Posts Tagged ‘MegaBus

08
Jul
14

7.8.14 … canned soup …

Progresso “Artisan” Creamy Potato Soup with Sausage and Kale, canned soup, artisan: Progresso “Artisan” Creamy Potato Soup with Sausage and Kale was very good … But doesn’t soup hermetically sealed in box go against the definition of “artisan?” Obviously if you follow my conversations, you know of my discussion of the use/misuse of this word.

 Crumbs cupcake empire:

When news broke last night that the Crumbs cupcake empire crumbled, outlets were quick to declare (yet again) the end of the cupcake trend as we know it. While the shuttering of a major chain is certainly noteworthy, this isn’t actually the end of a era—we still have Magnolia, Sprinkles, and countless other sugar-laden chain bakeries. There are still Sex and City tour buses and bachelorette parties, not to mention people who just generally enjoy the taste of cupcakes (not that there’s anything wrong with that). Even Robicelli’s, a Brooklyn bakery that happens to bake quite excellent cupcakes, admits that cupcakes are still a hot-ticket item:

Here’s my theory: Crumbs closed because it made awful cupcakes (and some questionable financial decisions). Despite its attempts at vaguely innovative flavors like Oreo, Crumbs did not produce a good product. Maybe the rest of the population finally wised up to that fact—down with mediocrity! If you want to eat a cupcake, great. But it should at least be a palatable one.

What’s more, this may be evidence of an overall trend: Americans are developing a sense of taste (at last). Other bland, mass-market food categories are down as well. Domestic light beer sales will hit a 10-year low in 2015, reports Bloomberg Businessweek. Why the plummet? Because people are veering toward craft beer, imports, and cider. Translation: People want to drink things that taste good.

The frozen food industry is hurting as well, according to both National Journal and the Wall Street Journal. ”Within this foodie culture the last few years, I think there has been a change in how some people define healthy foods,” Rob McCutcheon, president of ConAgra’s consumer frozen-food division, told the WSJ. “There is definitely a push toward products that are more real, higher quality, more homemade and closer to the source.”

Even the salad dressing industry is feeling the pain of consumer discernment; sales for premium salad dressing are growing at two to three times the rate of regular dressing, the WSJ reported last year. (Bonus: It’s really easy to make your own.)

No one even wants cereal anymore either! Why? Because cereal—whether ultra-sugary or ultra-healthy—can’t quite live up to the morning hero du jour: yogurt!

Does this mean the artisanal food revolution has succeeded? Have we home cooks won the war? Will parents be rolling out kouign amann for their kids’ birthday parties? Will shoyu ramen replace the Quarter Pounder?

Maybe not quite yet. Though casual chains such as Olive Garden and Applebee’s are struggling to stay relevant, TGI Friday’s actually just launched a new “endless appetizer” special: a neverending deluge of mozzarella sticks, potato skins, and more—for only $10. So you know what? Forget what I just said about people caring more about quality than quantity (and price). This is America. Cupcakes may crumble, craft beer may bubble up, but we will always have our fried cheese. Only, perhaps a little more now than before, it may be burrata.

via Crumbs Is Closing—Are Americans Developing a Palate?.

Bonaparte, Joseph Bonaparte, US, history:

Mental Floss ‏@mental_floss 1m

Napoleons older brother Joseph Bonaparte lived for many years in New Jersey.

via 3 Twitter.

 AS a former king, he entertained on a lavish scale. In exile, he surrounded himself with European artwork. He was oldest brother to the conqueror of Europe, but he far preferred gardening to warfare.

Beginning in 1816, Joseph Bonaparte, the brother of Napoleon, was a New Jersey resident. Once king of Spain and Naples, Bonaparte made his home in exile at Point Breeze, a promontory overlooking the junction of the Crosswicks and Thornton Creeks with the Delaware River.

In the last two years, students from Monmouth University in West Long Branch, led by Richard F. Veit, an associate professor of anthropology, have worked to unearth the foundations of Joseph Bonaparte’s first house, which was destroyed by fire in 1820. In two six-week summer digs this year and last, some 125 students recovered more than 14,000 artifacts, mostly remnants of china, marble and glass.

“Uncovering the foundation cornerstone was hands down the most exciting find we made,” Sean McHugh, a graduate student from Brick, said about finding a portion of the mansion. “It helps orient the whole site.”

Monmouth University’s find was showcased at a recent open house at Point Breeze, hosted by the Divine Word Missionaries, whose seminary now sits on the property. “The university’s undertaking of archaeology here has helped bring the hidden pages of history back to life,” said Pierre Villmont, France’s ambassador to the United States, who attended the event.

Little remains on the property original to Bonaparte’s time. The former estate is honeycombed with underground tunnels, which were used to bring in supplies and also offered a quick escape route if enemies came to call. A brick archway now teetering in the woods may have once supported a carriageway to Bonaparte’s house, according to Keri Sansevere, a Monmouth student from Middletown.

While Joseph Bonaparte’s time in New Jersey may be obscure to some, residents of Bordentown City are well acquainted with his story. Mayor John W. Collom III talked of exploring the underground tunnels as a teenager. Kathleen Pierce, who would have been a close neighbor of M. Bonaparte, said a local repairman once asked her, “And what Bonaparte artifact do you own?”

Bonaparte, who escaped to America from France after his brother’s defeat in 1815, purchased Point Breeze in 1816. He quickly set about enlarging the existing house and acquiring more land, eventually owning more than 1,800 acres in the Bordentown area.

His first mansion burned on Jan. 4, 1820. Bonaparte was away but arrived in time to see the roof collapse, Dr. Veit said.

But his Bordentown neighbors rushed to the property when they saw the flames, and rescued most of his artwork, furniture, silver and other valuables. Bonaparte later publicly praised their efforts in a letter written to local newspapers.

He then built a second, grander mansion, set farther back from the river. This residence was judged by many visitors to be the “second-finest house in America,” after the White House, according to Patricia Tyson Stroud, author of “The Man Who Had Been King,” which was used in Dr. Veit’s course work for the dig.

When he was king of Spain, Bonaparte loved wine and dinner parties — his nickname was “Joey Bottles” — and Monmouth students unearthed generous evidence of this in the hundreds of broken wine bottles recovered at the site. Bonaparte also loved to garden, and Dr. Veit said his estate was a forerunner to Central Park — with an artificial lake and marble statues — that Bonaparte often opened to the public.

In 1839, Bonaparte left New Jersey for Europe, where he died in 1844. His second home was bought by Henry Beckett, the son of a former British consul, who promptly razed it to build another mansion. He was dubbed “Beckett the Destroyer” by local residents.

via History – Unearthing the Home of That Other Bonaparte, the One Who Lived in New Jersey – NYTimes.com.

Why Every City Needs a Labyrinth – CityLab, maze v. labyrinth: Not really a labyrinth, but very cool!

 

I’m the kind of person who probably couldn’t find his way out of a paper bag, so it was with some hesitation that I stepped into the BIG Maze. This is a project at D.C.’s National Building Museum, a summer folly designed by the always-entertaining Danish architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group, a plywood playground where kids will snap selfies all season long. For a person with a sense of direction like mine, though, it couldn’t be worse if a Minotaur were lurking in the middle.

The labyrinth swallowed me. Though the structure is dwarfed by the cavernous museum itself, this maze is no slouch, spanning more than 3,000 square feet. In a word, it’s big: The maple-wood walls rise 18 feet high, and each side is is 57 feet long. Welp, I thought, as I assessed my inventory: If I was going to have to live in a maze for the holiday weekend, at least I had a Perrier.

via Why Every City Needs a Labyrinth – CityLab.

quotes:

As Edward de Bono would say, “Creativity involves breaking out of established patterns in order to look at things in a different way.”

via CATHERINE WILMER | CACHE Worldwide.

MegaBus: I’m on the MegaBus with Steph Curry’s mother-in-law. She is one of the most down to earth women I have met in a long time … And one very proud grandmother. She paid a dollar for her trip.

 

02
Jul
14

7.2.14 … “Poetry is the dark side of the moon. It’s up there, and you can see the front of it. But what it is isn’t what you’re looking at. It’s behind what you’re looking at.”

Julianna’s:  I just love this place.

As quaint and charming as ever, this cafe serves up a menu of both savory and sweet crepes. Since I hadn’t had lunch yet, I went for savory while Lucy went for the classic sweet combo of strawberries, banana, and honey. Both tasted a bit like the French/Hungarian childhood I never had.

via julianna’s crepes | tide & bloom | inspiration, creativity, and growth | atlanta events, food, culture, beauty.

Charles Wright ’57, America’s Next Poet Laureate, Davidson College: Another great day to be a wildcat!

As a Davidson student Wright was a history major and won the college’s Vereen Bell Prize for writing. Davidson awarded Wright an honorary doctor of letters degree in 1997, the year before he won the Pulitzer Prize. “Poetry fulfills a spiritual need, the need to explain to myself what it is I would like to happen,” Wright once told the Davidson Journal.

via The New York Times: Charles Wright ’57, America’s Next Poet Laureate – Davidson College.

“Poetry is the dark side of the moon,” he said. “It’s up there, and you can see the front of it. But what it is isn’t what you’re looking at. It’s behind what you’re looking at.”

via Charles Wright Named America’s Poet Laureate – NYTimes.com.

MegaBus: Odd assortment on the bus … Indian woman in beautiful Indian attire walked up and demanded younger girl give up her seat and younger girl did, very cute chatty younger twenty-something with white skeleton on black background t-shirt and sticker that says “wanted: redneck girl with truck” and African American older woman who is totally upset because somehow she will have a 5 hour wait in Charlotte and she thought it was only an hour.  It was a relatively full bus: I still love my bus!

ACAC Southeast Art Summit 9/50 opening soirée: I know I am getting old … Meow Lin (Chanel Kim) and ZigZagZig (Zopi Kristjanson) hip-hoppin’ their “lunar mythology” with inspiration drawn from Wu Tang Clan, ancient cultures, and personal drama …  funky!

Bloomsday 6.16: Happy Bloomsday 6.16!

James Joyce’s “Ulysses” changed literature and the world, not necessarily in the ways its author intended and certainly in ways we still don’t entirely understand. One of the unexpected effects of the novel, which was first published in its entirety in Paris in 1922, was the most famous obscenity trial in U.S. history, conducted in 1933. That trial serves as the culmination of Kevin Birmingham’s astute and gorgeously written “The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce’s ‘Ulysses,’” an account of the tortuous path Joyce’s masterpiece took to print. Publishing is not the world’s most fast-paced and high-stakes business, but when it came to introducing the English-speaking world to a novel that one critic deplored as “full of the filthiest blasphemies” and “afflicted with a truly diabolical lack of talent,” the ride was a wild one.

Countless reams of paper have been consumed by writings on Joyce and “Ulysses,” but Birmingham has two particular, little-discussed themes to bring to the table. First, and most peripheral to his narrative, is Birmingham’s discovery of strong evidence that the eye problems that tormented and eventually blinded Joyce were caused by syphilis. (Birmingham concludes that a medication given to Joyce by his Parisian doctor in the late 1920s was probably “an obscure French drug called galyl,” used only to treat symptoms of syphilis.) Birmingham expands on this a bit by arguing that the effects of pain and disability on the writer and his work have been underestimated. It’s a credible argument, especially once you’ve read this book’s squirm-inducing description of a typical eye surgery Joyce endured and learn that he went through the equivalent a dozen times over. But Birmingham never quite gets around to showing how Joyce’s suffering shaped his work.

via “The Most Dangerous Book”: When “Ulysses” was obscene – Salon.com.

family history, kith/kin: And this is what I was searching for … A picture of my mom that through Facebook reconnecting, a friend from Davidson and I discovered that her mother took this of my mother at Wesleyan College. She had asked my mom to model for her.

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And in response … here’s another pic your Mother may enjoy: the reporter/photographer in action while working on the Anderson Daily Mail!  My Mama – the journalist/photographer – with the elephant! One of my all time favorites!

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kith/kin:  Photos at the train station … they  look like the Addams Family. We think my sis,  a Wednesday’s child, would have made a good Wednesday Addams …

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In Addams’ cartoons, which first appeared in The New Yorker, Wednesday and other members of the family had no names. When the characters were adapted to the 1964 television series, Charles Addams gave her the name “Wednesday”, based on the well-known nursery rhyme line, “Wednesday’s child is full of woe”. She is the sister of Pugsley Addams (and, in the movie Addams Family Values, also the sister of Pubert Addams), and she is the only daughter of Gomez and Morticia Addams.

via Wednesday Addams – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

In all fairness to my sis …

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Hawkinsville GA, Pineview GA:  All my life when I visited Pineview GA, we would visit nearby Hawkinsville GA, and my grandparents would turn down Merritt St and stop in front of this house. They would say that my grandparents house on Bay Street in Pineview had been built in a hurry to replace a house that looked just like this house that had burned down around 1910. My great-grandfather JJ Dennard refused to build another two-story house since two of his girls had to jump to safety from the second story balcony. The new house which still stands is one story and all rooms have a door to the outside.

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Artistic Sushi Rolls,  Edvard Munch:

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via Artistic Sushi Rolls – Edvard Munch inspired Food Art from Sushi Sculptors.

‘Lawrence of Afghanistan’… And His Woman, Jim Gant, Top Green Beret Officer:  Fascinating story!

via Lawrence of Afghanistan: Rise and Fall of a Special Forces Legend Photos | Image #3 – ABC News.

‘Lawrence of Afghanistan’… And His Woman

General David Petraeus: ‘Going Native’ To Win In Afghanistan

A legendary Special Forces commander was quietly forced to leave the U.S. Army after he admitted to a love affair with a Washington Post war correspondent, who quit her job to secretly live with him for almost a year in one of the most dangerous combat outposts in Afghanistan.

U.S. Army Special Operations Command never publicly disclosed that highly-decorated Green Beret Major Jim Gant was relieved of command at the end of a harrowing 22 months in combat in March 2012.

His commanders charged in confidential files that he had “indulged in a self-created fantasy world” of booze, pain pills and sex in a tribal village deep in Taliban and al Qaeda country with his “wife,” journalist Ann Scott Tyson.

via Jim Gant: Top Green Beret Officer Forced to Resign Over Affair With WaPo Reporter – ABC News.

 

 

03
Mar
14

3.3.14 … I cheated … Homeless Jesus … “Do not ask your children to strive for extraordinary lives.” … ” the stories we tell ourselves about animals totally color how we see them. “Emotion matters. Imagination matters, and we are free to spin whatever stories we want about them.” The wild animals, he says, ‘always have no comment.'” …

MegaBus, Monarch of the Glen, Netflix bingeing, spoilers, Katrina:  On my bus … bingeing on Monarch … but I cheated … I am on Series 3 and I read the spoilers for the rest of the series.  I do not like the way the story goes after Series 3.  I like Katrina way too much.

“Homeless Jesus”, St. Alban’s, Canadian sculptor Timothy P. Schmalz, DavidsonNews.net: 

Canadian artist Timothy Schmalz sits on the bench next to his work. (Via sculpturebytps.com)

McCoy and Macon discussed different ideas in recent years until they came upon Schmalz’s work. Both use the word “serendipity” to describe how they discovered it. Macon said McCoy “stumbled upon it. … Once found, that became the thing.”

“At the end of the day, this was the most compelling,” Macon added.

Schmalz has said the piece was inspired by a gospel passage, Matthew: 25. “This sculpture is a representation that suggests Christ is with the most marginalized in our society. The Christ figure is shrouded in a blanket … the only indication that it is Jesus is the visible wounds on the feet. The life-size version of the work has enough room that someone is able to sit on the bench.”

The fact that the sculpture was surrounded by controversy made it all the more interesting, Macon said. And that also caught the attention of Buck and others at St. Alban’s.

The juxtaposition of the sculpture and relatively new building “reminds us what (the church) is all about,” Buck said.

So on Friday, McCoy, Buck and a small crew of other workers brought “Homeless Jesus” to its new home.

Said Macon: “It’s extraordinarily appropriate. … It certainly is thought-provoking and inspirational. I don’t think it’s disturbing, but it gives you pause.”

via ‘Homeless Jesus’ finds a home, in front of St. Alban’s  | DavidsonNews.net.

William Martin, Do not ask your children to strive for extraord…., Goodreads:  Just liked this one.

Do not ask your children

to strive for extraordinary lives.

Such striving may seem admirable,

but it is the way of foolishness.

Help them instead to find the wonder

and the marvel of an ordinary life.

Show them the joy of tasting

tomatoes, apples and pears.

Show them how to cry

when pets and people die.

Show them the infinite pleasure

in the touch of a hand.

And make the ordinary come alive for them.

The extraordinary will take care of itself.

― William Martin, The Parent’s Tao Te Ching: Ancient Advice for Modern Parents

via Goodreads | Quote by William Martin: Do not ask your children to strive for extraord….

Polar Bear Flip-Flop: People Hated, Then Loved These Photos. What Changed?, Krulwich Wonders, NPR:  The pictures are fun, but this is an interesting analysis of the effect of media and changing perceptions.

via ▶ Animals at Play – YouTube.

Thirteen years later, polar bears hadn’t changed, but our sense of them had. By 2007, most people had seen scenes of weak, starving bears struggling to stay on shrinking hunks of melting ice. The earth was warming and polar bears had no place to go. Suddenly, they were vulnerable, heading to extinction. Animals, says Mooallem are “free-roaming Rorschachs.” We see them through the heavy filter of our own feelings, our own needs. And our filter for polar bears had flipped. Animals who’d once been proud and vicious had become “delicate, drowning” victims, lonely animals — who now just might need the companionship of a friendly husky — who might come to a backyard, looking for a hug.

Jon Mooallem believes that the stories we tell ourselves about animals totally color how we see them. “Emotion matters. Imagination matters, and we are free to spin whatever stories we want about them.” The wild animals, he says, “always have no comment.”

via Polar Bear Flip-Flop: People Hated, Then Loved These Photos. What Changed? : Krulwich Wonders… : NPR.

12
Jan
14

1.12.14 … A lot of Downton and a little Maimonides … and some in between …

me, MegaBus, Atlanta:

So a few things … I really do prefer the bus.  Atlanta traffic is a nightmare.  Downton Abbey viewing party with my family is great fun.

Downton Abbey, Sillybubs, Downton Abbey Viewing Party:  So during my visit, we had a DA Viewing Party:  Our menu was deviled eggs (according to the internet, very Edwardian!), roasted chicken, mashed potatoes, salad, and sticky toffee pudding.  I had to explaint o Mollu that the pudding was not pudding, but moist cake.  Why do the Brits do that? And if I had paid attention I would have done syllabubs which I always spelled sillybubs.  🙂 And btw, we had sillybub in South Georgia when I was growing up.

Syllabubs and possets are English dairy dishes which probably first evolved during the sixteenth century. Syllabubs were made from cream and wine and were served cold. Possets were frothy spiced custards made with cream, wine and eggs and were usually served hot. Because they were cold, syllabubs could be served in delicate glass pots without any fear of the glass cracking. On the other hand, piping hot possets had to be consumed from much more durable ceramic pots, like those illustrated on the right.

via Syllabubs.

Eric Stevens, 23, of Rochester, New York, loves Downton Abbey. How much does he love Downton Abbey?

So much that when he found there was no existing Downton Abbey Lego set, he built one for his girlfriend as a Christmas present.

via Man Creates Adorable Downton Abbey Lego Set for His Girlfriend : People.com Mobile.

Molly Wilmer Barker, Running Mates USA, Girls on the Run, fathers: Excellent post by Molly Wilmer Barker!

For some reason, I had a hard time loving my dad. He wasn’t around…when I was a little girl. My mom struggling, with her own demons, was completely unavailable to mother even herself, much less me. Unsure and poorly equipped, my dad simply disappeared. He emotionally and physically checked out. He lost himself in his work and his political life…he lost himself out there and I often questioned, as many kids do, whether I did something to push him away.

But now, I recognize that my father is fast becoming one of my greatest teachers.  My anger or lack of understanding for him has gently slipped away in these recent weeks.  How liberating to see him as a man…a man simply doing his best to deal with life on life’s terms.  I don’t know specifically what drove him to work so hard, to serve others with such persistence, but I do know that he, like me, you, my son and daughter share this experience we call being human.

If I’m honest with you….really honest to the point of revealing something I’ve been a bit ashamed to admit but can do so now with tenderness and understanding of myself, the anger I’ve had for my dad has spilled over into other areas of my life: my work in the early years, my marriages, my personal relationships, my own need at times to escape or seek the love from others I felt lacking from my Dad and also from self…but thanks to this new project and the wonderful people I’ve met in the process of working on it, I’m recognizing that the boxes we allow  to confine us aren’t restricted only to women.  Men have them too and as limited as I often allow myself to feel by our culture’s female stereotypes, the shackles that restrain men are as powerful and debilitating as those that restrain us.

I only now  beginning to understand and gently accept his humanness…the pull he felt to be a man, a father, provide for his family and how scary it might have been watching your child suffer…feeling unequipped because you were…because men after all, at least in his generation were supposed to be strong, capable and completely stoic and sufficient.

via Running Mates USA – My Father.

Northern Lights, aurora borealis,  bucket list, CO: I saw this post from Jack. Since seeing the Northern Lights is on my bucket list, I would love to be in CO last week.  Unfortunately, it snowed that night.

 Aurora Borealis seen in Greenland.

It seems the entire state is abuzz about going towards the light.

The Northern Lights may still be visible in Colorado Thursday evening, but as darkness fell skygazers tried to remain optimistic amid forecasts that clouds might block the view or that the solar storm that causes the lights might not have been as intense as predicted.

Any chance to see the the aurora borealis as far south as Colorado is very rare. And the possibility comes thanks to impeccable timing, said Joe Kunches, a forecaster with the federal Space Weather Prediction Center.

via Northern Lights show still possible in Colorado after sundown – The Denver Post.

Chicago, snow in the city, LOL:

<img class="aligncenter" alt="Working on some KNIGHT Dibs… </p><br /><br /><br />
<p>(don’t worry, I’ll show myself out)</p><br /><br /><br />
<p>—via rhyank” src=”http://31.media.tumblr.com/92ac26dbf9e3667b76e80d0235b2b3bd/tumblr_mz2cxmYR4x1qgkpcgo1_1280.jpg&#8221; />Jan 8, 201411 notes #chicago #dibs #chicagodibs #snow #parking

So, some asshat parks in the spot you clearly shoveled out and dibs-ed with a lawn chair — do you A) slash his tires, B) light his car on fire, or C) write a passive-aggressive note that makes him feel really terrible? You think it\’s the car-on-fire thing, but you\’re not totally sure, are you? Thankfully, the fine folks at the Chicago Dibs Tumblr are, which\’s why we hit them up to help us put together an official rule sheet for every Chicagoan\’s favorite spot-saving pastime.

via Chicago Parking Dibs – The Unwritten Rules – Thrillist Chicago.

Calendar, Barbara Brown Taylor, Myers Park Baptist Church,  October 17-19 2014:  Calendar item!

A little preview of Barbara Brown Taylor, coming to MPBC October 17-19, 2014!

“Reverence may take all kinds of forms, depending on what it is that awakens awe in you by reminding you of your true size… Nature is full of things bigger and more powerful than human beings, including but not limited to night skies, oceans, thunderstorms, deserts, grizzly bears, earthquakes, and rain-swollen rivers. But size is not everything. Properly attended to, even a salt marsh mosquito is capable of evoking reverence. See those white and black striped stockings on legs thinner than a needle? Where in those legs is there room for knees? And yet see how they bend, as the bug lowers herself to your flesh. Soon you and she will be blood kin. Your itch is the price of her life. Swat her if you must, but not without telling her she is beautiful first.”

from An Altar in the World, p. 22

Save the date for Barbara Brown Taylor at MPBC, October 17-19, 2014!

via Myers Park Baptist Church.

Christie Controversy,  Political Scandals,  Washington Wire – WSJ:  I.m waiting for the memes.

In this case, as Slate’s John Dickerson notes, there already was a sense that Gov. Christie could be a bit of a bully.That means that it’s harder for the politician at the controversy’s center to skirt around it because it fits into a perception for which the groundwork already was laid in voters’ minds. Thus, it was hard for President Bill Clinton to move past the Monica Lewinsky scandal because it played directly into a pre-existing perception that he was a little loose on the marital fidelity front. Similarly, Republican candidate Mitt Romney was deeply damaged by comments suggesting he didn’t care about the opinions of 47% of Americans who didn’t like his economic policies because those comments, however fairly or unfairly they were characterized, seemed to confirm a sense among many voters that he was a bit of a wealthy elitist.

via The Christie Controversy and Lessons on What Feeds Political Scandals – Washington Wire – WSJ

 Maimonides by Moshe Halbertal, Book Review, WSJ.com:

Scholars often divide Maimonides intellectual work in two: first, his efforts at codifying Jewish law, which previously existed mainly in the vast and often unresolved legal discussions in the 63 tractates of the Talmud; second, his philosophical writing that reconciles the science of his time with his Jewish and by extension, all monotheistic faith. Mr. Halbertals achievement here is that he presents these two projects as a single one: a bold attempt by Maimonides to make sense of faith for an educated audience in an advanced civilization.

via Book Review: Maimonides by Moshe Halbertal – WSJ.com.

13
Oct
13

10.13.13 … on the bus … what does the brat pack have to do with it? …

Happy birthday to my Mom earlier this month.  🙂

I made my usual trip on the bus, on MY bus. And it was absolutely delightful trip.  I ventured down and was able to read and play on the computer on my way down.

When I got “home,”  I  had dinner with my mom on Tim’s patio. Tim was the former manager at the community, and he died at young age;  they named the patio after him. The patio is probably my favorite place to eat when the temperature is just right. We enjoyed an evening with a another couple. This coupled warned us that they were not talkative. My mom and I both looked each other all knowingly. We knew we could fill in the gaps of any quiet couple. So we got them talking about Africa and Sudoku puzzles, and by the end of the evening, we had a delightful conversation. It was a wonderful birthday.

The next morning we ran errands and had lunch with my brother and his family at in this Prime, a steak and sushi restaurant.  I chuckle because my mother will never add sushi to her repertoire of food items.

After that we ventured home and relaxed, and then went down for dinner and bingo. At bingo, we won $60 on a $20 investment. Not bad!

The next day, we again just spent time together and then headed out for dinner with the extended adult clan where at the dinner table we discussed such significant issues as our favorite scenes in movies. Mine was closing scene of Dirty Dancing. Then we discussed those situations where you’re watching a movie with  an audience, such as your grandparents, and it is not appropriate. We noted several, including Bull Durham and Flashdance.

via ▶ Dirty Dancing – Time of my Life (Final Dance) – High Quality – YouTube.

The end of that evening was the beginning of the end of the Braves. It was the first game of the series and it was a disaster. It was interesting because my mother was such a fan that it made me realize that I was really not a significant van and contrast.  Afterwards we watched Downton Abbey, a better use of our time.

And then I returned on the bus …


where I watched several episodes of  …

 Photo

Trivia fact:  Did you know that Elizabeth McGovern/Lady Cora was part of the Brat Pack?  And speaking of the Brat Pack, Dirty Dancing is a classic Brat Pack film.  🙂

The Brat Pack is an unofficial group of young actors in the 1980s who appeared in several teen-oriented comedies and romantic comedies and were dubbed as a group due to their popularity, hipness and frequent appearances together. The name is a play on the on the name Rat Pack, which was an official group in the 1960s. The actors who are frequently listed as members of the Brat Pack are:

Kevin Bacon

Matthew Broderick

Tom Cruise

Jon Cryer

John Cusack

Matt Dillon

Robert Downey, Jr.

Emilio Estevez

Jami Gertz

Jennifer Grey

Anthony Michael Hall

C. Thomas Howell

Diane Lane

Rob Lowe

Mary Stuart Masterson

Andrew McCarthy

Elizabeth McGovern

Demi Moore

Judd Nelson

Molly Ringwald

Ally Sheedy

Charlie Sheen

James Spader

Kiefer Sutherland

Patrick Swayze

Mare Winningham

via Brat Pack – The TV IV.

11
Aug
13

8.11.13 … working on the MegaBus … mausoleums … first McNugget 30 years ago … America and Elvis Presley… Les Schtroumpfs … The Dwarf House … internet yoga/internet Thoreau

MegaBus, PowerPoint, MARTA:  Last Wednesday, I hit the road again, the MegaBus road.  I maneuvered a single seat. I felt guilty.  There is something about the people dynamics on the bus that is interesting.  I used the bus time to work in my first PowerPoint presentation, and I got a lot a lot done.  I may need to ride a few more trips to finish up.  I’ve added a new public transportation piece.  Unfortunately this time I did not time it well and had to wait for the #25 MARTA bus at Lenox Station … I had timed trip perfectly last time … This trip … Not so much.  Still, thank you MegaBus and MARTA.

mausoleum, Word of the Day, kith/kin:  This word brings up a favorite family story about my middle child.  I never thought to ask the source of the the word “mausoleum.”

Photo: The word mausoleum derives from the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus in modern Turkey, the grave of King Mausolus, built between 353 and 350 BCE. They have been popular throughout history as a way to honor the deceased. In the 19th century, mausolea were common features in rural garden cemeteries like Oakland. Visit some of our 55 mausolea on the Art and Architecture of Death tour at 6:30pm, or pay a visit earlier in the day for our overview tours at 10am, 2, or 4pm. (photo on Instagram by nicolethurmansnow)

The word mausoleum derives from the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus in modern Turkey, the grave of King Mausolus, built between 353 and 350 BCE. They have been popular throughout history as a way to honor the deceased. In the 19th century, mausolea were common features in rural garden cemeteries like Oakland. Visit some of our 55 mausolea on the Art and Architecture of Death tour at 6:30pm, or pay a visit earlier in the day for our overview tours at 10am, 2, or 4pm. (photo on Instagram by nicolethurmansnow)

30 Things Turning 30 , 1983, cultural icons,  first McNugget, the D.A.R.E. program,  the first modern incarnation of the Internet, Mental Floss: !983 was not a big year in my life, but it seems to have be in terms of cultural icons in my life.

Though we often forget it in favor of its younger and more popular sibling (1984), 1983 was a banner year for American culture: It is the birth year of the first McNugget, the D.A.R.E. program, and the first modern incarnation of the Internet. So if you’re turning 30 this year, you’re not alone—here are 30 things to celebrate with.

via 30 Things Turning 30 This Year | Mental Floss.

Political Humor,  America, Elvis Presley, analogy, John Oliver: America is Elvis Presley:

Photo: Shared by Political Humorvia Political Humor.

Smurfs, corporate law: I am probably one of the few people who have a “legal” connection to the Smurfs … In the late 80’s and 90’s I did legal work for a theme park operator that had a license with The Smurfs owners.  It was always fun to work on the Smurf contract.  🙂

Photo: I am probably one of the few people who have a "legal" connection to the Smurfs ...

For the 1981 series, see The Smurfs (TV series). For the 2011 film, see The Smurfs (film).

The Smurfs

Les Schtroumpfs

The Smurfs (French: Les Schtroumpfs) is a Belgian comic and television franchise centred on a group of Smurfs: small blue fictional creatures that live in mushrooms. The Smurfs were first created and introduced as a series of comic characters by the Belgian comics artist Peyo (pen name of Pierre Culliford) in 1958. The word “Smurf” is the original Dutch translation of the French “Schtroumpf”, which, according to Peyo, is a word invented during a meal with fellow cartoonist André Franquin, when he could not remember the word salt.[3] There are more than one hundred Smurfs, whose names are based on adjectives that emphasize their characteristics, e.g. “Jokey Smurf”, who likes to play practical jokes on his fellow smurfs, “Clumsy Smurf”, who has a habit of creating havoc unintentionally, and “Smurfette”—the first female Smurf to be introduced in the series. The Smurfs wear Phrygian caps, which represented freedom in Roman times.[citation needed]

The Smurf franchise began as a comic and expanded into advertising, movies, TV series, ice capades, video games, theme parks, and dolls.

via The Smurfs – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

The Dwarf House, Chick-fil-A,, Woodstock GA:  We went to a s

it-down, dine-in,  order off the menu Chick-fil-A, called The Dwarf House … No joke. — at Woodstock.  The vegetables on my vegetable plate were quite good.

Company Overview

It all started in 1946, when Truett Cathy opened his first restaurant, Dwarf Grill, in Hapeville, Georgia. Credited with inventing Chick-fil-A’s boneless breast of chicken sandwich, Mr. Cathy founded Chick-fil-A, Inc. in the early 1960s and pioneered the establishment of restaurants in shopping malls with the opening of the first Chick-fil-A Restaurant at a mall in suburban Atlanta in 1967

via Chick-fil-A: Company Fact Sheet.

Dwarf House®: Truett’s original, full-service Restaurants offer an extensive menu and provide customers a choice of table service, walk-up counter service or a drive-thru window. Eleven Chick-fil-A Dwarf House restaurants currently operate in the metro Atlanta area.

via Chick-fil-A: Company Fact Sheet.

CS Lewis, James Howell, choices, joy/peace/knowledge/power, anxiety/rage/impotence/loneliness: Thanks, james for the quote!

Sunday’s sermon probably will include this insight from C.S. Lewis: “Every time you make a choice you are turning the central part of you, the part of you that chooses, into something a little different from what it was before. And taking your life as a whole, with all your innumerable choices, all your life long you are slowly turning this central thing either into a heavenly creature or a hellish creature, either into joy, peace, knowledge and power, or anxiety, rage, impotence, and loneliness. Each of us at each moment is progressing to the one state or the other.”

internet, the good and the bad, yoga online, Thoreau:  Resources …

Online Yoga Classes Aid Busy Schedules – WSJ.com.

Simplify Your Tech Life, Thoreau-Style – WSJ.com.

27
Jul
13

7.27.13 … another MegaBus fan … Zombie Marie Curie … re Paula Deen: “It points to the fact that race is at the heart of Southern food and you can’t avoid it.”

MegaBus: So somebody else is a MegaBus fan!

Megabus is a cheap way to get from city to city.

The Megabus describes itself as a “safe, convenient, low cost, daily express bus service that offers city-to-city travel … in luxury single and double-decker buses.” Not only are the buses comfortable, but Megabus provides free wi-fi and an electrical socket while you are traveling down the highway. Did I mention they have a bathroom on board, too? This means no pit stops like you waste time doing when traveling by car.

The bus departs from Charlotte Transportation Center at three different times each day and arrives at Union Station in the middle of DC in about seven and a half hours, including pick-up spots in Raleigh and Richmond, and a 30-minute food pit-stop.

My round trip ticket to Washington, DC cost $70. I chose the 10pm bus and arrived in Union Station at 5:30 the next morning. I had two seats, so after checking my email, I laid down on the extra seat, curled up in my blanket, and slept the whole way. No security lines at the airport, no swearing at other cars in traffic jams, and no baggage claim.

via No car? No problem! | DavidsonNews.net Guide.

Paula Deen, Mrs. Charles, history, Southern Culture, Southern Cooking, NYTimes.com:  This is not looking good … but is this broad statement, “It points to the fact that race is at the heart of Southern food and you can’t avoid it,” true?  I think this  limits the Southern cook.

“It points to the fact that race is at the heart of Southern food and you can’t avoid it.”

Mrs. Charles realizes that her time with Paula Deen is over, and that she will soon leave her kitchen. But the relationship will always be there.

“I still have to be her friend if I’m God’s child,” she said. “I might feed her with a long-handled spoon, but, yeah, I’m still her friend.”

via Paula Deen’s Cook Tells of Slights, Steeped in History – NYTimes.com.

Zombie Marie Curie:  “Zombie Marie Curie” — a fun and thoughtful look at women and science from cartoonist Randall Munroe of xkcd.

via Facebook.

16
Jul
13

7.16.13 … on kindness and the MegaBus …

MegaBus, kindness:  Well, I learn a little about myself each time I ride, so I get a lot for my $1 … immediately made me think of an earlier post on kindness. From yesterday’s ride …

Well, my bus is becoming less enjoyable. This one was filled with large people who think nothing of encroaching on their neighbor’s personal space … That would be my space.

Also there was a breast-feeding mom and her little one sitting across from me. I have nothing against breast-feeding moms, but I don’t like to travel with them and their little ones. Why? They are often fussier and need to eat more often. I find it a private matter, and on a bus, there is no privacy. Cute baby.

In the end, I enjoyed my neighbor .. She is new to Charlotte and helps at risk kids. She wore me down with her kindness and we spent the last hour chatting. Yes, I feel unkind for judging.

But I am home … Door to door in 6 hours at a cost of $1 plus $2.50 for MARTA. I played 12 games of Sudoku and read a chapter of a book … I’ll keep riding the bus for now.

Here is my earlier post on kindness:

just a thought …, Henri Nouwen, Tolstoi, kindness:

Here is the great challenge: All people, whatever their color, religion, or sex, belong to humankind and are called to be kind to one another, treating one another as brothers and sisters. There is hardly a day in our lives in which we are not called to this.

via Daily Meditation: Becoming Kind.

Nothing can make our lives, or the lives of other people, more beautiful than perpetual kindness. – Leo Tolstoy in A Calendar of Wisdom

via Nothing can make our lives, or the lives of other… • literary jukebox.

via 2.4.13 … Becoming Kind … | Dennard’s Clipping Service.

Maria Popova (@brainpicker)

6/25/13, 9:41 PM

“In the long run, the sharpest weapon of all is a kind and gentle spirit.” Anne Frank’s diary, 66 years ago today j.mp/148Ejzz

via Dennard Lindsey Teague.

13
Jul
13

7.13.13 … Wheels on the bus …

Wheels on the bus …

I arrived at 6:38, and the bus driver was about to shut the door .. And did … then I tapped on the window.

The driver shook her head and informed me that bus left at 6:30, and she was not going to be late because if me. I apologized, but reminded her that the  bus did not leave until 6:45. She finally opened the door … I asked her what time I needed to be there in order to get on the 6:45 bus because that should be the scheduled bus departure time or clearly posted. After this uncomfortable banter, it was now only 6:42 which I showed her, and she began to be a little more pleasant.

Given that I am reading about the Montgomery Bus Boycotts of the civil rights era…I can sense how powerless blacks felt when those in power drew an arbitrary but fluid seating line in the bus. My driver’s line is not arbitrary … 6:30, but she is dead wrong because the bus schedule says 6:45,  and she wanted to pick a fight with me. Why?

My companion at the table is a 6 ft 6 man moving from NC to Dallas. He has been up 23 hours and smells horrendous. He is a part time psychic reader, part time computer repairman and now has a new carrer. He is is moving to Dallas for a job with security with the Cowboys. He has recently lost 75 pounds, down from 425. He has $20 left. I am not sure I believe him … However, I am using my calming techniques to be kind …

Pleasant ride other than the driver and the companion.

I’ll stop and smell the roses when I arrive! — at I 85 North Clemson South Carolina.

 

01
Jul
13

7.1.13 … Wheels on the bus …

Wheels on the bus …  Driver to the 20 something  who was staking a claim to two seats … “Baby you can’t have your legs up on the seat like that, not on my bus.”  Ms Massey is my driver.




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