Posts Tagged ‘March Madness

11
Apr
14

4.11.14 … collective nouns … an ostentation of peacocks… How great is that! …

trivia: Listening to NPR last weekend … collective nouns … an ostentation of peacocks… How great is that!  I could not find the NPR link, but I found this …

An “exaltation of larks”? Yes! And a “leap of leopards,” a “parliament of owls,” an “ostentation of peacocks,” a “smack of jellyfish,” and a “murder of crows”! For those who have ever wondered if the familiar “pride of lions” and “gaggle of geese” were only the tip of a linguistic iceberg, James Lipton has provided the definitive answer: here are hundreds of equally pithy, and often poetic, terms unearthed by Mr. Lipton in the Books of Venery that were the constant study of anyone who aspired to the title of gentleman in the fifteenth century. When Mr. Lipton’s painstaking research revealed that five hundred years ago the terms of venery had already been turned into the Game of Venery, he embarked on an odyssey that has given us a “slouch of models,” a “shrivel of critics,” an “unction of undertakers,” a “blur of Impressionists,” a “score of bachelors,” and a “pocket of quarterbacks.” This ultimate edition of An Exaltation of Larks is Mr. Lipton’s brilliant answer to the assault on language and literacy in the last decades of the twentieth century. In it you will find more than 1,100 resurrected or newly minted contributions to that most endangered of all species, our language, in a setting of 250 witty, beautiful, and remarkably apt engravings

via Goodreads | An Exaltation of Larks: The Ultimate Edition by James Lipton — Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists.

 

The Dance, March Madness, UK:  In the end, it was  just me, two dogs and a cat pulling for the cats … shhh … Don’t tell the dogs … Dogs won anyway.  next year.

 Dan Clodfelter, Charlotte mayor scandal, It’s a great day to be a Wildcat!: Who you gonna call?

Davidson President Carol Quillen said, “Congratulations to Dan on his election to Mayor of Charlotte. Dan is a remarkable and dedicated leader and has been an incredible asset to the Davidson College community for more than 40 years. We look forward to the great impact Dan will have on the Charlotte region. It’s a great day to be a Wildcat!”

Clodfelter is an attorney with Moore & Van Allen, PLLC, who served on Charlotte City Council 1987-1993. He was a philosophy major at Davidson and earned his law degree from Yale.

At Davidson, Clodfelter was active in student government, and served as SGA President his senior year. He was on the debate team, and served as the student representative on several trustee and faculty committees. He was once featured on national television as one of Ralph Nader’s “Raiders” because of his advocacy for better working conditions in the textile mills of Kannapolis. He graduated cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa as Davidson’s 17th Rhodes Scholar. His hometown of Thomasville, N.C., celebrated the honor with a Daniel G. Clodfelter Day.

Davidson awarded him its Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2007. The citation accompanying the award praised him for a distinguished career in which he brought tenacity and open-mindedness to legal and political tasks; for the high standard of ethics he brought to his twin professions; for the recognition by his peers, and for the distinction he reflects upon Davidson through his achievements.

After two years at Oxford and at Yale, Clodfelter and his wife Elizabeth Bevan returned to North Carolina, where he clerked for U.S. District Court Judge James B. McMillan in Charlotte. He joined Moore & Van Allen in 1978. His practice there emphasizes counseling and litigation involving federal and state antitrust and unfair trade practices, including mergers and acquisitions, and litigation and advice relating to zoning, land use, and planning law.

via Charlotte City Council Selects Dan Clodfelter ’72 as Mayor – Davidson College.

George W. Bush,  painter, The New Yorker: Is he worse than, as good, or better than Churchill?

 

During Friday’s segment on the “Today” show, in which the NBC special correspondent Jenna Bush Hager joined her father, former President George W. Bush, for a tour of an exhibition of his never-before-seen paintings, the two came upon a self-portrait—not the infamous one of Bush in the bathtub, but a more conventional depiction, from the shoulders up.

“You think you got to the soul of you?” Hager asked her father.

“Well, you’re gonna have to ask other people who know me better, like yourself,” the former President said.

In the interview, Bush told his daughter that painting had opened his mind, but perhaps it is too much to think that it would have turned the outward-looking, goal-driven man inward. Some Bush paintings that leaked last year, including ones in the shower and the bathtub, were startling not merely for their unexpected setting (and ex-Presidential skin) but because they, with their primitive experimentation with point of view, suggested a kind of soul-searching. They were quiet and a little sad. The magazine’s art critic, Peter Schjeldahl, wrote, “Someone could run with it into themes of appearance and reality, mysteries of identity, and whatnot. Not me, though.” It turns out he was wise to resist the urge. As Bush tells it, he conceived of those scenes because “I wanted to kind of shock my instructor.”

via George W. Bush Paints the World : The New Yorker.

The Stories Behind 12 Seemingly Obvious Baseball Rules | Mental Floss: 🙂

1. RUNNERS CANNOT RUN THE BASES BACKWARDS [RULE 7.01, 7.02, 7.08(I)]

Considering the purpose of a baserunner is to advance safely to home plate, running the bases in reverse seems nonsensical. However, the silly antics of Germany Schaefer, a journeyman infielder in the early 1900s, forced officials to put this rule in the book.

On August 4, 1911, Schaefer stole second, intending to draw a throw from the catcher to allow his teammate—Clyde Milan, who was on third—to steal home. However, the opposing catcher held the ball, keeping Milan struck at third. Hoping to recreate the play, Schaefer looked to steal again. This time, the only option was to steal first.

On the next pitch, he took off for first, but a double steal still didn’t materialize; the catcher was too surprised to make the throw. The opposing player-manager ran onto the field to argue and amid the chaos Milan finally took off for home plate, where he was thrown out.

This wasn’t the first time Schaefer attempted a double steal by regression, but the 1911 stunt received more publicity. It took until 1920, but the sport’s officials finally passed a rule prohibiting such actions, which remains to this day. Now, if a player runs the bases in reverse

via The Stories Behind 12 Seemingly Obvious Baseball Rules | Mental Floss.

Elite Colleges Turn Away Up to 95%, NYTimes.com:  This is making education very difficult.  Overvaluing a few at the expense of everyone.

Enrollment at American colleges is sliding, but competition for spots at top universities is more cutthroat and anxiety-inducing than ever. In the just-completed admissions season, Stanford University accepted only 5 percent of applicants, a new low among the most prestigious schools, with the odds nearly as bad at its elite rivals.

via Best, Brightest and Rejected: Elite Colleges Turn Away Up to 95% – NYTimes.com.

25
Mar
14

3.25.14 … “I’m a behaviorist, not a sociologist. Only one part of this equation interested me—the fucking-ape-shit part.” … and now naked dining, or is that “nekkid” dining? …

Spring 2014 memes: Given the wintry mix today …

 

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2014 Lenten Labyrinth Walks: Oh, no … the very brief wintry mix late this afternoon completely knocked out my commitment to “walk.” Good thing I can double up tomorrow. God is forgiving.  🙂

9 Rules for Naked Dining: The Etiquette of Nude Resorts, Bon Appétit: What is it with the naked everything? And that word is one of those words that make me snicker .., I always pronounce it “neck-ed.”  And of course, a friend reminded me of Lewis Grizzard: You know Lewis Grizzard used to say that “nekkid” meant you were without clothes and up to something as opposed to being naked which meant you just didn’t have on clothes! 🙂

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9 Rules for Naked Dining: The Etiquette of Nude Resorts – Bon Appétit

Nine rules to follow when dining at a nude resort, from where to place a napkin to whether or not to Instagram

Once upon a time, etiquette was important: One needed to know which fork to use, which glass to sip from. Those days, my friends, are over. Now, questions of etiquette mainly revolve around how many Instagrams each guest is allowed to take during dinner.

But there remains one corner of the world where table etiquette remains a vexing and important issue: at nude resorts. And it’s a problem for a growing number of people.

“We’re seeing a rise in ‘nakations,’ especially among people in their thirties,’” says Sue Nerud, spokesperson for the American Association for Nude Recreation. Exact statistics are hard to come by, however, since many nudists prefer to remain anonymous. (In fact, several nudists in this article spoke only on the condition their names not be used.) And while Nerud said recent studies show that nakations are great stress relievers, there remain those pesky etiquette issues—which we are about to solve for you!

via 9 Rules for Naked Dining: The Etiquette of Nude Resorts – Bon Appétit.

Three Grandmas, Beyonce’s ‘Drunk In Love’: I must be a grandma!


via ▶ It’s Too Much For Them: Grandmothers Reading Lyrics To Beyonce’s Drunk In Love Remix Ft. Kanye West – YouTube.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably heard Beyonce’s hit song “Drunk in Love,” featuring Jay-Z. Seriously, even these three Grandmas have heard it.

However, they weren’t exactly aware of the song’s lewd lyrics. Watch above as they read the words aloud while laughing and feeling generally shocked by the crassness of it all.

Their conclusion: “I don’t like those lyrics at all.”

via Three Grandmas Read The Lyrics To Beyonce’s ‘Drunk In Love’ And Can Barely Handle It.

Duke Blue Devils, Mike Krzyzewski, Coach K, Mercer University, 2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament, March Madness, UGA Law School Class of ’85 : I am not a fan of Duke and definitely a fan of Coach K.  But I am glad to know he knows how to be good sport and a gentleman.  And don’t you fellow UGA Law School “85 Classmates love the connection to Ellen and Bobby!!

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Say what you want about the Duke Blue Devils and head coach Mike Krzyzewski, but what Coach K did after losing to the Mercer Bears was classy.

After the 78-71 loss to No. 14 Mercer, Coach K went into the Bears’ locker room to congratulate the team on the win. According to Nicole Auerbach from USA Today, Krzyzewski told the Bears, “If we got beaten, at least we got beaten by a hell of a basketball team.”

via Duke’s Coach K Visits Mercer’s Locker Room to Congratulate Bears After Upset Win | Bleacher Report.

Love this post from a UGA Law School “85 Classmate:

William Dyer, a Delt from Georgia (and proud son of Bobby and Ellen) was the brains behind today’s HUGE upset win by Mercer over Duke. William, the graduate assistant coach for the Mercer Bears, was the chief strategist in what will no doubt go down as one of the biggest shockers in NCAA history.

** Ok – William IS the son of Bobby and Ellen, he IS a Delt and he IS the graduate assistant coach at Mercer. As for the rest of that… well, that’s the story I am telling and I am sticking to it !

Flight MH370, The Wall Street Journal:  I cannot help myself.  I am human like the rest of us.  I want to know where the plane is.  I want closure.

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It is with “deep sadness and regret that I must inform you that, according to this new data, Flight MH370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean.” said Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak. http://on.wsj.com/1hfLCcv

Delta’s ‘Innovation Class’:  Interesting …

Delta’s ‘Innovation Class’ Makes Networking At 35,000 Feet Easier Than Ever

The exclusive program awards both the expert and the up-and-coming professional with free first-class tickets to their destination. During the flight, the two are free to discuss their respective fields. Hopefully, they gain insight and valuable knowledge along the way.

“We have customers flying with us who are big thinkers and innovators and are changing the world,” Mauricio Parise, Delta’s director of worldwide marketing communications, told CNBC. “We want to bring the ones succeeding in their field together with people who aspire to follow them.”

According to Delta, the first two participants were Eric Migicovsky, the inventor of the Pebble Smartwatch, and James Patten, an interaction designer. The two flew to the 2014 TED Conference in Vancouver, B.C., last week.

“It’s very rare to get the chance to sit down with someone in that sort of position and talk about whatever you want,” Patten said in a video for Delta after the flight. “Had we met in another context we probably would have at, at most, a five-minute conversation.”

Delta’s next Innovation Class flight will feature Sean Brock, an executive chef, on a flight from Charleston, S.C., to the James Beard Awards in New York. To apply for the open seat next to Brock, or to see a list of upcoming flights, visit the Delta Innovation Class website.

via Delta’s ‘Innovation Class’ Makes Networking At 35,000 Feet Easier Than Ever.

New Parenting Study Released : The New Yorker:

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A recent study has shown that if American parents read one more long-form think piece about parenting they will go fucking ape shit.

The study was conducted by Susan Waterson, a professor of behavioral psychology at the University of Massachusetts and the author of zero books, because, Waterson says, “another book at this point would just be cruel.” In the course of seven weeks, Waterson interviewed a hundred and twenty-seven families about their reaction to articles that begin with a wryly affectionate parenting anecdote, segue into a dry cataloguing of sociological research enlivened with alternately sarcastic and tender asides, and end with another wryly affectionate anecdote that aims to add a touch of irony or, failing at that, sentimentality. “I wasn’t looking to prove there was too much of this content,” Waterson said. “I’m a behaviorist, not a sociologist. Only one part of this equation interested me—the fucking-ape-shit part.”

via New Parenting Study Released : The New Yorker.

fun food, Vincent Van Gogh, Starry Night:

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Eat, Drink & Be Social’s photo.

March 23

This Van Gogh inspired cake is truly a delectable masterpiece.

Serenity Prayer, memes, LOL:  I’ve posted on the Serenity Prayer a couple of times.  I like this take …

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24
Mar
14

3.24.14 … Boo, Haman … Oh, and in case you missed it, ALL OF AMERICA IS ELIMINATED … First naked yoga … Now naked pilgrims …

Beth Hillel Congregation Bnai Emunah, Purim Carnival 2014, Wilmette Life: When I lived in Wilmette, a Jewish high school student came and taught Sunday School to elementary age students at our Presbyterian church. He taught on Purim.  It was a very fun day in Sunday School.

Explaining the costumes, games and obstacle courses of Purim Carnival 2014, Rabbi Michael Cohen described the celebration as “the Jewish version of Mardi Gras.”

“We’ve got all these kids dressing up, enjoying themselves, having a good time, it’s a wonderful thing,” said Cohen. “It fills up my heart with joy.”

Purim’s festive tone celebrates the events chronicled in the “Megillat Esther.”

Congregants typically read from the Biblical “Scroll of Esther,” which tells of a villain named Haman who tried to convince the king to kill the Jewish people. Fortunately, a noblewoman named Esther spoke up to save the day.

via Beth Hillel Congregation Bnai Emunah Purim Carnival 2014 | Wilmette Life.

Purim, The week’s best photojournalism – The Week:

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men wearing costumes celebrate the holiday of Purim in Jerusalem’s Mea Shearim neighborhood. (REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun)
via The week’s best photojournalism – The Week.

 

Modern Art Desserts UK-based, Gustav Klimt: Fun food!

After I wrote about Modern Art Desserts, UK-based Hungarian reader Gabriella Szucs sent me this photo of a brilliant Klimt cake she baked for a cupcake competition in Northampton.

More edible homages to modern art here.

via Explore – After I wrote about Modern Art Desserts, UK-based….

101 Things I Will Teach My Daughters, Thought Catalog:  Loved this!

28. Classy is a relative term.

29. Drink whiskey if you like whiskey.

30. Drink wine if you like wine.

31. Like what you like.

via 101 Things I Will Teach My Daughters | Thought Catalog.

Gus Mayopoulos, Charlotte native, Harvard’s student council: Charlotte Latin graduate Gus Mayopoulos got elected president of the undergraduate council, sort of like the student council, at Harvard … and it all started out as a joke.

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And while that may not sound all that funny – Mayopoulos, 21, the son of Amy Lefkof and Fannie Mae president Tim Mayopoulos, is the kind of well-educated young person who could be expected to hit a high bar for achievement. Still, how it happened is, actually, pretty funny.

First, it wasn’t supposed to happen at all. Mayopoulos ran as vice president on a two-man ticket with his roommate, Sam Clark. Their platform was a joke: A promise to get two-ply toilet paper in the dorms and more tomato basil ravioli soup in the campus dining halls.

“We were irreverent and we were making it distinctly not serious,” admits Mayopoulos, a junior who was home in Charlotte last week on spring break.

Goofing on serious things, he says, is Harvard tradition. After all, the Cambridge, Mass., school is the home of the Harvard Lampoon, and Hasty Pudding Theatricals. Mayopoulos writes for the campus publication Satire V (it spells “veritas” backward) and performs with a comedy troupe, On Thin Ice.

Clark and Mayopoulos, however, ran a well-organized joke campaign, even joining in a public debate.

Then the funny thing started to happen: Their campaign attracted support. It began to look like they might, improbably, win. So they talked it over and decided that if elected, they wouldn’t serve.

“ ‘We started it as a joke and we should end it as a joke,’ ” Mayopoulos says they agreed.

So what happened? They got elected. Clark stepped down. And Gus … well, Gus didn’t.

via Charlotte’s Gus Mayopoulos leads Harvard’s student council | CharlotteObserver.com.

Wall Poems, public art, Charlotte NC:  I noticed this “wall poem” today for the first time.   One thing I love about Charlotte is its public art.  This poem  by A.R. Ammons on the Dandelion Deli is the first of a series and was installed in 2013.  There are now two.  I wonder what poem will pop up next?

 

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The first wall poem, completed April 2013

via The Wall Poems of Charlotte – Home.

“The necessity for poetry is one of the most fundamental traits of the human race.”

– Amy Lowell

The Wall Poems of Charlotte are murals that bring poetry to the people, all of whom deserve access to it and to whom it belongs.

The project celebrates NC’s literary heritage: All poems are by North Carolina writers. And it heralds the creative career programs at Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), whose Advertising + Graphic Design students design the murals.

Over time, the wall poems will make up a walking tour based on the Leiden Walls in Holland, where 101 poems large and small grace city buildings for residents and tourists to discover and enjoy.

via About – The Wall Poems of Charlotte.

G7/G8, Putin, Ukraine/Crimea invasion:

The leaders are trying to isolate Russia politically and economically, but the suspension also aimed to bruise Putin’s ago. He cares about Russia’s prestige and standing on the world stage, administration officials said, so his exclusion from the group should sting.

via G-7 countries to skip Russian summit – Carrie Budoff Brown – POLITICO.com.

 Goethe, Psychology of Color and Emotion, Brain Pickings:

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One of Goethe’s most radical points was a refutation of Newton’s ideas about the color spectrum, suggesting instead that darkness is an active ingredient rather than the mere passive absence of light.

…light and darkness, brightness and obscurity, or if a more general expression is preferred, light and its absence, are necessary to the production of colour… Colour itself is a degree of darkness.

But perhaps his most fascinating theories explore the psychological impact of different colors on mood and emotion — ideas derived by the poet’s intuition, which are part entertaining accounts bordering on superstition, part

prescient insights corroborated by hard science some two centuries later, and part purely

via Goethe on the Psychology of Color and Emotion | Brain Pickings.

recipes, artichokes: 11 Recipes for Artichokes, Both Fresh and Jarred

Naked Tourists,  Machu Picchu, News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com: First naked yoga … Now naked pilgrims!

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Peruvian officials are cracking down on naked tourism at Machu Picchu after three separate incidents this month. Four Americans were detained for stripping down and taking photos on March 14, and similar incidents occurred with both Canadian and Australian tourists earlier this month.
“There are places in the world that people can get naked, but not all places are for getting undressed,” Alfredo Atayupanqui, the director of archaeological resources for Peru’s Ministry of Culture, told CNN.
An Israeli man has taken naked tourism to new heights by creating a website called My Naked Trip, in which he shares his naked photos from around the world, including his visit to Machu Picchu.
In Peru, officials are not amused by the rise of nudity at the country’s premiere travel destination. Regulations are expected to tighten, according to the Peruvian Times.
via Naked Tourists Hit Machu Picchu | News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com.

2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament, Billion Buffett Perfect NCAA Bracket, March Madness: Did anyone think that no entry would survive the first (actually) second) round?

UPDATE: Memphis won. ALL OF AMERICA IS ELIMINATED.
via Billion Buffett Perfect NCAA Bracket: These 6 Entries Left | SportsGrid.

MLB Memes:

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March 21
How we ALL feel about our brackets right about now
from @rileybreck — with Terry Williams.

Girl Scout Cookies, Thin Mints, first world problems: It makes my life all the more difficult that thin mints freeze perfectly and taste even better frozen. So just when you least need them, they are there waiting in the perfect state. #firstworldproblems

easter eggs, easter tree, The week’s best photojournalism, The Week:

German pensioner Volker Kraft adds Easter eggs to his apple tree in the eastern German town of Saalfeld. Each year since 1965, Volker and his wife Christa have spent up to two weeks decorating the tree with their collection of 10,000 hand-painted eggs. (REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch)
via The week’s best photojournalism – The Week.

Lance Dodes,  ‘The Sober Truth’, NPR:

Since its founding in the 1930s, Alcoholics Anonymous has become part of the fabric of American society. AA and the many 12-step groups it inspired have become the country’s go-to solution for addiction in all of its forms. These recovery programs are mandated by drug courts, prescribed by doctors and widely praised by reformed addicts.

Dr. Lance Dodes sees a big problem with that. The psychiatrist has spent more than 20 years studying and treating addiction. His latest book on the subject is The Sober Truth: Debunking The Bad Science Behind 12-Step Programs And The Rehab Industry.

Dodes tells NPR’s Arun Rath that 12-step recovery simply doesn’t work, despite anecdotes about success.

“We hear from the people who do well; we don’t hear from the people who don’t do well,” he says.

via Author Interview: Lance Dodes, Author Of ‘The Sober Truth’ : NPR.

Fred Rogers, quotes, March 20: The Neighborhood is such a great place. And the sweater, just love the sweater.

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“Love isn’t a state of perfect caring. It is an active noun like struggle. To love someone is to strive to accept that person exactly the way he or she is, right here and now.” – Fred Rogers, born on this day in 1928.

Donna Leon, mystery series, Venice: I  just got a recommendation for this author from one of my mom’s friends at Lenbrook. Her mysteries are set in Venice. Any one read her books? The official site for author Donna Leon.

20
Mar
14

3.20.14 … Six weeks after Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow, winter is finally over …

Vernal Equinox, First Day Of Spring 2014 Arrives On Thursday March 20:

Six weeks after Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow, winter is finally over. The first day of spring, which falls on March 20, hints that higher temperatures are not far off.

For those in the Northern Hemisphere, the vernal equinox (or spring equinox) takes place in March when the sun passes over the celestial equator. This year, the sun will move across the invisible line between hemispheres on Thursday at 12:57 p.m. EDT.

Earth experiences the astronomical events we know as equinoxes and solstices four times a year. They signify the end of one season and the beginning of another.

Equinoxes occur in March and September and herald the spring and fall, while solstices — in June and December — indicate the beginning of summer and winter. While the people in the Northern Hemisphere welcome spring, people south of the equator enter autumn.

Here are some myths associated with the annual spring equinox:

The length of the day is equal to the length of the night.

Well, not exactly. Though some believe the day is just as long as the night on the spring equinox, it turns “days of day-night equality” take place just before the vernal equinox, National Geographic notes. Geoff Chester, a public affairs specialist with the U.S. Naval Observatory, explained that it all hinges on location.

“Exactly when it happens depends on where you are located on the surface of the Earth,” Chester told National Geographic.

The spring equinox falls on the same day each year.

Not always. While the spring equinox tends to occur in late March, the exact date differs from year to year. This has more to do with the number of calendar days than the equinox itself. It takes the Earth slightly more than 365 days to complete one revolution around the sun. However, the Gregorian calendar rounds down to 365 days and does not account for the extra 0.256 days. So the vernal equinox may fall on March 20 several years in a row and occur on March 21 in a later year.

via First Day Of Spring 2014 Arrives On Thursday, March 20.

Charlotte NC: There is a debate going on following this HuffPost article.  I commented that it was scary, but true.  I really do believe that there is a grain of truth in the items on the list.  But I love the debate, and almost universally people who live in Charlotte love Charlotte.  It is nice.

Lately, it seems like Charlotte is topping the list of just about everything. While it is a great place for young professionals and anyone in banking, it can also be a truly bizarre place to live and an even more bizarre place to visit.

via 15 Reasons Why Charlotte Is The Weirdest.

Every time you try to describe it, you interrupt yourself and think of something better. Most people give up on trying to attach any one label to it, so they just say it’s nice.

via This is Charlotte | Our State Magazine.

Have a Sip, Davidson Wine Shop:

All the pieces are coming together – including a last-minute name change – for the Friday opening of downtown Davidson’s newest retail store, Davidson Wine Shop.  Al and Robin Gardner plan a grand opening for the new wine store in South Main Square Friday from 11:30am to 9pm with wine tastings, music and a live radio broadcast from the tasting room.

via Have a sip – Davidson Wine Shop opens Friday | DavidsonNews.net.

Shneeka Center ’14,  Watson Fellowship – Davidson College, female social mobility through sport: Kudos, Shneeka!

The TJW Fellowship, awarded through the Thomas J. Watson Foundation, is a one-year grant for independent study and travel outside the United States awarded to graduating college seniors nominated by participating institutions. It offers college graduates of “unusual promise” a year of independent, purposeful exploration and travel – in international settings new to them – to enhance their capacity for resourcefulness, imagination, openness and leadership, and to foster their humane and effective participation in the world community. Each fellow receives a $28,000 stipend.

Center will travel to Sweden, India, Senegal and Peru to study and research the topic of female social mobility through sport.

“My project strives to examine how participation in athletics is enabling females to positively or negatively influence their position in society,” said Center, who will graduate in May from Davidson with a degree in political science. “My Watson year will take me to four locations where sports are providing girls with unique opportunities to change their social standing. I aim to answer case-specific questions and uncover the methods by which sports have an influence on girls’ lives worldwide.”

via Shneeka Center ’14 Awarded Prestigious Watson Fellowship – Davidson College.

authentic pho, Korean BBQ, Pho Nam – Cornelius NC, Living Davidson – The Davidsonian – Davidson College:  I have been saying that pho was the next dish I wanted to learn to appreciate.  As with sushi, I had to have it quite a few times before I knew what good sushi or authentic sushi was.   … And now I will try this exit 28 restaurant and visit the Molls.

One of the best barbecue restaurants in Atlanta, Georgia, is a hole-in-the-wall restaurant called Heirloom Market BBQ. Although barbecue joints abound in the south, Heirloom consistently has lines of people waiting out the door and down the street for their barbecue. Heirloom Market BBQ is so popular because it is unique: It specializes in and serves Korean barbecue.

When I’m home in Atlanta, Heirloom Market is always a great place to eat, and I miss their unique barbecue while I’m at Davidson. Here, I’ve not been able to find anywhere that rivals Heirloom’s Korean barbecue—until now. Pho Nam, an authentic Vietnamese restaurant located off exit 28, serves delicious Korean barbecue.

Although the barbecue was the highlight of my Pho Nam experience, the restaurant also offers a wide selection of food including vermicelli (an angel hair rice noodle), com dia (steamed rice with a choice of toppings), Com Chien (fried rice), Pho (beef and noodle soup), and a selection of chef’s specials.

The small, humble restaurant boasts a friendly staff and delicious food. The staff focuses on creating authentic Vietnamese food and a home-like atmosphere. The owner personally greets every customer when he or she walks into the restaurant; and it is the owner, his brother and son, who run Pho Nam and work at the restaurant every day.

Tai Bassin ’15, frequents Pho Nam weekly. His favorite dishes include the Korean barbecue over white rice and the pho dish. Put quite simply, “It’s Pho Nom-enal,” Bassin said.

via Family restaurant offers authentic pho, Korean BBQ – Living Davidson – The Davidsonian – Davidson College.

2014 NCAA tournament bracket, March Madness, Davidson College, Matilda: Loved this! The Mathematician vs. the Matildas – Video – NYTimes.com.

toast, $4 a Slice, Bon Appétit, latest artisanal food craze, Trouble Coffee San Francisco, Pacific Standard: The Science of Society :

Back at the Red Door one day, I asked the manager what was going on. Why all the toast? “Tip of the hipster spear,” he said.

I had two reactions to this: First, of course, I rolled my eyes. How silly; how twee; how perfectly San Francisco, this toast. And second, despite myself, I felt a little thrill of discovery. How many weeks would it be, I wondered, before artisanal toast made it to Brooklyn, or Chicago, or Los Angeles? How long before an article appears in Slate telling people all across America that they’re making toast all wrong? How long before the backlash sets in?

For whatever reason, I felt compelled to go looking for the origins of the fancy toast trend. How does such a thing get started? What determines how far it goes? I wanted to know. Maybe I thought it would help me understand the rise of all the seemingly trivial, evanescent things that start in San Francisco and then go supernova across the country—the kinds of products I am usually late to discover and slow to figure out. I’m not sure what kind of answer I expected to turn up. Certainly nothing too impressive or emotionally affecting. But what I found was more surprising and sublime than I could have possibly imagined.

via How Did Toast Become the Latest Artisanal Food Craze? – Pacific Standard: The Science of Society.

Carol Quillen, President of Davidson College, Misadventures Magazine:

Pres­i­dent of David­son Col­lege for the last three years and a pro­fes­sor of his­tory, Carol Quillen is both the first woman and first non-alumnus to lead the col­lege, which was founded in North Car­olina in 1837 but didn’t admit women until 1972. Its biggest head­lines over the last six years have starred for­mer bas­ket­ball player Stephen Curry (maybe you’ve heard of him). Yet David­son, which con­sis­tently ranks among the top 10 lib­eral arts col­leges in the coun­try, is enjoy­ing new media atten­tion and some­thing of a growth spurt since Pres­i­dent Quillen arrived. Under her lead­er­ship, the col­lege has begun to explore online edu­ca­tion, launched an entre­pre­neur­ship pro­gram, and announced the con­struc­tion of a new “aca­d­e­mic neigh­bor­hood.” Sounds magical.

Pres­i­dent Quillen her­self has been in the spot­light recently: she spoke at Tedx­Char­lotte, and was just last week named to Pres­i­dent Obama’s Advi­sory Coun­cil on Finan­cial Capa­bil­ity for Young Amer­i­cans (yes, she flew on Air Force One).

When Carol Quillen arrived at her office for our inter­view she walked quickly and with pur­pose. In one breath she apol­o­gized for being late, beck­oned us into her wood-paneled office, told us to take a seat around an oak table, and asked her sec­re­tary to bring in a Fresca. She had the econ­omy of motion of a per­son whose days are packed. She speaks quickly, though thought­fully, and takes time to laugh. Our con­ver­sa­tion ran the gamut from moments of adver­sity to the mys­ter­ies of Twit­ter. We were riveted.

via Carol Quillen, President of Davidson College | Misadventures Magazine.

22 Hours in Balthazar, NYC, NYTimes.com:

Over the course of what I will be repeatedly told is a slow day, 1,247 people will eat here. (Normally, it’s about 1,500.) But within a narrow range, Balthazar knows how many people will come through its doors every single day of the week, and it can predict roughly what it will sell during every meal. It mass-produces high-quality food and pushes it out to customers, and its production numbers are as predictable as the system that churns out the food itself. Just about everyone who works at Balthazar calls it a machine.

via 22 Hours in Balthazar – NYTimes.com.

3.18.14 lunar eclipse:  I loved the tongue in cheek list, but missed the lunar eclipse …

Tonight will be the darkest night of the past 500 years

Thanks to a lunar eclipse on the longest night of the year, tonight we’ll be experiencing the longest, darkest night in a very long time. It’s been nearly 500 years since the last solstice lunar eclipse.

via Tonight will be the darkest night of the past 500 years.

recipe,  Ginger-Chicken Meatballs with Chinese Broccoli,  Meet Your New Favorite Meatball – Bon Appétit:  I must e hungry because this looks really good.

Ginger Chicken Meatballs with Chinese Broccoli

When it comes to meatballs, who says that pork and beef get to have all the fun? In this light and healthy recipe, chicken takes center stage: It’s doctored up with plenty of big flavor—garlic, ginger, soy, and scallions—and served with spicy Chinese broccoli to round out the meal. Healthy and fresh, plus easy to pull together on a weeknight, this is your new go-to. Why exactly? Because not only is this a great meatball recipe—it’s a great chicken soup recipe as well.

Get the recipe: Ginger-Chicken Meatballs with Chinese Broccoli

via Meet Your New Favorite Meatball – Bon Appétit.

Entering World of Literature’s Great Sleuth, NYTimes.com: Looks like a fun exhibit.

From original manuscript pages from “The Hound of the Baskervilles” to props from the current BBC hit “Sherlock,” the exhibition aims to engage all levels of enthusiasts. Galleries feature an examination of Conan Doyle and late 19th-century London, the science behind the Holmes stories and pop culture artifacts, past and present. There is also an immersive interactive Victorian-era murder mystery that visitors are asked to solve, clue by clue, after an introduction to Holmes’s scientific methods of crime-solving.

Careful not to confuse young visitors about reality and fiction, galleries are clearly delineated as containing actual artifacts and scientific data. “We separated the science lessons from the interactive mystery so the mystery was a place to practice and use the information you already learned, not a place to learn the science and history itself,” Mr. Curley said.

via Entering World of Literature’s Great Sleuth – NYTimes.com.

17
Mar
14

3.17.14 … Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh (Happy St. Patrick’s Day!) … Sláinte!!

St. Patrick’s Day, How To Pronounce Slainte – YouTube, St. Patrick’s Day memes, How the Irish Saved Civilization: Now I know why I’ve been craving mint patties …

The Dublin Airport Facebook page posted this notice clarifying that it’s “Saint Paddy’s Day,” not “Saint Patty’s Day.” (DublinAirport/Facebook)

Here’s a PSA from the Dublin Airport: Don’t call it St. Patty’s Day. Also, March 17 should never be referred to as Patty’s Day either.

You may, however, call it St. Paddy’s Day, or Paddy’s Day. Also acceptable are the traditional St. Patrick’s Day and Patrick’s Day.

Got that?

In a fogra (notice, in Gaelic) posted to its Facebook page, the airport addressed what is apparently a pet peeve: the improper use of St. Patty’s Day in the United States and Canada.

“Please share this simple message with your friends and relations in the United States and Canada,” the fogra reads. “Using the power of your network, hopefully we can banish the scourge of St Patty once and for all.”

So what’s the problem with St. Patty’s Day?

Patty is a nickname for Patricia, a woman’s name, according to the website paddynotpatty.com. St. Patrick was, of course, a man.

Paddy is appropriate because it comes from Padraig, a variant of the name Patrick.

But if you really want to impress an Irishman, you need only say: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh (Happy St. Patrick’s Day!).

via Please Don’t Call It St. Patty’s Day | ABC News – Yahoo.

via How To Pronounce Slainte – YouTube.

Not withstanding our earlier (March 15) serious discussion of St. Patrick, this is just too good to ignore!

via The Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta.

An intro to St. Patrick from one of my favorite books:

Photo: Thomas Cahill will be in conversation with Karen Armstrong, founder of Charter for Compassion on Tuesday, November 26th at the 92nd Street Y in NYC. Open to the Public, link below. The event will also be LIVE STREAMED from the Y's website for everyone across the US who would like to see these two great scholars converse about two of the greatest forces in life: compassion and cruelty.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>http://www.92y.org/Event/Meeting-of-Minds-On-Compassion.aspx

Like many another in impossible circumstances, he began to pray. He had never before paid attention to the teachings of his religion; he tells us that he didn’t really believe in God, and he found priests foolish. But now, there was no one to turn to but the God of his parents. One is reminded of the reports of contemporary hostages about how they make it through the dreary years of captivity. “Tending flocks was my daily work, and I would pray constantly during the daylight hours. The love of God and the fear of him surrounded me more and more—and faith grew and the Spirit was roused, so that in one day I would say as many as a hundred prayers and after dark nearly as many again, even while I remained in the woods or on the mountain. I would wake and pray before daybreak—through snow, frost, rain—nor was there any sluggishness in me (such as I experience nowadays) because then the Spirit within me was ardent.”

Patricius endured six years of this woeful isolation, and by the end of it he had grown from a careless boy to something he would surely never otherwise have become—a holy man, indeed a visionary for whom there was no longer any rigid separation between this world and the next. On his last night as Miliucc’s slave, he received in sleep his first otherworldly experience. A mysterious voice said to him: “Your hungers are rewarded: you are going home.” Patricius sat up, startled. The voice continued: “Look, your ship is ready.”

Cahill, Thomas (2010-04-28). How the Irish Saved Civilization (Kindle Locations 1304-1316). Anchor. Kindle Edition.

via Dennard Lindsey Teague.

“They understood, as few have understood before or since, how fleeting life is and how pointless to try to hold on to things or people. They pursued the wondrous deed, the heroic gesture…poetry for intense emotion, the music that accompanied the heroic drinking with which each day ended, bewitching ornament for one’s person and possessions.”

― Thomas Cahill, How the Irish Saved Civilization

Selection Sunday, process and bracket structure, NCAA Basketball, March Madness, NIT, Davidson basketball:

An overview of how teams are selected and seeded in the men’s NCAA basketball tournament, and a look into bracket methodology.

via Selection process and bracket structure – Associated Press Interactive.

2014 NCAA bracket: Use Slate’s interactive to make your picks based on the odds, SAT scores, coach’s salary, and a whole lot more. I may try dog lovers.  According to the interactive, Connecticut wins. And then again, Wofford has a dog mascot, a terrier,  and they got the SoCon’s automatic bid.  So maybe not.

Want to pick an NCAA bracket but have no idea where to start? No worries—use our interactive March Madness bracket-filler. We can pick the winners based on who’s the odds-on favorite, or we can serve up a bracket full of underdogs. Want to go with whoever has a dog mascot, or a cat, or a bird? We can help. What about picking by SAT scores? We’ve got you covered. The first-round games start on Tuesday, but most bracket contests give you until Thursday morning to submit your picks. Now, get to clicking!

via 2014 NCAA bracket: Use Slate’s interactive to make your picks based on the odds, SAT scores, coach’s salary, and a whole lot more..

I really don’t like the NIT. What is the point …

Davidson Athletics @DavidsonWildcat 1m

No. 7 seed @DavidsonMBB will play at No. 2 seed Missouri on Tuesday on @ESPN2 in the 1st round of the NIT Tournament

Pat’s Backcountry Beverages Covet | OutsideOnline.com: I neither drink beer nor camp … so that is just interesting to me. So I guess the question, “After all, who among us hasn’t fantasized about some sweet suds at the end of a long, hot hike? ” doesn’t apply to me.

We’ve written about Pat’s Backcountry Beverages Carbonator, the Nalgene-size system for fizzifying your drink of choice where ever the trail takes you. And while we’ve talked about Pat’s alcohol-packed beer flavors—the world’s first beer concentrate, according to the company—we haven’t put them to the test. Until now.

As a backpacker and a booze writer, when I heard about Pat’s first two beer flavors (complete with alcohol!) I couldn’t resist checking them out. After all, who among us hasn’t fantasized about some sweet suds at the end of a long, hot hike? But could these “beers” pass the taste test of an admittedly picky beer drinker? The short answer—Yes.

For those unfamiliar with the idea, Pat’s Backcountry Beverages Carbonator is a plastic bottle with built-in levers, valves, and cups. You add a mixture of potassium bicarbonate and citric acid to the small charging cup within the bottle, pull a lever on the cap a few times to add water, and a chemical reaction starts, releasing CO2 into your beverage of choice. In this case, your beverage of choice would be beer.

Pat’s offers two flavors: Pale Rail and Black Hops. They both come in portable, 1.7-ounce liquid packets that you add to the water before you charge it. These packets are sold in four-packs for $10 a pop, which isn’t too outrageous compared to your standard micro-brew.

It’s worth noting that these aren’t merely “beer flavored.” Founder Pat Tatera developed what he calls a “Hybrid Brewing Process.” The beer begins as a normal beer would, except once it’s done fermenting, he vacuum-distills it. This pulls out most of the water and the alcohol, which Tatera sets aside, leaving a beer-like syrup. Then he restarts the brewing process, but instead of using water to create the wort, he uses the beer syrup. He repeats these steps four times, then soaks Cascade Hops in the reserved alcohol to extract their flavor, and combines that with the syrup. The result? A little packet of concentrated beer. Just add fizzy water.

I went through the process exactly as I would if I were in the field, using cold, bottled water to simulate filtered water from a stream. Despite Pat’s claim that it’s just three steps, there are several steps within each step, and you’d be hard-pressed to remember them all if you didn’t bring the instructions. It takes approximately five minutes to brew each beer. Here’s how they measure up to the real thing.

via Pat’s Backcountry Beverages | Covet | OutsideOnline.com.

The Wall Street Journal, MH 370: Curiouser and curiouser!

Police have intensified their investigation of the pilots of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 amid suspicion that foul play was involved in the jet’s disappearance. http://on.wsj.com/OuBZ2i

Follow our streaming coverage here: http://on.wsj.com/1n4l1Yj

100 Diagrams That Changed the World, Brain Pickings:

100 Diagrams That Changed the World (UK; public library) by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web.

But most noteworthy of all is the way in which these diagrams bespeak an essential part of culture — the awareness that everything builds on what came before, that creativity is combinatorial, and that the most radical innovations harness the cross-pollination of disciplines. Christianson writes in the introduction:

It appears that no great diagram is solely authored by its creator. Most of those described here were the culmination of centuries of accumulated knowledge. Most arose from collaboration (and oftentimes in competition) with others. Each was a product and a reflection of its unique cultural, historical and political environment. Each represented specific preoccupations, interests, and stake holders.

[…]

via 100 Diagrams That Changed the World | Brain Pickings.

Jane Austen, Elizabeth Bennet, A Lesson From Elizabeth Bennet, Darling Magazine:  A new magazine.  🙂

Truth is not always that which the majority believes it to be; it is often disguised as myths found in the popular trends of social normality, myths that a girl like Elizabeth Bennet is able to debunk. Elizabeth is, in essence, a modern woman well before her time. She is able to see past the delicacies and deceits of corseted ball gowns, budding romances, and pretentious suitors, all of which make the young women around her swoon with anticipation.

The simplicities of the female lifestyle do not satisfy Elizabeth’s longing for a life of purpose and meaning for the mere reason that she, unlike her sisters, is unwilling to exchange her desire for truth with a fleeting happiness inspired by a gentleman’s passing fancies. She refuses to take the hand of a man for whom she feels anything but wholehearted love, and instead she chooses to sleep soundly with a well-deserved pride in her nonconformity.

via A Lesson From Elizabeth Bennet | Darling Magazine.

best travel apps, lists, Making Your Device Your Best Travel Companion, NPR:

Kayak.com

Yapta

Triposo

Booking.com

Tango

hopstop

google maps

Roam to Rio

maplets

via Making Your Device Your Best Travel Companion : NPR.

RIP, Howard “Bo” Callaway, ‘Superstar’ of Republican party, http://www.ajc.com, kith/kin: RIP Bo Calloway: I will never forget him. We got a dog in 1966 and named him Bo for Bo Calloway. That is my first memory of an election. I was 6. He lived until 1981 and I was 21.  It was a good name for a dog.

In the 1960s, when nearly every elected Georgia Republican could fit in a Studabaker, Howard “Bo” Callaway was the party’s driver.

By 2010, when the GOP swept every statewide office for the first time, Callaway’s name was spoken with reverence, as the father of the Georgia Republican Party and its first superstar.

Callaway, 86, who helped his parents create the Callaway Gardens resort near Pine Mountain, died Saturday, nearly two years after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage.

His death marks the end of an era that saw him become, in 1964, the state’s first Republican congressman since Reconstruction, and almost the first Republican governor two years later. And while he never returned to elected office, veteran Georgia Republicans say he never stopped working to grow the party.

via Howard “Bo” Callaway: ‘Superstar’ of Republican party | www.ajc.com.

Monet, van Gogh, visual artist, crazy people:

Artists like Monet and van Gogh saw the world in a way that was once rejected as crazy. But their work came to be prized in every meaning of that word. This Monet masterpiece is called “Parliament in London,” part of the priceless collection at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

You may not be a visual artist. But if you’re one of those “crazy” people who sees hopeful possibilities in a world that others claim is going to hell in a handbasket, don’t let the cynics do eye surgery on you!

You won’t become as famous as Monet, but you’ll achieve something equally important. You’ll open other people’s eyes to the daily opportunities we all have to help make this world a more life-giving place for all concerned.

via Facebook.

3.13 Davidson’s “birthday”: A Facebook birthday!

Happy Birthday, Davidson! Today is the perfect day to make your gift to Davidson. You only turn 177 once, after all. – http://bit.ly/1kD4AjY

Flexibility, Lenten Devotions:

Sunday March 16, 2014

The Virtue of Flexibility

Flexibility is a great virtue.  When we cling to our own positions and are not willing to let our hearts be moved back and forth a little by the ideas or actions of others, we may easily be broken.   Being like wild reeds does not mean being wishy-washy.  It means moving a little with the winds of the time while remaining solidly anchored in the ground.   A humorless, intense, opinionated rigidity about current issues might cause these issues to break our spirits and make us bitter people.  Let’s be flexible while being deeply rooted.

Green Renaissance, Panchita (a Galapagos sea lion) :  Panchita, now pregnant and expecting her baby sea lion,  goes out to sea every day and then returns to the hotel to rest. … as good as a good dog story!

March 13

This is Panchita, a Galapagos sea lion. Panchita was caught up in a net, which left deep cuts all over her body. She managed to make it to this hotel where animal advocates nursed her back to health for 3 months.

Panchita, now pregnant and expecting her baby sea lion any day, goes out to sea every day and then returns to the hotel to rest.

Be kind to Nature.

Source – https://www.facebook.com/giveashitaboutnature

Chartres Cathedral, Easter Dances by the clergy, Holy Innocents’ Episcopal Church | The Second Sunday in Lent (March 16):  Just loved this devotional post.  And now I must research Chartres Cathedral Easter Dances by the clergy!

Martha Sterne on Mar 16, 2014 9:13am

Sundays are “Feast and Fill in Your Own Quote” days on our Lenten Journey. What comes to you through this image? This I just learned – the labyrinth in Chartres Cathedral, created in the early thirteenth century, was the scene of Easter Dances by the clergy! Photo is by an anonymous internet pilgrim.

Helen A on Mar 16, 2014 1:24pm

I would love to see that dance!

via Holy Innocents’ Episcopal Church | The Second Sunday in Lent (March 16).

Stanford’s newest majors marry computer science and the humanities,  USA TODAY College:

Many students see little noteworthy overlap between course offerings in computer science and in the traditional humanities. However, a new generation of digitally savvy liberal arts scholars believes that technology is changing our understanding of the humanities.

In a growing field known today as the “digital humanities,” professors and students engage in a computer-based study of the liberal arts.

In light of the growing popularity of the field, Stanford University approved two new “joint-majors” on March 6 that will allow students to pursue an interdisciplinary study of English and computer science or music and computer science beginning next academic year, according to a press release by the university.

Unlike double majoring in computer science and a humanities field, students who choose the new CS+X program will not be required to complete all the requirements from both majors, according to the university.

Students will pursue a curriculum integrating coursework from both disciplines and will need to complete a senior project or honors thesis that synthesizes their work from both fields.

via » Stanford’s newest majors marry computer science and the humanities USA TODAY College: College news and information powered by USA TODAY.

21
Mar
13

3.21.13 … March Madness … bracketology — the art and science of picking winners among 68 teams in a single-elimination tournament …

LA Times, March Madness, Chartier,  Davidson math professor, bracketology:  Funny, his name is chart-ier!

Blame it on tiny Butler College. Chartier’s math class was among those to recognize that fifth-seeded Butler was destined for the finals in 2010. That was the second year Chartier started making bracketology — the art and science of picking winners among 68 teams in a single-elimination tournament — part of his syllabus. That’s right: take Chartier’s course and you’ll be deep into basketball come March. He’s even written a research paper on it.

via LA Times – March Madness puts Davidson math professor in a bracket of his own.

15
Mar
11

3.15.2011 … cave indus martias …

Sara Bates, Anne Temmink, Davidson College, Watson Fellowship, kith/kin, kudos: Kudos to Sara, Anne and the other Watson Fellows! … and kudos to Sara’s proud parents … Lisa and Thomas!

Sara Bates, Davidson College

Delivering Hope: A Comparative Study of Midwifery Programs and Practices

New Zealand, Indonesia, Chile, Ethiopia

While childbirth is often a positive and fulfilling experience, for too many women it is associated with fear, suffering, ill-health, and even death. Today, midwives remain the primary providers of health care for childbearing women around the world. Midwifery encompasses the care of women during pregnancy, labor, and the postpartum period, as well as care of the newborn. My project aims to explore the cross-cultural factors of midwifery in order to further my knowledge of the techniques midwives use and struggles they face on a daily basis.

Anne Temmink, Davidson College

Women, Sewing, and the Globalization of Fashion

Ghana, India, Indonesia

Clothing communicates many things about the history of a culture as well as an individual’s origins and affiliations. Historically, women throughout the world have occupied roles in many facets of clothing making. My proposal will take me to study in three countries each with an identity strongly tied to its particular style of dress or textile traditions. By working alongside seamstresses and dyers, I will explore the histories and trades that surround clothing production to see the effects of Western clothing on the livelihood of female artisans.

via The Watson Fellowship: Our Fellows.

Japan Earthquake/Tsunami:

A video model created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows the extraordinary power of the earthquake and tsunami that struck the coast of Japan last Friday, causing widespread devastation and setting off a deepening nuclear crisis.

The model, based on observational data from deep-sea buoys, shows waves more than a hundred miles long spreading rapidly throughout the Pacific basin, said Yong Wei, a NOAA tsunami modeler.

The wave energy from the event was on par with the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, which killed more than 200,000 people, Dr. Wei said.

via Model Shows Intense Wave Power of Tsunami – NYTimes.com.

fashion, Emma Watson: OK … how can Emma Watson be the face of Lancome when she is the face of Hermione … the face of my children’s generation? … Besides Lancome is the rich old lady makeup … I haven’t moved up to it yet and I am 51.

Emma Watson’s beauty is striking—so much so that her fabulous features just inked a deal to be the new face of Lancôme! Watson confirmed the news on her Twitter this morning, where she had left clues over the past few days so her fans could guess her big news. “It starts with an L and ends with an E. I’m sure you have guessed the new face of Lancôme is me!” the 20-year-old actress Tweeted.

via Emma Watson for Lancome: ‘The Icon of Her Generation’ : InStyle.com What’s Right Now.

cities, urban development:

What is the evidence that cities are more efficient ways of organising economic activity? Specifically, how do we know that – in this day-and-age of telecommunications – the existence of cities arises from superior efficiency in organising economic activity, and not merely from superior efficiency in organising rent-seeking?

It’s a good question. How do we know cities are productive and not just centres for rent-seeking? The answer is simple: because they export.

Only in those cases where another industry with different location-specific advantages arose did cities recover. These new “knowledge” industries may themselves prove vulnerable at some point in the future. For the moment, however, the exporting capacity of metropolitan firms suggests that economies are deriving huge benefits from their cities.

via Economic geography: What are cities good for? | The Economist.

March Madness:

The Daily Tar Heel :: Serving UNC students and the community since 1893.

It’s bracket season, the time when everyone from hardcore college-basketball fans to those who can’t name one Pittsburgh Panther enters the office’s NCAA tournament pool.

The trouble with bracket time, though, is that even the most analytical thinkers get corrupted by the archenemy of objectivity: emotion. It doesn’t matter if your alma mater is stumbling down the stretch like Villanova; you’re still having them win their first game. Likewise, if Kansas burned you last season, you’re determined to prevent the Jayhawks from doing it again, no matter how good they look now (and their No. 1 seed).

via NCAA Bracket as Blind Taste Test – WSJ.com.

gold, history, Charlotte:  Outside of Charlotte was the first significant gold find in the US … 1799.

Should gold be represented in an investment portfolio? I believe it should, for a number of reasons.

New York financial adviser Lewis J. Altfest calls gold a gift, not an investment .

In the short run, gold can be a safe haven in a time of crisis. We don’t know what the next crisis will be, but we have seen plenty of “black swan” events over the past two years alone; our markets and our world seem increasingly hard-wired to experience periods of crisis and calm. In this sense, gold can be seen as a short-term hedge, or a short-term speculative play on volatility.

Some may say that we’re heading for a period of stability, but that’s hard to believe. The Fed is desperately trying to stimulate the economy. Housing prices remain weak. Unemployment remains high. On the political side, the Middle East has been far from stable in recent weeks. We have learned from the past three years that events can move extremely quickly in our increasingly interconnected world. Stability will be more and more fleeting—perhaps permanently.

In the longer term, gold is a good way to invest in expectation of higher inflation—a growing possibility. As governments battle debt problems and central banks intervene on their behalf, we could very well see deliberate weakening of currencies in many developed countries. Why use gold, rather than some other inflation hedge? Simplicity. Gold can be easily held in most portfolios, particularly with the advent of gold-bullion ETFs.

via Buy Gold: It’s a Safe Haven and Inflation Hedge – WSJ.com.

news, Charlotte, condolences, kith/kin:  A tragedy struck an event a good friend coordinates.  Condolences to the family and friends of the volunteer.

The loss had an emotional impact on the weekend-long event, said meet director Barb Frith.

“All the coaches are visibly shaken,” Frith said. “And we can all understand that you leave home at 7 a.m. for a swim meet and at 7:20 a.m. life is changed forever.”

via Team swims through grief for committed volunteer – CharlotteObserver.com.




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