Posts Tagged ‘men

21
Oct
11

10.21.2011 … Buttery and Beanery … hasn’t changed a bit …

places, Buttery & Beanery: John and I ventured to Davidson and dined at the Buttery and Beanery – ‎”A Convenient Store & Restaurant”!!! Funny … not a “convenience store” but a “convenient store.” 🙂

cities: “Ecosystems outlast organisms.”

In modern times, it’s almost unheard of for a city to run out of steam, to disappear or to become obsolete. It happens to companies all the time. They go out of business, fail, merge, get bought and disappear.

What’s the difference?

It’s about control and the fringes.

Corporations have CEOs, investors and a disdain for failure. Because they fear failure, they legislate behavior that they believe will avoid it.

Cities, on the other hand, don’t regulate what their citizens do all day (they might prohibit certain activities, but generally, market economies permit their citizens to fail all they like).

This failure at the fringes, this deviant behavior, almost always leads to failure. Except when it doesn’t.

Ecosystems outlast organisms.

via Seth’s Blog: Cities don’t die (but corporations do).

Moammar Gaddafi, dictator, vanity: wigs?

The long, strange tale of Moammar Gaddafi is at an end, after the former Libyan leader was shot and killed in his hometown of Sirte Thursday.

At the hospital, Libyan officials ran a number of tests, including on hair samples for DNA, to prove the identity of the dictator who had been on the run for the last two months. The hair was not Moammar Gaddafi’s. The slain leader was wearing a wig.

via Gaddafi’s wig: A dictator undone by vanity? – BlogPost – The Washington Post.

Al Gore, Steve Jobs, Tim Cook, Apple’s Board: Good advice … “Don’t ask what Steve would have done. Follow your own voice.”

Jobs, Gore reminded the audience, had become a Disney board member after selling his Pixar animation shop. “He used to talk initially about how after Walt Disney died, the company always got in trouble about asking ‘what would Walt do in this situation?’” Gore said. “And he made it very clear — ‘I don’t want that at Apple.’ He made it clear to Tim Cook and everyone else, ‘Don’t ask what Steve would have done. Follow your own voice.’”

via Al Gore on Steve Jobs, Tim Cook and Apple’s Board (Video) – Peter Kafka – AsiaD – AllThingsD.

Vice President Joe Biden, absurd claims, fact checkers, journalism: As I have said before, I love the fact checker articles … useful with regard to both parties.

More important than the raw figures is the rate per 100,000 individuals. Murder did go up—though the rate did not double from 2009 to 2010, as Biden claimed. But rape has gone down. Biden actually asserted it had tripled.

Biden’s office referred us to officials in Flint. After inquiries from The Fact Checker, Dawn Jones, a spokeswoman for Flint’s mayor, issued a statement from Public Safety Director Chief Alvern Lock saying: “The City of Flint stands behind the crime statistics provided to the Office of The Vice President….This information is the most accurate data and demonstrates the rise in crime associated with the economic crisis and the reduced staffing levels.”

The statement said the murder rate for 2010 was different than the FBI statistics because of a “clerical error” when the data was submitted to the FBI. (Someone in the police department forgot to add people to the murder rate if they died long after the assault.) But the revised number for the FBI will be 58 murders, not Biden’s figure of 65, because the FBI only counts willful homicides, not manslaughter and negligent homicide, Jones said.

The statement, however, was strangely silent on the massive discrepancy in the rape statistics. There have been a number of studies (see here and here) that document that the FBI statistics do not capture all forms of rape. The FBI stats include forcible intercourse but not oral sex or other forms of sexual assault.

But that issue does not explain why Biden’s rape statistics would be so much higher than what was reported in the local press over the years. The Flint Journal on May 24, in fact, reported the number of rapes had declined in the city from 2009 to 2010.

via Biden’s absurd claims about rising rape and murder rates – The Fact Checker – The Washington Post.

Facebook, student grades: Interesting analysis …

Mr. Junco found a direct relationship between site use and out-of-class sociability: the more time a student spent on Facebook, the more likely that student was to be involved with extracurricular activities.

Meanwhile — contradicting the zero-sum logic of some who might believe that a minute spent social networking is a minute spent not attending to schoolwork — the study found no substantive link between time spent on Facebook and time spent studying.

Mr. Junco said in an e-mail that he was surprised by the fact that the number of times a student checked Facebook each day was only weakly related to academic performance.

“This tells me that spending an inordinate amount of time on Facebook is related to negative outcomes, while just checking Facebook for a few minutes each time is not,” he wrote.

via Facebook’s Impact on Student Grades – NYTimes.com.

brain development, exercise: “Miracle-Gro for the brain.”

Dr. John Ratey has discovered that exercise releases a special brain-nourishing protein – something he calls “Miracle-Gro for the brain.” The research means that exercise has added benefits for adults, but also for children and learning at school. We’ll find out how increasing physical activity before and during school can help kids improve their grades, lower their anxiety levels and keep them healthy all at the same time.

(Originally Aired: 4/14/2011)

via WFAE 90.7 FM.

recipes – biscuits: Great biscuits to me are not fluffy … but it is definitely worth trying to make some.

There are biscuits, and then there are biscuits. Whether you like to savor them solo with honey and butter, paired with ultra-crunchy fried chicken, or slathered with sausage gravy (hello, breakfast!), they can be the sleeper hit of any meal. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to make fluffy, picture-perfect biscuits—as well as to gather appeals for seconds from everyone at the table.

via Secrets to Perfect Biscuits | The Feed.

apps, exercise: An exercise app …

Everyone knows that fitness is a worthy end unto itself, but that doesn’t mean that many people don’t need a little extra motivation. Enter Nexercise, an iPhone app that brings a dose of gamification to the world of fitness, with medals, discounts and even free merchandise offered as rewards for physical activity.

Now available in the iTunes store, Nexercise rewards users for walking, running, aerobics, yardwork, dancing, or any physical activity that lasts at least 15 minutes. Users begin by telling Nexercise what activity they’re about to start, and with their phone somewhere on their body, they then go ahead and do it. When they’re done, they hit a button to notify Nexercise, which verifies the activity has taken place via the motion of the device. In return, users earn rewards such as points and medals — with bonus points awarded for exercising with a friend — as well as discounts on a variety of products and services. The more points a user amasses, the better the deals become, and at the end of every month there’s a grand prize. Users can also check into gyms, view their exercise history, and compete against friends added to the app’s friend list via a connection with Facebook and Twitter.

via App turns exercise into a game, with rewards for healthy activity | Springwise.

Steve Jobs, Android, President Obama, modern medicine: If nothing else, he was opinionated … “I’m going to destroy Android. I’m willing to go thermonuclear war on this.”

The Associated Press reported that Jobs, an eternal competitor, was reportedly furious after Google introduced its Android operating system, calling it a stolen product. “I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple’s $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong,” he reportedly said. “I’m going to destroy Android. I’m willing to go thermonuclear war on this.”

While Apple and Google had enjoyed a close partnership before the Android launch, Jobs reportedly told Google chairman Eric Schmidt that he had no interest in settling Apple’s lawsuit over the system. Android is now the world’s dominant smartphone platform.

Excerpts of the book obtained by the Huffington Post run over Jobs’ relationship with the current administration. According to the report, Jobs told Obama that he was “headed for a one-term presidency” and criticized the president for not being business friendly. Still, Jobs reportedly offered to help Obama with his advertising but knocked heads with senior aide David Axelrod.

In a short preview of an interview with the book’s author posted by CBS, Isaacson said that Jobs regretted his decision to delay surgery that could have prevented his pancreatic cancer from spreading. Jobs had a rare form of pancreatic cancer that could be treated with surgery.

When Isaacson asked Jobs why he chose to treat his cancer with alternative medicine before consenting to surgery, Jobs told him that he “didn’t want my body to be opened…I didn’t want to be violated in that way.” It’s not clear if delaying the surgery truly would have made a difference in the end, the Associated Press reported, but doctors did say that Jobs waited a “significant period” of time before accepting the recommended treatment.

via Steve Jobs bio: His thoughts on Android, Obama and modern medicine – The Washington Post.

websites: This is useful … It checks to see if a site is still valid … but why not just put the address in the browser. Is It Old?.

“Ms.”, history: I remember my dad ranting about women who used “Ms.” It is such a non-issue today.

Ms. was suggested as a marriage-neutral honorific as early as 1901 and periodically in the years thereafter, but it never got any traction until about 1970. And with all the success that it has enjoyed since then, it’s easy to forget the resistance it met when it was first widely put forward, in the months before the magazine’s launch.

My wife was cleaning out a closet the other day and came across an issue of the Wellesley College News dated October 21, 1971—precisely 40 years ago, it now strikes me. It contains a truly remarkable letter from the president of the college, Ruth Adams (1914-2004), which I am delighted to quote nearly in full:

I read with a certain horror your lead editorial of October 14.

I consequently make this request of you: when it is necessary for you to include my name in a news story or editorial, may I be referred to either as Miss Adams or as Ruth Adams, please.

I deplore the use of the depersonalizing, degrading, and meaningless Ms. When mail comes into my house bearing that appellation, I rate it as slightly more consequential than that mail which comes addressed either to “Occupant” or “Resident.” The destination of both categories is immediately the wastepaper basket. If a correspondent cannot display the interest, intelligence, and courtesy of determining the maiden or married state of someone to whom he [sic] is writing, the correspondence is of no value. …

I rather like my maiden status and wish to have it indicated when I am identified publicly. I indeed was of the generation that was brought up believing that a married woman was referred to by her husband’s name, and only when she was translated into widowhood was she properly identified by her given name together with her married name.

Autre temps, autre meurs!

So, with this plea that I may retain the identity with which I have lived, lo, these many years, herewith my request to be identified as Miss Adams or Ruth Adams but not as that nullity which is Ms.

Seriously, there are so many important and consequential aspects involved in our attempts properly to define and identify women this cause is trivial in comparison and leaves you vulnerable to patronizing laughter.

The use of maiden is worthy of note. Also, translated into widowhood.

I was reminded of Miss Adams’s sentiments recently while listening to an NPR segment about efforts in France to get rid of the term mademoiselle. There wasn’t a push for a Ms.-like term, merely a move for all adult females to be referred to as madame. The reporter talked to a 45-year-old woman in the street whose comment shows how far this particular campaign has to go: “As long as no one calls me ‘monsieur,’ I’m fine. Anyway, we naturally refer to an older, unmarried woman as ‘madame.’ And if you you’re married but don’t look your age, you might get called ‘mademoiselle.’ It’s flattering one way and less so the other, but that’s life.”

via Ms., 40 Years On – Lingua Franca – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

One Scene, websites, film critique, Brazil: Another one that caught my attention.

Barely a scene, this is one of those thankless transitions that shows how our protagonist gets from point A to point B. It doesn’t really advance the narrative or reveal new information about characters. In old-timey screenwriting parlance, it’s just “shoe leather.”

But look at this leather!

The intro of Sam Lowry’s vehicle is old-school Monty Python hilarious, but I’ll never forget the revelation of Shangri-La Towers, which is at first really funny and then almost immediately kind of depressing. Talk about world building. Even when the different elements of the filmmaking seem to be operating at cross-purposes, the jaunty score, battered set design, and sumptuous cinematography somehow work in concert to make this absurd future feel not just plausible but likely. And that poster behind the kids looks like it was stolen from 2011.

This entire little journey could have been handled with a cheaper/easier/saner dissolve, but instead, like with every scene in Brazil, we get something epic and unexpected and beautiful.

via One Scene: Brazil – From the Current – The Criterion Collection.

spaces, cooking, tiny kitchens, kith/kin: Our favorite house had a tiny kitchen … my daughter loved that house and swears she will never have a big house. Tiny spaces can make for great kitchens.

I turned to Shaun Hill, chef at the Michelin-starred restaurant the Walnut Tree. Before moving to his current roomy premises, Hill ran Merchant House in Ludlow from a 3m by 2m domestic-sized kitchen. In this space he singlehandedly whipped up Michelin-starred meals for up to 24 diners (with four choices). When he decided to move on, no other chef was brave enough to take on the tiny kitchen and he had to turn Merchant House back into, well, a house.

So what did he learn? “When I started there, I had been cooking for a thousand years and you have in mind ideas for what you would like to make, but it doesn’t necessarily work in the space. Quite a few things didn’t work – anything that required too many pans.” But, he promises, there are definite advantages. “It concentrates the mind. There are fewer things to turn into a disaster zone, and it doesn’t take hours to clean – you have to tidy as you go, so you can use the same space for whatever’s next.”

Mark Bittman is equally sure that size should not be an issue. When the food writer was pictured in his former kitchen in the New York Times, readers demanded to know how he created anything in such an inadequate space – which he finds hilarious. “People all over the world make do with a hotplate and nothing else, and they do fine. I’ve never felt oppressed by my small kitchen.” Instead, he points out, cooking is less tiring when everything is within reaching distance.

via Size shouldn’t matter: tiny kitchens | Life and style | The Guardian.

“Whispering windows”, marketing, technology, 24/7:

Whispering windows have been a favorite of advertisers and marketeers for a few years now. The windows are equipped with speakers and programmed to emit sounds or speech as passers by walk past the built in sensors. Often they are designed to entice or create intrigue for those on the street, but the windows installed in South African 8ta stores are adding a new level of functionality to the technology by enabling customers to browse the store’s catalogue throughout the day and night.

8ta is a mobile brand from South African Telkom that operates numerous stores selling the latest devices and services. Aiming to make a visit to their stores a sensory-rich experience for shoppers, the brand has tapped One Digital Media for a variety of technological elements. The stores’ whispering window technology “turns store windows into glass window speakers, creating a unique way to deliver messages throughout or around your store,” as One Digital Media explains. However, the windows differ from similar whispering window examples we’ve seen recently; their innovative use of through-glass touch technology allows customers to browse through a store catalogue after hours, even requesting a callback when the store reopens. Also included in 8ta stores are large video walls showcasing 8ta’s latest commercials and handset deals, as well as “pick ‘n watch” screens that allow customers to interact with and learn more about the different mobile phone models. Touch tables, meanwhile, are on hand to detail and compare all the handsets available.

Bricks and mortar may still play a key role in many product categories, but that doesn’t mean physical stores can’t borrow elements from the best of the online shopping experience — including the ability to deliver multimedia messages and product information 24/7. Other retailers around the globe: be inspired!

via ‘Whispering windows’ let stores interact with shoppers 24/7 | Springwise.

animals, animal behavior: I definitely believe animal’s feel.

But why should our inability to measure these phenomena mean that they don’t exist at all? That’s exactly what scientist and animal advocate Jonathan Balcombe explores in The Exultant Ark: A Pictorial Tour of Animal Pleasure — an absolutely remarkable and fascinating journey into the rich, tender and complex emotional lives of animals.

Balcombe examines a new generation of research on animal feelings, especially animal pleasure, illustrated with joyful images of the animal kingdom by some of the world’s leading wildlife photographers. The story unfolds with equal parts affectionate enthusiasm and scientific rigor, extending a gentle invitation to reexamine our relationship with living beings, reaching for more kindness, more empathy and more wholeheartedness in how we think of and treat other animals.

Nobody denies that other humans are sentient, though it’s no more possible to prove another human being is sentient than it is to prove an animal’s sentience. We don’t accept such solipsism. It would be far-fetched. So let’s stop drawing this line between humans and all other animals.” ~ Jonathan Balcombe

via The Exultant Ark: The Secret Emotional Lives of Animals | Brain Pickings.

gender stereotyping, men:

The human male is in crisis. Or at least he must be, given the recurring themes in this season’s crop of new TV shows. Apparently the networks have sensed something in the zeitguyst that cries out for reassurance, and they have scampered to oblige. Oh, sorry, men don’t scamper. They stride purposefully. And network TV’s recent purposeful steps include the following:

How to Be a Gentleman, about a prissy fop destined to be made into a real man (CBS);

Man Up, about three grown men feeling like they’re anything but (ABC);

Last Man Standing, in which Tim Allen angrily defends traditional masculinity from the encroaching forces of femininity and metrosexuality (ABC).

Here now is where I trot out my man bona fides. Yes, I like to grill meat and drink beer. I also like to play video games, and I share an interest in some of the media aimed at my seven-year-old son. I also love my cats, have had long talks with my son about feelings, and one time in the housewares section he asked my wife if she thought I wanted a new vacuum cleaner (I was uncertain about switching to a bagless model, but it’s working out well).

via Jeff Alexander on The Gender Stereotyping of Man Shows | TIME Ideas | TIME.com.

dictators, class: Dictators and classy don’t seem to mix?

When you’re the ruthless autocrat of an oppressed country, chances are your inside coterie consists entirely of yes men. And yes men are notoriously unreliable judges of taste — especially when their boss has a reputation for executing those who don’t mesh with their personal sense of … um … style. You know, for example, that no one was willing to give Libyan leader Col. Muammar Gaddafi pointers in aesthetics when he decided he wanted a huge golden fist crushing an enemy fighter jet to grace a courtyard inside his compound in Tripoli — as seen here after rebels seized the compound in late August 2011. Classy!

via What Dictators Consider Classy – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

Arab Spring, Tunisia, democracy: Democracy is not going to be easy. “From dictatorship to democracy in less than nine months: Tunisia remains not only the seedbed of the Arab Spring but its model.”

But Harrath is referring to his native Tunisia, the country that lit the touch paper for the uprisings that toppled the regimes of its larger neighbors to the East. Its revolution, sparked by the death of a fruit seller in Sidi Bouzid, was quick, almost clinical, taking barely a month to sweep President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali from power. Tunisia’s democracy is also blooming before others in the region, with elections called for this Sunday, Oct. 23. From dictatorship to democracy in less than nine months: Tunisia remains not only the seedbed of the Arab Spring but its model.

And that model may prove uncomfortable for the western countries that have hailed the uprisings and joined the public denunciations of regimes with whom they until recently did business. An Islamist party Ennahdha is topping the polls as Tunisians prepare to select a Constituent Assembly to pen the country’s new constitution and set up its transitional government. Tunisians living abroad have already been invited to cast their ballots. Their ranks include exiles whose mistreatment, not only by the Tunisian authorities but by storied democracies and institutions that might have been expected to protect them, informs their worldview.

via A Tunisian Islamist in Exile Expresses His Hopes Ahead of Oct. 23 Election – Global Spin – TIME.com.

Facebook, LOL: Facebook Voicemails from my Mom – YouTube.

19
Aug
11

8.19.2011 … last weekend of summer according to the academic calendar …

history, national parks, national military parks, GA:  I found this surprising … I wonder why they chose these two?

August 19, 1890

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park became the first national military park in the United States.

via Atlanta History Center, August 19, 1890.

culture, men, happiness:  How many agree with this?  After traveling in France with my spouse, I would not include medieval cathedrals on the list of cultural activities that reduce stress and make “my man” happy and satisfied.

Men who enjoy taking in the ballet or browsing art museums are more likely to be happy with their lives and satisfied with their health than men who don’t enjoy the finer things in life, a new study finds.

And although greater enjoyment of cultural activities is associated with higher income, the arts have a beneficial effect regardless of other factors that might influence health and happiness, including socioeconomic status.

The results suggest that encouraging cultural participation may be one way to encourage healthfulness, the authors reported online May 23 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. [ Amazing Art & Science Images ]

via Artsy, museum-going men are happier, study says – Health – Behavior – msnbc.com.

Jane Austen: …… SHARP ELVES SOCIETY …… Jane Austen’s Shadow Stories.

The Help, movies, race: The amazing thing to me is how “all across the board people are on this movie (and the book).  As I said before, I liked the movie better than the book because the black actresses gave authenticity to the black story and dialogue.

“The Help” is bound to be a hit. Just as readers loved the book, for good reason—its resonant themes transcended its imperfect craftsmanship—audiences starved for substance after a long, dry summer will embrace the movie. They’ll do so not only for the white guilt it addresses, and deftly mitigates, but for the plot’s entertaining contrivances (chief among them a climax of cyclonic uplift), the bonds of love between whites and blacks and a cast of outsize characters that includes Bryce Dallas Howard’s chillingly bigoted Hilly, smiling incessantly and focused on preserving white purity with ever more black-only toilets; and Jessica Chastain’s desperate, white-trashy Celia. Sissy Spacek’s Missus Walters isn’t outsize, she’s just-right-size. Droll in her dottiness, the old dame is devoid of illusions about the hypocrisy that surrounds her.

Much has been made of the author, Ms. Stockett, having given her book’s screen rights to Mr. Taylor, a friend from childhood, and having supported his determination to write and direct the film, even though he hadn’t done a feature before. This speaks well for their friendship, but the director’s inexperience shows when Aibileen and Minny aren’t on screen (and sometimes when they are: Minny’s gleeful revenge plot seems awfully silly). Skeeter’s mother, played by Allison Janney, is a drab construction with an oddly unsatisfying story to tell. Skeeter’s boyfriend is an inconstant cipher, and her book editor in New York is a fleeting caricature of a Jewish liberal, while the caricatures of Hilly’s Junior League cohorts are as vivid as they are unrestrained.

As for Ms. Stone’s Skeeter, she’s the pivotal figure in a coming-of-age story with darkly dramatic overtones; by enlisting the town’s maids in her forbidden literary venture, she’s exposing them as well as herself to great danger. And she’s played by a young actress who has become, in what seems to have been no time flat, one of the most interesting, quick-witted stars in contemporary films. Disappointingly, though, Skeeter remains a device, albeit an attractive one, an earnest learner taking notes with her pencil and pad while “The Help” gets indispensable help from sassy Minny and soulful Aibileen.

via The Help | Senna | 1960s Racism in Black and White – WSJ.com.

Beneath all of these factors, there’s a basic, staring-you-in-the-face element that I think has been responsible for a certain moralistic ire that has greeted The Help. And that is this: Why, in 2011, at a moment when we have our first African-American president, does the most prominent movie of the year to deal with black life in America center on housekeepers and servants from 50 years ago? Is this really an exploration — or is it a kind of genteel, borderline racist nostalgia?

Well, I’d like to testify that if you forget about what The Help looks like it adds up to “on paper,” and if you actually watch what’s up there on screen, what you’ll see is a movie that is tender, biting, honest, surprising, and far, far more curious and morally adventurous about race than many have given it credit for. The key to the film’s power, and its originality, is this: It’s a movie not about taking bold crusader’s stands — which, at this point, wouldn’t be a bold movie to make anyway — but about the low-key, day-to-day, highly ambivalent intimacy of black/white relationships in the Deep South. It’s about what really goes on in middle-class households between the lines of the most seemingly ordinary encounters.

More than that, what’s refreshing about The Help — and this, I think, is what the critics of it have gotten wrong — is that it doesn’t use white characters as a false entry point of identification for the audience. It is, rather, a sprawling ensemble piece that asks everyone in the audience — black and white, women and men — to identify with everyone on screen. That’s the way that Robert Altman’s films used to work. They were tough-minded spectacles of shifting empathy, and The Help, though it lacks Altman’s storytelling magic (it’s prose rather than poetry), isn’t so far removed in spirit from an Altman film. Every woman in it has her own way of looking at the world, and the movie wants you to understand how those viewpoints all jostle and mesh and collide.

via Is ‘The Help’ a condescending movie for white liberals? Actually, the real condescension is calling it that | Inside Movies | EW.com.

In the same year in which The Help is set, Eudora Welty wrote “Where Is the Voice Coming From?” bravely capturing the feelings that were in the air in Jackson that year. They were feelings unspoken by many at the time, just as they were missing on-screen in The Help.

Published in The New Yorker, “Where Is the Voice Coming From?” tells the story of the murder of civil rights activist Medgar Evers from the point of view of his assailant. Welty wrote the story the same night that she learned of Evers’ murder. When she heard the news, it occurred to her that she knew what was going on in the mind of the man who pulled the trigger. She knew because she had lived all of her life where it happened.

“It was the strangest feeling of horror and compulsion all in one,” Welty commented in an interview almost 10 years later. “I just meant by the title that whoever was speaking, I — the writer — knew, was in a position to know, what the murderer must be saying and why.”

via Eudora Welty’s Jackson: ‘The Help’ In Context : NPR.

apps, FBI, child safety:

One helpful tool for parents has been the emergence of ID cards for children that contain everything from descriptive statistics to DNA. Usually, the child carries one and the parents keep one.

This is a great idea, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has just taken it one step further by making an admirable leap into the digital age with its release of an iPhone app called Child ID.

This is the first-ever mobile app released by the FBI. Not only can parents input and store information about their child’s appearance using this app, but they can also send information directly from the app to law enforcement during a crisis.

Kudos to the FBI, but it would be great if the FBI added two additional features to this app: password protection and fingerprint storing capability. A lost or stolen iPhone could put lots of personal info about your child in the wrong hands. A simple password protection would take care of that.

via Child ID: New FBI iPhone App Could Help Keep Kids Safe – ABC News.

food, blogs, recipes:  Never clip hungry 🙂 … first service seems like a waste of money!

Previously we’ve seen food served up alongside books , but now San Francisco-based food and music blog Turntable Kitchen have launched the Turntable Kitchen Pairings Box, “a curated food and music discovery experience”, which is delivered to subscribers’ mailboxes every month.

Turntable Kitchen, or TK, was started by food and music lovers Matthew and Casey, featuring recipes that focus on local and fresh ingredients combined with hand-selected musical pairings and album reviews, with the intention of introducing food lovers to music and vice versa. With the Turntable Kitchen Pairings Box they aim to bring the food and music pairings into people’s homes. For USD 25 a month, shipping included, subscribers will receive a limited-edition 7-inch vinyl single featuring tracks by one of TK’s favorite artists or bands, an exclusive downloadable digital ‘mixtape’ packed with up-and-coming artists, three seasonal recipes, one or two premium dried ingredients, suggested pairings, and tasting notes specific to the package as well as additional surprises. The monthly subscription service will be starting soon, but in the meantime a limited number of boxes can be reserved via their website.

via Monthly food and music pairing package by subscription | Springwise.

 


Asian Herbed Omelet Wraps – Recipe – NYTimes.com
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Crab and Cantaloupe Salad With Ginger and Mint Dressing – Recipe – NYTimes.com
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2012 Presidential Election, Republican Candidates, Mitt Romney, Rick Perry, Michele Bachmann:  I’m not liking what I see … I am beginning to think we need to rethink our primary system.  It promotes extremism and gives a great deal of power to the extremists.

Romney and Perry can both make a credible case that they could be better stewards of the economy than President Obama: Romney thanks to his business experience, and Perry due to Texas’ impressive record on job creation. But both have their weaknesses.

Romney is viewed skeptically by many Tea Partiers and social conservatives, who question his conservatism because he signed an individual mandate-based health care law in Massachusetts and once held moderate positions on abortion and gay rights.

Perry, meanwhile, is untested on a national stage, and he has a closetful of issues that could cause him problems. Among them: His decision to sign an executive order requiring that sixth-grade girls in Texas be vaccinated against the human papilloma virus – to the horror of many social conservatives, who worried that such a vaccination would encourage promiscuity – and his close ties to some fringe evangelical figures, which could turn off moderates.

One advantage Perry brings, however, is his appeal both to the establishment Republicans drawn to Romney and to the social conservatives who drove Bachmann to victory in the straw poll. Bachmann’s narrow win in Iowa gave her candidacy a boost, but it wasn’t enough to put to rest questions about whether her appeal is too limited to make her a serious contender.

via Mitt Romney, Rick Perry, Michele Bachmann and the new GOP presidential landscape – Political Hotsheet – CBS News.

extreme couponing, criminal acts, random:  Another type of extremism …

Extreme couponing is becoming extreme stealing. Bargain hunters across the country are reportedly stealing newspapers for their money-saving coupon inserts. The thieves may have been inspired by the popular show Extreme Couponing on TLC, where p

People save thousands of dollars by coupon clipping. One woman in Arkansas is being charged for stealing 185 copies of her town’s Sunday paper for the coupon inserts. The woman, who is a member of a coupon club, says she didn’t think she was breaking the law because the papers were left outside a grocery store for pick-up.

via ‘Extreme Couponing’ Leads to Arrests, Rapper ‘The Game’ In Trouble With Police Over Tweet, and San Francisco Transit Gets Hacked | Trending Now – Yahoo! News.

culture, dancing, grinding, youth:  Do you remember when people would “grind?”  Can you imagine a 40-year-old doing it!  Don’t understand how this ever got to be mainstream, but it is … we get letters from the school telling us our children will be sent home from dances …

“A guy comes up to you, starts dancing on you, you turn around and you give him one of these [weird faces],” she told “Good Morning America.” “The trick is you don’t say anything the whole time. You stand there, frozen, and don’t change your face.”

With that, the 24-year-old from East Cambridge, Mass., has launched an assault against “grinding,” the type of dirty-style dancing that mimics sex.

“I’m sick and tired of guys thinking that just because I showed up at a club or a dance or a bar, that I want to have their genitalia touching my backside,” Mourey said.

via “Jenna Marbles'” Anti-Dirty Dance: Teens Say No to Grinding – ABC News.

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Nov
10

‎11.8.2010 … wow, PBS’s Sherlock has my head spinning … now I will have to watch the whole series to figure out what happened … studying forgiveness with my ChristCare group … blessed …

Billy Graham, Charlotte, evangelism:  Happy Birthday, Rev. Graham.  It is hard not to know who Billy Graham is if you live in Charlotte.  I frequently drive down Billy Graham Boulevard (on my way to the airport) and by the Billy Graham Library.  His column appears regularly in our paper.  But on my recent trip to South Africa, Simon, our guide in Kruger,  asked me if I knew Billy Graham … knew in the sense of knew who he was … I said yes and told him that Charlotte, my home, was Rev. Graham’s childhood home and the home of his world-wide ministry.  Simon spent several minutes retelling of his multi-day encounter with Rev. Graham as a guide to him, his family and traveling party.  He was touched by Mr. Graham.  And when Rev. Graham left he gave him his “expensive” animal and plant guide … well used and well-worn now.  He truly touched Simon.  Rev. Graham knew Simon and Simon knew Rev. Graham.  I know Rev. Graham a little better now.  If someone who reads this knows how to get a message to Rev. Graham.  Tell him Simon says hello and thank you.

It will be a quiet celebration today in Montreat, as Billy Graham gathers with family to mark his 92nd birthday.

via Graham still looking to serve the Lord at age 92 – CharlotteObserver.com.

law, copyright, me: I hope I show adequate legal and intellectual respect for the work of others … My blog is a “clipping service.”  The comments are mine.

What makes this story astonishing, really, is that unless it’s an incredibly elaborate hoax, this isn’t some isolated example. This is how this magazine apparently did business for years — and that lends credibility to the idea that Griggs may have honestly thought that she was allowed to just copy whatever she wanted from the Internet. Again, she was crediting the authors. Not always the sources, but at least the writers. It’s a weird head-fake in the direction of treating people fairly, which smells a little bit like — just as she told Gaudio — she actually thought this was fair.

There’s much about this that isn’t known, and it’s important to hold to your skepticism about some of what’s happened since this turned into a meme (for instance, some additional obnoxious responses showed up on Facebook yesterday purporting to be from Griggs, but not everyone thinks they actually were). Griggs hasn’t been heard from directly since all this happened.

Internet justice is always swift and often severe, which can be satisfying at a moment like this if you happen to be a person who creates content. At the same time, it’s a really sobering reminder that in this case, the mob may very well be correct, but what would it have taken to slow it down if it weren’t true?

via The Day The Internet Threw A Righteous Hissyfit About Copyright And Pie : Monkey See : NPR.

bookshelf, quotes, Great Recession: Maybe I will get this book for my kith/kin children …  “All these big institutional investors essentially got sold oregano when they thought they were buying weed,” Taibbi tells NPR’s Guy Raz.

Since then, Taibbi’s columns have been a destination for those trying to understand what happened in the aftermath of the financial meltdown. His new book, Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids and the Long Con That Is Breaking America, tries to make the subject even clearer in the colorful language Taibbi’s readers know well.

“All these big institutional investors essentially got sold oregano when they thought they were buying weed,” Taibbi tells NPR’s Guy Raz.

via ‘Griftopia’: The Financial Crisis Easily Explained : NPR.

LOL. As Seen On TV :  The egg thing reminds me of a scene in Bridget Jones Diary!  An As Seen on TV Thanksgiving: Products that could help.

Facebook, British Monarchy: I “Liked” them …

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth has joined Facebook, adding a presence on the world’s most popular social network to the royal family’s accounts on Twitter, photo-sharing site Flickr and YouTube.

The British monarchy‘s Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/TheBritishMonarchy) does not allow users to “friend” the Queen or to send her messages, but offers updates on royal news and diary events.

via Britain’s Queen Wins 60, 000 Fans on Facebook Debut – NYTimes.com.

parenting, motherhood, culture, me:  I bought into cloth diapers and organic food (but not homemade) … silly me.

In the oscillations of feminism, theories of child-rearing have played a major part. As long as women remain the gender most responsible for children, we are the ones who have the most to lose by accepting the “noble savage” view of parenting, with its ideals of attachment and naturalness. We need to be released from guilt about our children, not further bound by it. We need someone to say: Do the best you can. There are no rules.

via Erica Jong on the Madness of Modern Motherhood – WSJ.com.

If I had a million dollars …:  Just the description makes me want one. 🙂  Canon G Series: The Aspirational Point-and-Shoot | Plugged In – WSJ.com.

business, urban life, pop-ups: As I have said before I want to live in a city big enough to support pop-ups.  They are a modern-day indicia of a BIG city.

The two-year pilot program provides temporary seating platforms for restaurants not eligible for sidewalk cafés licensed by the Department of Consumer Affairs because of narrow sidewalks or zoning restrictions.

The owners of Fika Espresso Bar and Bombay’s Restaurant, located near each other on Pearl Street in the Financial District, housed the city’s first pop-up café, which went up in August and is expected to come down in the next two weeks.

The first curbside wooden platform, measuring 6 feet wide by 84 feet long provided space for about 50 chairs and 14 tables, and attracted throngs of lunch goers.

“My business went up by about 14%,” estimated Prashant Bhatt, owner of Bombay’s Restaurant. “If you come at lunch time there’s no place to sit outside.”

The business owners split the cost of the pop-up café, which they said was slightly more than $10,000 each.

via Pop-Up Cafés to Reappear in 2011 – WSJ.com.

random, men, consumer products, gift ideas:  OK, years ago  (pre-internet) my law associates and I would get into these highly intellectual conversations about certain topics (i.e., is the chocolate milk product Yoohoo or Yahoo … we called a 7-11 to find out).  One topic was why is a man’s “makeup” bag called a “dopp” kit … We found the answer from an older army man … But anyway here is a great Christmas idea for the man  who has everything (and the answer to the question) …

Dopp kit, Il Bisonte; John Allan’s mint conditioner; Sephora travel dental kit; Mason Pearson pocket brush; Kiehl’s Facial Fuel eye de-puffer; Jurlique Chamomile Soothing Mist; Diptyque Tam Dao body lotion; Anthony facial scrub; John Allan’s ocean shampoo; Lightfoot Pure Pine shave creme soap; Marvis Classic Mint travel toothpaste; Clark’s Ultra Rich Lip Balm; The Art of Shaving pure badger brush; Jack Black Double-Duty face moisturizer; Hermès Eau d’Orange Verte soap.

via The Best Ways to Fill Your Dopp Kit – WSJ.com.

Apple, IBM: Good article … two of my favorite stocks.  Like the illustration, too.

Illustration by The New York Times

The two companies have long been cast as polar opposites, even before Apple’s commercial during the 1984 Super Bowl that depicted a female rebel (Apple) striking a blow against a corporate Big Brother (I.B.M.).

Today, Big Blue is seen as a machine — a company that caters to big corporate and government customers and is known for steady improvement and five-year profit plans. Indeed, I.B.M.’s profit rose 12 percent for the third quarter, the 31st consecutive quarter that the company delivered higher earnings. Apple, by contrast, is seen as a consumer-product hit factory that is on a roll.

Yet I.B.M. and Apple can be viewed as the yin and the yang of high-tech innovation, as two companies with more in common than is generally understood. There is a lot of eureka invention and deep science in I.B.M.’s varied businesses, industry experts say. And Apple’s continuing success, they add, is explained in good part by its ability to make innovation a managed system, more machinelike.

via Apple and I.B.M. Aren’t All That Different – NYTimes.com.

Great Recession:  Hope so …

But positive indicators can and do disappoint, so I decided to consult an expert on these matters: Ian Shepherdson, chief United States economist at High Frequency Economics. As a reader of economic tea leaves over the last five turbulent years, Mr. Shepherdson has a darn good record. For instance, unlike the throng of economists who failed to see the housing crisis coming, Mr. Shepherdson warned his clients in fall 2005 that real estate would crash and a recession would ensue.

He was early, of course, and now acknowledges that he was not nearly emphatic enough in his warnings. But he was fundamentally right back then and has been consistently on target since. So, I am happy to report that he sees the beginnings of a turn in the economy that could translate to a rise in gross domestic product growth and an improving employment picture in the second half of 2011.

via Forecaster Ian Shepherdson Sees an End to Economic Gloom – NYTimes.com.

random, culture, Charlotte: Enjoy … and let me know if you hear about such an event in Charlotte!

Knight Foundation is funding 1,000 Random Acts of Culture over the next three years. So if you live in any of these eight cities – Akron, Charlotte, Detroit, Macon, Philadelphia, San Jose, St. Paul and Miami – be on the lookout and have your cellphones ready.

via What a Joyful Noise: 650 Singers Burst into Hallelujah as part of Random Act of Culture | Knight Arts.

random, kith/kin, new blog:  I could so see some of my friends doing this!  On the Road with Honey: Atlanta to Chicago by Kevin Austin | LikeTheDew.com.

media, journalism, boundaries:  I always thought the New Yorker was more literary than political commentary.  They certainly jump right into the fray with their covers!

In his inaugural address in January 2009, President Barack Obama promised a new era of diplomacy in foreign affairs. “To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history,” he said. But, he continued, “we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.”

He didn’t know that he might as well have been speaking to the Republicans.

The November 15, 2010 cover of The New Yorker features Obama offering to shake the hand of Republican congressman John Boehner, who is expected to take over as the next Speaker of the House. Instead of offering his hand to shake in return, Boehner offers Obama his fist.

The illustration is by Barry Blitt and recalls his controversial July 2008 cover for the magazine, which featured Obama wearing a turban and giving a fist bump to Michelle Obama in the Oval Office.

via John Boehner Gives Obama ‘Terrorist Fist Bump’ On New Yorker Cover.

tv, Sherlock Holmes, me: wow, PBS’s Sherlock has my head spinning … now I will have to watch the whole series to figure out what happened …

In with three criminally clever whodunits, A Study in Pink (October 24), The Blind Banker (October 31) and The Great Game (November 7), consulting detective Sherlock Holmes teams up with former army doctor John Watson to solve a dizzying array of crimes with his signature deductive reasoning. From the writers of Doctor Who, Sherlock is co-created and written by Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat.

via Masterpiece | Sherlock | PBS.

recipes, chicken, comfort foods:  Roast chicken is one of my favorite “comfort foods.”  I will try this … Rozanne Gold’s “Opinionated Way to Roast a Chicken” | The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More.

The Supreme Court, politics:  great article …

One of the legacies of the pitched battle ten years ago is that voters appreciate now, in a way they did not before Florida 2000, that our elections, like any human endeavor, are fraught with errors. Bush v. Gore thus opened eyes and lowered expectations. Voting in America is guaranteed by law but not in fact. The votes of some simply don’t get counted.

So did the Court lose respect among Americans for its ruling in Bush v. Gore? Did it lose legitimacy? You can argue it both ways and scores of legitimate scholars have gleefully done so. If the Court did lose some credibility, and I think it did, clearly it did not lose enough to generate much of an anti-Court backlash. The Justices are still going strong– witness their landmark corporate speech case this past January in Citizens United. And so are their critics. Bush v. Goredidn’t change the world. The world changed shortly after Bush v. Gore and it’s likely never going to change back.

via Bush v. Gore: The Disputed Election Fades Into History.

architecture, design,Chicago: As my kids say … fail …

Sprucing up a dull city plaza sounds good in theory, but the outcome depends upon the vision of enlightened clients and the talents of skilled designers. Both, unfortunately, are in short supply in the tidy but clinical revamp of the Plaza of the Americas, a small public space whose importance is magnified because it provides one of the few openings along densely-packed North Michigan Avenue.

When it opened in 1965, the plaza possessed a multitude of smaller touches that made it a welcoming public space. Planter boxes filled with shrubs, trees and flowers lent color to the cityscape. The planters had broad ledges where pedestrians were free to sit. Multi-colored lights made the plazas’s fountains sparkle at night. The plaza’s aggregate surface, with its varied hues of crushed stone, was a cut above dull gray concrete.

But flash forward to the first decade of the 21st Century, and the picture looked very different. The aggregate was crumbling and the plaza’s drainage grates were failing. In winter, water would pool up and turn into dangerous sheets of ice. The plaza’s undergirding was deteriorating, too. That raised a simple but contentious question: Who would pay to fix things up?

via Cityscapes | Chicago Tribune | Blog.

Jane Austen, movies:  Mollywood … Mormon film industry!

Alert Janeite Sylvia M. let us know that a new, modern-set version of S&S, called Scents and Sensibility, is in production for release in 2011. It looks like it is a product of the Mormon film industry, which also produced a modern-set version of P&P a few years back. Not much info available yet about the new movie, but well, hello Brandon.

(Somebody else told us about this–it has something to do with perfume–and we wish they would remind us about it comments! Sorry!)

via AustenBlog.




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