Posts Tagged ‘kith/kin



01
Jan
15

1.1.15 … Happy New Year! … Blessings on your pilgrimage in 2015!

Pilgrimage, Devotional:  i wrote the devotional for PW at my church.  I think it pulls together  much of what I experienced in 2014.
What is a Pilgrimage?
Back in 2013 Kirk Hall preached on the Transfiguration. His sermon was entitled,  “A Glimpse of Glory.”  From that day I was also quite struck by the Affirmation of Faith …
“We believe Christ gives us and demands of us lives in pilgrimage toward God’s kingdom. Like Christ we may enjoy on our journey all that sustains life and makes it pleasant and beautiful. No more than Christ are we spared the darkness, ambiguity, and threat of life in the world. We are in the world, but not of the world. Our confidence and hope for ourselves and other people do not rest in the powers and achievements of this world, but in the coming and hidden presence of God’s kingdom. Christ calls each of us to a life appropriate to that kingdom: to serve as he has served us; to take up our cross, risking the consequences of faithful discipleship; to walk by faith, not by sight, to hope for what we have not seen. (Declaration of Faith, 9.5)” (Source: http://www.firstpres-charlotte.org/bulletins/bulletin.pdf)
 
So, what is a Pilgrimage?
Our Church is orchestrating a 2016 Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.  According to the brochure it is an opportunity whereby “Each traveler will connect to a different facet of the Holy Lands whether it’s the feel of the land, the antiquity of the place or the history come to life. Evenings will include devotions and a time for reflection.”  And it is necessary to prepare for the encounter and experience by studying scripture, researching archeology, learning biblical history, and gaining an understanding of all these through a review of contemporary issues.
So how can you experience a life in pilgrimage towards God’s kingdom?   Find a practice that promotes your movement toward God.  It can be a dedicated Bible study, centered prayer, meditation, or even going on a dedicated travel opportunity such as the Church’s Holy Land Pilgrimage.  It does not have to expensive, but it does need to be intentional and dedicated toward gaining a glimpse of God’s glory.
I personally have found pilgrimage through the practice of walking labyrinths. A labyrinth is a uni-circular pathway.
 “In some cultures, the circling pathway simulates the movement of planets in the solar system. The spiritual journey is the main focus of the Labyrinth experience. Walking and resting simulate the believer’s movement through life. In Medieval times, Christians who wanted to journey to the Holy Land would approximate that pilgrimage in a local labyrinth walk and with Bible stories as a guide. Some believers pray the labyrinth journey to become clear on the direction for life and walk with a prayer phrase such as the mantra, “Show me the way, I will follow.” This may lead to surrendering and allowing the Spirit to lead the way.” Source: http://rockhilloratory.blogspot.com/2009/04/oratory-labyrinth-prayer-garden.html
 
For years, my favorite passage has been Psalm 46:10 which states, “Be still and know that I am God.”  One interpretation for “be still” is “surrender.”
Pilgrimage is surrendering and that can be done in many ways, but ultimately all pilgrimages lead the believer to know God in all his glory. 
Blessings on your pilgrimage in 2015!
December 19, 2014

Kith/kin, memories, Atlanta, Thomasville GA, Louisville KY, :

Memories of New Year’s Celebrations …

As a child I remember my parents would host a small party. Everyone would arrive by 7 and they would have dinner and then they would go to a movie. While they were out, my sister, my brother and I would decorate the house, and then when the adults came back, we would listen to the “adults” cheer in the New Year.

And then there was the year that my dad went down to Rich’s and bought a color tv, our first. There was one condition, it had to be delivered by 5 pm on New Year’s Eve. It was, and we watched the Rose Bowl Parade and whatever bowl game Alabama was playing in “in living color.”

As a high school and college student, I would go downtown in Atlanta to the neon Coke sign which was later moved. I remember one year, we were taking Champagne with us and my mother gave me an antique monogrammed linen Champagne “napkin” which was lost in the celebration My mother was not too pleased with me.

One year I was in Louisville for the New Year, and my always industrious now brother in law Bito and his friends decided they needed some money, so they cooked the traditional NYD southern good luck meal and sold them to family and friends.

In the married but before kids period, John and I were visiting Julie and Doug in Thomasville GA. We were going to stay at the “farm” for the night. Julie’s family’s housekeeper had fixed a picnic dinner. It was one of the best meals I ever ate. I know it included quail. The good life.

And then there was San Francisco … Mike and Diane got married in SF on New Year’s Eve. Black tie, etc. … but Diane had kids from her first marriage so there was this wonderful element of whimsy. She had a balloon artist making balloon hats, etc. Happy Anniversary, Mike and Diane!!

After kids, while my parents were in Pineview, I arrived after driving 16+ hours right before midnight (after being pulled for weaving on the last 12 mile stretch from Hawkinsville … cop told me my old clunker van with Illinois plates was suspicious because of all the drug trade) and put the kids to bed. My mom and I went out and watched one of the most beautiful meteor showers I have ever seen.

Another New Year’s Eve during that era, I was driving back from Georgia and the weather was very bad. My friends Ruth Ann and Tim demanded that I stop in Louisville for the night. I yielded to their better judgement. We went sledding at midnight and it was glorious. My kids had not been sledding like that in years since snow was iffy in NC and Chicago is basically flat. The next morning we went to Lynn’s Paradise Cafe, a funky Louisville restaurant where folks went in their pajamas on New year’s Day, and Jack, probably 11, asked if he could have lobster with his eggs. Sure … and he loved it!

Other than that I am usually in bed by 11 … watching the tv and keeping an eye out for 3 kids … and that era is almost over.

Happy New Year!

New Year’s good luck foods: I’m cooking black-eyed peas, turnips and ham.

To dig a little deeper, I chose four popular regional American good luck foods of the new year—the pork and sauerkraut of the Midwest, the greens and black-eyed peas of the South, the pickled herring of Scandinavian immigrants, and the lentils of Italian-Americans—on a quest for the facts behind the fortune.

via The True Story of Traditional New Year’s Lucky Foods | Serious Eats.

20
Jul
14

7.20.14 … I always remember this day because a good friend shares it as her day. Has anything special happened on your day? …

45 Years Ago Landed Men on the Moon, In Focus – The Atlantic, kith/kin: 

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the Moon near the leg of the Lunar Module (LM) “Eagle” during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity on July 20, 1969. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin explored the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon and astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “Columbia” in lunar orbit. (NASA)

via 45 Years Ago We Landed Men on the Moon – In Focus – The Atlantic.

17
Jul
14

7.17.14 … if only these walls could talk …

TBT 1927, family history, kith/kin, 1429 Ponce de Leon, Harman, The Paideia School, if only these walls could talk … : This house at 1429  Ponce de Leon in Atlanta houses the College Counseling Offices for Paideia School. I wonder if anyone at the school knows that someone was born in the house in 1927, that person being my dad. He was born in the Harman Home, the home of his grandparents (my great grandparents). — at The Paideia School.

 

via Paideia School: About Us » Our Campus.

Eleanor “Ellie” Frith, kith/kin, dance, ballet:  One of my favorite families.  A great story!

 

For the love of dance – Frith accepts offer from Houston Ballet II

A follow-up to a Charlotte Observer story

Ballet dancer, Eleanor “Ellie” Frith, is a graduating from the Performance Learning Center’s eLearning Academy. When her fellow classmates walk across the stage on June 11, Ellie will be preparing for her performance in the Houston Ballet Academy’s Swan Lake. Ellie was recently offered a position with Houston Ballet II on a year contract. Ellie was accepted into the Houston Ballet Academy’s year-round program when she was 15 years old. She studied as a virtual student during her junior and senior years of high school packing her schedule with studies, rehearsals, performances and learning the essentials of being independent. Ellie was also accepted to the University of Virginia but has deferred enrollment. See the link to the original story from the Charlotte Observer: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/01/06/4591971/dancers-life-takes-pivotal-turn.html#.U39bSFEUP9c (Contact: Stacy Sneed)

via Grad Stories.

 “On the road”: the ambitious exhibition commemorating the 800th anniversary of St Francis of Assisi’s pilgrimage to Santiago:

“On the road”, the ambitious exhibition commemorating the 800th anniversary of St Francis of Assisi’s pilgrimage to Santiago, will be on display in Santiago de Compostela, Spain until 30 November.

Comprising works by 35 contemporary artists, including Yves Klein, Tacita Dean, Christian Boltanski and Anthony McCall, the exhibition is taking place across three locations in the Galician capital: the church and cemetery of San Domingos de Bonaval, and the Pazo de Xelmírez, adjoining Santiago’s cathedral.

A variety of media — painting, sculpture, installation, video, and art intervention — feature in the exhibition which pays homage to the intercultural character and dynamism of the city, repositioning it as a meeting place for history, spirituality and the future.

Director of Tourism in Galicia, Nava Castro, has described the show as offering the “possibility to rethink” the pilgrimage’s anniversary and to create a cultural event of international relevance and importance.

via American Pilgrims on the Camino (APOC).

It is unlikely, though, that anyone would come away from this huge display, ranging across a palace, a church and a park, without being affected by the enduring ideas St Francis has stamped on our collective consciousness. A new pope who has pointedly called himself Francis; inequality; material versus spiritual value; our troubled place in the natural world: all this is fresh and familiar, even if the actual figure of the friar is blurred in the vast temporal distance that separates us from 1214.

“It is no use walking to preach unless our walking is our preaching” is one of the saint’s aphorisms. Looking at Alÿs’s film loop, pondering why, in an otherwise bare room, a car hubcap is leaning against the wall, I was struck by how pilgrimage has always had a whiff of the postmodern about it. Chaucer knew that to travel talkatively was better than to arrive. Pilgrimage was a medieval road movie, whose goal, and centre, was always shifting.

Every afternoon pilgrims from all countries stream in to Santiago with their blisters and backpacks, continuing the decades-long camino boom triggered partly by Paulo Coelho’s 1987 new-age novel The Pilgrimage. David Lodge’s novel Therapy (1995), or the 2010 film The Way, starring Martin Sheen, also centre on the Santiago route as a balm for modern-day exhaustion and alienation.

On The Road, then, will not lack a global audience. The show is a chance to reposition the city as a fusion of history, spirituality and something more hip, and yet its sheer scale and grandiloquence are sometimes at odds with the thirst for simplicity and scaling back at the heart of this new pilgrimage. For all that Barbi’s final work signs off on a meditative note, it does not quite dispel an overall feeling that less might well be more.

via ‘On the Road’, Santiago de Compostela – FT.com.

Portillo’s, chicagotribune.com:  Best chopped salad ever …

Portillo’s Chicago-style hot dogs and Italian beef have whet the appetite of Boston-based buyers who are eager to introduce the local favorites to more diners nationwide.

The company confirmed Tuesday that Berkshire Partners is investing in Dick Portillo’s eponymous chain, two months after its 74-year-old founder announced he was considering financial alternatives for the restaurant.

“Portillo’s is my life’s work and I remain committed to ensuring the continued growth and success of the business,” Portillo said in a statement. “I was seeking an experienced partner that shared our vision for the company and an appreciation for our culture.”

via Portillo’s future in the hands of Boston buyout firm – chicagotribune.com.

 

06
Jul
14

7.6.14 … long story short …

long story short:  OK, why do I “clip”?  Long story short … it’s my filing cabinet.

long story short

Sl. to make a long story short. Okay, long story short: everything that goes up comes down, okay? Then the guy comes over, and—long story short—\”You got a match?\”

See also: long, short, story

via long story short – Idioms – by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia..

So I was looking back over past posts for 7.6 and I found several worthy of reposting.

Umberto Eco, lists, culture, Brain Pickings:  So I said I love lists ….

As a lover and maker of lists, this made my heart sing: In 2009, the great Umberto Eco became a resident at the Louvre, where he chose to focus his studies on “the vertigo of lists,” bringing his poetic observational style to the phenomenon of cataloguing, culling, and collecting. He captured his experience and insights in The Infinity of Lists: An Illustrated Essay, where he charts the Western mind’s obsessive impulse for list-making across music, literature and art, an impulse he calls a “giddiness of lists” but demonstrates that, in the right hands

The list is the origin of culture. It’s part of the history of art and literature. What does culture want? To make infinity comprehensible. It also wants to create order — not always, but often. And how, as a human being, does one face infinity? How does one attempt to grasp the incomprehensible? Through lists, through catalogs, through collections in museums and through encyclopedias and dictionaries. There is an allure to enumerating how many women Don Giovanni slept with: It was 2,063, at least according to Mozart’s librettist, Lorenzo da Ponte. We also have completely practical lists — the shopping list, the will, the menu — that are also cultural achievements in their own right.”

~ Umberto Eco

via Umberto Eco on Lists and Making Infinity Comprehensible | Brain Pickings.

via 7.6.13 … Umberto Eco on Lists: “The list is the origin of culture.” | Dennard’s Clipping Service.

And when I looked back at this wonderful fire pit,

Third Rock Fire Pit.

Third Rock – Earth and all its glory reveal a fiery inner core through the continents of our planet.

via Third Rock Fire Pit.

I found this (I want one by the way!):

 Marshmallow Roasting Art

via Marshmallow Roasting Art.

 statistics, blogging: Everyday I check to see what has interested “my” readers.  My most popular posts are the “naked yoga” and the Ben Judah version of the “serenity prayer.”

 

Today

Title Views

Home page / Archives 9

7.3.14 … when cultures collide and the result is rollicking laughter, the deep in your belly kind, it’s all good … I would always rather be happy than dignified … 6

7.4.14 … It’s not the 4th of July without TOMATO PIE! … And a history lesson … Happy 200th anniversary, The Star Spangled Banner … What’s Queen Charlotte got to do with anything? … 3

7.5.14 … Summer nights are worth staying up for … 2

7.12.13 … Alto del Perdon Spain: ‘Where meet the path of the wind and the path of the stars” … 1

1.12.13 … all my babies are gone … almost … 1

3.24.14 … Boo, Haman … Oh, and in case you missed it, ALL OF AMERICA IS ELIMINATED … First naked yoga … Now naked pilgrims … 1

1.25.14 … pilgrimages and naked yoga … 1

1.27.2011 … Felt like I was in the blue soup scene of Bridget Jones’ Diary last night. 🙂 1

Total views of posts on your blog 25

And here are a  few new ones … and yes they are random!

It’s A Nice Day For A Flash Wedding, NPR:  Where would I want a pop up wedding?

You’ve heard of pop-up restaurants, flash mobs and other hipster happenings. Now comes a pair of entrepreneurs in Washington, D.C., offering pop-up weddings for those who want to elope, but do it with flair.

Locations are never booked ahead of time, planning is minimal and fingers are crossed that you and your partner don’t get asked to leave before you are pronounced husband and wife, or wife and wife.

PopWed Co., which started last January, procures the wedding license, chooses a creative location, takes the photographs and performs the ceremony.

via It’s A Nice Day For A Flash Wedding : NPR.

fruit pizza, kith/kin: And years ago, I had fruit pizza at the home of my college roommate.  I make it around the 4th of July which is also near her birthday.  Happy birthday!!

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Fruit Pizza I Recipe – Allrecipes.com.

 

02
Jul
14

7.2.14 … “Poetry is the dark side of the moon. It’s up there, and you can see the front of it. But what it is isn’t what you’re looking at. It’s behind what you’re looking at.”

Julianna’s:  I just love this place.

As quaint and charming as ever, this cafe serves up a menu of both savory and sweet crepes. Since I hadn’t had lunch yet, I went for savory while Lucy went for the classic sweet combo of strawberries, banana, and honey. Both tasted a bit like the French/Hungarian childhood I never had.

via julianna’s crepes | tide & bloom | inspiration, creativity, and growth | atlanta events, food, culture, beauty.

Charles Wright ’57, America’s Next Poet Laureate, Davidson College: Another great day to be a wildcat!

As a Davidson student Wright was a history major and won the college’s Vereen Bell Prize for writing. Davidson awarded Wright an honorary doctor of letters degree in 1997, the year before he won the Pulitzer Prize. “Poetry fulfills a spiritual need, the need to explain to myself what it is I would like to happen,” Wright once told the Davidson Journal.

via The New York Times: Charles Wright ’57, America’s Next Poet Laureate – Davidson College.

“Poetry is the dark side of the moon,” he said. “It’s up there, and you can see the front of it. But what it is isn’t what you’re looking at. It’s behind what you’re looking at.”

via Charles Wright Named America’s Poet Laureate – NYTimes.com.

MegaBus: Odd assortment on the bus … Indian woman in beautiful Indian attire walked up and demanded younger girl give up her seat and younger girl did, very cute chatty younger twenty-something with white skeleton on black background t-shirt and sticker that says “wanted: redneck girl with truck” and African American older woman who is totally upset because somehow she will have a 5 hour wait in Charlotte and she thought it was only an hour.  It was a relatively full bus: I still love my bus!

ACAC Southeast Art Summit 9/50 opening soirée: I know I am getting old … Meow Lin (Chanel Kim) and ZigZagZig (Zopi Kristjanson) hip-hoppin’ their “lunar mythology” with inspiration drawn from Wu Tang Clan, ancient cultures, and personal drama …  funky!

Bloomsday 6.16: Happy Bloomsday 6.16!

James Joyce’s “Ulysses” changed literature and the world, not necessarily in the ways its author intended and certainly in ways we still don’t entirely understand. One of the unexpected effects of the novel, which was first published in its entirety in Paris in 1922, was the most famous obscenity trial in U.S. history, conducted in 1933. That trial serves as the culmination of Kevin Birmingham’s astute and gorgeously written “The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce’s ‘Ulysses,’” an account of the tortuous path Joyce’s masterpiece took to print. Publishing is not the world’s most fast-paced and high-stakes business, but when it came to introducing the English-speaking world to a novel that one critic deplored as “full of the filthiest blasphemies” and “afflicted with a truly diabolical lack of talent,” the ride was a wild one.

Countless reams of paper have been consumed by writings on Joyce and “Ulysses,” but Birmingham has two particular, little-discussed themes to bring to the table. First, and most peripheral to his narrative, is Birmingham’s discovery of strong evidence that the eye problems that tormented and eventually blinded Joyce were caused by syphilis. (Birmingham concludes that a medication given to Joyce by his Parisian doctor in the late 1920s was probably “an obscure French drug called galyl,” used only to treat symptoms of syphilis.) Birmingham expands on this a bit by arguing that the effects of pain and disability on the writer and his work have been underestimated. It’s a credible argument, especially once you’ve read this book’s squirm-inducing description of a typical eye surgery Joyce endured and learn that he went through the equivalent a dozen times over. But Birmingham never quite gets around to showing how Joyce’s suffering shaped his work.

via “The Most Dangerous Book”: When “Ulysses” was obscene – Salon.com.

family history, kith/kin: And this is what I was searching for … A picture of my mom that through Facebook reconnecting, a friend from Davidson and I discovered that her mother took this of my mother at Wesleyan College. She had asked my mom to model for her.

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And in response … here’s another pic your Mother may enjoy: the reporter/photographer in action while working on the Anderson Daily Mail!  My Mama – the journalist/photographer – with the elephant! One of my all time favorites!

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kith/kin:  Photos at the train station … they  look like the Addams Family. We think my sis,  a Wednesday’s child, would have made a good Wednesday Addams …

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In Addams’ cartoons, which first appeared in The New Yorker, Wednesday and other members of the family had no names. When the characters were adapted to the 1964 television series, Charles Addams gave her the name “Wednesday”, based on the well-known nursery rhyme line, “Wednesday’s child is full of woe”. She is the sister of Pugsley Addams (and, in the movie Addams Family Values, also the sister of Pubert Addams), and she is the only daughter of Gomez and Morticia Addams.

via Wednesday Addams – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

In all fairness to my sis …

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Hawkinsville GA, Pineview GA:  All my life when I visited Pineview GA, we would visit nearby Hawkinsville GA, and my grandparents would turn down Merritt St and stop in front of this house. They would say that my grandparents house on Bay Street in Pineview had been built in a hurry to replace a house that looked just like this house that had burned down around 1910. My great-grandfather JJ Dennard refused to build another two-story house since two of his girls had to jump to safety from the second story balcony. The new house which still stands is one story and all rooms have a door to the outside.

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Artistic Sushi Rolls,  Edvard Munch:

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via Artistic Sushi Rolls – Edvard Munch inspired Food Art from Sushi Sculptors.

‘Lawrence of Afghanistan’… And His Woman, Jim Gant, Top Green Beret Officer:  Fascinating story!

via Lawrence of Afghanistan: Rise and Fall of a Special Forces Legend Photos | Image #3 – ABC News.

‘Lawrence of Afghanistan’… And His Woman

General David Petraeus: ‘Going Native’ To Win In Afghanistan

A legendary Special Forces commander was quietly forced to leave the U.S. Army after he admitted to a love affair with a Washington Post war correspondent, who quit her job to secretly live with him for almost a year in one of the most dangerous combat outposts in Afghanistan.

U.S. Army Special Operations Command never publicly disclosed that highly-decorated Green Beret Major Jim Gant was relieved of command at the end of a harrowing 22 months in combat in March 2012.

His commanders charged in confidential files that he had “indulged in a self-created fantasy world” of booze, pain pills and sex in a tribal village deep in Taliban and al Qaeda country with his “wife,” journalist Ann Scott Tyson.

via Jim Gant: Top Green Beret Officer Forced to Resign Over Affair With WaPo Reporter – ABC News.

 

 

24
Jun
14

6.24.14 … skiing by the light of the moon …

The Perfect Summer: Lake Life, Garden and Gun, Lake Rabun GA, kith/kin, Lake Toxaway NC: I adore this pic from my daughter’s  recent visit to the Lake Rabun to visit a Davidson friend, her family and  their 4 footed friends. And, of course, she returned last  weekend, her last in the US for a while. Ah, the good life! (And her summer mountain lake weekends reminded me of many weekends I spent at Lake Toxaway in NC (one in particular when I was a college student at the Black’s lake house … skiing by the light of the moon. 🙂

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Lake Rabun

Lakemont, GA

There’s one marina and a twenties-era inn, and the closest grocery store is a thirty-minute drive. But it’s exactly that quiet charm that has kept families returning for generations to this North Georgia hideout, just a hundred miles from Atlanta. Summer highlights include the Fourth of July Wooden Boat Parade—the area is home to one of the country’s largest concentrations of classic crafts.

via The Perfect Summer: Lake Life | Garden and Gun.

Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, 9/50, Gregor Turk:

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I had great fun at the Opening Gala for 9/50: A Southeast Arts Presenters Summit at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center 6.20 with Catherine W.. Seriously thought about buying a Gregor Turk original dish. As a matter of fact, I may go back … It is not often that you can own a dish designed by one of your first crushes.

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2014 FIFA World Cup, viewing venues, Germany:  I would go and watch!

This Stadium In Berlin Was Transformed Into A Giant Living Room For The World Cup

World Cup fans in Germany transformed the Union Berlin stadium into a giant living room Thursday, packing the pitch with sofas to lounge on while watching the opening match between Brazil and Croatia.

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AP Photo/Axel Schmidt

Organizers estimate that 12,000 fans showed up at the home field of 1 FC Union Berlin for the first World Cup game. 780 sofas were registered and an estimated 3,000 watched from a couch on the field. End tables and lamps were also provided.

via This Stadium In Berlin Was Transformed Into A Giant Living Room For The World Cup.

baking,  the Best Chocolate Chip Cookies,  tweaking:  Useful info!

Some like their chocolate chip cookies soft and chewy. Others prefer it a little crispier. No matter what your cookie preference is, a simple adjustment in ingredients will help you bake your perfect batch of chocolate chip cookies.

OZY took insights from several science-focused food experts (UCLA Science and Food teacher Kendra Nyberg, cookbook author Tessa Arias, Serious Eats, and cookie videos) to come up with rules of thumb for making different kinds of cookies.

For example, if you want a crispy cookie with a soft center, use 1/4 teaspoon baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon baking soda. Want it more cakey? Use more baking soda to puff the cookies up.

Hit up the link below for more cookie variations.

via Bake the Best Chocolate Chip Cookies by Knowing What to Tweak.

UNESCO’s newest World Heritage Sites, CNN.com, lists, bucket list:  I keep adding places … the Grotte Chauvet-Pont d’Arc (France)

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New World Heritage Sites include the earthen remains of a Louisiana civilization dating back to 3700 B.C., Myanmar’s Pyu ancient cities (Myanmar’s first-ever site), and evidence of the end of the age of dinosaurs at the cliffs of Stevns Klint in Denmark.

Trading routes that crossed modern borders across South America and Asia were also inscribed on the list. The Qhapac Nan, the Andean road system, runs through Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. A 5,000-kilometer section of the Silk Roads known as the routes network of Chang’an-Tianshan Corridor crosses through China, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

In addition to being of “outstanding universal value,” an inscribed site must also meet at least one of 10 criteria such as “representing a masterpiece of human creative genius,” containing “exceptional natural beauty” or being an outstanding example of a traditional human settlement.

Other new sites include the Okavango Delta (Botswana); the Grotte Chauvet-Pont d’Arc (France); Rani-ki-Vav (India); Caves of Maresha and Bet Guvrin in the Judean Lowlands (Israel); the vineyard landscape of Piedmont: Langhe-Roero and Monferrato (Italy); Namhansanseong emergency capital city (South Korea); and Saudi Arabia’s historic Jedda, the Gate to Makkah.

UNESCO has been gradually adding to the World Heritage List since 1978.

via UNESCO’s newest World Heritage Sites – CNN.com.

13
Jun
14

6.12.14 … Happy birthday to my great great great grandmother, Agnes ….

Agnes Irvine Scott, Agnes Scott College, Flat Agnes”, kith/kin:  Happy birthday to my great-great-great-grandmother, Agnes Irvine Scott, born this day 1799 in Ireland to an impoverished family.  And this is “Flat Agnes” a fun alumni gimmick found in their Fall ’13 Alumni Magazine … She travels the world over.  Quite a beauty, don’t you think?

 

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The story of Agnes Irvine Scott and the college that bears her name is one of faith, courage and independence. The college’s late-19th century beginnings, rooted in the generosity, faith and progressive thinking of a small group of Presbyterians, very much reflect the values and ideals of Agnes Irvine, mother of one of the college’s original founders. Irvine was born to an impoverished family in 1799.

Agnes departed her homeland in 1816 at 17 with her twice-widowed mother, leaving behind her home in Newry. Buoyed by the works of Burns, Shakespeare and the Bible, and hoping for a better life with family members, she journeyed to Alexandria, Pennsylvania. There she married John Scott, a widower with five children. Together they had seven more children.

Agnes Irvine Scott lived long enough to see her family divided by the Civil War. One son, John Scott, became a U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Another, George Washington Scott, became a successful businessman in Florida and Georgia. He, along with the Rev. Frank Henry Gaines and a group of Presbyterian leaders, founded an institution of higher learning for women in Decatur, Georgia, in 1889.

via Agnes Scott College – About Agnes Irvine Scott.

And a little bit more about Agnes and her local descendants: Full text of “The Story of Agnes Irvine Scott, 1799-1877: A Family Memoir”,  Betty NOBLE Obituary: View Betty NOBLE’s Obituary by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

 




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