East stability, NATO:  Getting your arms around all the issues in the April Sring is very difficult.  This article is helpful with regard to Libya.

The toppling of Colonel Qaddafi—no matter whether he is eventually tried, killed or exiled—will be a boon to the Middle East and Western powers that supported the rebels. The implications for Libya itself are less clear and in part depend on whether Qaddafi loyalists will disperse and keep their weapons or agree to disarm. To become a rule-based democracy—the stated goal of all the various rebel groups—Libya must avoid an Iraqi-style insurgency, as well as disputes among the new rulers.

Helpfully, Libya has no sectarian divide. Its society is relatively homogeneous but grievances abound after four decades of oppression. Revenge killings loom, as well as tribal conflicts and large-scale looting, given the lack of physical security at the moment. The fall of Saddam Hussein in Iraq and the Taliban in Afghanistan showed that a temporary power vacuum can lead to long-term instability and undermine the formation of a functioning state.

The impact of Libya’s liberation on the rest of the Arab world looks clearer. What counts there is the dethronement of a tyrant. It will lift spirits in Syria, where another reformist revolt is under way. It will also give renewed drive to Egyptians and Tunisians who toppled their dictators several months ago but have since been grappling with constitutional change. Libya will inject new momentum into the Arab spring—raising hopes that decades of stagnation and repression can be ended.

Libya will have an impact on NATO too. The military alliance that faced down the Red Army might have been expected to crush the clumsy forces of Colonel Qaddafi in days. Instead it took five months of fighting and 17,000 air sorties. An embarrassment for NATO? Not at all. The alliance has had a good war so far (who said “stalemate” not long ago?) and is winning the best kind of victory given the circumstances: one achieved mostly by Libyans themselves. Rebels entered the capital without a single Western soldier visible on the ground (though there were some special forces). NATO air attacks, as well as weapons supplied by friendly Gulf states, aided the rebels. But they alone manned trenches, which will give them added legitimacy in months to come.

via End-game in Libya: Going, going… | The Economist.

Neil Gaiman, heroes, LOL, twitter:  Never meet your heroes!  But this goy got a retweet by his hero!

Neil Gaiman (@neilhimself)
8/28/11 12:41 PM
Very funny… RT “@barryhutchison: Blog post about meeting @neilhimself at @edinbookshop last night:http://t.co/3QHUgm3

You might not have heard of Neil Gaiman. At least, you might not have heard of him if you’re deaf and blind, and have spent the last 20 years living in a ditch. On the moon. Just in case this describes you, here’s a quick summary of his career. Much more detailed information can be found on Wikipedia. You can also read Neil’s blog.

Neil Gaiman is very busy man. He has written adult novels, children’s novels, graphic novels, short stories and picture books. He has also written movie screenplays and scripts for TV programmes, most notably BABYLON 5 and DOCTOR WHO, as well as his own original series, NEVERWHERE, for the BBC.

It was only during the three hour drive home that I realised I’d made a mess of the little message I’d written to him inside the book. I thanked him for inspiring me to become an author myself. At least, that’s what I meant to write, but I’m pretty sure in my semi-coherent state I actually thanked him for ‘encouraging’ me to become an author, as if he himself had popped round my house back in the late 80s/early 90s and personally egged me on. After reading that, I’ll be surprised if he bothers going any further.

And that, I think, is why they say you should never meet your heroes. You’ll only end up making a dick of yourself if you do.

via Meeting Neil Gaiman | BarryHutchison.com.

Hurricane Irene, twitter, quotes:  Harsh! Re: NY … NC got in the way …

CNN Video (@CNNVideo)
8/28/11 12:31 PM
New Yorkers should be thanking the state of North Carolina for a weakened #Irene. Chad Myers explains. Video:http://t.co/oS3971b
WSJ Greater New York (@WSJNY)
8/28/11 11:56 AM
“A wet day in London seems worse than this.” Tourists in Times Square react to Irene:http://t.co/bjUJG2h
Eric Holthaus (@wxrisk)
8/28/11 10:40 AM
Def historic. first landfalling TS or Hurr in 5 boroughs since 1893. @rap584 So was #Irene of “historical proportions” as we were told?

Apple, iPad, tablet market:  I like my iPad …

More than anything else, the announcement showed that the firm had finally seen the light about the tablet market—namely, that there is no such thing.

What exists instead is a rip-roaring market for iPads. Tablets based on Google’s Android, Hewlett-Packard’s webOS, Microsoft’s Windows, and Research In Motion’s BlackBerry operating systems—have failed dismally to capture consumers’ hearts and minds the way Apple has with its iconic iPad.

You only have to look at the numbers. Apple’s share of the tablet market is over 61% and growing, while all the Android tablets together make up barely 30% and are being squeezed. According to Strategy Analytics of Newton, Massachusetts, Windows tablets account for 4.6% and Research in Motion’s 3.3%. Sooner or later, the rest of the iPad wannabees are going to realise that, just because Apple has a runaway success on its hands, they cannot charge Apple prices for their hastily developed me-too products and expect consumers to clamour for them.

via Tablet computers: Difference Engine: Reality dawns | The Economist.

Paris, France, guides, private guides, Donna Morris:  Small is good; private is better … I found this website and it looked wonderful – France…Off the Beaten Path.  I will give a BIG plug for our private guide in Paris, Donna Morris.  If you need a great way to get oriented, give her a call … Best Friend in Paris France.

World of Coca-Cola, Asa Candler, business cards, end of an era, random:  Are business cards on the way out … I loved seing this old card of Asa Candler … and had not realized business cards had been around since the 1890s or before.

Twitpic – Share photos and videos on Twitter.

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell, Former Vice President Dick Cheney:  I like Colin Powell; I do not like Dick Cheney … enough said.

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell said Sunday that former Vice President Dick Cheney took “cheap shots” in his forthcoming memoir, and that he was taking his aggressive promotional techniques “a bit too far.”

Powell, speaking on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” targeted Cheney’s claim that the book, “In My Time,” would “make heads explode.”

“My head isn’t exploding, I haven’t noticed any other heads exploding in Washington, D.C.,” Powell pointed out. “From what I’ve read in the newspapers and seen on television it’s essentially a rehash of events of seven or eight years ago.”

In fact, Powell suggested, the most notable thing about the book was Mr. Cheney’s characterization of it.

“What really sort of got my attention was this way in which he characterized it: it’s going to cause heads to explode,” he said. “That’s quite a visual. And in fact, it’s the kind of headline I would expect to come out of a gossip columnist, or the kind of headline you might see one of the supermarket tabloids write. It’s not the kind of headline I would have expected to come from a former Vice President of the United States of America.”

He added: “I think Dick overshot the runway.”

Powell also took issue with Cheney’s claim that, during his tenure as Secretary of State, he declined to fully present his positions to former President George W. Bush.

“Mr. Cheney may forget that I’m the one who said to President Bush, ‘If you break it you own it,'” Powell said, referencing the administration’s actions in Iraq. “I gave the president my best advice.”

via Powell: Cheney “overshot the runway” in book – CBS News.

green, electric cars, standards:

Indeed, charging the car’s battery pack at home, or topping up at the office or shopping mall, will work fine for most drivers. But what about trips that are beyond the range of a single battery charge? Couldn’t a driver in need simply pull up to a charging kiosk and plug in for a rapid refill?

It’s not that simple.

Sure, there are already public charging stations in service, and new ones are coming online daily. But those typically take several hours to fully replenish a battery.

As a result, the ability for quick battery boosts — using a compatible direct current fast charger, the Leaf can refill to 80 percent capacity in 30 minutes — could potentially become an important point of differentiation among electric models.

But the availability of fast charging points has in part been held up by the lack of an agreement among automakers on a universal method for fast charging — or even on a single electrical connector. Today’s prevalent D.C. fast-charge systems are built to a standard developed in Japan by Nissan, Mitsubishi and Subaru in conjunction with Tokyo Electric Power.

Called Chademo, which translates roughly to “charge and move,” it uses a connector that is different from the plugs in most electric cars. As a result, a Chademo-compatible car like the Nissan Leaf requires two separate sockets.

Overcoming the limitation of a short driving range is vital to achieving acceptance by consumers who want uncompromised, do-everything vehicles. The potential solutions all have drawbacks. Larger batteries are expensive and saddle the car with added weight. An onboard generator turned by a gasoline engine, as used in the Volt plug-in hybrid and similar future models, are another possible solution, but such systems add cost and pounds — and compromise the emissions-free image that attracts consumers to electric cars in the first place.

via Electric-Car Makers’ Quest – One Plug to Charge Them All – NYTimes.com.

13
Jul
11

‎7.13.2011 … Water bill 6 x the usual (as in $550!)… You think we’d have a broken main … But no, just broken irrigation pipes … praying for an adjustment …

water bill, City of Charlotte, prayers:  I think they will work with me … but you can imagine my shock!

chefs, shilling, new words/phrases:  Shilling doesn’t sound very nice, does it?

Ferran Adrià working for Pepsi? Nate Appleman cooking for Chipotle? What’s up with all these high-end chefs aligning with mainstream corporate sponsors? Thanks to the influence of reality TV and the celeb-chef phenomenon, chef shilling has been on the rise lately. Which begs the question – has the food-TV monster turned some famous chefs into sellouts? Here’s a list of the most shocking chef shills in recent years. What do you think – should accomplished professional chefs be plugging Diet Coke and toothpaste? Let us know in the comments.

via The 5 Most Shocking Celebrity Chef Shills | Zagat

A shill, plant or stooge is a person who helps a person or organization without disclosing that he or she has a close relationship with that person or organization. Shill typically refers to someone who purposely gives onlookers the impression that he or she is an enthusiastic independent customer of a seller (or marketer of ideas) that he or she is secretly working for. The person or group that hires the shill is using crowd psychology, to encourage other onlookers or audience members to purchase the goods or services (or accept the ideas being marketed). Shills are often employed by confidence artists

via Shill – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

cooking, Big Green Egg, Atlanta:  We own one … never use it.  My brother-in-law owns one … it’s in a storage warehouse.  They are made in Atlanta, and there are some who swear by them.  John heard about them and just had to have one 🙂 … it has never been worth all the effort.

When I lived in Atlanta in the late 1980s, I learned to cook Thanksgiving turkeys, Fourth of July pork shoulders, and Sunday night burgers on the Big Green Egg. When I moved to Oxford, Miss. in 1995, I had to leave my Egg behind. It wouldn’t fit in the moving truck.When my mother in law, Marley Hobbs, age 88, moved two doors down a couple years ago, she saved enough room in her moving truck for her Egg. Of late, I’ve been borrowing hers more frequently, while pondering the purchase of a Primo, one of those glossy black oblong models. Sure, they’re expensive. But, after reporting my story on them, I want one more than ever.

via Do You Use a Big Green Egg? – NYTimes.com.

quotes, Gretchen Rubin, Ralph Waldo Emerson:  Got this from Gretchen’s Happiness blog.  Sometimes we talk about famous people who are known by one name (Cher, Madonna) … how many are known by three?

Good manners are made up of petty sacrifices.”
 Ralph Waldo Emerson

technology, things past, history, morse code:  I found this one fun.

POINT REYES NATIONAL SEASHORE, Calif. — It has been a little more than a decade since the last of the nation’s commercial Morse code radio stations officially went off the air, as new technology sank a system that had been a lingua franca of maritime communication since before the Titanic.

But like transmissions that continue to travel through the cosmos long after their original senders are gone, there are some things that refuse to die. And on Tuesday, several outposts of Morse code blazed to life again, if only for a night, with the help of a group of enthusiasts bent on preserving what they call “the music of Morse,” one key tap at a time.

The occasion was an annual radio reboot known as the Night of Nights, held every year on the anniversary of the last Morse code broadcast from a coastal California station in 1999, which included a traditional sign-off (“We wish you fair winds and following seas”) and more than a few teary-eyed former radio operators.

On Tuesday, though, some of those old key men were back on the job, broadcasting from the former headquarters of a marine Morse station in Northern California, KPH, and joined on air by two other stations outside Seattle and in Mobile, Ala., all to honor a system that linked the world long before the Internet, e-mail and Twitter.

via For a Night Each Year, the Airwaves Buzz With Morse Code – NYTimes.com.

 fashion, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, change:  I wore pantyhose daily while I worked (until 1999) … now no one wears them.  I think women look unprofessional without them.  Maybe the Royals will bring back pantyhose … at least for professional or formal situations.

Kate Middleton, Nude PantyhoseCatherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Pippa Middleton are fans of the nude pantyhose! Thanks to the sisters, sales of the hosiery have spiked nearly 85 percent in England, The Telegraph reports. Buckingham Palace enforces a strict dress code for women—they must wear stockings and closed-toed shoes, and royals like Queen Elizabeth,Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie all slip them on when they’re out. The look is also practical, as pantyhose provide extra warmth on chilly nights and a layer of protection against the sun.

http://news.instyle.com/2011/07/13/kate-middleton-pippa-middleton-nude-pantyhose/.

iPad, apps, Tweed:

Tweed presents you with a list of links to new articles, blog posts or anything else posted by your friends and people you follow on Twitter as well as our own curated lists of people we read and follow.

via Tweed: The Twitter app that’s just for links..

iPad, apps, StumbleUpon:   

When the iPad was launched, people across the geek-o-sphere condemned it as a dumb chunk of glass “for consumption only” – a tool incapable of facilitating content creation and possibly a threat to the future of human creativity. “The iPad is an attractive, thoughtfully designed, deeply cynical thing,” wrote Alex Payne. “[If] I had an iPad rather than a real computer as a kid, I’d never be a programmer today.”

That may very well be, but the new iPad app that popular web exploration network StumbleUpon released this week goes a long way towards compensating for whatever risks to creativity that the device poses. If you’ve got an iPad, I think it’s a must-have app. That’s true for everyone, including for kids.

via StumbleUpon for iPad: Like a Magic Carpet Ride for Your Brain.

Harry Potter stars, Emma Watson, Letterman:  This is silly. She is 21.

“Do you drink at all? Do you use controlled substances?” Letterman asked the 21-year-old actress.

Things get a little more uncomfortable after that, as Letterman begins to talk about spirits. And not the kind that fly around Hogwarts.

via On ‘Letterman,’ Harry Potter Star Emma Watson Talks About Getting Drunk – Speakeasy – WSJ.

Netflix, digital media, end of an era:  I have been a Netflix fan for many years … This is a big price increase that takes away the flexibility that I have enjoyed.  I may cancel and see what I think.

Netflix Inc. NFLX -2.69% said Tuesday that it would no longer offer unlimited plans that include both streaming and DVDs by mail. Users must now either subscribe to a stream-only plan, a DVD-only plan, or a combined plan. The unlimited streaming plan will remain at $7.99 a month. The price for obtaining both unlimited streaming and unlimited DVDs will be $15.98 a month ($7.99 + $7.99).

via Netflix separates DVD, streaming plans – MarketWatch.




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