Posts Tagged ‘kith/kin

23
Apr
19

4.23.19 … “However many other religious languages I learn, I dream in Christian. However much I learn from other spiritual teachers, it is Jesus I come home to at night.” – Barbara Brown Taylor(

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Wayt Private Labyrinth – Cumming GA:

I read this extract as part of a devotional for a Bible study I attend at First Presbyterian Church in Charlotte . There was lots to ponder.

I became a fan of Barbara Brown Taylor about 10 years ago. The first book I read was An Altar in the World: Finding the Sacred Beneath Our Feet. She walks labyrinth by the way …

She has a new book, Holy Envy: Finding God in the Faith of Others and in connection with its publication last month she has done quite a few interviews. This is an excerpt from a CNN interview from last week (https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/21/us/outcast-pastor-finds-way-home-easter/index.html).

“I worship every day,” she says. “Sometimes it’s in churches, but other times it’s around dinner tables, in airports, in city parks, and in the woods with wild turkeys.”

Those answers, though, are the kind of poetic musings that still make some Christians suspicious. Is she more than “happy faces and pumpkins in the sky?”She doesn’t sound like a person who is giving up on Christianity.

In “Holy Envy” she writes: “However many other religious languages I learn, I dream in Christian. However much I learn from other spiritual teachers, it is Jesus I come home to at night.”

Easter morning also helps her find her way home.

She still believes in the Easter story. She just doesn’t believe that it represents the triumph of Christianity — proof that Christians have a monopoly on religious truth.

How can you believe in Easter without believing Christ is the only way?

The way she now talks about God in the Easter story helps explain why.

“Jesus never commanded me to love my religion. He said love God and your neighbor. That’s about all I can handle day by day.”

“These days I would say Easter is the eruption of life from a tomb as God’s huge surprise, going in a different direction, and if anything, proof that you can never predict how God is going to act next,” she says.

Taylor’s spiritual restlessness may continue to push her in different directions. But she no longer sounds afraid to look her faith in the eyes.

“Now I value Easter as the reminder that you never know where life is going to come from next, and there’s no sense being attached to the day before yesterday because the day before yesterday is dead, and today something is alive,” she says.

She leans forward on her sofa and her expression turns solemn. She gets a faraway look in her eyes, and raises her hands as if in worship.

“So why not follow the life, and see where it leads, with some kind of trust in the spirits’ ability to blow where nobody expected to blow, and in a direction nobody expected it to go into — and be willing to be blown away.”

And then I closed with this from Paul Bane: Source: When Does the Kingdom of Heaven Come to Earth? | Paul Bane, https://www.patheos.com/blogs/mindfulchristianitytoday/2018/08/when-does-the-kingdom-of-heaven-come-to-earth/

Every time we pray we experience God at a given point until our mind moves on to other thoughts.

Heaven comes every time we love our brothers and sisters. Heaven comes when we are at peace with our circumstances in life. Heaven comes every moment we dwell in the presence of God. Heaven comes when I know I am one with the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

… remember, there is no need to prepare for the kingdom of Heaven it is already here. The kingdom of Heaven is neither found in the past or the future it is present in every moment of time, and God is the “Eternal Now.” So stop, take a deep breath and realize the kingdom of Heaven is present within you. Contemplate you are in a relationship with the “resurrected Christ” and his Kingdom is present and alive in your heart. Practice the wonderment of the now and enjoy the presence of God in whatever is happening to you at this moment. Focus on the existence of God and the fullness of his kingdom is yours right now. The Kingdom of God is within you.

Amen

After my class, I drove to Atlanta detouring via Cumming where I spent an evening with a friend, Marty, her sister Becca and their mom Martha. We shared a walk on Martha’s labyrinth as the sun was getting low in the West. We then enjoyed a dinner on the porch watching the sun do it final hurrah for the day. It was a perfect evening.

We discussed anything and everything, including Barbara Brown Taylor with whom the Kiser and Wayt families share a special friendship of over 40 years, Courtney Cowart and her work at 9/11 Ground Sero, labyrinths,friendship, Richard Rohr, enneagrams, thin places,history, and mutual friends such as the Campbell family…I drove away energized and feeling both loved and nurtured.

And as I drove to Atlanta, and once I entered Georgia, I turned on Georgia public radio. I thought you would want know that today is the first day that Vidalia onions are available. There are only 10,000 acres that are allowed to grow Vidalia onions, the official Georgia vegetable. Also, they will be available until August.

4.23.19

11
Mar
19

3.11.19 … Oh, the places you will go …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, Lenten Lists, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (6/40), finger labyrinth@home:

Today, the painting crew arrived. One of the many things on my to do list this spring is to repair and freshen up the paint in the public areas of my house. And today was the day … it already looks soooo much better.

I am using a new finger labyrinth today. It was a gift from my sister. I normally leave it in the car, so I rediscovered it yesterday and decided that today would be a good day to “walk” it. The path is not really walkable, but this one is really more about feeling the smooth tick in my hand, turning it over and remembering the kindness of the gift. It is a great stress reliever!

At the end of the day I realized that I had never left home. But then I realized that I had … I’d been with my sister as I walked my finger labyrinth and I had been in France reliving a trip from 2011, where I visited Chartres but could not walk the labyrinth because it was covered in Chairs

Oh, the places you will go.

3.11.19

Today’s Lenten List :

Local labyrinths

1. Avondale

2. Myers Park Baptist

3. Sardis Baptist

4. Wedgewood

5. McCrorey YMCA

6. Presbyterian Hospital

7. MorningStar Lutheran Chapel

8. Myers Park Methodist

9. St. John’s Episcopal (canvas)

10. Private labyrinth on Hardison

11. Private labyrinth off Sheron View

06
Mar
19

3.6.19 … “Mamma mia, here I go again. My my, how can I resist you? Mamma mia, does it show again, My my, just how much I’ve missed you?“

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (1/40), Myers Park Methodist Church Francis Chapel – Charlotte NC, Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC, Ash Wednesday, Lenten Practices, List making, kith/kin:

So I’m planning my forty 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks and this pops into my head ….

Mamma mia, here I go again

My my, how can I resist you?

Mamma mia, does it show again

My my, just how much I’ve missed you?

And at 10 my Davidson roommate and labyrinth walking buddy calls … she’s already walked at Epiphany Catholic Church in Anchorage KY (near Louisville).

I’ve been wondering if anyone else walks daily or weekly during Lent. With the adoption of Lent by many mainstream Protestant denominations there has been a steady increase of including spiritual disciplines and practices in faith formation.

Lent is a good time to begin a new practice of daily or weekly labyrinth walking. The Rev. Dr. Lauren Artress differentiates a practice from a discipline. She says,

“A practice is more flexible than a discipline. A discipline is usually done at a certain time each day. There are specific methods or techniques to enter into it. The practice of labyrinth walking is guided by what you need from the walk. … Use a labyrinth when it calls you. When you want the benefits of a quiet mind, a prayerful heart, a release from controlling behavior, find your way to a labyrinth.” (Artress, 2006, pg. 6)

At Harmony Grove UMC, where I coordinate the Labyrinth Ministry, on occasions I have issued the following invitation.

Start Something New for Lent

“This year don’t give something up for Lent. This year start something new: the spiritual practice of walking the labyrinth daily or weekly.

Source: Ministry Matters™ | Labyrinth Walks for Lent, Holy Week, and Easter,https://www.ministrymatters.com/all/entry/4736/labyrinth-walks-for-lent-holy-week-and-easter

So what else will I do?

1. I will take 40 labyrinth walks

2. I will use multiple devotionals including the Henry Nouwen book and study guide being used by my church and the Myers Park Methodist Lent devotional booklet.

3. I will attend worship at my church.

4. I will pay attention to what my friends post. And ask questions and respond.

5. I will make 40 lists: Lenten Practices and Disciplines, List of lists, gratitude, labyrinth resources, Lenten devotional resources. (This counts as one list)

With pleasant anticipation, I dressed in my Chartres Cathedral polyester silk like scarf and headed out. “Mamma mia, here I go again.”

As I drove to my labyrinth chosen for Walk 1/40, I received telephone call number two from a friend, which in this case happens to be my sister, informing me that she was walking a labyrinth today on Ash Wednesday. And she sent me a picture and told me that her walk at Eastminster Presbyterian Church in Marietta GA had been, “Very Cold. I walked in one foot in front of the other and out backward. Tricky for me. Had to balance and really concentrate.”

(And yes, even our shadows resemble each other!)

Today’s walk was hopefully going to be in the Francis Chapel at Myers Park Methodist Church, the location of my very first Ash Wednesday walk in 2012. Although I knew that there was a delay in opening this new in door permanent stone labyrinth to the public, I still hoped that I would be able to walk privately today as I did several weeks ago with my friend Toni. But that was not to be; the labyrinth and the chapel are inaccessible due to the continued construction in connection with the installation of the new organ.

So I quickly regrouped and headed to Myers Park Baptist Church.

Today‘s walk was a very sensory-filled walk, especially sounds and physical feelings. I heard a jackhammer, a truck backing up, a worker making a whooping noise which I assumed was to alert another worker of danger, and the chimes announcing 11:30 AM at Queens College. I also noticed the cold as it was about 40°. There was a light breeze in blindingly bright sunshine. I always enjoy walking in and out of the sunshine, and today the sun shining live all but one corner of the labyrinth.

A few other observations… The lost child’s princess headband stuck in the lamp sculpture and the very bedraggled rosemary along the edge.

Toward the end I want, I realized that the breeze a very cool breeze, was picking up and I was actually cold. My hands felt icy cold.

After my luck, I continued on my way to my church First Presbyterian Church at Charlotte which was hosting a lunch at noon followed by a Ash Wednesday a position of ashes service says in the small and intimate Good Samaritan Ben Long Fresco Lobby.

The Lobby is worth visiting ..,

Jesus’ parable of the Good Samaritan was chosen as the subject of the fresco because it deals with a fundamental question of a center city church: “Who is our neighbor?” It symbolizes the mission of First Presbyterian Church to be a witness “For Christ in the Heart of Charlotte” to the thousands of people who live and work in downtown Charlotte.

Immediately upon entering the front doors of the Fellowship Hall, a dramatic image of the Samaritan bending over a beaten and bloodied stranger serves as an important reminder of the intimate relationship between the teachings of Christ and the work we are called to do. It measures 8 feet high and 28 feet long and is painted in the true fresco style of the 15th century masters.

Source: First Presbyterian Church — Ben Long Fine Art,
http://www.benlongfineart.com/first-presbyterian-church

I sat at the luncheon with Pen Perry, our senior minister. And as with the anticipated, we discussed our traditions around Ash Wednesday and Lent. I was significantly older than anyone else at the table, and my traditions around Lent did not happen until after I was 50 years old.

After the luncheon, we proceeded into the Good Samaritan Lobby which was set up intentionally with Pen being included in the community rather than “preaching” from the pulpit. The service was short and impactful, and I left with the ash cross on my hand. When I looked down shortly afterwards, I realized that the mark had at all but disappeared and all I could see was my very wrinkled and old looking hand. “Ashes to ashes, dust to dust” … Actually this line is not in the Bible, but derives from Genesis 3:19 – “By the sweat of your face you shall eat bread, till you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken; for you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”

After telling one of my children that I had attended an Ash Wednesday Service, he immediately sent me this article. I think mainline denominations are reaching out to nontraditional millennials in both traditional ways reimagined and nontraditional ways in nontraditional places. And funny that my son picked up on this story on the twitter feed of the blogger “Bar Stool Sports” …

If you needed ashes for Ash Wednesday, many churches made it convenient to get it while still going about your normal day’s routine.

On what is a special religious day for Christians, many churches offered “Ashes to Go,” for example, at bus and train stations in the D.C. area, something that is becoming more and more common in today’s fast-paced culture of express delivery, instant meals and live-streaming TV.

In one such instance Wednesday, at the Shady Grove Metro station in Rockville, ashes became available starting at 7 a.m. for those getting on and off their train.

The “Ashes to Go” initiative was launched over a decade ago by an episcopal church in St. Louis. The goal is to pull religion from the pews and bring the Holy Spirit into regular, busy places.

Source: Churches offer ‘Ashes to Go’ for Ash Wednesday at bus, train stations in D.C. area | WJLA, http://wjla.com/news/local/churches-offer-ashes-to-go-ash-wednesday-dc-area

I ran across this article in Presbyterian Outlook recently.

While some Protestants still struggle with what to make of Lent (“Isn’t that a Catholic thing?”), increasingly Presbyterian congregations are seeking creative approaches for making the season meaningful – including giving people opportunities to explore spiritual practices and to bring depth and a sense of community to the weeks leading to Easter.

The practices are varied — from the program Lent 4.5, which focuses on simplicity and caring for the earth; to study groups in which a congregation reads a book together (recent examples include theologian Richard Lischer’s “Stations of the Heart,” about lessons learned through the death of his son, and “Daring Greatly,” in which research scientist Brené Brown explores the value of vulnerability and imperfection); to the exploration of ancient spiritual practices. Last year, for example, Westminster Presbyterian Church in Durham, North Carolina, offered a series of study sessions called “Practicing Life into Wholeness” — exploring spiritual practices including centering prayer, lectio divina and the daily examen.

Source: Lent is for Presbyterians, too: Creative, connectional disciplines – The Presbyterian Outlook, https://pres-outlook.org/2015/02/lent-presbyterians-creative-connectional-disciplines/

And this from my good friend Mary Bowman at Selwyn Avenue Presbyterian here in Charlotte:

In the simplest terms, Lent is 40 days set aside to prepare for Easter – beginning with Ash Wednesday and ending with Holy Saturday (the Saturday before Easter).

Ash Wednesday, also known as the imposition of ashes, derives its name from the practice of placing ashes in the shape of a cross on our foreheads as a reminder that we are temporary beings and it is only God who can conquer death and give the gift of eternal life. In other words, we remember we are finite and sinful (a bit of a mess) and we need God.

Lent, which comes from the Greek word for “fortieth,” is a time for us to focus on our relationship with God and draw closer through self-reflection and spiritual activities such as prayer, meditation, repentance/confession, worship, fasting (giving up something), Scripture reading, serving others, etc. These spiritual “disciplines” allow us to open ourselves to God so we can grow in our faith, in our gratitude for God’s undeserved love, and in our own self-understanding as children of God.

If you are someone who likes to count things, you may realize that there are more than 40 days between Ash Wednesday (March 6) and Easter (April 21). During this serious time of reflection and preparation for Good Friday and Easter, we continue to have mini-Easters (which are Sundays) where we continue to celebrate all the Jesus has done for us. If you are counting the days, the Sundays don’t count because they are an important reminder of the ultimate story.

Source: Our Blog – Lent 101: Let Us Prepare Together, http://www.selwynpres.org/our-blog/lent-101-let-us-prepare-together/

And I must add this:

“Did you not know what the Holy One can do with dust?” I am in a wildly different place than when I wrote those words as part of an Ash Wednesday blessing six years ago, in what would turn out to be my last Lent with Gary. And I can say now: I know what God can do with dust. And I am learning still. As the season of Lent arrives, what blessing do you need to claim from the ashes?

BLESSING THE DUST

All those days

you felt like dust,

like dirt,

as if all you had to do

was turn your face

toward the wind

and be scattered

to the four corners

or swept away

by the smallest breath

as insubstantial—

did you not know

what the Holy One

can do with dust?

This is the day

we freely say

we are scorched.

This is the hour

we are marked

by what has made it

through the burning.

This is the moment

we ask for the blessing

that lives within

the ancient ashes,

that makes its home

inside the soil of

this sacred earth.

So let us be marked

not for sorrow.

And let us be marked

not for shame.

Let us be marked

not for false humility

or for thinking

we are less

than we are

but for claiming

what God can do

within the dust,

within the dirt,

within the stuff

of which the world

is made

and the stars that blaze

in our bones

and the galaxies that spiral

inside the smudge

we bear.

—Jan Richardson

from Circle of Grace: A Book of Blessings for the Seasons

Image: “Ash Wednesday Cross” © Jan Richardson

janrichardsonimages.com

Mamma mia, here I go again

My my, how can I resist you?

Mamma mia, does it show again

My my, just how much I’ve missed you?

Ashes to ashes, dust to dust …

3.6.19

05
Mar
19

3.5.19 … “She would snap it in half, the way that children who eat Pop-Tarts do to make them feel like they last longer” … laissez les bon temps rouler …

“Throw me something (preferably a Pop-Tart), mister”

Everything is late this year. I have been anticipating my annual Lenten Labyrinth Walks for weeks. Some years I am already half way through.

But today is Mardi Gras, a pre-Lent bacchanalian festival, and in some communities the festival has been going on for weeks. And I just learned that it is supposed to go on for weeks, because liturgically the festival takes place from Epiphany until Ash Wednesday, culminating in one wild final hoopla on Fat Tuesday/ Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras. Let the good times roll. Who knew?

Source: 10 Mardi Gras Traditions to Know in 2019 – The History Of Mardi Gras, https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/arts-and-culture/g16129475/mardi-gras-traditions-history/

My first pre-Lent bacchanalian festival indulgence is a Diet Dr. Pepper and a toasted brown sugar cinnamon Pop-Tart. I, too, “snap it in half, the way that children who eat Pop-Tarts do to make them feel like they last longer.” And I must share with you where I found this quote … you will never enjoy a brown sugar cinnamon Pop-Tart the same again. Bob Trobich, a close Davidson friend posted a note about a publication by his son, Michael, my godson. Bob said … “Proud Dad time. My son Michael has been a writer since high school (maybe before). He’s won some awards and had a piece published previously in “Polyphony”, an international student-run literary magazine. Now, he has a piece in “Adelaide”, which is a literary journal published out of New York and Lisbon.” I immediately loved Micheal’s piece, and one of my favorite passages was about a brown sugar cinnamon pop-tart.

“When Kate was younger, she had the same nightmare on the second Saturday of every month. She would be holding a Pop-Tart in her mother’s kitchen, brown sugar cinnamon, her favorite. She would snap it in half, the way that children who eat Pop-Tarts do to make them feel like they last longer. She would break it, and out would come a colony of ants, a steady stream of tiny black marching insects, rows and columns and regiments and battalions and she couldn’t drop the Pop-Tarts, all she could do was let the ants crawl over her body, cover her skin, and scream silently.

Kate does not call the way she is “nervous”. Kate does not call it anything. She takes photos of the best that people can be because people, she has decided, are like Pop-Tarts. Sometimes, they are horrible and terrifying. But most of the time, they’re pretty okay, and they deserve to see that.”

Source: http://adelaidemagazine.org/f_michaeltrobich.html

And tomorrow is Ash Wednesday and the first day of Lent. This Lent, I hope to de-binge, to practice limits. I shall purposefully restrict myself and be disciplined. I want to appreciate Lent, think about what I’m doing with my time, putting in my body, or feeding to my soul. I shall choose during the 40 days of Lent to set limits and require myself to do something else or, sometimes, both.

In addition to enjoying a last indulgence of a perfectly toasted brown sugar cinnamon Pop-Tart and a Diet Dr. Pepper, I will take a Mardi Gras walk, go to my TMBS class, look at pics of friends celebrating in New Orleans and Rio de Janeiro (hello, Angela!), the largest such festival in the world, and eat pancakes (and in case you are wondering, they do not serve pancakes at the Waffle House) and make a list of something, my 2019 Lenten practice. That will be a new practice for Lent. It may be a grocery list … but I’m in a listmaking phase of life.

Laissez les bon temps rouler!!

3.5.19

23
Feb
19

2.23.19 … “The duality of the labyrinth–connecting the physical act of walking with the inner, spiritual passages–resonates with the duality of public ceremonies.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Louisville Presbyterian Seminary- Louisville KY:

I’m here today for my niece’s wedding. I thought about Hunter and Eric today as I walked. I actually researched the concept of using the labyrinth as a venue for a wedding. I found this:

The duality of the labyrinth–connecting the physical act of walking with the inner, spiritual passages–resonates with the duality of public ceremonies.

A wedding is often called a “public affirmation of a private commitment.” Walking the labyrinth in a ceremony can connect you both to the community of friends–who can witness and acknowledge the event from the perimeter of the circle–and to the larger community of humankind across cultures and generations. For thousands of years, labyrinths have been interwoven into rituals in cultures from Europe to Asia to South and North America.

Source: https://www.beliefnet.com/love-family/relationships/weddings/walking-the-wedding-labyrinth.aspx#MoCIxevwzlQEVvZQ.99

So I thought about this concept of a wedding. And although the wedding will not take place on a labyrinth, but at the nearby Chapel on the seminary’s campus, I am here to witness this public affirmation as a part of my niece’s community in a ritual that crosses cultures and generations.

My walk took place at about 1. The family has been watching the weather all week as the reception is at a venue on River Road, right next to the Ohio River. They have had massive rains and flooding for the last 10 days.

So when I approached the labyrinth I realized how muddy and brown everything is. I saw dead leaves, sticks and debris, almost as if they had been swirling water.

Instead of looking down I looked up and noticed two new trees planted at the entrance. And my spirits were lifted by a chorus from the birds nearby, and they were chirping wildly.

It was a quick walk. I noticed some new trees, new benches and new bushes. The boxwoods around the edge are growing out of their perfectly round shape.

And as I reenteredd the here and now, I realized that size matters. Although this is a traditional 11th circuit Chartres pattern, it is larger than any that I regularly walk. I found my timing was off and that I pushed myself, almost ran, to keep my normal pace. I am going to have to be more intentional about my next walk here to enjoy this labyrinth’s timing. It’s not all about me. I need to be willing to change.

I pondered my interconnectedness with my niece Hunter and the groom Eric and the Teague family and the many friends and family that I have known and loved for the over 40 years of my being part of this family. And today we are adding Eric and his family to the circle and the interconnected walk we share within the circle. The thought that our circle has expanded and we can now hope to share the walk for another generation.

Blessings!

2.23.19

25
Jan
19

1.25.19 … “If you are mindful, or fully present in the here and now, anxiety disappears and a sense of timelessness takes hold, allowing your highest qualities, such as kindness and compassion, to emerge.”

Thich Nhat Hanh, Mindfulness, Vietnam: Another non-Westerner who has influenced my life in recent years.

Nhat Hanh taught that you don’t have to spend years on a mountaintop to benefit from Buddhist wisdom. Instead, he says, just become aware of your breath, and through that come into the present moment, where everyday activities can take on a joyful, miraculous quality. If you are mindful, or fully present in the here and now, anxiety disappears and a sense of timelessness takes hold, allowing your highest qualities, such as kindness and compassion, to emerge.

This was highly appealing to Westerners seeking spirituality but not the trappings of religion. Burned-out executives and recovering alcoholics flocked to retreats in the French countryside to listen to Nhat Hanh. An entire mindfulness movement sprang up in the wake of this dharma superstar. Among his students was the American doctor Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction course that is now offered at hospitals and medical centers worldwide. Today, the mindfulness that Nhat Hanh did so much to propagate is a $1.1 billion industry in the U.S., with revenues flowing from 2,450 meditation centers and thousands of books, apps and online courses. One survey found that 35% of employers have incorporated mindfulness into the workplace.

Source: Thich Nhat Hanh, Father of Mindfulness, Awaits the End | Time, http://time.com/5511729/monk-mindfulness-art-of-dying/

Rumi, quotes: I truly love Rumi quotes. So why had I never heard of him until a few years ago. He’s only been around for 700+ years

The inspiration you seek is already within you.

Be silent and listen.

~ Rumi

Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī, also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhī, Mevlânâ/Mawlānā, Mevlevî/Mawlawī, and more popularly simply as Rumi, was a 13th-century Persian poet, jurist, Islamic scholar, theologian, and Sufi mystic originally from Greater Khorasan. Wikipedia
Born: September 30, 1207
Died: December 17, 1273, Konya, Turkey

stuff that doesn’t matter:

“As is usually the case with viral stuff that doesn’t actually matter but that we pretend matters anyway in order to give ourselves some semblance of control, identity, and distraction in this exponentially disastrous world, the arrow question has kindled fierce arguments between folks who believe their way of drawing X’s is THE ONLY CORRECT WAY and EVERYONE ELSE CAN GO TO HELL.”

Source: Twitter Is Divided Over The Right Way To Draw An ‘X’, https://hub.bloomjoy.com/ruin-my-week/right-way-to-draw-an-x/

LOL;

1.24.19

Cultural Rorschach test, Covington Catholic viral video, viral video:

I’ve been slow to opine on the Covington Catholic viral video. I reposted two days later this post by Fr. James Martin, SJ whom I respect.

And I hope that the students are ready to apologize as well.

Until then, dialogue is essential. Among Covington High School administrators. Between the students and indigenous peoples. Or simply between that group of students and Mr. Phillips.

In disagreement, dialogue is essential, as is what Pope Francis calls a “culture of encounter.” For example, a service trip for the students to a Native American reservation–as a learning opportunity.

Another essential lesson, which transcends whatever happened in Washington this weekend: an understanding of the appalling treatment that Native Americans have endured in our country. That lesson needs to be learned regardless of what you think of Covington High School.

This Teachable Moment can offer us, if we are open, lessons about dialogue, encounter and reconciliation during this coming week, which is, believe it or not, Catholic Schools Week.

Source: https://www.facebook.com/46899546495/posts/10155810610636496/

And then I saw this. Did you pass or fail? I waited … and I’m not sure why. So I barely passed.

The story is a Rorschach test—tell me how you first reacted, and I can probably tell where you live, who you voted for in 2016, and your general take on a list of other issues—but it shouldn’t be. Take away the video and tell me why millions of people care so much about an obnoxious group of high-school students protesting legalized abortion and a small circle of American Indians protesting centuries of mistreatment who were briefly locked in a tense standoff. Take away Twitter and Facebook and explain why total strangers care so much about people they don’t know in a confrontation they didn’t witness. Why are we all so primed for outrage, and what if the thousands of words and countless hours spent on this had been directed toward something consequential?

Source: Julie Irwin Zimmerman: I Failed the Covington Catholic Test – The Atlantic, 
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/01/julie-irwin-zimmerman-i-failed-covington-catholic-test/580897/

And I loved having a conversation about cultural Rorschach testswith Davidson friend A. Hall

Yes, it is. Fascinating. We’ve had some vivid reminders that what we perceive as reality is based on the lenses with which we view it. And those lenses can change depending on the information we put in or on our lived experience. It can feel like vertigo to know that people have a completely different perception of reality – but it looks like understanding that is a challenge we should take up.

Ditto what she said!

At the same time, I regret commenting on another friend’s post, because my comment only gave friends a g”otcha, you’re a racist moment.” I wanted a discussion of cultural Rorschach tests and lenses and respect, and instead, I felt that the commenter was saying, “gotcha.”

The Great Comma, Epiphany moment, liturgical Christian traditions,Apostles Creed, Niceness Creed: The Great Comma! So, I guess I worship in one of the liturgical Christian traditions, and I participate in proclaiming the Great Comma. An Epiphany Moment for me.

 . . Born of the Virgin Mary,
suffered under Pontius Pilate, . . .

—The Apostles’ Creed

If you worship in one of the liturgical Christian traditions, you probably know the opening words of the Apostles’ Creed by heart:

I believe in God, the Father Almighty, creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried; he descended into hell; . . .

But have you ever noticed the huge leap the creed makes between “born of the Virgin Mary” and “suffered under Pontius Pilate”? A single comma connects the two statements, and falling into that yawning gap, as if it were a mere detail, is everything Jesus said and did between his birth and his death! Called the “Great Comma,” the gap certainly invites some serious questions. Did all the things Jesus said and did in those years not count for much? Were they nothing to “believe” in? Was it only his birth and death that mattered? Does the gap in some way explain Christianity’s often dismal record of imitating Jesus’ life and teaching?

There are other glaring oversights. The Apostles’ Creed does not once mention love, service, hope, the “least of the brothers and sisters,” or even forgiveness—anything that is remotely actionable. The earliest formal declaration of Christian belief is a vision and philosophy statement with no mission statement, as it were. Twice we are reminded that God is almighty, yet nowhere do we hear mention that God is also all-suffering or all-vulnerable (although it does declare that Jesus “suffered . . . , died, and was buried”). With its emphasis on theory and theology, but no emphasis on praxis (i.e., practice), the creed set Christianity on a course we are still following today.

The Apostles’ Creed, along with the later Nicene Creed, is an important document of theological summary and history, but when the crowd at my parish mumbles hurriedly through its recitation each Sunday, I’m struck by how little usefulness—or even interest—the creed seems to bring as a guide for people’s daily, practical behavior. I hope I am wrong, but I doubt it.

Both creeds reveal historic Christian assumptions about who God is and what God is doing. They reaffirm a static and unchanging universe and a God who is quite remote from almost everything we care about each day. Furthermore, they don’t show much interest in the realities of Jesus’ own human life—or ours. Instead, they portray what religious systems tend to want: a God who looks strong and stable and in control. No “turn the other cheek” Jesus, no hint of a simple Christ-like lifestyle is found here.

https://email.cac.org/t/ViewEmail/d/EA7137F1585CAE9E2540EF23F30FEDED/1DC1AEAE5E535C1F0B3A73003FEB3522

1.23

Peripatetic Posse, kith/kin, wasabis, safety in numbers: My friend reposted one of my favorite of her blog posts. I’m not the letter writer.

My friend Dennard Lindsey Teague reminded me of an article I wrote several years ago in tribute to my group of Davidson College Alumni women from the Davidson College Class of 1982. They are my “peripatetic posse.”

In honor of Dennard’s upcoming birthday (and our particular friendship going back to first grade), I wanted to post this again in celebration of her, of MY friendships, and in celebration of ALL women’s friendships.

And yet fifteen years after graduation we came back together for a reunion, setting in motion a powerful force, the original “us” reconvened and buttressed.

Now we see each other yearly, as many of us as can get there, with the “there” moving between vacation homes, rented camps, and urban hotels. We have a system for choosing location and time, and it begins anew each spring so we can gather in the fall. We pool resources to be sure all can come.

On the appointed weekend, from the time the last one arrives on Thursday or Friday until the first one leaves on Sunday, we sit in a circle with a single purpose: listening to what has happened in each other’s lives throughout the last year. Listening to hear, not listening to solve or fix. Just listening. We take breaks only for meal preparation, pouring coffee or wine, a long walk or hike each day, and a little sleep.

There’s power in our honesty and in our safety. There are opportunities for us to see both sides of an issue through each other as we skip the “How could someone think that?” in favour of the “Oh, I can see why you feel the way you do.” Maybe one woman has parenting challenges that help another imagine that her own mother did all she could; a rant on health-care annoyances is met with a doctor’s own perspective on her disappointment in her changing profession. Yet we don’t go out of our way to stir up the subjects on which we would disagree (and there are probably several). It’s not a place to be right; it’s a place to be loved.

Source: My Peripatetic Posse: Safety in Numbers | Comment Magazine, https://www.cardus.ca/comment/article/my-peripatetic-posse-safety-in-numbers

Corolla, OBX: many years at OBX, many memories of the horses …

Carolla Beach … What a way to start the day! This is our idea of traffic

Lunar eclipse, wolf moon: I was so excited, but I slept through the entire event: I’m glad some people were up,and shared their photos!

The Evolution of Lin-Manuel Miranda: The Evolution of Lin-Manuel Miranda is just fun to watch!

https://youtu.be/u-gte9G2urU, The Evolution of Lin-Manuel Miranda,

1.21.18 … We cannot be held responsible for bibliomania!

Baltimore MD, Lee’s Oyster and Pint, The Helmand (Afghan), Gnocco, Pitango Coffee, The Book Thing – Baltimore MD:

So far, lunch at Lee’s Oyster and Pint, great Afghan meal at The Helmand last night with Averie and Suzanne, brunch today at gnocco, now coffee at Pitango … endless opportunities for good food, good drink and good company in Baltimore. And then The Book Thing. We cannot be held responsible for bibliomania!

We cannot be held responsible for bibliomania!

20
Jan
19

1.20.19 … “Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” -Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver, Poetry, RIP, NPR: I will miss her words.

Much-loved poet Mary Oliver died Thursday of lymphoma, at her home in Florida. She was 83. Oliver won many awards for her poems, which often explore the link between nature and the spiritual world; she also won a legion of loyal readers who found both solace and joy in her work.

Oliver got a lot of her ideas for poems during long walks — a habit she developed as a kid growing up in rural Ohio. It was not a happy childhood: She said she was sexually abused and suffered from parental neglect. But as she told NPR in 2012, she found refuge in two great passions that lasted her entire life.

She said, “The two things I loved from a very early age were the natural world and dead poets, [who] were my pals when I was a kid.”

Source: Mary Oliver, Who Believed Poetry ‘Mustn’t Be Fancy,’ Dies At 83 : NPR, https://www.npr.org/2019/01/17/577380646/beloved-poet-mary-oliver-who-believed-poetry-mustn-t-be-fancy-dies-at-83

I have loved reading friends’ favorite Mary Oliver poems that many have posted on Facebook since her death was announced 1.17.

Here is a favorite of mine:

“Morning Poem”:

Every morning

the world

is created.

Under the orange

sticks of the sun

the heaped

ashes of the night

turn into leaves again

and fasten themselves to the high branches—

and the ponds appear

like black cloth

on which are painted islands

of summer lilies.

If it is your nature

to be happy

you will swim away along the soft trails

for hours, your imagination

alighting everywhere.

And if your spirit

carries within it

the thorn

that is heavier than lead—

if it’s all you can do

to keep on trudging—

there is still

somewhere deep within you

a beast shouting that the earth

is exactly what it wanted—

each pond with its blazing lilies

is a prayer heard and answered

lavishly,

every morning,

whether or not

you have ever dared to be happy,

whether or not

you have ever dared to pray.

And a few from others …

“The Summer Day”:

Who made the world?

Who made the swan, and the black bear?

Who made the grasshopper?

This grasshopper, I mean-

the one who has flung herself out of the grass,

the one who is eating sugar out of my hand,

who is moving her jaws back and forth instead of up and down-

who is gazing around with her enormous and complicated eyes.

Now she lifts her pale forearms and thoroughly washes her face.

Now she snaps her wings open, and floats away.

I don’t know exactly what a prayer is.

I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down

into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,

how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,

which is what I have been doing all day.

Tell me, what else should I have done?

Doesn’t everything die at last, and too soon?

Tell me, what is it you plan to do

with your one wild and precious life?

Dog Songs”:

You may not agree, you may not care, but

if you are holding this book you should know that of all the sights I love in this world — and there are plenty — very near the top of the list is this one: dogs without leashes.

“The Journey”:

One day you finally knew

what you had to do, and began,

though the voices around you

kept shouting

their bad advice–

though the whole house

began to tremble

and you felt the old tug

at your ankles.

“Mend my life!”

each voice cried.

But you didn’t stop.

You knew what you had to do,

though the wind pried

with its stiff fingers

at the very foundations,

though their melancholy

was terrible.

It was already late

enough, and a wild night,

and the road full of fallen

branches and stones.

But little by little,

as you left their voices behind,

the stars began to burn

through the sheets of clouds,

and there was a new voice

which you slowly

recognized as your own,

that kept you company

as you strode deeper and deeper

into the world,

determined to do

the only thing you could do–

determined to save

the only life you could save.

Painting by Leonid Afremov

via Holland UCC


Meaning of Joy, Katelyn Ohashi, Steph Curry, gymnastics:

Even the  WSJ was impressed!  (And a shout out to Steph to boot!)

An amazing college gymnastics performance by @katelyn_ohashi becomes a viral video because it radiates human joy, writes @jasongay.

This is go­ing to sound pre­ten­tious, but what­ever: I think Ohashi’s rou­tine is a ra­di­ant ex­pres­sion of what it means for a hu­man be­ing to be very, very good at some­thing—and to want to share that with every­one. She projects a con­fi­dence that only great per­form­ers project, whether Olympic cham­pi­ons or con­cert pi­anists, that every eye is upon them. In­stead of shirk­ing from that, in­stead of get­ting rat­tled, Ohashi rushes to­ward the mo­ment. The mo­ment be­comes her.

These in­stances are rare, but they’re re­ally the rea­son why we watch sports, aren’t they? Sure, we come up with all kinds of ra­tio­nal­iza-tions for our sports ob­ses­sions—tra­di­tion, re­gional loy­al­ties, very bad bets on the Min­nesota Vikings—but what truly keeps the au­di­ence com­ing back is the chance that every once in a while, you’ll see a ra­di­ant ex­pres­sion of hu­man great­ness and joy. An Odell Beck­ham Jr. one-handed grab. A Patrick Ma­homes sidearm touch­down pass. Mikaela Shiffrin crush­ing a turn in the gi­ant slalom (Shiffrin’s ab­so­lutely ba­nanas World Cup sea­son is the most un­der­ap­pre­ci­ated sports story of the mo­ment.) A Roger Fed­erer one-handed back­hand down the line. Pretty much every­thing Steph Curry does. Ditto Si­mone Biles.

Student teacher relationships, emotional intelligence: I am forever grateful for teachers I had at E. Rivers Elementary School, Westminster, Davidson College and UGA Law. Those I had relationships stand out. Those I loved I will never forget.

“That unplanned moment illustrated for me the connection between emotional relationships and learning. We used to have this top-down notion that reason was on a teeter-totter with emotion. If you wanted to be rational and think well, you had to suppress those primitive gremlins, the emotions. Teaching consisted of dispassionately downloading knowledge into students’ brains.

Then work by cognitive scientists like Antonio Damasio showed us that emotion is not the opposite of reason; it’s essential to reason. Emotions assign value to things. If you don’t know what you want, you can’t make good decisions.”

Source: Opinion | Students Learn From People They Love – The New York Times, https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/opinion/learning-emotion-education.html

TMBS, aging, ageism, happiness is a choice, kith/kin:

I gain something wonderful every week at TMBS. This week, it was the insight from this article…The Joy of Being a Woman in Her 70s … I want to be described like this in 15 years!

The only constant in our lives is change. But if we are growing in wisdom and empathy, we can take the long view. We’ve lived through seven decades of our country’s history, from Truman to Trump. I knew my great-grandmother, and if I live long enough, will meet my great-grandchildren. I will have known seven generations of family. I see where I belong in a long line of Scotch-Irish ancestors. I am alive today only because thousands of generations of resilient homo sapiens managed to procreate and raise their children. I come from, we all come from, resilient stock, or we wouldn’t be here.

By the time we are 70, we have all had more tragedy and more bliss in our lives than we could have foreseen. If we are wise, we realize that we are but one drop in the great river we call life and that it has been a miracle and a privilege to be alive.

Source: NYTimes: The Joy of Being a Woman in Her 70s, https://nyti.ms/2RIcnnk?smid=nytcore-ios-share

Silence, Be Still, Sanctuary for God’s Presence, Paul Bane, Patheos: Great ideas to ponder!

Silence is the sanctuary for God’s presence residing in the depths and recesses of our heart.  In the solitude and quiet, we seek and discover the love of Christ dwelling with us. In the silence, we become still to hear God speaking life to us. Be still and know I am God.

The silence lifts us beyond our internal and external thoughts, and we discover the inward voice of God telling us that we are loved.You and I are daughters, sons and joint heirs of His divine kingdom. Silence is the sanctuary for God’s presence where we discover His unconditional love and never-ending hope for our life.

Source: Silence is the Sanctuary for God’s Presence | Paul Bane, https://www.patheos.com/blogs/mindfulchristianitytoday/2018/08/silence-is-the-sanctuary-for-gods-presence/

1.17.19

The Smithsonian, portraits, Henrietta Lacks, medical miracles – CNN, HeLa cells: I have been fascinated with the story of Henrietta lacks since my oldest son recommended that I read the book outlining her story. I was thrilled to see that she now has a portrait at the Smithsonian. This is old news from May 2018. I need to plan a visit to DC.

This week, the Smithsonian unveiled a portrait of Henrietta Lacks, the black tobacco farmer who ended up changing the world. Her cells have allowed for advances in cancer treatment, AIDS research, cloning, stem-cell studies and so much more. They traveled to the moon to test the effects of zero gravity, and scientists have sold and purchased them by the billions.

Source: The Smithsonian unveils a portrait of Henrietta Lacks, the black farmer whose cells led to medical miracles – CNN,

https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/16/health/henrietta-lacks-portrait-smithsonian-tmd/index.html

1.17.19

“Who Will Write Our History“, Holocaust, Auerbach:

Nobility is a luxury for people imprisoned in a way station to annihilation, and the film does include expressions of futility, despair, and outrage at the conduct of fellow Jews. Auerbach worked in a soup kitchen that, some argued, just postponed rather than averted starvation. Another point of debate the archive documents is the proper attitude toward others’s suffering: Is callousness an expression of weakness or strength? 

The writings that were buried under the ghetto, soon to be burned to the ground by German troops, offer as many viewpoints as the people who contributed their words to the project. Together, though, they constitute what one historian calls “one great accusation.”

Queen Victoria, History Extra, funerals: Interesting if you enjoy history …

When Queen Victoria died at the age of 81 on 22 January 1901, it took her family, court and subjects by surprise – very few had been able to contemplate the mortality of the monarch who had ruled over Britain and its empire for almost 64 years. Her death marked the end of the Victorian era. Here, Stewart Richards considers Queen Victoria’s final moments, the chaotic preparations for her state funeral on 2 February 1901, and the secret items placed inside her coffin…

Source: The bizarre funeral of Queen Victoria: how, when and where did she die? – History Extra, https://www.historyextra.com/period/victorian/queen-victoria-death-funeral-mask-cause/

Westminster Abbey’s Hidden Gallery, Westminster Abbey, London:

They say good things come to those who wait. But if you’ve been waiting to get a glimpse inside Westminster Abbey’s old triforium, you’ve missed a hefty chunk of human history in the process: 700 years, in fact! Luckily, your wait is over, as the hidden gallery opened for public viewing this summer – for the first time since it was built, way back in the 13th century. Patience is a virtue, you know…

Photo: @theattinghamtrust

For many years, the triforium was essentially Westminster’s attic, used as storage space or as a spillover viewing gallery for coronations (one ticket, found during the renovation and now part of the display, was from the 1702 coronation of Queen Anne). It even served as the BBC’s outpost during Queen Elizabeth’s coronation, as Richard Dimbleby narrated the affair to a captive TV audience.

Source: Westminster Abbey’s Hidden Gallery: Inside The 700-Year Old Triforium, https://secretldn.com/westminster-abbey-hidden-gallery/

1.14.19

Outer Banks wild horses, RIP, Roamer, tourism ads, Charlotte Observer:

A wild mustang known around the world for being featured prominently in Outer Banks tourism materials has died at the height of his stardom.

The Corolla Wild Horse Fund announced Monday that Roamer, a 15-year-old stallion, died Saturday, just 24 hours after being diagnosed with a tear in his GI tract that led to sepsis.

“People out there know who Roamer is, but may not realize it,” said Meg Puckett, the herd manager for the Corolla wild horses.

He was sort of a legend, on the cover of the tourism fliers and even on billboards. He was an ambassador for the horses.”

Roamer was among the oldest of the herd of nearly 100 horses, and also one of those who could not be easily tamed. He frequently refused to stay fenced into the area reserved for wild horses, and took off to wander among the tourists, Puckett says.

Herd managers eventually had to relocate him to a rehabilitation site operated by the Corolla Wild Horse Fund, out of fear he would be hit by an off-road vehicle.

“That’s how he got his name, Roamer,” Puckett said. “He eventually became part of our ‘Meet a Mustang’ program (at the rehab site), which lets people have a more intimate experience meeting the horses.”

Source: Outer Banks wild horse featured in tourism ads dies | Charlotte Observer, 
https://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/article224515940.html

Rich’s, Department Stores, Atlanta GA, Southern Childhood, Southern Living: I loved both Rich’s and Davison’s in Atlanta. My grandmother was a Chin buyer for Davison’s, but I have more memories of Rich’s.

Rich’s

VIA THE GEORGIA TRUST

Atlanta, Georgia

Rich’s, opened in 1867 by Morris Rich, was Atlanta’s premiere department store for all things fashionable and classic. At Christmas, shoppers anticipated the extravagant holiday decorations and gigantic Christmas tree that was displayed on top of a multi-level glass bridge, which was the first of its kind in the city. Eventually, Rich’s fashion show in Atlanta got so big it had to be moved to the Fox Theatre, as its customers were so anxious for a glimpse of next season’s clothes. After 138 years, Rich’s (known then as Rich’s-Macy’s due to its earlier acquisition) ended its era in 2005 and was converted to just “Macy’s.”

Source: Department Stores You’ll Remember From Your Southern Childhood – Southern Living, https://www.southernliving.com/fashion-beauty/vintage-southern-department-stores

j. peterman catalog, John Peterman: what a description! “the gentleman-retailer famously satirized on “Seinfeld,” talks adventuresome fashion, ‘Downton Abbey,” and the value of learning how to ride” … and here is a link to the catalog: https://www.jpeterman.com/?gclid=CjwKCAiAsoviBRAoEiwATm8OYDKBL93geNPsO-SZCHPCFSjOdTKDBtrhQNs6IzQKbW8iLOGVkjXuWBoCsRAQAvD_BwE

He has vis­ited at least 80 coun­tries, and when John Pe­ter­man says “vis­ited,” he means it. “That’s not just stop­ping at the air­port to change planes,” said the founder of J. Pe­ter­man Co., the cloth­ing com­pany that’s ac­quired cult sta­tus due to its hand-il­lus­trated cat­a­log and fan­ci­fully nar­ra­tive prod­uct de­scrip­tions that of­ten ref­er­ence far-flung places. At 77, Mr. Pe­ter­man still reg­u­larly sets off from his Lex­ing­ton, Ky., home to des­ti­na­tions like Paris and Buenos Aires. “I’m go­ing out and look­ing for in­spi­ra­tion,” he ex­plained. He in­sists that if you want to find the proper cut of a kilt, you must tramp around Scot­land to find it your­self. Each J. Pe­ter­man item be­gins with a jour­ney.

Source: Remember the J.Peterman Catalog? It’s Still Going Strong and So Is Mr. Peterman, https://www.wsj.com/articles/remember-the-j-peterman-catalog-its-still-going-strong-and-so-is-mr-peterman-11547569560?emailToken=cb5b9d341bc1b8bfb327c13eefd6e907J8TZSiLglM76h3xPZMtnb4IkNrSSHwU05gCkgRCZTCwwoQD12x7zIQ9+byovazWueSq778WhBhr7dfnodqaNC7CpbIZS7hi/1GvtpAxsjm07yWgpm8M93L8ghFn/W/OrG54XYfL0B9VGv6LMrMZRAQ%3D%3D&reflink=article_email_share

Louisville International Airport (Standiford Field (SDF)), Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport, Muhammad Ali, Louisville KY:

Ali’s widow Lonnie Ali called the champion a “global citizen,” according to the release, but added “he never forgot the city that gave him his start. It is a fitting testament to his legacy.”

While the airport’s name will change, its current three-letter International Air Transport Association (IATA) code — SDF — won’t change.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/louisville-international-airport-renamed-muhammad-ali-vote-today-2019-01-16/

And I loved this anecdote on Facebook by Dave Kindred …

News that my old town, Louisville, is renaming its airport for Muhammad Ali reminds me of an old story. Flight attendant tells the champ he must buckle his seat belt, to which he says, “Superman don’t need a seat belt.” Flight attendant says, “Superman don’t need a plane” Champ buckles up.

1.15.19

Quotes: Besides the poetry quotes, I pondered these this week …

“Curiosity is one of the permanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous intellect. Every advance into knowledge opens new prospects, and produces new incitements to further progress.”

— Samuel Johnson, Rambler

“It was on a bright day of midwinter, in New York. The little girl who eventually became me, but as yet was neither me nor anybody else in particular, but merely a soft anonymous morsel of humanity—this little girl, who bore my name, was going for a walk with her father. The episode is literally the first thing I can remember about her, and therefore I date the birth of her identity from that day.”

– Edith Wharton, A Backward Glance

“Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit, and as vital to our lives as water and good bread. A civilization which destroys what little remains of the wild, the spare, the original, is cutting itself off from its origins and betraying the principle of civilization itself.”

― Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire

“Eternity is in love with the productions of time.”

— William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell

“Heaven have mercy on us all – Presbyterians and Pagans alike – for we are all somehow dreadfully cracked about the head, and sadly need mending.”

-Herman Melville – from “Moby Dick”

God writes the Gospel not in the Bible alone, but also on trees, and in the flowers and clouds and stars.

– Martin Luther

Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/martin_luther_140721

In the vast abyss before time, self

is not, and soul commingles

with mist, and rock, and light. In time,

soul brings the misty self to be.

Then slow time hardens self to stone

while ever lightening the soul,

till soul can loose its hold of self

and both are free and can return

to vastness and dissolve in light,

the long light after time.

-Ursula K. Le Guin, HOW IT SEEMS TO ME

LOL, Brexit: brexit shouldn’t be funny … but I laughed.


LOL, POTUS, Clemson visits the White House, Govern Shutdown, “The Fast Supper”, #Cofveve #hamberders #Funny #NotFunnyToo:

1.17.19

LOL, POTUS, political cartoons:

I often don’t agree with “God,” but I frequently laugh.

1.18.19

LOL, dog employee of the month:

This is the story about a distribution sales manager who works from home. Michael Reeg from Georgia has a dog Meeka which he considers as a real asset. He considers the dog as a best friend because it doesn’t allow him to feel lonely during work hours. The dog has in a way eased the transition of Michael Reeg to the telecommuting. Meeka is quite punctual. She turns up to the work regardless the presence of Michael. She goes there like every model employee would do for his employer. Meeka is quite enthusiastic for the work, when she finds the door of the office shut, she doesn’t leave for taking a rest. Instead she prefers to sit outside the door. Michael Reeg was interviewed by The Dodo. He said that transitioning to home based work was not an easy thing. He said that it was quiet and devoid of excitement. Thus, according to him, the dog helped him cover that journey.

Source: Man who works from home keeps naming his dog employee of the month, https://www.talkofweb.com/man-who-works-from-home-keeps-naming-his-dog-employee-of-the-month/




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