Posts Tagged ‘kith/kin

12
Jul
19

7.12.19 … “And this is precisely the secret held by all those who go by foot: life is prolonged when you walk. Walking expands time rather than collapses it.” -Erling Kagge

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, The Cathedral of St. Philip-Atlanta GA:

I have a lot going on right now. I have been in Atlanta helping my mom deal with some major dental issues. I never thought about it, but there is a useful life for teeth. And for my mom, 92 seems to be the number. It is not fun to deal with serious dental health issues at 92.

My sister had an appointment at Piedmont so I drove with her and decided I could use my time free time as quiet time … Iced coffee from Starbucks, labyrinth walk, and, if time permits, a visit to Richards Five and Dime.

I have secured my coffee, and a blueberry muffin, and I’m now sitting in the very hot sun, 89°, at The Cathedral. There is a magnolia tree in the distance that still has a few blooms on it, but most in this garden, are well past any blooms.

My thoughts wander to my three adult children and what they are doing. Jack is in Alaska and the temperature in Alaska has been breaking records. It was hotter in Anchorage AK last week than in Atlanta GA today. It hit the 90s for the first time in recorded history and in the lower 90s for three days in a row in McCarthy AK. And there are over 400 forest fires; so bad that Jack says the normally pristine air is hazy from the fires.

My son Edward is in Colorado and dealing with the ups and downs of relocation, finding a job, and how sometimes the world just doesn’t play into your hand. But, he is surrounded by good friends and has found a beautiful place to live, so I am hopeful that he will find a spot where he enjoys this period of his life.

And Molly, my daughter, is in Brooklyn. Last month she traveled to Ecuador and now she will work super hard and then have mini vacations to attend the weddings of two close friends in August and September. I think this wedding season will be different than when I was her age because each wedding, as a general rule, is unique. No longer does a bride go home to her childhood church and get married surrounded by her family and friends of childhood with a couple of additions from college, etc. instead, the couple often choose a venue that is special to them, a beach resort or a mountain venue or even a local park or venue near where the couple currently lives. It’s a different world.

Before I walk I took stock of my surroundings. As I mentioned, it was hot. And the birds were the most significant activity in the garden today. I enjoyed watching them fly from tree to tree and singing to each other.

I love this cartoon forwarded to me by a good Episcopalian friend. I wish I knew the cartoonist so I could give him/her credit.

I found this quote the other day…

“And this is precisely the secret held by all those who go by foot: life is prolonged when you walk. Walking expands time rather than collapses it.”

-Erling Kagge’s Walking: One Step at a Time (translated by Becky L. Crook, Pantheon)

I certainly believe that my walking expands time, rather than collapses it. I’m hoping my life is prolonged by my walks.

And I enjoyed Hamilton’s score today:

🎶Look around, look around at how lucky you are … to be alive right now … 🎶

And as for the goats … you’ll have to ask my brother.

7.12.19

and I found this …

23
May
19

5.23.19 … “Look deep into nature and you will understand everything better.” ~Albert Einstein

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, The Cathedral of St. Philip-Atlanta GA, kith/kin:

After a meeting at Lenbrook, my sister and I headed out for a walk. We enjoyed our time in the sun, despite the heat. The birds seemed to enjoy our presence. Magnolia leaves were strewn across the labyrinth. I always enjoy the sound of rustling magnolia leaves when I walk over them.

“Look deep into nature and you will understand everything better.” ~Albert Einstein

5.23.19

23
Apr
19

4.23.19 … “However many other religious languages I learn, I dream in Christian. However much I learn from other spiritual teachers, it is Jesus I come home to at night.” – Barbara Brown Taylor(

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Wayt Private Labyrinth – Cumming GA:

I read this extract as part of a devotional for a Bible study I attend at First Presbyterian Church in Charlotte . There was lots to ponder.

I became a fan of Barbara Brown Taylor about 10 years ago. The first book I read was An Altar in the World: Finding the Sacred Beneath Our Feet. She walks labyrinth by the way …

She has a new book, Holy Envy: Finding God in the Faith of Others and in connection with its publication last month she has done quite a few interviews. This is an excerpt from a CNN interview from last week (https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/21/us/outcast-pastor-finds-way-home-easter/index.html).

“I worship every day,” she says. “Sometimes it’s in churches, but other times it’s around dinner tables, in airports, in city parks, and in the woods with wild turkeys.”

Those answers, though, are the kind of poetic musings that still make some Christians suspicious. Is she more than “happy faces and pumpkins in the sky?”She doesn’t sound like a person who is giving up on Christianity.

In “Holy Envy” she writes: “However many other religious languages I learn, I dream in Christian. However much I learn from other spiritual teachers, it is Jesus I come home to at night.”

Easter morning also helps her find her way home.

She still believes in the Easter story. She just doesn’t believe that it represents the triumph of Christianity — proof that Christians have a monopoly on religious truth.

How can you believe in Easter without believing Christ is the only way?

The way she now talks about God in the Easter story helps explain why.

“Jesus never commanded me to love my religion. He said love God and your neighbor. That’s about all I can handle day by day.”

“These days I would say Easter is the eruption of life from a tomb as God’s huge surprise, going in a different direction, and if anything, proof that you can never predict how God is going to act next,” she says.

Taylor’s spiritual restlessness may continue to push her in different directions. But she no longer sounds afraid to look her faith in the eyes.

“Now I value Easter as the reminder that you never know where life is going to come from next, and there’s no sense being attached to the day before yesterday because the day before yesterday is dead, and today something is alive,” she says.

She leans forward on her sofa and her expression turns solemn. She gets a faraway look in her eyes, and raises her hands as if in worship.

“So why not follow the life, and see where it leads, with some kind of trust in the spirits’ ability to blow where nobody expected to blow, and in a direction nobody expected it to go into — and be willing to be blown away.”

And then I closed with this from Paul Bane: Source: When Does the Kingdom of Heaven Come to Earth? | Paul Bane, https://www.patheos.com/blogs/mindfulchristianitytoday/2018/08/when-does-the-kingdom-of-heaven-come-to-earth/

Every time we pray we experience God at a given point until our mind moves on to other thoughts.

Heaven comes every time we love our brothers and sisters. Heaven comes when we are at peace with our circumstances in life. Heaven comes every moment we dwell in the presence of God. Heaven comes when I know I am one with the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

… remember, there is no need to prepare for the kingdom of Heaven it is already here. The kingdom of Heaven is neither found in the past or the future it is present in every moment of time, and God is the “Eternal Now.” So stop, take a deep breath and realize the kingdom of Heaven is present within you. Contemplate you are in a relationship with the “resurrected Christ” and his Kingdom is present and alive in your heart. Practice the wonderment of the now and enjoy the presence of God in whatever is happening to you at this moment. Focus on the existence of God and the fullness of his kingdom is yours right now. The Kingdom of God is within you.

Amen

After my class, I drove to Atlanta detouring via Cumming where I spent an evening with a friend, Marty, her sister Becca and their mom Martha. We shared a walk on Martha’s labyrinth as the sun was getting low in the West. We then enjoyed a dinner on the porch watching the sun do it final hurrah for the day. It was a perfect evening.

We discussed anything and everything, including Barbara Brown Taylor with whom the Kiser and Wayt families share a special friendship of over 40 years, Courtney Cowart and her work at 9/11 Ground Sero, labyrinths,friendship, Richard Rohr, enneagrams, thin places,history, and mutual friends such as the Campbell family…I drove away energized and feeling both loved and nurtured.

And as I drove to Atlanta, and once I entered Georgia, I turned on Georgia public radio. I thought you would want know that today is the first day that Vidalia onions are available. There are only 10,000 acres that are allowed to grow Vidalia onions, the official Georgia vegetable. Also, they will be available until August.

4.23.19

11
Mar
19

3.11.19 … Oh, the places you will go …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, Lenten Lists, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (6/40), finger labyrinth@home:

Today, the painting crew arrived. One of the many things on my to do list this spring is to repair and freshen up the paint in the public areas of my house. And today was the day … it already looks soooo much better.

I am using a new finger labyrinth today. It was a gift from my sister. I normally leave it in the car, so I rediscovered it yesterday and decided that today would be a good day to “walk” it. The path is not really walkable, but this one is really more about feeling the smooth tick in my hand, turning it over and remembering the kindness of the gift. It is a great stress reliever!

At the end of the day I realized that I had never left home. But then I realized that I had … I’d been with my sister as I walked my finger labyrinth and I had been in France reliving a trip from 2011, where I visited Chartres but could not walk the labyrinth because it was covered in Chairs

Oh, the places you will go.

3.11.19

Today’s Lenten List :

Local labyrinths

1. Avondale

2. Myers Park Baptist

3. Sardis Baptist

4. Wedgewood

5. McCrorey YMCA

6. Presbyterian Hospital

7. MorningStar Lutheran Chapel

8. Myers Park Methodist

9. St. John’s Episcopal (canvas)

10. Private labyrinth on Hardison

11. Private labyrinth off Sheron View

06
Mar
19

3.6.19 … “Mamma mia, here I go again. My my, how can I resist you? Mamma mia, does it show again, My my, just how much I’ve missed you?“

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (1/40), Myers Park Methodist Church Francis Chapel – Charlotte NC, Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC, Ash Wednesday, Lenten Practices, List making, kith/kin:

So I’m planning my forty 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks and this pops into my head ….

Mamma mia, here I go again

My my, how can I resist you?

Mamma mia, does it show again

My my, just how much I’ve missed you?

And at 10 my Davidson roommate and labyrinth walking buddy calls … she’s already walked at Epiphany Catholic Church in Anchorage KY (near Louisville).

I’ve been wondering if anyone else walks daily or weekly during Lent. With the adoption of Lent by many mainstream Protestant denominations there has been a steady increase of including spiritual disciplines and practices in faith formation.

Lent is a good time to begin a new practice of daily or weekly labyrinth walking. The Rev. Dr. Lauren Artress differentiates a practice from a discipline. She says,

“A practice is more flexible than a discipline. A discipline is usually done at a certain time each day. There are specific methods or techniques to enter into it. The practice of labyrinth walking is guided by what you need from the walk. … Use a labyrinth when it calls you. When you want the benefits of a quiet mind, a prayerful heart, a release from controlling behavior, find your way to a labyrinth.” (Artress, 2006, pg. 6)

At Harmony Grove UMC, where I coordinate the Labyrinth Ministry, on occasions I have issued the following invitation.

Start Something New for Lent

“This year don’t give something up for Lent. This year start something new: the spiritual practice of walking the labyrinth daily or weekly.

Source: Ministry Matters™ | Labyrinth Walks for Lent, Holy Week, and Easter,https://www.ministrymatters.com/all/entry/4736/labyrinth-walks-for-lent-holy-week-and-easter

So what else will I do?

1. I will take 40 labyrinth walks

2. I will use multiple devotionals including the Henry Nouwen book and study guide being used by my church and the Myers Park Methodist Lent devotional booklet.

3. I will attend worship at my church.

4. I will pay attention to what my friends post. And ask questions and respond.

5. I will make 40 lists: Lenten Practices and Disciplines, List of lists, gratitude, labyrinth resources, Lenten devotional resources. (This counts as one list)

With pleasant anticipation, I dressed in my Chartres Cathedral polyester silk like scarf and headed out. “Mamma mia, here I go again.”

As I drove to my labyrinth chosen for Walk 1/40, I received telephone call number two from a friend, which in this case happens to be my sister, informing me that she was walking a labyrinth today on Ash Wednesday. And she sent me a picture and told me that her walk at Eastminster Presbyterian Church in Marietta GA had been, “Very Cold. I walked in one foot in front of the other and out backward. Tricky for me. Had to balance and really concentrate.”

(And yes, even our shadows resemble each other!)

Today’s walk was hopefully going to be in the Francis Chapel at Myers Park Methodist Church, the location of my very first Ash Wednesday walk in 2012. Although I knew that there was a delay in opening this new in door permanent stone labyrinth to the public, I still hoped that I would be able to walk privately today as I did several weeks ago with my friend Toni. But that was not to be; the labyrinth and the chapel are inaccessible due to the continued construction in connection with the installation of the new organ.

So I quickly regrouped and headed to Myers Park Baptist Church.

Today‘s walk was a very sensory-filled walk, especially sounds and physical feelings. I heard a jackhammer, a truck backing up, a worker making a whooping noise which I assumed was to alert another worker of danger, and the chimes announcing 11:30 AM at Queens College. I also noticed the cold as it was about 40°. There was a light breeze in blindingly bright sunshine. I always enjoy walking in and out of the sunshine, and today the sun shining live all but one corner of the labyrinth.

A few other observations… The lost child’s princess headband stuck in the lamp sculpture and the very bedraggled rosemary along the edge.

Toward the end I want, I realized that the breeze a very cool breeze, was picking up and I was actually cold. My hands felt icy cold.

After my luck, I continued on my way to my church First Presbyterian Church at Charlotte which was hosting a lunch at noon followed by a Ash Wednesday a position of ashes service says in the small and intimate Good Samaritan Ben Long Fresco Lobby.

The Lobby is worth visiting ..,

Jesus’ parable of the Good Samaritan was chosen as the subject of the fresco because it deals with a fundamental question of a center city church: “Who is our neighbor?” It symbolizes the mission of First Presbyterian Church to be a witness “For Christ in the Heart of Charlotte” to the thousands of people who live and work in downtown Charlotte.

Immediately upon entering the front doors of the Fellowship Hall, a dramatic image of the Samaritan bending over a beaten and bloodied stranger serves as an important reminder of the intimate relationship between the teachings of Christ and the work we are called to do. It measures 8 feet high and 28 feet long and is painted in the true fresco style of the 15th century masters.

Source: First Presbyterian Church — Ben Long Fine Art,
http://www.benlongfineart.com/first-presbyterian-church

I sat at the luncheon with Pen Perry, our senior minister. And as with the anticipated, we discussed our traditions around Ash Wednesday and Lent. I was significantly older than anyone else at the table, and my traditions around Lent did not happen until after I was 50 years old.

After the luncheon, we proceeded into the Good Samaritan Lobby which was set up intentionally with Pen being included in the community rather than “preaching” from the pulpit. The service was short and impactful, and I left with the ash cross on my hand. When I looked down shortly afterwards, I realized that the mark had at all but disappeared and all I could see was my very wrinkled and old looking hand. “Ashes to ashes, dust to dust” … Actually this line is not in the Bible, but derives from Genesis 3:19 – “By the sweat of your face you shall eat bread, till you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken; for you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”

After telling one of my children that I had attended an Ash Wednesday Service, he immediately sent me this article. I think mainline denominations are reaching out to nontraditional millennials in both traditional ways reimagined and nontraditional ways in nontraditional places. And funny that my son picked up on this story on the twitter feed of the blogger “Bar Stool Sports” …

If you needed ashes for Ash Wednesday, many churches made it convenient to get it while still going about your normal day’s routine.

On what is a special religious day for Christians, many churches offered “Ashes to Go,” for example, at bus and train stations in the D.C. area, something that is becoming more and more common in today’s fast-paced culture of express delivery, instant meals and live-streaming TV.

In one such instance Wednesday, at the Shady Grove Metro station in Rockville, ashes became available starting at 7 a.m. for those getting on and off their train.

The “Ashes to Go” initiative was launched over a decade ago by an episcopal church in St. Louis. The goal is to pull religion from the pews and bring the Holy Spirit into regular, busy places.

Source: Churches offer ‘Ashes to Go’ for Ash Wednesday at bus, train stations in D.C. area | WJLA, http://wjla.com/news/local/churches-offer-ashes-to-go-ash-wednesday-dc-area

I ran across this article in Presbyterian Outlook recently.

While some Protestants still struggle with what to make of Lent (“Isn’t that a Catholic thing?”), increasingly Presbyterian congregations are seeking creative approaches for making the season meaningful – including giving people opportunities to explore spiritual practices and to bring depth and a sense of community to the weeks leading to Easter.

The practices are varied — from the program Lent 4.5, which focuses on simplicity and caring for the earth; to study groups in which a congregation reads a book together (recent examples include theologian Richard Lischer’s “Stations of the Heart,” about lessons learned through the death of his son, and “Daring Greatly,” in which research scientist Brené Brown explores the value of vulnerability and imperfection); to the exploration of ancient spiritual practices. Last year, for example, Westminster Presbyterian Church in Durham, North Carolina, offered a series of study sessions called “Practicing Life into Wholeness” — exploring spiritual practices including centering prayer, lectio divina and the daily examen.

Source: Lent is for Presbyterians, too: Creative, connectional disciplines – The Presbyterian Outlook, https://pres-outlook.org/2015/02/lent-presbyterians-creative-connectional-disciplines/

And this from my good friend Mary Bowman at Selwyn Avenue Presbyterian here in Charlotte:

In the simplest terms, Lent is 40 days set aside to prepare for Easter – beginning with Ash Wednesday and ending with Holy Saturday (the Saturday before Easter).

Ash Wednesday, also known as the imposition of ashes, derives its name from the practice of placing ashes in the shape of a cross on our foreheads as a reminder that we are temporary beings and it is only God who can conquer death and give the gift of eternal life. In other words, we remember we are finite and sinful (a bit of a mess) and we need God.

Lent, which comes from the Greek word for “fortieth,” is a time for us to focus on our relationship with God and draw closer through self-reflection and spiritual activities such as prayer, meditation, repentance/confession, worship, fasting (giving up something), Scripture reading, serving others, etc. These spiritual “disciplines” allow us to open ourselves to God so we can grow in our faith, in our gratitude for God’s undeserved love, and in our own self-understanding as children of God.

If you are someone who likes to count things, you may realize that there are more than 40 days between Ash Wednesday (March 6) and Easter (April 21). During this serious time of reflection and preparation for Good Friday and Easter, we continue to have mini-Easters (which are Sundays) where we continue to celebrate all the Jesus has done for us. If you are counting the days, the Sundays don’t count because they are an important reminder of the ultimate story.

Source: Our Blog – Lent 101: Let Us Prepare Together, http://www.selwynpres.org/our-blog/lent-101-let-us-prepare-together/

And I must add this:

“Did you not know what the Holy One can do with dust?” I am in a wildly different place than when I wrote those words as part of an Ash Wednesday blessing six years ago, in what would turn out to be my last Lent with Gary. And I can say now: I know what God can do with dust. And I am learning still. As the season of Lent arrives, what blessing do you need to claim from the ashes?

BLESSING THE DUST

All those days

you felt like dust,

like dirt,

as if all you had to do

was turn your face

toward the wind

and be scattered

to the four corners

or swept away

by the smallest breath

as insubstantial—

did you not know

what the Holy One

can do with dust?

This is the day

we freely say

we are scorched.

This is the hour

we are marked

by what has made it

through the burning.

This is the moment

we ask for the blessing

that lives within

the ancient ashes,

that makes its home

inside the soil of

this sacred earth.

So let us be marked

not for sorrow.

And let us be marked

not for shame.

Let us be marked

not for false humility

or for thinking

we are less

than we are

but for claiming

what God can do

within the dust,

within the dirt,

within the stuff

of which the world

is made

and the stars that blaze

in our bones

and the galaxies that spiral

inside the smudge

we bear.

—Jan Richardson

from Circle of Grace: A Book of Blessings for the Seasons

Image: “Ash Wednesday Cross” © Jan Richardson

janrichardsonimages.com

Mamma mia, here I go again

My my, how can I resist you?

Mamma mia, does it show again

My my, just how much I’ve missed you?

Ashes to ashes, dust to dust …

3.6.19

05
Mar
19

3.5.19 … “She would snap it in half, the way that children who eat Pop-Tarts do to make them feel like they last longer” … laissez les bon temps rouler …

“Throw me something (preferably a Pop-Tart), mister”

Everything is late this year. I have been anticipating my annual Lenten Labyrinth Walks for weeks. Some years I am already half way through.

But today is Mardi Gras, a pre-Lent bacchanalian festival, and in some communities the festival has been going on for weeks. And I just learned that it is supposed to go on for weeks, because liturgically the festival takes place from Epiphany until Ash Wednesday, culminating in one wild final hoopla on Fat Tuesday/ Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras. Let the good times roll. Who knew?

Source: 10 Mardi Gras Traditions to Know in 2019 – The History Of Mardi Gras, https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/arts-and-culture/g16129475/mardi-gras-traditions-history/

My first pre-Lent bacchanalian festival indulgence is a Diet Dr. Pepper and a toasted brown sugar cinnamon Pop-Tart. I, too, “snap it in half, the way that children who eat Pop-Tarts do to make them feel like they last longer.” And I must share with you where I found this quote … you will never enjoy a brown sugar cinnamon Pop-Tart the same again. Bob Trobich, a close Davidson friend posted a note about a publication by his son, Michael, my godson. Bob said … “Proud Dad time. My son Michael has been a writer since high school (maybe before). He’s won some awards and had a piece published previously in “Polyphony”, an international student-run literary magazine. Now, he has a piece in “Adelaide”, which is a literary journal published out of New York and Lisbon.” I immediately loved Micheal’s piece, and one of my favorite passages was about a brown sugar cinnamon pop-tart.

“When Kate was younger, she had the same nightmare on the second Saturday of every month. She would be holding a Pop-Tart in her mother’s kitchen, brown sugar cinnamon, her favorite. She would snap it in half, the way that children who eat Pop-Tarts do to make them feel like they last longer. She would break it, and out would come a colony of ants, a steady stream of tiny black marching insects, rows and columns and regiments and battalions and she couldn’t drop the Pop-Tarts, all she could do was let the ants crawl over her body, cover her skin, and scream silently.

Kate does not call the way she is “nervous”. Kate does not call it anything. She takes photos of the best that people can be because people, she has decided, are like Pop-Tarts. Sometimes, they are horrible and terrifying. But most of the time, they’re pretty okay, and they deserve to see that.”

Source: http://adelaidemagazine.org/f_michaeltrobich.html

And tomorrow is Ash Wednesday and the first day of Lent. This Lent, I hope to de-binge, to practice limits. I shall purposefully restrict myself and be disciplined. I want to appreciate Lent, think about what I’m doing with my time, putting in my body, or feeding to my soul. I shall choose during the 40 days of Lent to set limits and require myself to do something else or, sometimes, both.

In addition to enjoying a last indulgence of a perfectly toasted brown sugar cinnamon Pop-Tart and a Diet Dr. Pepper, I will take a Mardi Gras walk, go to my TMBS class, look at pics of friends celebrating in New Orleans and Rio de Janeiro (hello, Angela!), the largest such festival in the world, and eat pancakes (and in case you are wondering, they do not serve pancakes at the Waffle House) and make a list of something, my 2019 Lenten practice. That will be a new practice for Lent. It may be a grocery list … but I’m in a listmaking phase of life.

Laissez les bon temps rouler!!

3.5.19

23
Feb
19

2.23.19 … “The duality of the labyrinth–connecting the physical act of walking with the inner, spiritual passages–resonates with the duality of public ceremonies.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Louisville Presbyterian Seminary- Louisville KY:

I’m here today for my niece’s wedding. I thought about Hunter and Eric today as I walked. I actually researched the concept of using the labyrinth as a venue for a wedding. I found this:

The duality of the labyrinth–connecting the physical act of walking with the inner, spiritual passages–resonates with the duality of public ceremonies.

A wedding is often called a “public affirmation of a private commitment.” Walking the labyrinth in a ceremony can connect you both to the community of friends–who can witness and acknowledge the event from the perimeter of the circle–and to the larger community of humankind across cultures and generations. For thousands of years, labyrinths have been interwoven into rituals in cultures from Europe to Asia to South and North America.

Source: https://www.beliefnet.com/love-family/relationships/weddings/walking-the-wedding-labyrinth.aspx#MoCIxevwzlQEVvZQ.99

So I thought about this concept of a wedding. And although the wedding will not take place on a labyrinth, but at the nearby Chapel on the seminary’s campus, I am here to witness this public affirmation as a part of my niece’s community in a ritual that crosses cultures and generations.

My walk took place at about 1. The family has been watching the weather all week as the reception is at a venue on River Road, right next to the Ohio River. They have had massive rains and flooding for the last 10 days.

So when I approached the labyrinth I realized how muddy and brown everything is. I saw dead leaves, sticks and debris, almost as if they had been swirling water.

Instead of looking down I looked up and noticed two new trees planted at the entrance. And my spirits were lifted by a chorus from the birds nearby, and they were chirping wildly.

It was a quick walk. I noticed some new trees, new benches and new bushes. The boxwoods around the edge are growing out of their perfectly round shape.

And as I reenteredd the here and now, I realized that size matters. Although this is a traditional 11th circuit Chartres pattern, it is larger than any that I regularly walk. I found my timing was off and that I pushed myself, almost ran, to keep my normal pace. I am going to have to be more intentional about my next walk here to enjoy this labyrinth’s timing. It’s not all about me. I need to be willing to change.

I pondered my interconnectedness with my niece Hunter and the groom Eric and the Teague family and the many friends and family that I have known and loved for the over 40 years of my being part of this family. And today we are adding Eric and his family to the circle and the interconnected walk we share within the circle. The thought that our circle has expanded and we can now hope to share the walk for another generation.

Blessings!

2.23.19




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 621 other followers

July 2019
S M T W T F S
« Jun    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031