Posts Tagged ‘literature

07
Jun
13

6.7.13 … life with a twist …

drinks with a twist, literature, Tequila Mockingbird:  kinda fun …


There are beverages here to suit all tastes. Ladies, get ready to celebrate history’s feistiest heroines in Drinks for Dames, a handful of recipes that take sugar and spice to a whole new level. From Are You There God? It’s Me, Margarita to A Rum of One’s Own to Bridget Jones’s Daiquiri, we’ve got every reading level covered.

Gents, your brawny books go down easier with a halftime chug. In Gulps for Guys, literature’s most savory stories get stirred into over two dozen recipes. From The Last of the Mojitos to The Old Man and the Seagram’s and Orange Julius Caesar—with characters this vivid, you’ll never drink alone again.

via ‘Tequila Mockingbird’ Book: 7 Literary Cocktail Recipes.

24
Feb
13

2.24.13 … feasting on facebook …

Lent, organic smoothies, feast days:  On my feasting day, i saw this … maybe I should try it for a week and then see if I want to go back on …

Here’s a POWERFUL Healing Tonic to help reduce inflammation:

source:Jay Kordich Organic ALKALINE Powerhouse! (makes over 1 quart/ 32
ounces) 1 large (unwaxed) Cucumber (English) 2 Limes peeled 1 cup
Spinach 1 cup Parsley 1 Green Apple 6 ribs Celery 1 inch Fresh
Ginger Root If you drink a tonic like this DAILY, in 30 days you
will notice a big difference in your skin, in your daily challenges
with swollen fingers, hands and your digestion will improve. 90
days of juicing this way, the chronic inflammation you may be
experiencing WILL significantly decrease. Granted, you need to also
mirror your food habits by eating Alkalizing foods as well.
via Facebook.

history, historical films,  Argo, NYTimes.com: Since seeing Argo , I’ve wondered how
much was true.

This awards season, though, some
of the Dream Factory’s highest-profile contenders — “Lincoln,”
“Argo,” “Zero Dark Thirty” and “Django Unchained” — have been
subjected to unusually insistent fact-checking from journalists,
politicians and op-ed pontificators. Among the accusations:
Connecticut congressmen did not vote against the 13th amendment in
1865, as shown in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln.” Iranian
Revolutionary Guards did not chase a plane carrying six American
Embassy workers down a Tehran airport runway in 1980, as they do in
the climax of Ben Affleck’s “Argo.” And a freed slave in 1858 did
not lay waste to a Mississippi plantation called Candyland to free
his German-speaking wife, as in Quentin Tarantino’s brazenly
fantastical “Django Unchained.” Arguments over these movies raise
familiar questions about art and its uses: Is art supposed to make
us better people, give us moral instruction, work toward the social
good or exist merely for our personal pleasure? Above all, does it
have to be true? When it comes to this recent crop of historically
informed movies, these eternal conundrums have been intensified by
an acute contemporary anxiety about the truth that has less to do
with how rightly or wrongly “Argo,” for instance, gets its facts
than with the crumbling monopolies on the truth held by
institutions like the government and the press. … Movies tend to
tell more than one story. “Argo” isn’t just about a thrilling
rescue: it is also about two powerful institutions — the American
movie industry and the Central Intelligence Agency — that are
masters of dissembling. … Given some of the stories that
politicians themselves have peddled to the public, including the
existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, such concern is
understandable. It can often seem as if everyone is making
stuff up all the time and in such a climate of suspicion and
well-earned skepticism — punctuated by “gotcha” moments of scandal
and embarrassment — movies are hardly immune. But invention remains
one of the prerogatives of art and it is, after all, the job of
writers, directors and actors to invent counterfeit realities. It
is unfair to blame filmmakers if we sometimes confuse the real
world with its representations. The truth is that we love movies
partly because of their lies, beautiful and not. It’s journalists
and politicians who owe us the truth. via The
History in ‘Lincoln,’ ‘Argo’ and ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ –
NYTimes.com
.

Argo, BBC News:

The central element of the story sounds
incredible but is in fact true. The CIA cooked up a plan to spirit
the six out of the country on a scheduled flight from Tehrans
Mehrabad airport, masquerading as Canadians working on a
non-existent science-fiction film. via BBC
News – Argo: The true story behind Ben Afflecks Globe-winning
film

snark v. sweetness, Harvard Business Review: interesting …

Sweetness has a couple of faces. It expresses an openness to the world, a wish to be useful, an
innocence, a goodness, a guilelessness, a disinclination to insist
on your own interests. If there is a poster girl, it is Jess (Zooey
Deschanel), the female lead in New Girl, the new show from Fox. New
Girl turns out to be a veritable shrine to sweetness, as four
roommates rescue one another from the stream of misadventures with
madcap enthusiasm and a touching generosity.

Why sweetness? Well, we are coming out of an era of some darkness. We
seemed almost to celebrate skepticism and snark. We dwelt upon the
grimmest aspects of the human experience. TV and movie making were
increasingly ghoulish, with new standards of viscera and depravity.
Shows like CSI and NCIS dwell lovingly on the crime victim. Bright
lights and strategically placed towels protect our sexual
sensitivities, but everything else on the autopsy table is
enthusiastically examined. Once the standard bearer of
heartlessness, The Silence of the Lambs (1991) now looks a little
quaint. Since its release, we have seen a succession of werewolves,
vampires, serial killers, and human monsters of every kind. If you
are 40 or under, you’ve grown up on a steady diet of heartlessness.
via The Decline of Snark and the Return of Sweetness – Grant McCracken –
Harvard Business Review
.

Evolution Of Mom Dancing (w/ Jimmy Fallon & Michelle Obama), YouTube, LOL:

Evolution
Of Mom Dancing (w/ Jimmy Fallon & Michelle Obama) –
YouTube
.

In honor of the First Lady’s “Let’s Move” campaign, and to
encourage parents everywhere to get up and get moving with their
kids, Jimmy Fallon and Michelle Obama present the “Evolution of Mom
Dancing.” via Evolution
Of Mom Dancing (w/ Jimmy Fallon & Michelle Obama) –
YouTube
.

Smart Ass Cripple, twitter, Roger Ebert:  A tweet I just had to follow up …

Roger Ebert
(@ebertchicago)

2/23/13, 11:15 AM Smart Ass Cripple
gets the last laubit.ly/121KLdB

I’ve found a new way to
amuse myself, which, after all, is what life is all about.One Last
Laugh First, I picture some anthropologists about a thousand years
from now discovering my crippled skeleton. That makes me chuckle.
My skeleton will be a keeper for them because they’ll know right
away it belonged to a cripple.  It bears the ravages of
sitting on my ass all day. It’s twisted and bent. It’s contracted
up fetal. The bones are soupy soft. Sitting takes a toll. If God
intended for humans to sit on our asses all day, she would have
made us all Congressmen. But my body either sits in a wheelchair
(or on a crapper) or lies in bed. Every day I abuse my body by
making it get out of bed.

via Smart Ass Cripple: One Last Laugh.

history, literature, novels:  I feel stupid … I have not read any and have not even heard of all of them.  😦

According to the
novel’s liveliest, undisciplined, and most raucous traditions (and
to the word “novel”‘s etymology), the purpose of fiction is to
bring readers “news” of the real state of things as experienced and
expressed in everyday speech. The novel’s job is to reflect the
truth of our lives in common in a way that official and respectable
languages—whether these be Latin, law, economics, public policy,
cybernetics, or professional humanism (the list goes on and
on)—can’t. History is one of those respectable languages by which
we expect to be instructed in navigating the present by placing
that present within a story of grand human development headed
toward some benign purpose.

via 10 Books That Rewrite History.

Banksy, public art, ownership, Bloomberg:  Who owns it?  good question.

BBC News – ‘Banksy’ boy worker image on Poundland shop wall.The stencilled image depicts a poor child making Union Jack flags on a sewing machine and was located on the wall of a Poundland discount shop in the Wood Green area of north London. The work was later removed and was to be auctioned in Miami. It was withdrawn
moments before the auction. Photographer: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty

via Bloomberg.

Michelle Obama’s Bangs, midlife crisis: .Michelle Obamas Bangs

Michelle Obama’s Bangs The Result Of Midlife Crisis? First Lady Jokes About Hair During Interview

via Michelle Obama’s Bangs The Result Of Midlife Crisis? First Lady Jokes About Hair During Interview.

Paul McIlhenny,  Tabasco,  RIP, NOLA.com:  RIP, Mr. McIlhenny.

Paul McIlhenny, an ebullient executive who for 14
years led the family-owned company that makes Tabasco sauce and who
reigned as Rex in 2006, died Saturday at his New Orleans home,
apparently of a heart attack. He was 68. Mr. McIlhenny, whom The
New York Times once called “The Scion of Spice,” became the
company’s president in 1998 — the sixth family member to hold that
title — and chief executive officer two years later. At his death,
he still held the latter position and also was chairman of the
board of directors, but a cousin, Anthony “Tony” Simmons, was named
president last year. The company, which was founded by Edmund
McIlhenny in 1868 on Avery Island, near New Iberia, sells Tabasco
sauce in about 165 countries and has 11 websites outside the United
States, in North and South America and Europe. During Mr.
McIlhenny’s years at the helm of the McIlhenny Co., he worked
aggressively to expand the number of items to which the familiar
Tabasco logo could be affixed. They include T-shirts, aprons,
neckties, teddy bears and computer screensavers, as well as seven
varieties of hot sauce. via Paul
McIlhenny, CEO of the company that makes Tabasco sauce, dies at 68
| NOLA.com
.

stress, health:

Roughly 25
percent of people say stress gives them an upset stomach or
indigestion, according to a survey by the American Psychological
Association. Here’s why: Prolonged anxiety slows digestion as your
nervous system directs its energy toward the organs and muscles
most critical to survival. This, in turn, can cause nausea,
constipation, cramping, and bloating.

via Side
Effects Of Stress: How Stressing Out Hurts Your
Body
.

Downton Abbey, Jane Austen, Journal of Victorian Culture Online:
Two of my favorites … linked …

But the connections between Downton Abbey and the
nineteenth-century novel (and Jane Austen’s novels in particular)
go far beyond the American penchant for indulging in the love
stories of “our betters” that come to pass while drinking high tea
in corseted costuming. Even a cursory glance at film adaptations of
Austen’s novels staring Downton Abbey actors reveals the
similarities between the events at Downton and the plots of
Austen’s novels. via Downton
Abbey & Jane Austen; Or, in Praise of Lady Mary | Journal
of Victorian Culture Online
.

The Pope, Twitter:  No surprise …

The Pope Is
Quitting Twitter

The Pope is giving up Twitter
when he leaves his office later this month. via The
Pope Is Quitting Twitter
.

House of Cards, NYTimes.com:  On my list to watch …

The Washington
that majestically unfurls in the credits for “House of Cards” is
recognizable to anybody who has spent time there. But even though
it can be a monumental kingdom filled with portent, it can also be
a fairly quotidian and sometimes ugly small town — but that’s not
the kind of place you make a huge, expensive television show
about.

An original series picked up and distributed by
Netflix, “House of Cards” is a great looking, lavishly made
13-episode series based on a BBC mini-series. It was developed and
produced by Beau Willimon, a guy steeped in politics as an aide to
Charles Schumer, Howard Dean and Hillary Clinton and who also wrote
“The Ides of March,” a film directed by George Clooney that got
high marks from politicos for its verisimilitude. “House of Cards”
revolves around Frank Underwood (played with lizard-like glory by
Kevin Spacey), a Democrat and House majority whip, who, when passed
over for a promotion to secretary of state wreaks revenge on all
who would lay him low. His willing partner is Zoe Barnes (played by
Kate Mara), a reporter/blogger at The Washington Herald, a
fictional establishment newspaper in the capital. via “House
of Cards”: Two reporters talk deconstruct the deck. –
NYTimes.com
.

apps ,
iPhone, Android , Digits – WSJ
:  I am such an iPhone loyalist … but I have friends that love their android …

When it comes to developing apps, the iPhone is
usually the first option. Look at apps like Instagram, which was
exclusive to the iPhone for an extended period of time before
landing on Android. But there are plenty of reasons to want to go
with an Android phone.

via Apps That Might Make You Want to Switch to Android – Digits -WSJ.

Danica Patrick, Daytona 500, firsts, kudos:  Congrats …

 

Dick’s Sporting Goods

Congratulations to Danica Patrick for becoming the first woman in history to win the Daytona 500 pole on Sunday.

via (1) Facebook.

23
Jun
12

6.23.12 … I want to B&B at sea …

bucket list, NC Coast:  I want to B&B at sea …

The rate is $300 a person for two nights, excluding transportation to the tower. Guests bring and cook their own meals. They shower in water collected in a cistern, sleep in rooms with ocean views (one of eight bedrooms has been repainted) and shoot pool on a billiards table in the rec room. No bugs, steady breezes, plenty of sun.

via Mecklenburg man opens a Bed & Breakfast at sea | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

a capella, Dartmouth College, Rockapellas:  Love this story … You go girls!

Then two enterprising freshmen, Debbie and Steph, decided they were going to start a singing group. If they started it themselves, they would have to be let in, right? And maybe they would take pity on me, in the same boat. I swallowed my wounded pride, and went and tried out. I got in. Mostly because it was midway through the semester and people were otherwise consumed with lots of extracurriculars already, so the auditions were pretty slim pickens.

We decided to call ourselves the Rockapellas. We also decided we weren’t going to be a fluffy, pretty singing group with a high vocal range that did all the current a capella standards—House at Pooh Corner and such. We would be multiracial, all different shapes and sizes, and we would do fun songs with a deep lower register (think Yaz) as well as songs with a social justice message (Sweet Honey in the Rock’s “Ella’s Song” was one of our first tunes).

We did skits in which we made fun of binge drinking, sexual assaulters and misogyny on Dartmouth’s campus. We invented a character, Fratman, embodied by my bestie Aisha Tyler, who is now an amazing stand up comic and talk show host without limits (it all started here).

We got snubbed by the other, more established singing groups, passed over time and time again for big group shows, but kept working hard and building our fan base and improving musically. And finally, grudgingly, they accepted us.

rockapellas ella’s song – YouTube.

via Holy Spirit Portality – Born This Way..

photography, literature, art:  How do people think of this!

The photographs in this series, Fictitious Dishes, enter the lives of five fictional characters and depict meals from the novels The Catcher in the Rye, Oliver Twist, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, and Moby Dick

via Fictitious Dishes : Dinah Fried.

film, The 10th Kingdom: Years ago, one friend mentioned this mini series … I look for it every once in a while …anyone seen it?

Two centuries after Snow White and Cinderella had their adventures, the Nine Kingdoms ready themselves for the coronation of Prince Wendel, Snow White’s grandson, to the throne of the Fourth Kingdom. But an evil once-queen has freed herself from prison, and turns the prince into a golden retriever. Wendel, by means of a magic mirror, escapes into a hitherto-unknown Tenth Kingdom (modern day New York City) and meets Virginia (Kimberly Williams) and her father Tony (John Larroquette). Pursued by trolls, cops and a wolf in man’s form, the three blunder back into the Nine Kingdoms and begin their adventures to restore Wendel to his human form and throne, and find the magic mirror that will take Tony and Virginia back home.

via Watch The 10th Kingdom Online – Full Episodes of The 10th Kingdom & More TV Shows Online with blinkx Remote.

Pretty Providence, blogs, interesting, cheapskates:  I stumbled on this blog … Am a being really cheap to try it?

Universal, always-working Redbox promo codes:

DVDONME

BREAKROOM

REDBOX

via PRETTY PROVIDENCE.

economic history, graph:  Very telling graph …

That headline is a big promise. But here it is: The economic history of the world going back to Year 1 showing the major powers’ share of world GDP, from a research letter written by Michael Cembalest, chairman of market and investment strategy at JP Morgan.

via Business – Derek Thompson – The Economic History of the Last 2,000 Years in 1 Little Graph – The Atlantic.

Jane Austen:

So,until the next wave of Austen TV/film remakes,we do have a good number of alternate Austen fare to fulfill our need for elegant entertainment. Not to mention the next season of Downton Abbey,which is just as inspiring despite not holding the distinction of being adapted from a book. Yet,that hardly diminishes the pleasure of any parody which charmingly combines both sides of that English pop culture coin:

 

 

via living read girl: Some merry modern romps with Jane Austen.

LeBron James,  Nike, advertising:  Out the next day … amazing!

As the Miami Heat celebrate as the 2012 NBA champions, Nike released this spot called, “Ring Maker” for LeBron James.

As usual the ad wizards over at Nike have produced another gem:

via LeBron James “Ring Maker” Nike commercial is out (Video) ~ That NBA Lottery Pick.

women, careers: Baby, check. Briefcase, check …

A magazine article by a former Obama administration official has blown up into an instant debate about a new conundrum of female success: women have greater status than ever before in human history, even outpacing men in education, yet the lineup at the top of most fields is still stubbornly male. Is that new gender gap caused by women who give up too easily, unsympathetic employers or just nature itself?The article in The Atlantic, by Anne-Marie Slaughter, a Princeton professor who recently left a job at the State Department, added to a renewed feminist conversation that is bringing fresh twists to bear on longstanding concerns about status, opportunity and family. Unlike earlier iterations, it is being led not by agitators who are out of power, but by elite women at the top of their fields, like the comedian Tina Fey, the Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg and now Ms. Slaughter. In contrast to some earlier barrier-breakers from Gloria Steinem to Condoleezza Rice, these women have children, along with husbands who do as much child-rearing as they do, or more.

via Elite Women Put a New Spin on Work-Life Debate – NYTimes.com.

dorm life, dorm art, college, clichés:  Guilty!

Well, we’ve surveyed the slightly younger generation, and apparently not much has changed as far as college dorm decorations are concerned. You’ve gotta be kidding. Well, alright. Let’s hit up some dorm rooms and delve into the (still) most cliched and popular posters and the art therein. Girls! Van Gogh! And other usual suspects! Which ones did you have? ‘Fess up.

Flavorwire & The Artists Behind Some of the Most Cliched Dorm Posters – StumbleUpon.

20
Jan
12

1.20.2012 … Lunch in Davidson at Toast then music by locals at the college … The final piece, Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18, performed by a teenager, was phenomenal! — with Susan …

Davidson, Toast, music, Rachmaninoff:  Lunch in Davidson at Toast then music by locals at the college … The final piece, Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18, performed by a teenager, was phenomenal! — with Susan.  I closed my eyes and imagined my grandmother Matibel  Dennard playing that piece in Athens Ga in approximately 1920 in the state high school music competition … which she won!

2012 Presidential Election, GOP Debates:  another one bites the dust … RIP Rick Perry … Did I hear this was the 17th debate? Have you changed your mind because of them!

college application process, kith/kin, UNC:  Molly has a college option … 🙂

Davidson College, basketball:

That was it. Kansas was done. Losing that game meant there was no way coach Bill Self’s team, one that couldn’t even beat a lowly Southern Conference squad, could hold off Baylor and Missouri in the rugged Big 12.

But the Jayhawks haven’t lost since Davidson. They demolished rival Kansas State to open conference play, then crushed previously undefeated Baylor on Monday. All of a sudden, Kansas looks like a very legitimate Final Four squad. At the time, the loss to Davidson was all about the Jayhawks; very few people even considered what the win meant about the Wildcats.

Well, it’s time to consider the Wildcats.

“When you get a big win like that, it builds and you just want to keep it going,” said guard Nik Cochran, who was 4-for-5 from beyond the 3-point arc against Kansas and finished with 21 points in the upset. “It definitely gave us a lot of confidence that we know we can play with anyone in the country.”

The Wildcats played a challenging non-conference schedule. They hung around long enough to give Duke a mild scare at Cameron Indoor, and they pushed Vanderbilt to the final few seconds before losing.

In the win against Kansas, though, everything came together.

“What happens when you have a victory like that is it’s recognized so nationally that the memory of it is constantly brought to the players’ minds,” McKillop said. “They’re watching Kansas beat Baylor the other night and Dick Vitale mentions it a couple of times. Well, that resurrects that memory, and that’s a good memory, something they can think about as they come to practice and get better.”

This is a relatively young Davidson squad—McKillop starts three juniors and two sophomores—but it’s also an experienced team. The Wildcats returned 81 percent of their scoring and 87 percent of their rebounding from last year’s team.

via Upset of Kansas not all Davidson is about – NCAA Basketball – Sporting News.

public speaking, advice,  Abraham Lincoln:

Introducing “Show and Tell,” a series in which we ask arts professionals for advice that applies to our everyday lives. First up: how to be a good public speaker, with David Selby, who plays Abraham Lincoln in Ford’s Theatre’s “Necessary Sacrifices,” opening Friday. Selby, 70, has appeared in numerous Broadway, off-Broadway and regional productions and has portrayed Lincoln multiple times, most recently in “The Heavens Are Hung in Black” at Ford’s in 2009.

via Take public speaking tips from Abraham Lincoln – The Washington Post.

free ride, marketing, hybrid stores, Apple:

But ample showrooms and well-trained staff are costly. And consumers may find that, having made their choice, they can save money by buying from dealers who skimp on such expenses—or, in the case of internet-only sellers, who spend nothing on maintaining physical outlets.

Rival dealers also like to see others invest in high-quality stores. In one of the cheekiest examples of low-cost sellers free-riding on other retailers’ lavish spending, Dixons, an online electronics retailer in Britain, ran a big advertising campaign in 2009 urging the public to try out televisions and other gadgets in big department stores—and then go to its website and buy them more cheaply (ironically, the parent company of Dixons operates physical stores vulnerable to online free-riders).

Unsurprisingly, high-quality retailers have trouble recouping their costs—a phenomenon economists call a “missing market”. That is a good thing for consumers: free-riding dealers keep prices down. But they also cause problems. The pressure on prices forces full-service dealers to cut spending on showrooms and advertising. As a result, fewer consumers may get to know the products, and overall demand for them may fall.

A paper by two American-based academics, published in 2001, just as the dotcom boom had turned to bust, suggested a market-friendly answer to all this. The manufacturers themselves could open “hybrid stores”, in which the full range of their products are beautifully displayed, but with not much stock. Consumers could try out the products, even if they ultimately bought them from a retailer elsewhere. The best-known adopter of this approach is Apple, a computer maker, whose chain of stores in city centres and shopping malls let browsers try out the company’s gadgets, with lots of bright young assistants offering advice, but with little pressure to buy.

Joe Oddo, one of the authors of the Capgemini report, notes that carmakers are increasingly following suit. Many have opened chains of Apple-like car showrooms in city centres, where potential buyers can kick tyres, sit behind the wheel and maybe even do a test-drive. Those who decide to buy are typically directed towards a retail dealership close to their home, which will also offer the after-sales services that motorists prefer to have close by. This is unlikely to reverse the trend towards fewer, larger dealerships (see chart). But neighbourhood dealers will no longer need to maintain such well-appointed and heavily staffed showrooms. The free-riding problem is unlikely to go away, but it will be less costly

via Selling cars: The cost of a free ride | The Economist.

Tim Tebow, Denver Broncos, race issues:

Yes, many people feel that that the issue of race and the quarterback position in the NFL was settled long ago, when Michael Vick became the first African-American quarterback to be selected with the first overall draft pick in 2001 by the Atlanta Falcons.

But the social issues around Vick are still generating heated discussion. On ESPN’s “First Take” several days ago, the panelists debated whether Tebow was in fact getting exposure because he was white and that black quarterbacks in the past had not been given the same opportunities. On the show, sports journalist Rob Parker stated “The NFL is making an exception for Tebow which has created resentment that is grounded in the question of ‘How come black players with similar skills in the past were not granted the chance to play quarterback?’”

There is little comparison between Tebow and Michael Vick apart from the fact that they are both left-handed, Vick clearly was a polished passer with very good mechanics meshed with tremendous speed and uncanny athletic ability. In essence he challenged many of the historic criticisms that limited the opportunities of those before him, black quarterbacks could not “read” defenses, did not have the ability to go through their progressions, or were not fundamentally sound mechanically throwing the football. Tebow has largely been described as a leader or winner, a player with intangibles who has drive and determination, and rock solid Christian faith despite having poor technique that causes numerous inaccurate passes to the tune of a 46.5 completion percentage. Professional football, unlike baseball or basketball only has a sixteen game regular season and coaches typically don’t have the luxury of extending patience to players–particularly quarterbacks who are not accurate.

Many thought that Tebow would find himself in a similar position, maybe as a hybrid quarterback/tight end/fullback, but instead the Broncos have stuck with their young quarterback. As a long-time Pittsburgh Steeler fan, I am not unbiased in my critique of the mania that this young man has generated, but he must be given credit for bringing raw determination, faith and more importantly chemistry to a team few believed had a chance to make the post season.

via Tim Tebow and the Denver Broncos: What’s Race Got to Do With It? – Speakeasy – WSJ.

curiosity, education, lifelong learning: !!

We are all lifelong learners, from day one to twenty-thousand-and-one, and that’s why we keep exploring, wondering and discovering, yearning and learning, reaching with more than just our hands… The future belongs to the curious.”

via The Future Belongs to the Curious: A Manifesto for Curiosity | Brain Pickings.

vocabulary, websites:

Definitive Jest is a vocabulary-building and SNOOT-approved word-of-the-day blog centered around David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest.*

via Definitive Jest: About.

John Steinbeck, advice, love: Love this!

We had your letter this morning. I will answer it from my point of view and of course Elaine will from hers.

First—if you are in love—that’s a good thing—that’s about the best thing that can happen to anyone. Don’t let anyone make it small or light to you.

Second—There are several kinds of love. One is a selfish, mean, grasping, egotistical thing which uses love for self-importance. This is the ugly and crippling kind. The other is an outpouring of everything good in you—of kindness and consideration and respect—not only the social respect of manners but the greater respect which is recognition of another person as unique and valuable. The first kind can make you sick and small and weak but the second can release in you strength, and courage and goodness and even wisdom you didn’t know you had.

You say this is not puppy love. If you feel so deeply—of course it isn’t puppy love.

But I don’t think you were asking me what you feel. You know better than anyone. What you wanted me to help you with is what to do about it—and that I can tell you.

Glory in it for one thing and be very glad and grateful for it.

The object of love is the best and most beautiful. Try to live up to it.

If you love someone—there is no possible harm in saying so—only you must remember that some people are very shy and sometimes the saying must take that shyness into consideration.

Girls have a way of knowing or feeling what you feel, but they usually like to hear it also.

It sometimes happens that what you feel is not returned for one reason or another—but that does not make your feeling less valuable and good.

Lastly, I know your feeling because I have it and I’m glad you have it.

We will be glad to meet Susan. She will be very welcome. But Elaine will make all such arrangements because that is her province and she will be very glad to. She knows about love too and maybe she can give you more help than I can.

And don’t worry about losing. If it is right, it happens—The main thing is not to hurry. Nothing good gets away.

via Letters of Note: Nothing good gets away.

Charles Dickens, Charles Dickens bicentennial, Edgar Allen Poe, literature:  Really interesting story … Nevermore …

Strange as it might sound, the dead bird and accompanying year-long Dickens program at the Free Library probably provide the perfect means for the American culture vulture to celebrate not only Dickens’s 200th birthday on Feb. 7, but also the little-known yet astonishing impact of Grip on American letters and popular culture to this day.

“That’s because Grip is ‘The Raven,’ ” said Edward G. Pettit, a lecturer at La Salle University, author of “Edgar Allan Poe in Philadelphia” (History Press, 2012) and consultant to the library’s coming year of exhibits, readings, pub crawls and other events to mark Dickens’s ties to Philadelphia and, more subtly, Poe’s shadow behind Dickens.

Poe (1809-49) was a literary critic in Baltimore, New York and, for six years, Philadelphia. (After his wife died, he wandered back to Baltimore, where he died mysteriously in the streets.) In 1841, he reviewed Dickens’ serialized new novel, “BarnabyRudge” for Graham’s Magazine, explained Pettit. The novel, long out of favor, centers on anti-Catholic riots in London and a strange hero named Rudge, who has a goofball talking raven named Grip. At the end of the fifth chapter, Grip makes a noise and someone asks, “What was that — him tapping at the door?”

Another character responds, “’Tis someone knocking softly at the shutter.”

In his review, Poe both accurately predicts the outcome of the serialized novel, and suggested that a spooky raven like Grip could have a more weighty role in literature.

“Two years after Dickens visited Philadelphia, when both met and groused about copyright infringement,” Pettit continued, “Poe writes ‘The Raven,’ with its haunting refrain of ‘Nevermore.’ ” The poem, for which he was paid $15 (about $350 in inflation-adjusted dollars today) “sweeps Poe to instant fame, if not fortune, and generations of American kids get their first exposure to poetry, usually in high school or junior high, through ‘The Raven.’ ”

via Charles Dickens bicentennial, and his link to Poe – The Washington Post.

OnLive Desktop, apps, cloud technology:

Most well-known for its cloud gaming service, OnLive rolled out a pretty ambitious product for Windows users looking to get a little work done. The company’s new OnLive Desktop iPad app grants you access to a version of Windows and, most importantly, Microsoft Office apps that run from OnLive’s servers directly to your tablet. Oh, and it’s free.

via OnLive Desktop | The 12 Coolest Things We Saw at the Consumer Electronics Show | Techland | TIME.com.

Norma Kamali Kulture, LBD (little black dress):  LBDs … Under-$100!

norma kamali, kamali kulture

Norma Kamali is launching a collection named Kamali Kulture this season, featuring a lineup of figure-flattering Polyester-Lycra jersey LBDs ranging in price from $74 to $96. “There are always situations when you need a little black dress,” the legendary designer told InStyle. “I know that no matter what woman you put in front of me, I can find a flattering dress for her in this line.” To see more Kamali Kulture looks—including dresses designed to balance your hips, highlight your collarbones and enhance your chest—check out page 129 in InStyle’s February issue, on newsstands now. We’ll reveal the full lineup soon, and you can sign up for updates at kamalikulture.com. Plus, read our tips on shopping for your shape!

via Norma Kamali to Launch Kamali Kulture, New Under-$100 Collection! : InStyle.com What’s Right Now.

Samuel Beckett, doodles, marginalia:

Novelist, playwright, poet, and Nobel laureate Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) is one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. As a hopeless lover of marginalia and voyeur of famous creators’ notebooks, I was thrilled to discover these excerpts from the original manuscript of Watt, Beckett’s second novel and a pinnacle of his signature deadpan philosophical humor, courtesy of the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. The manuscript consists of 945 pages spanning six notebooks and loose sheets, written in ink and colored crayons between 1940 and 1945, and features a wealth of doodles, sketches, mathematical calculations, rhyming schemes, and drawings.

via A Rare Look at Samuel Beckett’s Doodle-Filled Notebooks | Brain Pickings.

04
Oct
11

10.4.2011 … Think Pink 2011, pink Charlotte Observer, kudos Charlotte Observer … second Genesis class at FPC … God and violence … and Molls had a XC PR … woohoo!

Think Pink 2011, Charlotte Observer, kudos:  Anyone else have a pink newspaper today?  Kudos to the Charlotte Observer for starting the month long Brest Cancer Awareness Month with an impressive sign of support for the movement.

Tuesday Bible Study, FPC, blogging:  The  second Genesis class at FPC  focused on Cain and Able/God and violence … and my blog came in handy because I could easily find an article I clipped last week … I love being able to search and find something that I have read and tagged!

CLS XC, kith/kin:  Molls had a XC PR … woohoo!

 2011 Scotiabank Giller Prize, literature, free:

Six writers joined the 2011 Scotiabank Giller Prize shortlist this morning, running for this year’s $50,000 prize (in Canadian currency).

Follow the links below (via Globe Books) to read free samples from the six books shortlisted for the prestigious prize.

David Bezmozgis for The Free World

Lynn Coady for The Antagonist

Patrick deWitt for The Sisters Brothers

Esi Edugyan for Half-Blood Blues

Zsuzsi Gartner for Better Living through Plastic Explosives

Michael Ondaatje for The Cat’s Table

via Free Samples of the 2011 Scotiabank Giller Prize Shortlist – GalleyCat.

Kathy Reichs, author websites: The only “author website” I look at is Elizabeth Musser, and that is because Elizabeth is a good friend.  Kathy Reichs is one of my favorite writers … so maybe I will check it out.

Authors: masters of language, but often not the web. Even some writers with massive Twitter followings and social media campaigns don’t have useful websites. Does it matter? Depends on how you want to be perceived when people are searching for you. When we asked this week on Twitter and Facebook for the best author websites, we received the names of only a few that impressed us.

via Author Websites: 7 Of The Best Writers’ Sites (PHOTOS).

Occupy Wall Street:  As I mentioned yesterday, 10/3 the protests have tea party potential … http://t.co/KBpPWkNZ

The coalition of thousands of anti- Wall Street protesters in New York and cities across the U.S. has the potential to grow into the “Tea Party of the Left,” said Brayden King, who’s written on social and political movements at Northwestern University.

“They have to figure out what it is they are about in order to become the force of change in the Democratic Party like the Tea Party has been in the Republican party,” King, an assistant professor of management at the Kellogg School of Management, said by telephone from Evanston, Illinois. “Without that, it will be hard for politicians to figure out how to position themselves without just saying that ‘we’re mad too.’”

The demonstrations that began Sept. 17 in Lower Manhattan as Occupy Wall Street have spread with help from social media to cities including Boston, Chicago, Denver and Seattle. Signs and slogans have voiced opposition to everything from bank foreclosures and corporate influence in politics to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and insufficient job prospects.

via Wall Street Protests Have ‘Tea Party’ Potential, Professor Says – The Washington Post.

Nancy Grace,  Amanda Knox, journalism, media:  Why is nancy Grace sounding off … and why is she sounding off in People??   Who gave her a soapbox? (I guess you figured me out … not a big fan of NG type “journalism.”

Nancy Grace doesn’t see an innocent young woman in Amanda Knox, who was tried and convicted of the 2007 murder of her roommate Meredith Kercher – and then set free Monday after a successful appeal.

“I think that it was a miscarriage of justice,” Grace told PEOPLE Monday night after performing a waltz on Dancing with the Stars. “I only hope that Ms. Knox makes something of her life now because she’s certainly been given a second chance.”

She added, “Very few people are given the chance that she has been given today.”

Knox, a University of Washington student who had been studying in Perugia, Italy, had faced a sentence of 26 years in prison, but the appeals court later overturned the most serious charges.

If Grace’s crisp verdict on the matter sounds familiar, that’s because her reaction to another massive case starring another young woman was even more fierce. Grace famously didn’t hold back when it came to her opinions on the trial of Casey Anthony, who was acquitted of murdering her young daughter, Caylee. Said Grace at the time: “The devil is dancing tonight.”

via Amanda Knox Decision ‘Miscarriage of Justice’: Nancy Grace : People.com.

Georgia Tech, student pranks:  Pranks have gone on in college … it is sad that everything is so expensive.  Maybe they just love the letter “T.”

Georgia Tech students just can’t get enough of basic reading and writing, it seems. But all that fervor over a certain letter in the alphabet causes an arithmetic problem for the school. Theft of every possible ‘T’ off Georgia Tech buildings, signs and receptacles has cost the school over $100,000 in repairs.

The tradition of thievery of Tech’s ‘T’ started in the 1960s, when students started pilfering the letter off Tech Tower. But only one ‘T’ doesn’t go far, so students at the Atlanta school have gotten a touch greedy lately. CBS Atlanta reports the ‘T’ has already gone missing from a brand-new building and can’t be found on smaller items either, such as the book return bins in front of the school’s library.

With repair costs piling up, school officials are practically begging students to stop the incessant pranking and student leaders instituted an amnesty program in the hopes of getting some of the ill-fated letters back in the proper hands (and proper buildings).

You know what else starts with a ‘T’ that could be the result of all this mischief? Yup — ‘T’uition hikes.

via Give Me a ‘T’: Students Stealing Bevy of Letters on Georgia Tech Campus – TIME NewsFeed.

18
Jul
11

‎7.18.2011 … early morning drive from ATL .. then PT … and now HP …

Harry Potter, movies:  Definitely, a HP day!  Harry Potter premiere photos from Twitter – storify.comMagical Recap: The Harry Potter Saga in 5 Minutes – Video – TIME.com.

Harry Potter, movies, Draco Malfoy: 🙂

Tom Felton is just happy to have all of his hair. After a decade of dyeing it platinum blond to play Draco Malfoy in the “Harry Potter” films, he’s finally been allowed to stay off the bleach.  He doesn’t have to religiously wear sunscreen, either, now that he’s no longer required to have ghostly white skin.

Speakeasy caught up with Felton a day before the New York premiere of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2,” the final film in the series.  Check out the video below to hear Felton’s thoughts on playing the villain to Daniel Radcliffe’s Bond, whether Draco truly gets redemption and why he’s happy with the length of the last film.

via Tom Felton On Playing Draco Malfoy: The Boy Who Hated Harry Potter – Speakeasy – WSJ

literature, travel, Harry Potter, Harry Potter Generation:  Where would you like to go?  Hogwarts was a favorite.  An aside, several cllerages market themselves to the Harry Potter Generation as being “like” Hogwarts … i.e. Sewanee, Kenyon, Yale …

Given that this is the season of travel, I thought I’d highlight responses to a recent creative challenge that asked which fictional place (from a novel or story) would you want to go this summer.

via DailyLit Readers’ (Fictional) Summer Destinations « DailyLit Blog.

 

Harry Potter, Children’s/YA literature: The fact that some call the children of the 90’s the Harry Potter Generation speaks as to its classic nature.  Quality literature is a different discussion.

To some extent, it matters little whether scholars label the series high-quality literature; millions of people around the globe consider the book to be a good read. And as doctoral student Todd Ide suggests, one need only look at the amount of scholarly work in the form of presentations, articles, chapters and books with a Harry Potter focus to see the impact of the series on literary scholarship.

But can we equate popularity and passion with quality? Phil Nel voices the sentiment of many when he asserts, “Rowling is gifted at inventing a carefully imagined parallel universe, great at creating character, and a skilled crafter of plots.” On the other hand, Jeffrey Canton compares the series to other works of fantasy and finds it lacking in craft.

“Every time I read Alice in Wonderland, I am astounded by Carroll’s text — that’s what I don’t find in Rowling — some fabulous moments but overall — it’s a great son et lumiere show but that’s all it is.”

One of the most interesting discussions centers on the community of readers. Some have suggested that though reading is often a solitary experience, many of us read Harry Potter as part of a community, discussing, interacting, writing fan fiction. Rowling has seemed acutely aware of her audience and has interacted with that community of readers increasingly through the text as the series went on. (Ebony Elizabeth Thomas)

In fact, with Harry set to move onto the recently announced Pottermore, the series will soon be at the forefront of digital social media.

via Is Harry Potter classic children’s literature? – College, Inc. – The Washington Post.

cars, green:

THE first Fisker Karma, a luxury four-seater high-performance electric car, will be delivered to its first customer, one Leonardo di Caprio, on July 21st. The Hollywood film star will find that unlike other electric cars, the Karma has been designed to be driven like a conventional combustion-engined vehicle, but also with the ability to change its character and use electricity for a different driving style.

via Electric cars: Karma chameleon | The Economist.

Jane Austen:

It’s been 200 years since readers first met the serious-minded Elinor Dashwood, heroine of Jane Austen’s first published novel, “Sense and Sensibility.” Austen-mania got off to a slow start, as the four books published during her lifetime were anonymous. But it has made up for time lost. Now, Austen is a superstar. Films, sequels, prequels and updated versions of her books bring her plots (and her life) to readers and moviegoers. And then there is the work of the academics: She was heartbroken by an Irishman — no, she was gay; she was conservative — no, she was a feminist. We love her; we hate her; we can’t agree about her; we know we should read her. Myths about her abound, but there are some truths we should universally acknowledge.

via Five myths about Jane Austen – The Washington Post.

cars, Mercury Villager, me:  I just saw a mercury villager,  green with gold trim husband, just like the one I drove for  10 years.  The woman inside looked very hot and  tired and had windows rolled down; I assume the a/c is no longer working. My Villager was a great car,  10 years 200,000. Just seeing her made me think of the many miles traveled together!

weather, derecho, vocabulary:  Wicked weather … new word.

The line of storms contained all of the characteristics of a derecho, defined as a widespread, long-lived windstorm associated with a band of rapidly moving showers and storms.

High winds at about 18,000 feet energized the fast-moving storms that ripped through Chicago Monday morning. (Twisterdata.com) The derecho was energized by very strong high altitude winds of 60-70 mph and abundant low level moisture. Its impacts extended well beyond Chicago. AccuWeather’s Henry Margusity tweeted as of 11 a.m. that the storms have traveled 425 miles, produced almost 200 wind damage reports, and caused more than a million power outages. As of 11:30 a.m., the storms stretched from around Lansing, Michigan to Fort Wayne, Indiana. The storms are likely to affect Detroit, Ann Arbor and Toledo Ohio through early this afternoon with the potential for damaging winds.

 

via Chicago blasted by violent line of thunderstorms, known as derecho – Capital Weather Gang – The Washington Post.

02
Jul
11

‎7.2.2011 … Au revoir to Molly!

architecture, bridges, lists:  This one impressed me!

The Henderson Waves Bridge

The Henderson Waves Bridge in Singapore is Southeast Asia’s longest and highest pedestrian bridge.

via The World’s Coolest Bridges – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

George C. Ballas, weed wacker, inventors: RIP Mr. Ballas, inventor of the weed wacker.

George C. Ballas loved tending to his lawn with meticulous care, but the 200 or more trees crowding a two-acre expanse behind his house in Houston posed a problem: how to get around the bulging roots and manicure close enough to achieve the near perfection he desired.

Then one day in 1971 he took his car to a car wash and was watching those whirling soapy brushes sweeping the grime away. Aha! Could something like that trim the grass and slash the weeds around the trees, between the rocks and under the fences?

via George Ballas, Inventor of the Weed Whacker, Dies at 85 – NYTimes.com.

Leonardo da Vinci, lost paintings, art,  Salvator Mundi:  Doesn’t Jesus look like the Mona Lisa?

A Leonardo da Vinci painting lost for centuries, is now found.

The painting, called Salvator Mundi, or “Savior of the World,” went missing for most of the 17th through the 19th centuries, but was discovered in a private collection in the United States and sold to a consortium of art dealers around six or seven years ago.

Though the group suspected it was an original da Vinci, it is only now that scholars have confirmed it, ARTNews reports.

The oil on wood panel measures 26-by-18 1 / 2 inches, and depicts Jesus Christ with his right hand raised in blessing and his left hand holding a globe. Over the years, attempts at restoration, including overpainting, damaged the original work, turning it gray. It was painstakingly cleaned to restore the image beneath. There is speculation that an original offer to buy the painting for $100 million was turned down by the consortium and that it is now asking for $200 million. Members of the group have remained silent, however, as to the details of a potential sale.

The art will be exhibited in London’s National Gallery as part of a showcase of da Vinci’s work Nov. 9.

via Lost Leonardo da Vinci painting found after hundreds of years – BlogPost – The Washington Post.

owls, Myers Park, Charlotte, kith/kin, LOL:  Years ago we lived in Myers Park and yes, indeed, there were owls.  Our good friends and neighbor Herb (married to Lea) used to tell his toddler daughter that id she did not go to sleep the owl might come and get her … DSS would be after him these days!  Recently we had an owl on our basketball rim … for several hours … eery.

Here are two great stories about the in-town owls.

That haunting cry at evening – hoo-hoo-to-hoo-oo! – has the ring of the wild about it. Coming from high in Charlotte’s dense tree cover, it sends mice, chipmunks and small songbirds scurrying for cover.

Yet it’s music to the ears of many Charlotteans who live in old, long-established urban neighborhoods such as Myers Park, Eastover and Plaza-Midwood. To them, it’s a signal that “our owls” are about their nightly business of communing with a mate or warning off rivals.

In these in-town neighborhoods, barred owls have made themselves an integral part of the landscape. In spite of barking dogs, honking traffic and even helicopters whose rotors split the night air, some 300 pairs are estimated to be living within 10 miles of uptown’s Square at Trade and Tryon.

They and their fuzzy, big-eyed babies have become a living science lesson for neighborhood kids as well as a source of entertainment for adults.

”Everybody loves their owls,” says Rob Bierregaard of UNC Charlotte. “They’re very noisy. Every neighborhood knows they’re there.”

A nightly ritual for one Myers Park family, a neighbor says, is to head for the patio, take a glass of wine and listen to the owls.

“It’s almost as though they want our attention,” says Chanee Vijay, who lives near the Little Sugar Creek Greenway. She remembers once when an owl “was sitting on the nook of a tree maybe 10 feet up, not 4 feet from the sidewalk. And we’re all sitting there taking pictures of him . . . they’re used to getting oohed and aahed at.”

via Guess whooo? | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

Hundreds of barred owls are living in the graceful willow oaks of Charlotte’s older neighborhoods, but the man on the ground who tracked their habits for 10 years is leaving.

Rob Bierregaard, an ornithologist who taught at UNC Charlotte, became such a presence in the owls’ lives that many recognize his whistle.

A few years ago, he hung a nesting box high in a pine in Marsha Gaspari’s front yard on Hermitage Road. She said Nellie, who raised two owlets there, knew Bierregaard so well she once swooped down at the sound of him locking his car. He had won her affection by bringing her mice to eat.

The Owl Man is moving to Philadelphia, where his wife took a job and where he will write up his research. He discovered that the urban trees of Myers Park, Eastover and Dilworth suit barred owls just as well as old-growth forests.

When he trolled for the birds at dusk, whole families tagged along. His departure, Gaspari says, is the city’s loss.

About 300 owl couples live within 10 miles of uptown, and he named many of them: Billy the Kid and Paulita, King George and Wilhelmina, and Ned and Nellie, whose secrets he documented with a hidden camera in their nest.

via Who’s watching hoo? Charlotte’s Owl Man is moving on | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

Michael Vick, Nike, animal cruelty: From the comments on Facebook by my animal rights and animal rescue friends … there is one group that is not supportive of Vick or Nike.  I guess it is good that dog walkers are not big Nike wearers.

Michael Vick is back in Nike’s good graces.

“We have re-signed Michael Vick as a Nike athlete,” Megan Saalfeld, a Nike spokeswoman, confirmed to CNN in an e-mail.

The Philadelphia Eagles’ quarterback, who lost his lucrative endorsement deals after serving 20 months in a federal prison because of his involvement in a dogfighting ring, was the NFL’s comeback player of the year in 2010. He has been active in speaking out about against dogfighting

“Michael acknowledges his past mistakes,” Saalfeld said. “We do not condone those actions, but we support the positive changes he has made to better himself off the field.”

He signed a two-year deal with Unequal Technologies — his first since his return to the NFL — in January. He began wearing their equipment after injuring his ribs in a game against the Redskins.

via Eagles quarterback Michael Vick makes a comeback with Nike, too – The Early Lead – The Washington Post.

travel, North GA, Dahlonega GA, Atlanta, day trips, kith/kin, memory lane, lists:  Almost every fall, we all loaded into the wagon and went for a day trip to see the leaves … and Dahlonega was our destination.  Anybody else go on one of the day trips listed here?

Atlanta to Dahlonega, Ga. (66 miles)

This town has multiple claims to fame: It was the site of an 1828 gold rush (you can visit an old mine), boasts ultra-punishing bike trails (according to pros like Lance Armstrong), and has the state’s tallest waterfall (a 729-foot beauty) at Amicalola State Park.

via Road Trip Atlanta to Dahlonega | Parade.com.

J.K. Rowling, Pottermore, publishing, media:  One lucky literary agent.

UK literary agent Neil Blair will be leaving the Christopher Little Literary Agency, taking client J.K. Rowling with him. The Bookseller reports that Blair will be setting up his own firm, The Blair Partnership.

Here’s more from the article: “Blair’s current base is at strategic digital agency TH_NK’s offices in east London. TH_NK and Blair worked together to develop the Pottermore site, through which Rowling’s Harry Potter books will be sold exclusively as e-books, though it is not yet known if TH_NK will be involved in Blair’s new company.”

According to scotsman.com, freelance readers  convinced agency founder Christopher Little to sign the author in 1996.

via J.K. Rowling Follows Her Agent & Leaves Christopher Little Literary Agency – GalleyCat.

politics, US debt limit, Great Recession:  We were discussing this at dinner the other night … does that make us old?

The stand-off between congressional Republicans and the Obama administration over raising a legal limit on how much the nation can borrow has been filled with dire warnings about what will happen if the U.S. government fails to pay its debts.

In truth, it could be bad for the economy if global investors even begin to doubt the ability or willingness of U.S. officials to reach agreement on the debt ceiling. The U.S. government can borrow money more cheaply than almost any other entity on Earth, and that could change abruptly if investors conclude that the government is too dysfunctional to pay its bills on time. That would make it far more expensive for the federal government to service its existing debts, and increase interest rates across the economy.

These leaders have played an influential role in shaping the politics behind the debate over U.S. fiscal policy.

“Given that we’re not on strong economic footing to begin with, higher interest rates and dislocations in the financial markets would probably have very bad ripple effects,” said Raymond Stone, co-founder of Stone & McCarthy Research Associates, a group that studies the economy and bond markets. “You’re treading on dangerous territory when you play with the credit worthiness of the federal government.”

So what are the early warning signs? If the bond market starts to panic over the U.S. government’s creditworthiness, how would we know?

Discontinuities in the Treasury bill market.

A narrower spread between rates on Treasury bills and other forms of short-term credit.

Spikes in the credit default swaps market.

Higher volatility.

A narrower spread between Treasuries and near substitutes.

via How to tell if financial markets start to freak out about U.S. debt limit – The Washington Post.

technology, smart phones, batteries, Duke University:  Interesting.

If you ever get the sense that someone on the wifi network you’re using is hogging all the juice, you may be right. Not only does sharing wifi with others downloading large files interfere with your enjoyment of the latest viral video, but it can majorly drain your battery as well.

A new solution from a Duke University computer science graduate student could alleviate your frustrations and potentially double your battery life by allowing your wifi device to “nap” until more bandwidth is available. This means you might have to wait a couple minutes to watch your video, but that could be a productivity boon anyway.

via New Wifi Tech Could Double Your Phone’s Battery Life – The Washington Post.

apps, Penguin Classics, literature:  Another one for me.

Penguin Classics–publisher of lit guides, special editions, and classics ranging from The Odyssey to On the Road–is doing for iPhone book browsing what Urbanspoon did for restaurant searching.

The Penguin Classics app for iPad and iPhone, the publisher’s complete annotated listing (free in the iTunes store starting Tuesday), lists every Penguin Classics release searchable by author, title, newest releases, essentials, and more. You can search for books about art in the 7th century or check out the list of Pulitzer Prize-winning classics; if you’re using your iPhone, you can even shake your phone like you would Urbanspoon to find something new to read at random.

via Penguin Classics App Shakes Up Book Browsing With A Pub Quiz For Lit Lovers | Fast Company.

24
Jun
11

‎6.24.2011 … Labyrinth walk #4 at Kanuga … very nice … happy camper, I mean junior counselor, is home … hail here now …

labyrinth walk,  Kanuga Conference Center:

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The labyrinth is a walking meditation, a tool that enables us, in the midst of the business of life, to be still, to focus our thoughts and feelings. Labyrinths can be found in cathedrals all over Europe and have been used by Christians for hundreds of years as a means of meditation and experience of the Divine Presence. The Kanuga Labyrinth is an exact replica of the one set in the floor of Chartres Cathedral.

To enter a labyrinth is like entering a cathedral. You sense the presence of The Holy.

It should be noted that there is a difference between a maze and a labyrinth. A maze has many entrances and many exits. It is a puzzle to be solved. The labyrinth has only one path that takes you to the center and back. It is a spiritual path.

There are now over 1,000 labyrinths across the United States, mainly in churches, but also prisons, hospitals, parks and retreat centers.

via Kanuga, Chapels: The Labyrinth.

JK Rowling, Pottermore, digital media:  Fascinating … she held back the digital rights to her books 13 years ago …

Ms. Rowling has made a bold move in going direct to consumers to sell her e-books, instead of relying on online retailers like Amazon.com Inc. and Apple Inc.’s iBookstore. Whereas publishers for other authors often own both the print and digital rights for books, Ms. Rowling owns the rights to the digital versions of the Harry Potter books herself. The digital rights aren’t held by her U.K. publisher Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, or by Scholastic Inc., which owns the U.S. print rights.

Now, Pottermore is Ms. Rowling’s next step toward keeping the franchise alive and vital beyond the book series.

Users can travel through the first book in the series—”Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”—and Ms. Rowling will then gradually reveal the online ecosystem tied to the subsequent six books over the course of a few years. Digital editions for all seven books, however, will be available in October.

via Rowling Conjures Up Potter E-Books – WSJ.com.

music, kith/kin:  From e …

new york city 1982, 1983…listened to wanna be startin’ somethin’ on walkman while taking subway to smith barney office on wall street…chapel hill June 2011…listening to same song on mp3 player while taking bus to unc hospitals…

social networking, gender differences:  Intriguing article … I don’t get LinkedIn!  Women Still Don’t ‘Get’ LinkedIn, Says LinkedIn – Technology – The Atlantic Wire.

Gone with the Wind, literature:  “narrative vigor”  … I enjoyed this video essay on the literary merits of GWTW.  I personally sdon’t think it is “great” literature … but it is a great story.  Maybe that is what F. Scott Fitzgerald  meant by “narrative vigor.”

Margaret Mitchell won the Pulitzer Prize in the spring of 1937, to the dismay of some critics and the delight of others. William Faulkner had expected to receive the award for his novel Absalom Absalom and F. Scott Fitzgerald, who never received the prize, would soon be working on the screenplay of Mitchell’s novel. On a warm night in May, Mitchell received news of the prize by phone, along with multiple requests for interviews. Hating publicity, she fled to a gospel concert at a small black church in Atlanta with her husband John Marsh, her publisher Harold Latham and her black housekeeper Bessie Jordan. The press scoured the city but never found her. It was a glorious night for Margaret Mitchell.

via PBS Arts : Pulitzer Prize Night.

Braves, baseball, Gone with the Wind, literature, Atlanta:  Hoopla!  I like corny things to get the fans to the ballpark … but this one seems wacky to me!!

If you’re going to the Atlanta Braves game on July 2, bring your glove and your hoop skirt.

The Braves, the Atlanta History Center and the Margaret Mitchell House are teaming up for “Gone with the Wind Night” to celebrate the novel’s 75th anniversary. Fans who show their July 2 Braves ticket stub at the Atlanta History Center or Margaret Mitchell House afterward will receive $5 off admission to either venue.

Fans who come to the game dressed as their favorite GWTW character on July 2 get $10 off Upper Box (regularly $18) or Outfield Pavilion (regularly $28) tickets. A Scarlett O’Hara impersonator will greet fans beginning at 4:30 p.m. and host GWTW trivia.

via “Gone With the Wind” night at Turner Field | The Buzz.

quotes, Bertrand Russell:

“Man needs, for his happiness, not only the enjoyment of this or that, but hope and enterprise and change.”
 Bertrand Russell

social networking, FBI, followup:  Just the other day, 6/21,  I posted about how the FBI was using social networking and lo and behold it worked!

On Monday, the FBI had announced a new television campaign aimed specifically at women, in the hopes of tracking down Greig.

Bulger is wanted in connection with 19 murders, while Greig is accused of harboring a fugitive; the two have been on the run together since 1995, according to the Associated Press. The FBI was offering $2 million for information leading to Bulger’s arrest.

via ‘Whitey’ Bulger Arrested: ‘Departed’ Mob Inspiration Nabbed in California – ABC News.

neuroscience, common chorus, music:  This is really fascinating.

Bobby McFerrin demonstrates the power of the pentatonic scale, using audience participation, at the event “Notes & Neurons: In Search of the Common Chorus”, from the 2009 World Science Festival, June 12, 2009.

via YouTube – World Science Festival 2009: Bobby McFerrin Demonstrates the Power of the Pentatonic Scale.

tweet of the day, Wimbledon, culture, etiquette:  I hate to say it but I think the grunting is annoying.

Opinion on grunting players at #Wimbledon RT @alexabahou: Great pkg, haha! Grunting is part of the game! @johnsberman

3 minutes ago via HootSuite

via Good Morning America (GMA) on Twitter.

houses, US, real estate, trends, followup: Like I said, my children’s favorite house is our smallest.

David Brooks wrote about this trend in American real estate a decade ago, in an article called “Castle in a Box.” Brooks visited a new development of five-million-dollar tract mansions in Rancho Palos Verdes, California, where the front doors could be set for fingerprint or iris recognition, and motion sensors activated room lights.

In the past five years, McMansions along these lines have been cropping up all across suburban America. The houses tend to be similar: the two-story “lawyer foyers” when you walk in; the four-car “garage mahals” jutting out front; the altar-like spas in the master baths, with those whirlpool tubs that look so suggestively sexy before you move in but seldom get used afterwards.

via Back Issues: Big Houses: Lawyer Foyers and Garage Mahals : The New Yorker.

social media, privacy: Good question …

Nothing is anonymous or invisible. Will the recent cases make people more careful about how they behave? Will they keep their tempers in check at the post office, or stop telling strangers how to raise their children? How does this growing “publicness” affect civility, privacy rights and free expression?

via You’re Mad! You’re on YouTube! – Room for Debate – NYTimes.com.

Apple, piracy:  I would never think to film a movie with my phone … I would not make a good pirate.  So it is fine with me if Apple disables my ability to violate the law.

Apple’s recent patent for an invisible infrared sensor that would block piracy at concerts and movies has net neutrality enthusiasts rattled, but some patent bloggers enthused about the possibilities.

The SavetheInternet.com coalition, a group of some two million people devoted to a free and open Internet, want to send Steve Jobs an online petition, “Dear Apple, Don’t Shut Down My Phone Camera,” to ask that he reconsider the patent. The patent, which would enable a device’s camera to shut down during a movie or concert, applies to iPhones, the iPod Touch and iPad 2.

via Dear Apple, don’t shut down my phone camera – BlogPost – The Washington Post.

education, philanthropy, kudos:  Kudos, PoP!  And I hope you are successful in your worthy endeavor.

Pencils of Promise (PoP) is a non-profit organization that endeavors to bring the possibility of education to communities of underprivileged children. Braun and PoP believe that education is a basic human right, and that by building educational structures, it will bring self-sustainability and ownership to the areas.

It is with this philosophy that Braun partnered with Bieber to create the “Schools 4 All” initiative. PoP is an interactive organization that allows participation, not just donation.

That’s where Bieber comes in. Whoever can raise the most money with their fundraising page gets a special visit by the pop star himself at the school of the winner’s choice. Creating a page is easy: All you need to do is visit schools4all.org and get started.

via Justin Bieber and Pencils of Promise partner to make education dreams come true – What’s Trending – CBS News.

Phantom of the Fox, Fox Theater, Atlanta, news, random:  Didn’t know there was an apartment in the Fox?  What a cool place to live.

It’s official: Joe Patten — the longtime Fox Theatre resident affectionately known as “The Phantom of the Fox” — can remain in the apartment he’s maintained in the historic Midtown venue for more than 31 years.

The Fox announced today that a settlement has been reached in the dispute between Atlanta Landmarks, its owner and operator, and Patten, who helped save the theatre from the wrecking ball in the 1970s.

Patten, who’d renovated the apartment with $50,000 of his own cash since moving in in 1979, claimed the theatre’s board committed housing discrimination when it terminated his lifetime lease and asked him to sign an occupancy agreement — complete with several stipulations — after he experienced a stroke.

via ‘Phantom of the Fox’ won’t have to leave Midtown theatre | Atlanta News & Opinion Blog | Fresh Loaf | Creative Loafing Atlanta.

quotes, Frank Lloyd Wright:

“Where I am, there my office is: my office me.” — Frank Lloyd Wright

travel, Europe:  I think we bought at the top!

Did you put off booking a trip to Europe this summer after plane ticket prices skyrocketed?

Here’s your chance to be a little impulsive. A quick scan of Bing Travel this afternoon indicated that ticket prices to Europe this summer are dropping quickly. (I used July 14-July 21 as travel dates.)

A one-stop flight (with less than an hour-and-a-half layover) from Atlanta to London from US Airways is priced at $1087, one of the lowest prices since the beginning of this year (the highest was $1493). Fights to Paris on multiple airlines were priced at $1223 (they peaked at $1775 in March), with prices expected to drop as well. Amsterdam is down to $1312, Frankfurt at $1297 and Prague at $1237.

via Summer airfare to Europe quickly dropping | Atlanta Bargain Hunter.

2012 Presidential Election, politics, polling, statistics:  Very interesting …

In a new Gallup poll, 22 percent of Americans say they would not vote for a “generally well-qualified person for president who happened to be Mormon.”

That’s the same number since Gallup began asking the question back in 1967, when George Romney, father of Mitt, was running for president. However, as Gallup notes, 25 percent of Americans in 1959 said they wouldn’t vote for a Catholic, and one year later John Kennedy was elected president.

A few other tidbits:

– Democrats (27 percent) were more likely than Republicans (18 percent) to reject a Mormon candidate.

– Two-thirds of Americans said they would support a well-qualified presidential candidate who happened to be gay, compared to only 26 percent in 1978.

– Fewer than half — 49 percent — would support an otherwise well-qualified candidate who happened to be atheist. But that too has changed. In 1958, the first year it was asked, just 18 percent would have supported an atheist.

You hear a lot of people talk about how much America has changed, and they seldom imply it’s for the better. But in many ways the changes of the last 50 years have made this a much better, stronger and united nation.

via Most voters would back Mormon or gay, but not an atheist | Jay Bookman.

cities, bookshelf: I am reading a book on urban living now … and here is a discussion of several more that I could add to my bookshelf.  I”ll wait …

The key factor in determining whether a city is successful is how significant a cohort of the Creative Class it attracts. “It would be a mistake for cities to think they can survive solely as magnets for the young and hip,” the Harvard economist Edward Glaeser writes in his new book, “Triumph of the City” (Penguin Press; $29.95), by way of dismissing Richard Florida. For Glaeser, the key factor that makes cities successful is not the presence of the Creative Class but “proximity,” the way they bring people into contact, enabling them to interact in rich, unexpected, productive ways. Though Edward Glaeser considers Richard Florida’s celebration of cities sentimental and unrigorous compared with his own celebration of cities, the same trump card of hard-hearted rigor could be played against Glaeser. An odd, fascinating new book called “Aerotropolis” (Farrar, Straus & Giroux; $30) predicts that, in the future, cities will reorient themselves around enormous airports.

via The City-Suburb Culture Wars and Globalization : The New Yorker.

twitter, lists: People should think before they tweet … Outrageous Tweets: A Short History – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

Jane Austen, zombie, genre, LOL:  There are people, including boys, reading Jane to better understand the Zombie takeoffs … LOL

Whoa! Pride and Prejudice? Darcy’s dip in the lake certainly was not written by Jane. Even Geek Mom knew that. So she went to the source to find out why pimply pre-pubescent boys would read a spinster’s 200 year-old-novel:

“If you’re wondering about that last one … well, as Nick, another of the boys in the group, explained, “It’s good to read to get the cultural references.” I suspect the allusions Nick was trying to understand involved the Undead, but hey, I’m not going to argue with anything that could get my kids to voluntarily pick up Jane Austen.”

They’re reading the original in order to understand Pride and Prejudice and Zombies??!!!! Ack! Guess that’s is better than endlessly playing World of Warcraft or hanging around the mall.

via Jane Austen Today: Will Banned Books Get Boys Interested in Jane Austen?.

food, places: Food is key to a sense of place … What do you crave from home?

Atlanta (me):  Henri’s PoBoys, Varsity onion rings, Greenwood peppermint ice cream with fudge sauce … they served it  the funeral reception of my kith uncle … a true Atlantan!

Cincinnati, OH – Graeter’s Mocha Chip Ice Cream ( Graeter’s peach is also divine.)

Southeast: CHCK-FIL-A!!!!! and “Hot Now” KrispyKreme doughnuts …

NJ – Philadelphia area – hoagies and cheese steak sandwiches

I’ve only been to the Bojangles’ in Union Station once since it opened, but I have to say, knowing it’s here, in the District, with a Cajun chicken biscuit and fries anytime I need, is soothing. It’s one of the things I think of when I think of home, in North Carolina. (And yes, I know they’re in Prince George’s, too, and yes, I have driven well out of my way to get to one. But I don’t have a car, so my options are limited.)

(Richard A. Lipski – WASHINGTON POST) It seems most people’s memories of their home towns are closely entwined with food, as we learn in Monica Hesse’s story of Manhattan transplants. They talk about missing cheap food, good Chinese takeout and bagels. (But they’re happy about the Shake Shack.)

A quick survey of my co-workers had everyone thinking about what they’d like to import

Anna’s Taqueria. (Eric Athas – The Washington Post) to Washington: Anna’s Taqueria for the Bostonians. Jack in the Box for the Californian. Bertman Ballpark Mustard for the Clevelander. A cherry limeade from Sonic for the guy who went to school in Kansas. Zapps’ potato chips for the New Orleanian. (At least now that she can get sno-balls here.)

No matter how much you like Washington, there’s still probably something you sometimes want to import. What would it be? Your answer doesn’t have to be food-related, though that’s the way our conversation went. What are you missing from your home town (or another city you called home for a while)? Tell us in the comments below or by using #DCWishList on Twitter.

via What you want imported to Washington (#dcwishlist) – The Buzz – The Washington Post.

music, generation gap, rant:  I found this amusing … no one wants to feel culturally insignificant!

… but is it . not distressing that parenthood and age, in combination, signify cultural insignificance?

via Immutable/Inscrutable., The New Yorker to One-Third of All Music Listeners in America: You Don’t Matter.

19
Apr
11

4.19.2011 … lazy basset day …

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random, media,lists: I remember most of these …The Most Controversial Magazine Covers of All Time | Webdesigner Depot.

Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility , literature, culture:  This is a very interesting perspective from a man!

Sense and Sensibility is of special importance to me because I think, one of the things Jane enables us to do in all her novels is hold a mirror up to ourselves. Her novels help us reflect on ourselves. Sense and Sensibility does this especially for me through the character of Willoughby. He reminds me of my dissolute youth, perhaps drinking too much , looking out for a good time always, and seeing attractive women merely as a good lay. I too was superficial. I empathise with his pain as maturity and knowledge of his true love dawns on him. Willoughby was unlucky because he made too many fatal mistakes and lost Marianne. I was far luckier. I met my wife, Marilyn, and she changed me. It felt, just right, deep down when I met her. We made a connection. It is still right 29 years and four children later. The superficiality of my early relationships, often as exciting as exploding fireworks, were no more than that, a bright sparkling explosion and then nothing.

via Jane Austen Today: Sense and Sensibility: Two hundred years this year.

Royal Wedding, Kate Middleton, faith and spirituality:  Nice perspective … but she Kate really had no choice.

Kate may have had some of the same conversations and wobbles of conscience that troubled me 16 years ago: that solemn vows have little weight unless you trouble yourself to consider the splendid solemnity of the forces that underpin them. It seems to me that one part of becoming an adult is to take responsibility for your faith, or, indeed, your lack of it. I can’t bear it when people say, “I’m a very spiritual person”, before telling you of their experimentation with Buddhism, Islam, yoga, joss sticks, crystals, Tantra, Wicca and the monster who lives under the bed. It is easy to leap from one fad to another, especially those that best justify your own manifold, selfish desires. I’d rather own my many transgressions and lapses of character and look to their roots, than pretend that I’ve never trespassed.

via Royal wedding: Kate Middleton’s statement of faith is bold, not dutiful – Telegraph.

health, sleep:  I think sleep is the key!

The Harvard Women’s Health Watch suggests six reasons to get enough sleep:

Learning and memory: Sleep helps the brain commit new information to memory through a process called memory consolidation. In studies, people who’d slept after learning a task did better on tests later.

Metabolism and weight: Chronic sleep deprivation may cause weight gain by affecting the way our bodies process and store carbohydrates, and by altering levels of hormones that affect our appetite.

Safety: Sleep debt contributes to a greater tendency to fall asleep during the daytime. These lapses may cause falls and mistakes such as medical errors, air traffic mishaps, and road accidents.

Mood: Sleep loss may result in irritability, impatience, inability to concentrate, and moodiness. Too little sleep can also leave you too tired to do the things you like to do.

Cardiovascular health: Serious sleep disorders have been linked to hypertension, increased stress hormone levels, and irregular heartbeat.

Disease: Sleep deprivation alters immune function, including the activity of the body’s killer cells. Keeping up with sleep may also help fight cancer.

via Importance of Sleep : Six Reasons Not to Scrimp on Sleep – Harvard Health Publications.

Lent, Passion of Christ, faith and spirituality:  To be honest I never have understood the use of the word “passion” in this context.

Passion is a kind of waiting – waiting for what other people are going to do. Jesus went to Jerusalem to announce the good news to the people of that city. And Jesus knew that he was going to put a choice before them: Will you be my disciple, or will you be my executioner? There is no middle ground here. Jesus went to Jerusalem to put people in a situation where they had to say “Yes” or “No”. That is the great drama of Jesus’ passion: he had to wait for their response.

via Weekly Reflection – Palm Sunday.

culture, Great Recession, careers:  This article is very troubling to me as the spouse of a “suit” … I see it in his friends.  This recession is truly a game-changer.

The suits are “doing worse than they have at any time since the Great Depression,” says Heidi Shierholz, a labor economist at the Economic Policy Institute. And while economists don’t have fine-grain data on the number of these men who are jobless—many, being men, would rather not admit to it—by all indications this hitherto privileged demo isn’t just on its knees, it’s flat on its face. Maybe permanently. Once college-educated workers hit 45, notes a post on the professional-finance blog Calculated Risk, “if they lose their job, they are toast.”

via Dead Suit Walking – Print – Newsweek.

Tax Day, lists:  You’ll have to go to the article to get the links …

Some links in honor of Tax Day:

The American companies that have the most untaxed foreign income.

A calculator created by the White House gives you your federal taxpayer receipt.

“Farms” owned by the rich are often used as tax shelters.

Seven percent of taxpayers file for extensions.

Tax facts hardly anyone knows, from David Cay Johnston.

Employment in tax preparation services, over the months and the years.

Alan Greenspan is calling for an end to the Bush tax cuts.

via Happy Tax Day – NYTimes.com.

gLee, tv, Gwyneth Paltrow:  Gwyneth must really like the show … she keeps coming back for mere.  🙂

British belter Adele will enter the “Glee” canon in tomorrow night’s episode with the song “Turning Tables” off her album “21.” It will be sung by Gwyneth Paltrow, who plays a substitute teacher at McKinley (and love interest of Mr. Schuester) and who seems intent on solidifying her image as a singer in real life. Paltrow, who performed at the Oscars and gained an immediate following with her interpretation of Cee Lo’s “Forget You” on a previous episode of the show, needs to bust out serious vocal chops  if she wants to do the song justice. What do you think of the song? Does Paltrow pull it off?

via Gwyneth Paltrow Takes on Adele in ‘Glee’ – Speakeasy – WSJ.

KJV, Bible, history:  Love the history of the KJV of the Bible.

This year, the most influential book you may never have read is celebrating a major birthday. The King James Version of the Bible was published 400 years ago. It’s no longer the top-selling Bible, but in those four centuries, it has woven itself deeply into our speech and culture.

The King James is woven into our lives. It was read in churches and family devotionals for centuries, and today its language laces hundreds of everyday phrases. Consider: “How the mighty are fallen” (Samuel 1:19), and “Can a leopard change its spot?” (Jeremiah 13:23), and “The writing is on the wall” (Daniel 5: 5/6), and “The blind leading the blind” (Matthew 15:14).

“These phrases have become part and parcel then of the general usage in the English language,” says Jeffrey. “We do not recognize them any longer perhaps as biblical unless we have a pretty good memory for the language of the KJV.”

Campbell adds that this Bible is foundational to the English-speaking world. “It’s in the texture of our society rather than on the surface of it, I think. But if you trace back who we are, how we speak, how we think, many of those things have their origins in the King James Bible.”

He and others say that new translations will come and go, as our language changes with each generation. But as long we can understand the King James Bible, this four-century-old book will be seen as the voice of God — and the highest poetry of man.

via NPR.org » Hallelujah! At Age 400, King James Bible Still Reigns.

Ayn Rand, Atlassphere, online dating:  Online dating for Randists … who  thought that one up??

“They are selfish,” Siadat said. “To become the best, you have to do what’s right for you, not someone else.”

That doesn’t sound like the conventional makings of a solid relationship. Maybe these people really do need their own dating site.

There are about 12,700 dating profiles on the Atlasphere, which Joshua Zader, 37, founded in 2003 after attending a few Rand-related conferences. “I realized that all the single people were using the conferences to search for another Ayn Rand fan they could fall in love with,” says Zader, who modeled the site after Match.com’s pay-to-view profile system. But the Atlasphere also functions as a social network (with some 22,000 nondating profiles) in which members can contribute essays and articles.

I asked Zader how someone who espouses a me-first philosophy can also maintain a loving relationship. “Ayn Rand has a great quote in The Fountainhead,” he told me. “She writes that a person cannot say ‘I love you’ without first being able to say the I.”

via Ayn Rand’s Atlasphere: Online Dating for Her Biggest Fans – TIME.

04
Apr
11

‎4.4.2011 RIP my first MacBook … So sad …Ok … Just rented and watched Tangled with the molls and John. It was fun. Sad to see the end of the Disney Princess era.

movies, Tangled, Disney Princesses, End of an Era: Fun movie … even John was laughing … very sad if it is the last … part of my my mom’s childhood, my childhood and my daughter’s childhood … From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) to Tangled/Rapunzel (2010).

Once upon a time, there was a studio in Burbank that spun classic fairy tales into silver-screen gold.

But now the curtain is falling on “princess movies,” which have been a part of Disney Animation’s heritage since the 1937 debut of its first feature film, “Snow White.” The studio’s Wednesday release of “Tangled,” a contemporary retelling of the Rapunzel story, will be the last fairy tale produced by Disney’s animation group for the foreseeable future.

via Disney – Disney Animation is closing the book on fairy tales – Los Angeles Times.

Royal Wedding, Princesses, Media:

It may not be the first royal wedding of the digital era, but it is the first full-on British royal wedding of the digital era in which a potential future king of Britain will marry.

So, when Prince William weds Kate Middleton on April 29, the event will be commemorated by a series of media firsts as well.

via Royal Wedding, Groundbreaking Coverage – NYTimes.com.

gLee, Smash, tv:  I was wondering who would be the first “copycat?”

NBC’s #Smash (starring Will & Grace’s Debra Messing), a show similar to FOX’s #Glee, is now in production. http://twitpic.com/4gmtvu

via Twitter / Glee Podcast: NBC’s #Smash (starring Wil ….

media, twitter, statistics: I follow 1-3 .. but after that not many on this list.

At 3,062,437, the New York Times remains the only American newspaper with more than a million followers. The Chicago Tribune, at 829,742, is number two, followed by the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post and Los Angeles Times.

via The Top 25 Newspapers on Twitter — Whos Up, Whos Down | The Wrap Media.

Harry Potter, exhibitions, NYC:

“Harry Potter the Exhibition” opened today at New York City’s Discovery Times Square. The video embedded above offers a sneak peek at the show that displays eight movies’ worth of props, costumes, and settings.

via Harry Potter the Exhibition Opens in New York City – GalleyCat.

Harry Potter, digital books:

It’s taken…well, far too many years, actually, but Harry Potter might finally be getting around to entering the 21st century. The Scotsman newspaper reports that after years ignoring the format, JK Rowling is considering e-book versions of all seven installments of the series that made her name. The newspaper quotes Liz Thomson, editor of publishing industry site BookBrunch, as suggesting that the rights may be worth £100m, going on to say that “Experts believe that move could revolutionize the world of electronic publishing, triggering rocket sales of e-book readers such as Kindle and the iPad.”

via Harry Potter Books to Get Digital Release Soon? – Techland – TIME.com.

iPhone 5, marketing:

“This year’s iPhone launch is likely to be later, towards the August/September timeframe,” Barclay’s Capital analyst Ben Reitzes wrote in a research note Tuesday.

Concerns about Apple’s iPhone 5 missing at the traditional June launch as well as a re-balancing move in the Nasdaq-100 index have been a knock on Apple shares recently.

via Apple iPhone 5 Could See Delay to Fall – TheStreet.

libraries, digital media, changes:

It is expected that demand for e-books will continue to rise, but print books will still be the dominant format for reading for some time to come. It’s been our experience that one use really reinforces the other and that the really exciting part of this is that e-books extend access to the printed word.

Although there has been exponential growth in our customers’ e-content use – up 88 per cent in 2009 and 70 per cent in 2010 – it still represents less than one per cent of the library’s total circulation.

via The Library Isn’t Dead … It’s Just Gone Digital | The Mark.

restaurants, King’s Kitchen, Charlotte, follow-up: What a great addition to the Charlotte restaurant scene.

As you enter The King’s Kitchen, on a busy corner in uptown Charlotte, you might overlook one sign that this is no ordinary restaurant. High on a wall of the foyer is a Bible verse, Proverbs 19:17, written in neat, black script: “He who has pity on the poor lends to the Lord, and He will pay back what he has given.”

The bankers and office workers who crowd the restaurant at lunch and dinner are here for Aunt Beaut’s panfried chicken and classic Southern-style vegetables cooked with a modern, healthier twist — without the fatback. They come back for the cornbread plump with kernels, the banana pudding layered with homemade vanilla wafers, the shrimp and grits.

via The King’s Kitchen | Our State Magazine.

random, Chicago:  Some people are crazy …

A police officer patrolling the Loop early Sunday heard an odd, “loud popping sound,” and saw a man “floating” down onto Wacker Drive, police said.

A parachutist had jumped from a 25-floor Loop building under construction at 117 W. Wacker Dr. about 2:40 a.m., said Chicago police News Affairs Officer John Mirabelli.

Shaun Walters, 44, was charged with reckless conduct, a misdemeanor, after jumping from the building under construction, which reaches 25 floors high, but is planned to reach 90.

via Man parachuting off Loop high-rise arrested – Chicago Sun-Times.

BP Oil Spill, follow-up:

BP has asked United States regulators for permission to resume drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, two company officials said on Sunday, creating a delicate situation for the Obama administration as it seeks to balance safety concerns with a desire to increase domestic oil production.

The petition comes less than 12 months after a rig BP had leased there exploded, causing a huge oil spill and killing 11 workers. The accident tarnished BP’s image and raised questions about its safety procedures.

via BP Seeks to Resume Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico – NYTimes.com.

literature, culture, quotes:  “Great novels read us as much as we read them.”

Probably the finest Victorian novel is Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations. The story recounts the life of little Philip Pirrip, an orphan from a modest background who fights his way to success in London, but is forever anxious about proving his status among those born to rule.

I sometimes wonder whether Michael Gove, the adopted scholarship boy from Aberdeen who is now sitting in a Cabinet of ex-public school pupils, ever sees something of himself in Pip.

It would be no shame if he did. One of the points of reading literature – whether as a student or as an adult – is finding things out about ourselves.

Great novels read us as much as we read them.

via Commentary: literary classics are a window on today’s world – Telegraph.



 




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