Posts Tagged ‘Ireland

08
Jun
13

6.8.13 … worth reading …

Irish postage stamp, 60 cents, celebrates the UNESCO City of Literature. (Photo: An Post)

Ireland’s New Stamp Features a 224 Word Short StoryBY   JUNE 3, 2013  POST A COMMENT

 

The Irish city that was once a Viking village and is now famous for its literature is Dublin.

The list of writers, poets and playwrights associated with Dublin is a long one. Or perhaps it’s a far-reaching, elongated, and meandering one.

In any case, one on the newest literary voices is a talented teenager. 17-year-old Eoin Moore wrote a short story for a creative writing program for teenagers called Fighting Words.

His story was chosen to be published. But the coolest thing is that it was published on Ireland newest postage stamp. All 224 words of it.

The stamp celebrates Dublin’s designation as a UNESCO City of Literature.

It’s a bright yellow, rectangular stamp (see above) with just enough space to display Eoin Moore’s story, and it’s now available at Irish post offices throughout Dublin…for just 60 cents.

via Ireland’s New Stamp Features a 224 Word Short Story | @pritheworld.

26
Jan
13

1.26.13 … fly on the wall …

U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R – GA,  Political Insider:  Thank you for your years of service to GA and to the Nation, Senator. I would love to be a fly on your back porch!

“I’m going to have a life after this,” Chambliss said. “Sitting on a back porch drinking whisky with some of y’all is exciting to think about.”

via U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss to announce retirement | Political Insider.

Paris, Best Friend in Paris: Small world!  My Charlotte friends “stalked” my FB page to find the name of my Paris guide and friend, Donna Morris.  i highly recommend her.  And loved getting this photo of them having a great time!  Best Friend in Paris: Custom, Personalized Tours of Paris.

Bussing back to Saint Germaine with D ‘s friends 🙂

Photo: Bussing back to Saint Germaine with Dennard Lindsey Teague 's friends :-)

Jane Austen, portrait, British Portrait Gallery, Jane Austen’s World:  I dragged my husband to see this portrait …

It is here , many of you will know, is the tiny portrait of Jane Austen attributed to her sister Cassandra and drawn in 1810 using pencil and watercolours. It is an unprepossessing little picture. It’s great worth is in who it is. But, if you stand back from the plinth with the perspex box on its summit containing Jane and view the whole vista you will notice that Jane is surrounded by a halo of super star writers. She is the centre of the group.

Bottom left is Sir Walter Scott. Moving clockwise next comes Samuel Taylor Coleridge, at the top is John Keats and then as you move down right of Jane, Robert Southey follows and last, bottom right, is Robert Burns. Quite a group, and there she is in the middle, our Jane. If you think I am imagining the halo metaphor, walk behind the plinth with Jane displayed and you will notice that there is nothing on the wall, there is a space. The halo metaphor works. The only thing behind Jane is a handwritten catalogue number on the back of the portrait itself. It reads; “NPG 360, Jane Austen.” It’s written in pencil in a reasonably legible hand. A scrawled note such as somebody might write as a memo to themselves on a post it and stick on their fridge door.

via Jane Austen’s World.

NYC, The Cloisters: If you get a chance while in NYC..

.“The Cloisters was assembled from architectural elements dating from the twelfth through the fifteenth century, and the collection comprises approximately 3,000 works of art. To add to the experience: the gardens at The Cloisters are treasures in themselves, and the views of the Hudson River are spectacular.” —Tom Campbell, The Director’s Tour http://met.org/WAKiItMade in, present-day France | Cloister from Saint-Michel-de-Cuxa | ca. 1130–40

.Photo: “The Cloisters was assembled from architectural elements dating from the twelfth through the fifteenth century, and the collection comprises approximately 3,000 works of art. To add to the experience: the gardens at The Cloisters are treasures in themselves, and the views of the Hudson River are spectacular.” —Tom Campbell, The Director’s Tour http://met.org/WAKiIt</p> <p>Made in, present-day France | Cloister from Saint-Michel-de-Cuxa | ca. 1130–40

wind turbines, UK, Ireland: How to create a conflict …

‘Giant’ Wind Turbines – British and Irish ministers will sign an agreement Thursday to build the world’s largest wind turbines across the Irish midlands, reports the BBC. Environmentalists have described the plan to build the 600 feet towers, which could generate energy for millions of U.K. homes, as “crazy” and believe that it will damage the Irish landscape. The proposed wind towers would transfer energy via cables under the Irish Sea back to the U.K. Even though developers claim that thousands of Irish jobs will be created, Andrew Duncan from Lakelands Wind Information said “it seems to be an Irish solution to a British problem … it seems they want to impose these wind farms on the Irish general public instead.” Irish energy minister Pat Rabbitte confirmed that the project is still in its infancy.

via Must-Reads from Around the World | TIME.com.

 “Friendfluence”, Carlin Flora, bookshelf, Sophisticated Dorkiness: Sounds like my friend group …

Review: “Friendfluence,” writes journalist Carlin Flora, “is the powerful and often underappreciated role that friends — past and present — play in determining the shape and direction of our lives.” Studies have shown that our friends help mold our identities and, as adults, subtly influence our beliefs, values and physical and emotional health. Our friends are both the most stable and the most flexible relationships we have, yet friendships are not nearly as well-studied or well-recognized as our relationships with our families and our spouses.

In Friendfluence, Flora takes a broad look at the research that is available about friendship, starting with our childhood pals, the benefits and dark sides of friendship, and how technology is changing the way we make friends and maintain friendships. In the book, Flora makes a convincing argument that our friends are more than just extras — they are vital relationships in our lives.

via Sophisticated Dorkiness — A bookworm journalist blogs on literature and life.

history, Britain, Jane Austen, Embarking On A Course of Study:

I happened upon this great series called Ian Hislop’s Emotional History of Britain. It’s in three parts but, alas, only part one is on YouTube. Still, it’s the part that covers Austen so, hurray!

Ian doesn’t only touch on S&S, but also P&P, and Emma. And the curator of the Jane Austen House Museum has some great advice for ladies to follow when choosing who to give your heart to. (Hint: Knightley to Emma: “If I loved you less, I could say more.”

Ian walks a bit through the house, which is lovely to see. There’s a wonderful peace to this six minute section. I miss her house!

But don’t just watch the Austen bit, watch the whole thing. It begins discussing how Brits used to be considered very emotional by other Europeans. And how a romantic sensibility was to be cultivated and prized, in the early to mid 1700s. Then he traces how the tide turned to the ‘stiff upper lip’.

The part related to Austen is 42:43 – 48:36.

via Embarking On A Course of Study.

SeinfeldToday, Downton Abbey, Twitter, LOL:

Jerry loses his phone contacts, doesn’t know which girl is texting.

ELAINE:”She mentioned Downton Abbey.”

J:”They all like Downton Abbey!”

via Twitter / SeinfeldToday: Jerry loses his phone contacts, ….

macroeconomics, The Economist:  As a college economics major, I am amazed at how much understanding of the subject area i have lost.

MAINSTREAM macroeconomics has a pretty poor reputation these days, both among the public at large and among economists in other fields. This is hardly surprising. There is little consensus on even the most basic questions in macro. Ask top academics why America’s post-crisis recovery has been so slow and you will get many different conflicting answers. But the most obvious reason for the widespread disdain is that the profession failed to predict that the biggest and most painful downturn since the Great Depression was even possible.

Now, several groups of economists are trying to rebuild macro, often melding previously discarded ideas with sophisticated new mathematical and computational techniques. This week’s print edition gives an overview of some of the interesting new developments, but in this post, I want to look more at the history of the field. The following slideshow by Markus Brunnermeier and Delwin Olivan of Princeton is a good place to start:

 

As this week’s article makes clear, however, a new generation of reformers and revolutionaries are figuring out how to realistically depict the financial system. Subsequent posts will discuss these and other worthwhile ideas that may reshape the field.

via A brief history of macro: How we got here | The Economist.

Super Bowl Ads,  YouTube,  AllThingsD:  Personally, I’d rather be forced to watch the game to see the ads …

Note that if you’re one of those weird people who wants to watch the Super Bowl on a browser instead of a TV, and you’re one of the people who wants to see the ads (smallish Venn overlap there, methinks), you’ll be in luck this year. CBS, which is streaming the game on the Web, says that it will also stream the broadcast ads on the Web — something that NBC didn’t do when it streamed last year’s game.

via Super Bowl Ads Run Early on YouTube – Peter Kafka – Media – AllThingsD.

LOL, Princess Bride:

A man aboard a New Zealand-bound Qantas Airlines flight was asked to remove his “Princess Bride” t-shirt after other passengers reported that they found it intimidating.

A man aboard a New Zealand-bound Qantas Airlines flight was asked to remove his "Princess Bride" t-shirt after other passengers reported that they found it intimidating.

via “Princess Bride” T-Shirt Freaks Out Australian Airline Passengers.

NYC, man’s best friend, graphics, @brainpickings: An Interactive Watercolor Map of the City’s Canine Caucus…

New York City has a special relationship with its dogs — just look at the treasure trove that is The Big New Yorker Book of Dogs, one of 2012′s best art books. Now, the data team at WNYC — consisting of John Keefe, Stephen Reader, Steven Melendez and Louise Ma — has put together this fantastic map of NYC’s dog names and breeds, explorable by area, down to the ZIP code. The data is displayed over Stamen’s stunning watercolor map of NYC, one of the works featured in Art Pickings

LOL:

A public school teacher was arrested today at John F. Kennedy International airport as he attempted to board a flight while in possession of a ruler, a protractor, a compass, a slide-rule and a calculator. At a morning press conference, Attorney General Eric Holder said he believes the man is a member of the notorious Al-Gebra movement.

He did not identify the man, who has been charged by the FBI with carrying weapons of math instruction.

‘Al-Gebra is a problem for us’, the Attorney General said. ‘They derive solutions by means and extremes, and sometimes go off on tangents in search of absolute values.’ They use secret code names like “X” and “Y” and refer to themselves as “unknowns” but we have determined that they belong to a common denominator of the axis of medieval with coordinates in every country. As the Greek philosopher Isosceles used to say, “There are 3 sides to every triangle.”

When asked to comment on the arrest, President Obama said, “If God had wanted us to have better weapons of math instruction, He would have given us more fingers and toes.”

Photo: A public school teacher was arrested today at John F. Kennedy International airport as he attempted to board a flight while in possession of a ruler, a protractor, a compass, a slide-rule and a calculator. At a morning press conference, Attorney General Eric Holder said he believes the man is a member of the notorious Al-Gebra movement.</p> <p>He did not identify the man, who has been charged by the FBI with carrying weapons of math instruction.</p> <p>'Al-Gebra is a problem for us', the Attorney General said. 'They derive solutions by means and extremes, and sometimes go off on tangents in search of absolute values.' They use secret code names like "X" and "Y" and refer to themselves as "unknowns" but we have determined that they belong to a common denominator of the axis of medieval with coordinates in every country. As the Greek philosopher Isosceles used to say, "There are 3 sides to every triangle."</p> <p>When asked to comment on the arrest, President Obama said, "If God had wanted us to have better weapons of math instruction, He would have given us more fingers and toes."

Davidson Basketball: Another great day to be a wildcat … Wildcats won! DAV(13):79 APP:56

01
Oct
11

10.1.2011 … ‎!♪♫•*¨*•.¸¸♪♪¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪ Happy Birthday (LXXXV) to my mamma ♪♫•*¨*• .¸¸♪♪¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪ … another end of an era … M’s last SAT … Wohoo! … and “Last” high school homecoming dance (better than last SAT) …

Davidson College, Study Abroad Program: I think the 1968-69 brochure speaks volumes for Davidson College … way ahead of its time.

According to a 1968-1969 brochure, “A year of study in a foreign country, confronting the student with new combinations of old ideas and opening his intellect to the possibilities for the development of new ideas, is an invaluable adjunct to any college program. This is particularly true for Davidson, which has as its goal the development of ‘disciplined and creative minds,’ minds which ‘make relevant and valid judgements,’ which ‘discriminate among values,’ and which communicate freely with others in the realm of ideas. Such study goes far toward making understanding out of prejudice, intellectual sophistication out of intellectual provincialism, and mature insights and habits of thought out of uncritical and adolescent minds. It therefore contributes in the most profound way to a truly liberal arts education.”

With its central place in the liberal arts tradition, Davidson now sponsors wide range of study abroad programs in its history, ranging geographically from Europe to the Indian sub-continent to Africa to South America. The current study abroad program for Davidson students is administered through the Dean Rusk International Studies Program.

via Study Abroad Shapes Students at Davidson — Around the D.

gLee, tv: Spoiler  …

It looks like the honeymoon is over for Kurt and Blaine.

Sources confirm to TVLine exclusively that Glee has tapped up-and-coming theater actor Grant Gustin to play the recurring role of Sebastian, a gay Dalton Academy Warbler who sets his sights on Blaine.

Major Glee Spoiler Alert: Big Developments For Rachel/Finn and Kurt/Blaine in Episode 5

Both Fox and the show’s producers declined to comment, but the buzz is that Sebastian is the polar opposite of Kurt in every possible way. He’s more like the male version of Santana in that he’s both promiscuous and kinda-sorta scheming.

via Glee Exclusive: New Gay Warbler Played By Grant Gustin to Come Between Kurt and Blaine! – TVLine – TVLine.

Spirits of Meath Halloween Festival, halloween, history, Ireland:  Never heard it was rooted in Ireland.

Spirits of Meath Halloween Festival

21 October 2011 – 06 November 2011

County Meath, uniquely where it all began, is bringing you Ireland’s most electrifying Halloween Festival…Fun by day, frights by night!! Samhain, the ancient Celtic Festival that we now call Halloween, originated in Co. Meath more than 2,000 years ago. Samhain marks the end of the old Celtic Year and the beginning of the New Year. One of the main spiritual centres of the ancient Celts was located on top of the hill of Tlachtga, now called the Hill of Ward, near Athboy, Co. Meath. Today, the old Celtic ceremony at Tlachtga has been revived and we mix the ancient past and the twenty-first century with a re-enactment of the Celtic celebration starting with a torch lit procession from the Fair Green in Athboy, Co. Meath to the top of the Hill of Tlachtga, at 7pm on October 31st each year.

via Spirits of Meath Halloween Festival.

Disney World, kith/kin, 40th Anniversary, family secrets:  OK, I am sure my brother (and I only have one)  has been wondering when this family secret would come up.  Our grandparents took the two of us to the NEW Disney World in the summer of 1972.  And we were allowed to go through the park together … and he abandoned me.  I had to ride the teacups by myself … You can cry now. Happy 40th Disney World!

 

Don’t get sick! This photo from 1955 shows some of the first children to ever brave Disneyland’s dizzying teacup ride, formally called “Mad Tea Party” and based on Disney’s animated version of Alice in Wonderland.

via Disney Theme Parks, Then and Now – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

Troy Davis, funeral, martyr, death penalty:  Martyr … is martyr the right word?  Tragic victim, maybe, but not martyr.

Sent to death row 20 years ago as a convicted cop killer, Troy Davis was celebrated as “martyr and foot soldier” Saturday by more than 1,000 people who packed the pews at his funeral and pledged to keep fighting the death penalty.

via More than 1,000 mourn Troy Davis as a martyr at Ga. funeral preaching end to the death penalty – The Washington Post.

BofA, Merrill Lynch, Warren Buffett, financial meltdown:  Profits, but no joy … they forget that many at ML got their hefty bonuses at the time of the merger … despite hefty losses.

IT sounded like a crank call, the business equivalent of “Do you have Prince Albert in a can?”: Hello, Warren Buffett wants to talk to your boss.

Brian Moynihan, Bank of America’s chief. The bank is still reeling under mortgage-related woes despite recent success at its Merrill Lynch unit.

Only this was no gag. The caller was telling a banker in Chicago that none other than Mr. Buffett wanted to reach the chief executive of Bank of America, ASAP.

The hurried deal that emerged from that early-morning call in late August underscored Bank of America’s predicament: It was the too-big-to-fail bank that, to some, also seemed too big to succeed.

Its C.E.O., Brian T. Moynihan, has been struggling to fix things for almost two years. After the financial markets turned on the company this summer, Mr. Buffett invested $5 billion, arresting a precipitous decline in Bank of America’s share price.

But not even the imprimatur of the Oracle of Omaha has been enough to dispel the clouds. Despite the billions from Mr. Buffett, and tens of billions in asset sales, Bank of America can’t seem to find its way.

The situation has set teeth on edge at its headquarters in Charlotte, N.C. But perhaps nowhere is the grumbling louder than in Midtown Manhattan, at One Bryant Park, now the base of the Wall Street bank formerly known as just Merrill Lynch.

DESPITE the pain, some senior bankers are saying privately that they’re hoping the division can become a bit nimbler as a result of Project New BAC.

“There is just a feeling that you can’t make a move on things that make a great deal of sense,” one executive says. “There’s just this enormous black hole.”

Sometimes, he says, the bureaucracy is suffocating. “I like being out on the road with clients,” this executive adds. “It’s only when I’m sitting in this office am I reminded of what a big, burdensome place this can be.”

Mr. Montag isn’t one for moaning and groaning. “At many firms, not just here, there’s a woe-is-us attitude,” he says. “The market is after us, the economy is after us. You name something and people will say it’s after us.”

He says morale is much better than it was two years ago. His advice for the complainers? “Show no fear. People respond to that.”

With that attitude, he says, “people will walk through the fire with you.”

via At Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Profits but No Joy – NYTimes.com.

27
Jul
10

‎7.27.2010 … missing my peeps … even jbt out of state today …

faith, missions, family, Gray: My nephew Gray is in Lesotho on this mission trip.  What a great experience and so great that I can follow from home!

The Give Love Mission Team is headed out tonight at 7:30 p.m. It’s a long flight (about 16 hours!). And aside from 6 youth and 10 adults, we have a lot of luggage to get there as well. We’re taking more than 200 blankets to the kids at the Ministry of Insured Salvation Orphanage from the North Avenue kids at Vacation Bible School, guitars, art supplies, and all kinds of goodies. Please pray for safe travels, team unity, and that God would be preparing our hearts for what we’re about to encounter. Be praying for the precious kids we’re about to meet, too!

via North Avenue Missionaries.

education, internships, Davidson:  Davidson, just like most liberal arts colleges, is struggling to incorporate internships into the college experience.

But besides the financial question, students who attend liberal arts colleges can find it’s difficult to get credit for internships, says Lauren Valentino, 22, a recent graduate of Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn., who wrote a thesis on unpaid internships.

“Liberal arts colleges maintain a distinct identity from other institutions through their non-vocational curriculum, which explains why they are less willing than some other universities to grant credit for internships,” Valentino says.

via Unpaid internships can cost — or pay off for — college students – USATODAY.com.

culture, high school: What will I say about my generation in 20 years?

I was witnessing a truth. Within our bodies of 67 or 68 years lived all the people we had ever been or seemed to be. All the success, all the defeat, all the love and fear. We were all here.

We went to Urbana High School between 1956 and 1960. We were the first post-Elvis generation, and one of the last generations of innocence. We were inventing the myth of the American teenager. Our decade would imprint an iconography on American society. We knew nothing of violence and drugs. We looked forward to the future. We were taught well. We were the best class.

via Talking ’bout my generation – Roger Ebert’s Journal.

news, random, LOL, truth – stranger than fiction:  I have seen this story before, but it is definitely one instance where truth is stranger than fiction.

Three street-muggers in Sydney, Aus chased a visiting med student down an alley and took his iPod and phone. Unfortunately for them, the alley they chased him down was next to the local ninja martial arts school, and a student ninja was lurking in the shadows. He got his teacher, and five ninjas stole out into the night and kicked ninjed the muggers’ asses.

via Muggers chase victim into crowd of ass-kicking ninjas – Boing Boing.

history, my nerdiness: I must be a real nerd because I found this article on the history and future of the electrical grid fascinating.

During the Depression, when power lines first electrified rural America, a farmer in Tennessee rose in church one Sunday and said—power companies love this story—”The greatest thing on earth is to have the love of God in your heart, and the next greatest thing is to have electricity in your house.”

via Electrical Grid – National Geographic Magazine.

culture, health:  We aren’t looking so good.  You should read the article …. talks about our generations drug use and unknown interactions with prescribed drugs when we are old …

The generation known as baby boomers may go into old age broke and fat, researchers say.

Particularly, those among the first decade of boomers – now at retirement age or within 10 years of it – may find a combination of unhealthy living and unwise personal finance decisions will leave them in rough shape after age 65.

They may not mind so much, however, because researchers say they also are more likely to be stoned on drugs than either their elders or those younger.

via Some N.C. boomers: Fat and flat broke – CharlotteObserver.com.

news, Charlotte, weather: Definitely hot here.

Charlotte hit 101 degrees on Sunday, a new record for the day, in a summer that so far is the city’s third-hottest on record, according to the National Weather Service.

via 101° – CharlotteObserver.com.

Apple: New Apples?

Will Apple launch new Mac Pros, iMacs, and the Magic Trackpad tomorrow?.

vuvuzelas, FIFA World Cup 2010:  Never thought about who invented them … just assumed they were a plastic version of an ancient african horn … but instead they evolved from a bike horn!

I invented the vuvuzela 35 years ago but, of course, it’s only since the start of the World Cup that it has become quite so well known globally. Whatever people may say about the sound it makes, it has never been so popular. That makes me proud; I see so many visitors taking vuvuzelas home with them, to Europe, South America and beyond.

I know people have complained in the past. One football squad objected to the noise when they played in South Africa, but I think it’s only polite to accept the customs of any country you visit, and this is our culture. Our players expect it and the sound encourages them – it’s the sound of our support. Many people say they don’t like the noise, but I’ve been blowing the vuvuzela for decades now and I’ve never heard of anyone going to hospital or dying because of it.

I approached someone who ran a manufacturing company and he made the first plastic version – a yellow one very much like those you see today. We called them Boogieblasts and sold them at games. I changed the name to vuvuzela in 1992, after Nelson Mandela was released and South Africa was allowed to compete internationally again – the name means three things in Zulu: “welcome”, “unite” and “celebration.”

via Experience: I invented the vuvuzela | Life and style | The Guardian.

FIFA World Cup 2010, marketing: Very interesting. .. Did Nike master the social network marketing and win despite Adidas’ sponsorship?

Two contenders, Adidas and Nike, each have a shot at becoming undisputed market leader when the whistle blows on July 11 and the final game concludes. Coming into 2010, their records show them evenly matched: each is estimated to have earned $1.5-1.7 billion in football merchandise sales in 2008 and 2009, and each controls about a third of the total market.

via The World Cup Brand Winner: Adidas or Nike? – Elie Ofek – HBS Faculty – Harvard Business Review.

culture, followup:  I forgot to include the illustration for Does Language Influence Culture? – WSJ.com …  The Tower of Babel’ by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, 1563.  That illustration really enhanced the article.  Also loved Ann Sheaffer Gibert’s comment:

I came to the same conclusion when I studied Hebrew. Language must shape how our brain works, and different language structures reflect (or cause) different cultural standards.

The Tower of Babel' by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, 1563

travel, Ireland:  Really enjoyed this article on Ireland  … hope to go back and it will give me some new insights into what I am seeing.

I have been wandering in a zig-zag way around its country parts, Waterford to Donegal, contemplating the three great quandaries that have obsessed Ireland during my own lifetime: the old, old miseries that arose centuries ago from the interference of the English; the recent hubris and nemesis of economics; the tragic loss of faith and trust in the Roman Catholic church, for centuries the very essence of Irishness.

To my mind there is something transcendental to the charm of the Irish, the very emblem of their national identity. They are no nicer than other peoples, no less bitchy, no less quarrelsome, no less murderous indeed, but without doubt they are, come boom or bust, come faith or disbelief, come peace or war the most charming of nationalities. I cannot make out how deeply they have been affected by the three great communal anxieties that have lately afflicted them, but I can vouch for the fact that in externals, at least, they are just as they always were.

Call it national character, call it community resilience, or call it, most mystically, spiritually and irresistibly of all, simply the luck of the Irish.

via FT.com / Travel – On a journey across Ireland.

RIP:  My friend Eleanor is a friend of Leah … her story is compelling …Leah Siegel, ESPN producer whose struggle with breast cancer inspired thousands, dies at 43 | News for Dallas, Texas | Dallas Morning News | Latest News.

faith, followup: I also loved the  Henri Nouwen post that Cary referred to here.  But Cary culls it down to one question … and my list is way too short.

A valid question is “What are the names of the poor whom you interact with?”

via Knowledge Leads to Empathy « Jubilee Year.

children’s/YA literature, faith, history:  I look forward to reading this book by the Pope.

On July 22nd, the Vatican press office announced that Pope Benedict XVI has authored a children’s book entitled, The Friends of Jesus. The twelve friends to the famed Messiah are the Twelve Apostles.

President of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, Spanish priest Julian Carron, wrote the prologue to the book. He also offers this comment about the publication: “[The Pope] takes us by the hand and accompanies us as we discover who Jesus’ first companions were, how they met him and were conquered by him to the point that they never abandoned Him.”

via Pope Benedict XVI to Publish Children’s Book – mediabistro.com: GalleyCat.

politics, The President: Sorry, Mr. President, this seems ridiculous … That is just too much for some face time with you.  And the people who pay such an  exorbitant amount expect something in return.

Chicagoans next week will have the chance to wish President Barack Obama “happy 49th birthday” for $30,400 ($60,800 a couple).

That’s the admission price for a Democratic National Committee “birthday” reception to be held at a the home of real-estate billionaire Neil Bluhm in Obama’s hometown on Aug. 5, the day after his birthday.

via Happy $30,400 birthday, Mr. President – Mike Allen – POLITICO.com.

tv, gLee: I hope Season 2 is as uniquely fun as Season 1. A ‘Rocky Horror’ Episode, and 9 Other ‘Glee’ Spoilers – Yahoo! TV Blog.




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