Posts Tagged ‘Mental Floss

22
Feb
16

2.22.16 … ”To become the person we are meant to be we may have to overcome our “stuckness” and our fear of change.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2016 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (Walk 12/40), Wedgewood Church – Charlotte NC:

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Noisy … A neighbor to this church is power washing something, no, he is using a circular saw. As I said it is very noisy. But it is always noisy at this labyrinth because it is right next to Tyvola Road. And somewhere nearby are train tracks because I hear very loud train horns.  And it is also noisy because the path is made of pebbles. Crunch, crunch, crunch.

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Winter … There is no sign of spring today, and at this labyrinth, there are dead fall leaves on the lawn. And the sky is overcast.

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I wonder if grass would have been cheaper. I really need to create an advice column on what makes for a perfect labyrinth.  One thing for sure is that the path needs to be even so that you don’t lose your balance when walking and and the area needs to be buffered from auditory and visual distractions. SIlence is nice. One basic requirement would be that you could walk barefoot. If you can’t, then there is a problem.

Research Lazarus and Bethany …

Jesus: A Pilgrimage: Chapter 18 – Bethany

Fr. Martin makes another point about this story. He wonders, “Why does Jesus shout?” “John’s Gospel says that Jesus spoke in a phonē megalē, a great voice.” We are used to hearing that God speaks to us quietly and that we need silence to hear Him, but Jesus shouts to Lazarus to “come forth”. Fr. Martin says, “Sometimes, however, God needs to speak more loudly” and that “God may need to get our attention… so that the dead parts of us can hear”. For Fr. Martin, “Lazarus’s tomb became the place to leave behind whatever I no longer needed, whatever kept me from new life”. Jesus last words in the story of Lazarus are “unbind him and let him go”. Jesus wants us to be unbound, and freed from our sins and our past. Our sins bring us to a spiritual death and Jesus wants to bring us back, he wants us to be fully alive. Fr. Martin says “Unbind him, and let him go is an invitation to all of us who are freed from old patterns and unhealthy behaviors. Untie him and let him be who he is meant to be.” To become the person we are meant to be we may have to overcome our “stuckness” and our fear of change. At the end of the chapter Fr. Martin tells us “I asked God to take away everything that kept me from becoming the person God wanted me to be. And I asked God for new life.” Then he left the tomb.

Source: Jesus: A Pilgrimage: Chapter 18 – Bethany

2.22.16

 

Dutch,  George Orwell’s Birthday,  Putting Party Hats On Surveillance Cameras, BuzzFeed News: this is from 2013, but worth a chuckle!

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On Tuesday, surveillance cameras in the center of the city of Utrecht were decorated with colorful party hats to celebrate the 110th birthday of George Orwell, Dutch art duo Front404 explained on their website.

“George Orwell is best known for his book ‘1984’, in which he describes a dystopian future society where the populace is constantly watched by the surveillance state of Big Brother.”

Source: Dutch Artists Celebrate George Orwell’s Birthday By Putting Party Hats On Surveillance Cameras – BuzzFeed News

French Phrases Hidden in English Words, Mental Floss

Even if you speak French you may never have noticed them.

Source: French Phrases Hidden in English Words | Mental Floss

 

CARTOON, Harper Lee, Scott Stantis, Yellowhammer News:

harper-lee

Longtime Alabama resident Scott Stantis is widely viewed as one of the best — if not the best — editorial cartoonists in the country. At one point he was the staff cartoonist for The Birmingham News. And although he’s now at The Chicago Tribune, which is one of the most high profile jobs in his field, Stantis still flies back to Alabama to get his driver’s license renewed. As long as he keeps coming back home — and cranking out cartoons like the one above — we’ll keep claiming him. Stantis’ latest masterpiece is a tribute to Alabama author Harper Lee, who passed away over the weekend at the age of 89.

Source: CARTOON: This Alabamian’s touching tribute to Harper Lee will warm your heart – Yellowhammer News

 

 

17
Feb
16

2.17.16 … Warning! never Consider the Labyrinth Either As a Game or as a Selfish Exercise. Walk It Sensibly, Slowly, Without Stopping, And With Awareness of Others …

“Solvitur  Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2016 Labyrinth Walks (Walk 8/40), Chartres Silk Scarf “Finger Labyrinth” @ Home – Charlotte:

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An interesting “walk”  … I saw my scarf from Chartres Cathedral  which I wear every once in a while, and I thought it might be fun.  So I got out my pictures from Chartres Cathedral. Included in my pictures is a short video I took while walking at Chartres.  It was very interesting because I could hear my footsteps in the cathedral.

As I retraced my Chartres walks, I reread the prayer I read as I walked two years ago.

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I also read the information signs that I saw at the Cathedral.  This one was  especially interesting.  IMG_0433

A few pictures from August 2014 …

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2.17.16

Justice Antonin Scalia, Foundation for Reformed Theology, Dr. James C. Goodloe, funerals: It will be interesting to learn what is said at Justice Scalia’s funeral in light of this letter. Thanks, Bill Wood for sharing.

Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the following about the funeral of Justice Lewis F. Powell, Jr., and even more about the importance of preaching–especially at a funeral!–preaching the Resurrection of Jesus Christ and the eternal life which follows from that. ————————————————————————————–

 

Supreme Court of the United States Washington, D. C. 20543

CHAMBERS OF JUSTICE ANTONIN SCALIA

September 1, 1998

Dr. James C. Goodloe

Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church

1627 Monument Avenue

Richmond, Virginia 23220-2925

Dear Dr. Goodloe:

I looked for you unsuccessfully at the luncheon following the funeral yesterday. I wanted to tell you how reverent and inspiring I found the service that you conducted. In my aging years, I have attended so many funerals of prominent people that I consider myself a connoisseur of the genre. When the deceased and his family are nonbelievers, of course, there is not much to be said except praise for the departed who is no more. But even in Christian services conducted for deceased Christians , I am surprised at how often eulogy is the centerpiece of the service, rather than (as it was in your church) the Resurrection of Christ, and the eternal life which follows from that. I am told that, in Roman Catholic canon law, encomiums at funeral Masses are not permitted—though if that is the rule, I have never seen it observed except in the breach. I have always thought there is much to be said for such a prohibition, not only because it spares from embarrassment or dissembling those of us about whom little good can truthfully be said, but also because, even when the deceased was an admirable person—indeed, especially when the deceased was an admirable person—praise for his virtues can cause us to forget that we are praying for, and giving thanks for, God’s inexplicable mercy to a sinner. (My goodness, that seems more like a Presbyterian thought than a Catholic one!)

Perhaps the clergymen who conduct relatively secular services are moved by a desire not to offend the nonbelievers in attendance—whose numbers tend to increase in proportion to the prominence of the deceased. What a great mistake. Weddings and funerals (but especially funerals) are the principal occasions left in modern America when you can preach the Good News not just to the faithful, but to those who have never really heard it.

Many thanks, Dr. Goodloe, for a service that did honor to Lewis and homage to God. It was a privilege to sit with your congregation. Best regards.

Sincerely, Antonin Scalia

Source: Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the following about… – Foundation for Reformed Theology

Alexander Hamilton,  the looming high court battle:  Excellent article.

Of course, anyone familiar with Hamilton’s personal life might find it odd to invoke him as the standard for extracting extreme partisanship from the political process. His temper was legendary, as were his many long-standing political battles. He clashed with political enemies and often with allies, including George Washington, who made him the first secretary of the treasury. He once nearly came to duel James Monroe. And after a lifetime of petty political disagreements, Hamilton squared off with Aaron Burr in New Jersey in 1804 (Hamilton, in the musical, quips: “Everything is legal in New Jersey). Burr’s shot struck Hamilton between the ribs and the bullet lodged in his spine. He died, excruciatingly, over the next 24 hours. But even the hotheaded Hamilton seemed to understand the nobility to which the republic’s structure, the Constitution he helped write, calls public servants in particular. And there seems no way he would countenance bald, preemptive usurpation of the president’s appointive power. Maybe he’d even borrow, with a twist, from an admonishment Washington’s character offers him in the musical: Obstructing is easy, senators. Governing is harder.

Source: Alexander Hamilton and the looming high court battle

Who Are We?, The New York Times: Very, very well said …

I find this election bizarre for many reasons but none more than this: If I were given a blank sheet of paper and told to write down America’s three greatest sources of strength, they would be “a culture of entrepreneurship,” “an ethic of pluralism” and the “quality of our governing institutions.” And yet I look at the campaign so far and I hear leading candidates trashing all of them.

America didn’t become the richest country in the world by practicing socialism, or the strongest country by denigrating its governing institutions, or the most talent-filled country by stoking fear of immigrants. It got here via the motto “E Pluribus Unum” — Out of Many, One.

Source: Who Are We? – The New York Times

Vulture, Hamilton, Grammys: Can’t wait to see this … Just don’t know when.

[http://youtu.be/2t2jM0Vavh8]

 

Watch the Hamilton the Musical performance at The GRAMMYs, because this will be the closest most of us will ever get to actually seeing the show.

Source: Vulture – Watch the Hamilton Performance At the Grammys, Because…

Doodles Using GPS and a Bicycle, Mental Floss:

Canadian artist Stephen Lund has found a way to stay active and create delightful illustrations at the same time. In order to make maps that form specific shapes and pictures, the athletic doodler rides his bicycle through the streets of Canada, choosing specific routes. Using the Strava app, he records his travels so you can see what he’s created. The results illustrate everything from pop culture characters to animals. Last year, the intrepid artist traveled 22,300 kilometers (13,857 miles). You can see more maps from those journeys on his website, GPS Doodles.

Source: Artist Creates Doodles Using GPS and a Bicycle | Mental Floss

Atlanta, Restaurants, Culinary Greats, The New York Times: A whole list of restaurants for me to try on my visits home. Anyone care to join me?

Getting traction as a great restaurant city has been harder. It has been tough to compete with neighbors like Charleston, S.C., New Orleans or that sexy food upstart, Nashville. As a national food contender, Atlanta never had the culinary firepower or customer base of New York, Los Angeles or Chicago. Diners made do with a parade of meals at local or national chains, punctuated by the occasional steak in a pretty room. But now, as the nation’s infatuation with Southern food matures and Atlanta’s recession-battered economy recovers, a city that often looked over its shoulder for culinary validation and inspiration is coming into its own. Continue reading the main story RELATED COVERAGE Where to Eat in AtlantaFEB. 16, 2016 Cookbooks: ‘Root to Leaf,’ a Field Guide to VegetablesMARCH 30, 2015 The Chef: Anne Quatrano: Grandma Burned the Beans: A Lucky BreakJULY 12, 2006 Travel Guide: Atlanta for KidsAPRIL 29, 2015 Over the last couple of years, a record number of new and independent restaurants have opened. Especially in the urban core — what people here call intown Atlanta — veteran chefs and newcomers alike have taken advantage of cheap rents and a growing cadre of good line cooks who don’t feel the need to prove themselves in bigger ponds.

Source: Atlanta Pulls a Chair to the Table for Culinary Greats – The New York Times

Hymns Mash-Up, “How Great Thou Art”/”It Is Well”/ “Great Is Thy Faithfulness”,  Christian Music Video:

How Great Thou Art” “It Is Well” “Great Is Thy Faithfulness”

Source: Hymns Mash-Up “HoAw Great Thou Art” “It Is Well” “Great Is Thy Faithfulness” – Christian Music Video

Stephen Curry Halfcourt Shot, NBA 2016 All Star Game:

Source: NBA on TNT – Stephen Curry Halfcourt Shot

Neil Reid, 14 Atlanta architects you should know about,  www.myajc.com: I did not know a friend’s childhood home was a Neil Reid! So many fun memories there.

Neel Reid (1885-1926): Reid was the first name in residential architecture in the early 20th century. His early career took him many places, including stints in Atlanta and Europe. After settling in Atlanta in 1909, his firm quickly found its niche in designing mansions in a variety of styles – often taking inspiration from places Reid saw in Europe. His name is practically a brand in Buckhead. Check out: the Shelton-Walden House (pictured); the Muse’s Building; Butler Street YMCA. (Special to the AJC)

Source: 14 Atlanta architects you should know about | www.myajc.com

A Picture Of Language: The Fading Art Of Diagramming Sentences, grammar, childhood memories,  NPR Ed : NPR:  I loved doing this in elementary school.

When you think about a sentence, you usually think about words — not lines. But sentence diagramming brings geometry into grammar. If you weren’t taught to diagram a sentence, this might sound a little zany. But the practice has a long — and controversial — history in U.S. schools. And while it was once commonplace, many people today don’t even know what it is. So let’s start with the basics. “It’s a fairly simple idea,” says Kitty Burns Florey, the author of Sister Bernadette’s Barking Dog: The Quirky History and Lost Art of Diagramming Sentences. “I like to call it a picture of language. It really does draw a picture of what language looks like.”

Source: A Picture Of Language: The Fading Art Of Diagramming Sentences : NPR Ed : NPR

 

22
Oct
13

10.22.13 … I loved this post on groupons … “Wise men ne’er sit and wail their loss, But cheerly seek how to redress their harms.” …

groupons, William Shakespeare, Henry VI:  I love a good liberal arts education … closing a discussion of wasted groupons with Shakespeare!

The way he said it made me think he might actually be in cahoots with the cockroaches.  Sort of like Tony Soprano saying, “Hey, bada bing, bada bang!, I’d hate to see you use that other waste removal company and possibly have some sorta accident rolling your trash bin up to Grey Road.”  Aaaargh!

Wise men ne’er sit and wail their loss,

But cheerly seek how to redress their harms.

William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part III Act V, scene 4, line 1.

via Leaving money on the table… | 50th Year of Pat Millen.

Malala,  Advocacy Curriculum, George Washington University:  A very impressive young woman!

George Washington University announced Monday that faculty members are creating multimedia curriculum tools to accompany a book recently released by the teen, Malala Yousafzai. Several faculty members will pilot the curriculum early next year for both college and high school instruction. Free of charge, it will focus on themes such as the importance of a woman\’s voice and political extremism, the university said.

The tools won\’t just look at the teen\’s story, but also how the same issues get reflected elsewhere, such as when girls face child marriage and pressures to leave school, said Mary Ellsberg, the director of the university\’s Global Women\’s Institute.

\”It\’s going to be really interactive and really encourage students to do … activities outside of school, it will encourage them to get engaged in the communities and as well to help the Malala Fund directly,\” Ellsberg said.

The university\’s Global Women\’s Institute is partnered with the Malala Fund, a nonprofit that seeks to ensure girls around the world have access to education.

via Malala Inspires Advocacy Curriculum At George Washington University.

college life, fraternity life, naked pictures, misogyny:  Why naked pictures aren’t harmless – Salon.com.

Last week at Swarthmore College a pledge posted a photograph on Instagram of his offer to join a fraternity. The picture was of a booklet cover featuring a mosaic of hundreds of naked or nearly naked women. The website Total Frat Move lamented that it wasn’t deliverd with a note saying, “Enjoy the tits.” The fraternity has used this format for several years — but this year, a group of students led by senior Marian Firke protested the use of the photography. They created an alternative version of the composite image and asked the school to suspend the fraternity’s school-funded party budget.

Swarthmore’s dean of students agreed with protesters and took steps to address their concerns, including requiring members of the fraternity to attend yet-to-be-defined “special training sessions.” The speed with which the administration has responded may have something to do with the fact that the college is one of a growing list of schools, including Occidental, the University of North Carolina, Yale and Dartmouth, involved in very public complaints for their handling (or mishandling) of sexual assault cases. Emerson is the latest school to be investigated by the Department of Education for related Title IX violations. While the administration’s responsiveness is laudable, the truth is that given the scope of the problem at hand, entire swaths of our population need “special training sessions,” and before they even make it to college. What do we do about them?

via Why naked pictures aren’t harmless – Salon.com.

faith, cultural v spiritual, Jewish identity:

All three embrace their Jewish identity — but this isn’t their parents’ Jewishness.

As underscored in a major new survey, they are among those navigating a period of historic flux in how American Jews view themselves, their religion, their culture, and how they affiliate with each other.

A growing minority of American Jews — including nearly a third of younger adults in particular — say they’re not religious but continue to identify themselves as Jewish, according to the survey, “A Portrait of Jewish Americans,” released this month by the Pew Research Center.

Intermarriage rates also continue at high levels among younger Jews — 58 percent among Jews married this century.

And on the list of things that make someone Jewish, far more Jews chose such things as remembering the Holocaust, being moral and ethical, working for justice and even having a good sense of humor than such traditional markers as belonging to the Jewish community or observing religious law.

via American Jews carve out faith different than parents’ | The Courier-Journal | courier-journal.com.

Black Friday/Thanksgiving:

Add Macy’s to the list of retailers kicking off “Black Friday” and Thanksgiving Thursday.

Macy’s will open the doors at most of its 800 namesake department stores, at 8 p.m. on Nov. 28. The company said the shift was voluntary for workers and that the move was “consistent with what many rivals are doing.

Traditionally, retailers have waited until Black Friday, the day after the Thanksgiving, to start their end-of-the-year push for sales.

U.S. retailers have extended their hours on Black Friday, so named because it\’s when most stroes go into the black, in recent years to get a jump on the holiday season sales.

via Macy’s latest retailer to open holiday shopping season on Thanksgiving – chicagotribune.com.

 William Faulkner’s “As I Lay Dying”, grammatically Incorrect, Mental Floss, Miley Cyrus, AMA Manual of Style, Bob Dylan (“Lay Lady Lay”), Eric Clapton (“Lay Down Sally”), lay/lie:

But did he? The comment links to a blog entry from the AMA Manual of Style on Faulkner’s use of “lay.” Though at first it may seem that the title of Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying is incorrect (what could be more intransitive than someone lying there dying?), the entry points out that here “lay” is actually the correct past tense of “lie.” (I know. Could these rules make it any more complicated?) So there is nothing wrong with the title.

What the article takes issue with is a sentence from the novel “you lay you down and rest you.” Obviously, this is in the vernacular and not to be taken as textbook grammatical, and yes, “the correct form of the sentence would use the intransitive verb: ‘You lie down.’” But here, even within the context of this non-standard dialect, Faulkner follows the rule. The verb “lay” does take an object in “you lay you down,” and the object is “you.” Not much different from “now I lay me down to sleep,” a sentence even the strictest red pen will pass over without a second glance.

So let’s leave Faulkner out of this. If you want, you can take it up with Bob Dylan (“Lay Lady Lay”) or Eric Clapton (“Lay Down Sally”). But it’s probably time we all just laid our tired bootys down and started focusing on more important matters, such as, what is the proper plural of “booty”?

via Is “As I Lay Dying” Grammatically Incorrect? | Mental Floss.

Einstein, “Combinatory Play”, secret of genius, Brain Pickings:

The concept, in fact, was perhaps best explained by Albert Einstein, who termed it “combinatory play.” (Einstein famously came up with some of his best scientific ideas during his violin breaks.) From his Ideas and Opinions (public library) — the same invaluable volume that gave us the beloved physicist’s timeless wisdom on kindness and our shared existence — comes Einstein’s single most succinct articulation of how his mind works, driven by this powerful combinatorial creativity. The 1945 letter was written in response to French mathematician Jacques S. Hadamard’s survey of the mental processes of famous scientists, inspired by polymath Henri Poincaré’s famous meditation on the subject and published as An Essay on the Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field, with Einstein’s missive included as a “testimonial”:

via How Einstein Thought: Why “Combinatory Play” Is the Secret of Genius | Brain Pickings.

Dan Pink, lists, My 5 favorite talks on work, TED Playlists, TED:  5 more for me to watch …

Dan Pink: My 5 favorite talks on work

Popular business author Dan Pink picks his 5 favorite TED Talks on how to find greater success at work.

via Dan Pink: My 5 favorite talks on work | TED Playlists | TED.

clutter-clearing myths,  The Happiness Project:

One of my great realizations about happiness (and a point oddly under-emphasized by positive psychologists) is that for most people, outer order contributes to inner calm. More, really, than it should. After all, in the context of a happy life, a crowded coat closet is trivial. And yet over and over, people tell me, and I certainly find this, myself, that creating order gives a huge boost in energy, cheer, and creativity.

But as much as most of us want to keep our home, office, car, etc. in reasonable order, it’s tough. Here’s a list of some myths of de-cluttering that make it harder to get rid of stuff.

via Do You Fall for Any of These Common Clutter-Clearing Myths? « The Happiness Project.

19
Sep
13

9.19.13 … To err is human; to arrrrrr is pirate …

Talk Like A Pirate Day, 17 Swashbuckling Facts,  Talk Like A Pirate Day,  Mental Floss: Ahoy, mateys!

3. PULITZER PRIZE-WINNING HUMOR COLUMNIST DAVE BARRY IS RESPONSIBLE FOR POPULARIZING TLAP DAY

Barry was so smitten with the holiday after having been introduced to it via email in early 2002 that he dedicated an entire column to its publicity that September, turning an inside joke into a global sensation.

via 17 Swashbuckling Facts About Talk Like A Pirate Day | Mental Floss.

Here’s another to add to the TLAP Day:

Pirate eye test.

updated 9.21.13 @10;37 am

11
Aug
13

8.11.13 … working on the MegaBus … mausoleums … first McNugget 30 years ago … America and Elvis Presley… Les Schtroumpfs … The Dwarf House … internet yoga/internet Thoreau

MegaBus, PowerPoint, MARTA:  Last Wednesday, I hit the road again, the MegaBus road.  I maneuvered a single seat. I felt guilty.  There is something about the people dynamics on the bus that is interesting.  I used the bus time to work in my first PowerPoint presentation, and I got a lot a lot done.  I may need to ride a few more trips to finish up.  I’ve added a new public transportation piece.  Unfortunately this time I did not time it well and had to wait for the #25 MARTA bus at Lenox Station … I had timed trip perfectly last time … This trip … Not so much.  Still, thank you MegaBus and MARTA.

mausoleum, Word of the Day, kith/kin:  This word brings up a favorite family story about my middle child.  I never thought to ask the source of the the word “mausoleum.”

Photo: The word mausoleum derives from the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus in modern Turkey, the grave of King Mausolus, built between 353 and 350 BCE. They have been popular throughout history as a way to honor the deceased. In the 19th century, mausolea were common features in rural garden cemeteries like Oakland. Visit some of our 55 mausolea on the Art and Architecture of Death tour at 6:30pm, or pay a visit earlier in the day for our overview tours at 10am, 2, or 4pm. (photo on Instagram by nicolethurmansnow)

The word mausoleum derives from the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus in modern Turkey, the grave of King Mausolus, built between 353 and 350 BCE. They have been popular throughout history as a way to honor the deceased. In the 19th century, mausolea were common features in rural garden cemeteries like Oakland. Visit some of our 55 mausolea on the Art and Architecture of Death tour at 6:30pm, or pay a visit earlier in the day for our overview tours at 10am, 2, or 4pm. (photo on Instagram by nicolethurmansnow)

30 Things Turning 30 , 1983, cultural icons,  first McNugget, the D.A.R.E. program,  the first modern incarnation of the Internet, Mental Floss: !983 was not a big year in my life, but it seems to have be in terms of cultural icons in my life.

Though we often forget it in favor of its younger and more popular sibling (1984), 1983 was a banner year for American culture: It is the birth year of the first McNugget, the D.A.R.E. program, and the first modern incarnation of the Internet. So if you’re turning 30 this year, you’re not alone—here are 30 things to celebrate with.

via 30 Things Turning 30 This Year | Mental Floss.

Political Humor,  America, Elvis Presley, analogy, John Oliver: America is Elvis Presley:

Photo: Shared by Political Humorvia Political Humor.

Smurfs, corporate law: I am probably one of the few people who have a “legal” connection to the Smurfs … In the late 80’s and 90’s I did legal work for a theme park operator that had a license with The Smurfs owners.  It was always fun to work on the Smurf contract.  🙂

Photo: I am probably one of the few people who have a "legal" connection to the Smurfs ...

For the 1981 series, see The Smurfs (TV series). For the 2011 film, see The Smurfs (film).

The Smurfs

Les Schtroumpfs

The Smurfs (French: Les Schtroumpfs) is a Belgian comic and television franchise centred on a group of Smurfs: small blue fictional creatures that live in mushrooms. The Smurfs were first created and introduced as a series of comic characters by the Belgian comics artist Peyo (pen name of Pierre Culliford) in 1958. The word “Smurf” is the original Dutch translation of the French “Schtroumpf”, which, according to Peyo, is a word invented during a meal with fellow cartoonist André Franquin, when he could not remember the word salt.[3] There are more than one hundred Smurfs, whose names are based on adjectives that emphasize their characteristics, e.g. “Jokey Smurf”, who likes to play practical jokes on his fellow smurfs, “Clumsy Smurf”, who has a habit of creating havoc unintentionally, and “Smurfette”—the first female Smurf to be introduced in the series. The Smurfs wear Phrygian caps, which represented freedom in Roman times.[citation needed]

The Smurf franchise began as a comic and expanded into advertising, movies, TV series, ice capades, video games, theme parks, and dolls.

via The Smurfs – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

The Dwarf House, Chick-fil-A,, Woodstock GA:  We went to a s

it-down, dine-in,  order off the menu Chick-fil-A, called The Dwarf House … No joke. — at Woodstock.  The vegetables on my vegetable plate were quite good.

Company Overview

It all started in 1946, when Truett Cathy opened his first restaurant, Dwarf Grill, in Hapeville, Georgia. Credited with inventing Chick-fil-A’s boneless breast of chicken sandwich, Mr. Cathy founded Chick-fil-A, Inc. in the early 1960s and pioneered the establishment of restaurants in shopping malls with the opening of the first Chick-fil-A Restaurant at a mall in suburban Atlanta in 1967

via Chick-fil-A: Company Fact Sheet.

Dwarf House®: Truett’s original, full-service Restaurants offer an extensive menu and provide customers a choice of table service, walk-up counter service or a drive-thru window. Eleven Chick-fil-A Dwarf House restaurants currently operate in the metro Atlanta area.

via Chick-fil-A: Company Fact Sheet.

CS Lewis, James Howell, choices, joy/peace/knowledge/power, anxiety/rage/impotence/loneliness: Thanks, james for the quote!

Sunday’s sermon probably will include this insight from C.S. Lewis: “Every time you make a choice you are turning the central part of you, the part of you that chooses, into something a little different from what it was before. And taking your life as a whole, with all your innumerable choices, all your life long you are slowly turning this central thing either into a heavenly creature or a hellish creature, either into joy, peace, knowledge and power, or anxiety, rage, impotence, and loneliness. Each of us at each moment is progressing to the one state or the other.”

internet, the good and the bad, yoga online, Thoreau:  Resources …

Online Yoga Classes Aid Busy Schedules – WSJ.com.

Simplify Your Tech Life, Thoreau-Style – WSJ.com.

16
Jul
13

7.16.13 … Shakespeare and phrases you use … Apple TV Ad-Skipping … spacewalks …Newsroom’s Best Moments … bookworms and old age … War on Women and political humor … Atlanta Zoo’s twin pandas … 2013 summer weather … CS Lewis on God …

Grammarly, Shakespeare, phrases you use: Which of these phrases do you use the most?

Apple TV Ad-Skipping, Variety:

Apple may be ready to revolutionize the TV business after all …

Following years of rumors of all sorts of newfangled products supposedly in development to take over the living rooms, there’s fresh scuttlebutt that Apple is in discussions to create a service that would allow viewers to engage in ad-skipping. The initial report comes courtesy of former Wall Street Journal reporter Jessica Lessin.

And here’s the grabber: Apple would supposedly pay the TV networks for the ad revenue they missed out on due to to the skipped commercials.

The particulars are few and far in between, but Apple CEO Tim Cook and senior veep Eddy Cue apparently made the rounds at the Allen & Co. conference in Sun Valley last week talking up the new technology to various entities in the TV business. How much consumers would pay for such a product is uknown.

via Apple TV Ad-Skipping: New Service in the Works | Variety.

Amid Falling Enrollment, Law Schools Are Cutting Faculty – WSJ.com.

Law schools across the country are shedding faculty members as enrollment plunges, sending a grim message to an elite group long sheltered from the ups and downs of the broader economy.

Having trimmed staff, some schools are offering buyouts and early-retirement packages to senior, tenured professors and canceling contracts with lower-level instructors, who have less job protection. Most do so quietly. But the trend is growing, most noticeably among middle- and lower-tier schools, which have been hit hardest by the drop-off.

via Amid Falling Enrollment, Law Schools Are Cutting Faculty – WSJ.com.

NASA, @AstroMarshburn, spacewalks:

NASA ‏@NASA 3h

.@AstroMarshburn talks spacewalks & more with @Newseum 8amET: http://go.nasa.gov/16F3Hvg . Spacewalk coverage begins 7am: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv .

via (1) Twitter.

The Best Moments,  ‘The Newsroom’ Season One, Movies News | Rolling Stone, lists:  I think its a sign of a good show that I can remember each of these “best moments.”.

Charlie yells, Jim and Maggie flirt and Will gets baked

via The Best Moments From ‘The Newsroom’ Season One | Movies News | Rolling Stone.

bookworms, old age, Mental Floss:

“Our study suggests that exercising your brain by taking part in activities such as [reading, writing, and playing with puzzles] across a person’s lifetime, from childhood through old age, is important for brain health in old age,” says study co-author Robert S. Wilson, PhD, senior neuropsychologist at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center.

For six years prior to their deaths, 294 people took cognitive tests, which examined their memory and clear thinking. The subjects also recounted how frequently they exercised their brains by reading a newspaper or book (or favorite blog, ah hem); writing a letter; playing a thinking game like chess or Sudoku; or visiting a museum or theater. All the subjects, part of the Rush Memory and Aging Process, donated their brains to science so that the researchers could examine them after death. (Currently, the only way to definitively determine if someone suffers from Alzheimer’s is to look at the brain post-mortem for tangles, lesions, and plaques, hallmarks of the disease.)

via Bookworms Have Better Brains in Old Age | Mental Floss.

Manhattanhenge, NYC: I’d like to see “Manhattenhenge.”

 

Manhattanhenge occurs when the setting sun is perfectly aligned with Manhattan’s rectangular grid of streets, lighting up the north and south sides of every cross street. The pretty spectacle happens four times a year, on two sets of two consecutive days, typically in May and July.

This photo, taken by Lou Barber, shows how the setting sun casts warm, orange light along the street corridors.

via Manhattanhenge Gallery: Photos of NYC’s Special Sunsets | LiveScience.

Funniest Responses to the War on Women, LOL, political humor:

Funniest Responses to the War on Women: http://bit.ly/12rNNrN

via (2) Political Humor.

Atlanta Zoo, twin pandas:

Kim Severson ‏@kimseverson 5m

Lun Lun had some fun fun. Twin pandas born at Atlanta zoo. http://on.thec-l.com/146LryQ

via (10) Twitter

ATLANTA — A giant panda named Lun Lun gave birth Monday at Zoo Atlanta to two tiny cubs, the first twin pandas born in the United States since 1987, zoo spokeswoman Keisha Hines announced.

The 15-year-old panda went into labor Monday afternoon and gave birth to the first cub at 6:21 p.m. EDT and the second two minutes later. Hines said zookeepers who had been anticipating only one cub based on a recent ultrasound were surprised by the first-ever twin panda births at Zoo Atlanta.

“We have twins!” Zoo Atlanta announced on its website.

via Twin pandas born at Zoo Atlanta | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com.

2013 summer weather

CS Lewis, quotes:

@CSLewisDaily: “He who has God and everything else has no more than he who has God only.” ‪#‎cslewis‬

 

 

12
Jul
13

7.12.13 … Corn Chowder Salad: I must be hungry … driverless cars: “What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself“What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself”… Another of those great Lindsey family debates (second only to the value of the electoral college): boil them or grill them? … The Met has reached into its bottomless duffel bag of curiosities to present an exhibition of early and extremely rare baseball cards … Can you see Hugh Grant as The Doctor?

Corn Chowder Salad:  I must be hungry … I had some corn today…not very good.  I have a bowl of corn for a higher purpose.

original

This is a fun twist on a corn chowder recipe that I love from my native New England.  I have been living in the heartland (Chicago) for over a year and as I look at all of this fresh corn,   it makes me wonder – is it tooo hot for corn chowder?  Maybe, but I wonder – how about a corn chowder SALAD?   It absolutely works and its gives you that homey feeling when you eat it.

via Corn Chowder Salad.

driverless cars, cities, NYTimes.com: “What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself.”

Imagine a city where you don’t drive in loops looking for a parking spot because your car drops you off and scoots off to some location to wait, sort of like taxi holding pens at airports. Or maybe it’s picked up by a robotic minder and carted off with other vehicles, like a row of shopping carts.

A test of Google’s self-driving car.

Inner-city parking lots could become parks. Traffic lights could be less common because hidden sensors in cars and streets coordinate traffic. And, yes, parking tickets could become a rarity since cars will be smart enough to know where they are not supposed to be.

As scientists and car companies forge ahead — many expect self-driving cars to become commonplace in the next decade — researchers, city planners and engineers are contemplating how city spaces could change if our cars start doing the driving for us. There are risks, of course: People might be more open to a longer daily commute, leading to even more urban sprawl.

That city of the future could have narrower streets because parking spots would no longer be necessary. And the air would be cleaner because people would drive less. According to the the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 30 percent of driving in business districts is wasted in a hunt for a parking spot. The agency estimates that almost one billion miles of driving is wasted every year as people search for parking.

“What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself,” said Ryan Calo, an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Law, who specializes in robotics and drones.

via Disruptions: How Driverless Cars Could Reshape Cities – NYTimes.com.

Hot Dogs, Sous Vide, Electrocution, BA Daily, Bon Appétit, kith/kin:  Another of those great Lindsey family debates (second only to the value of the electoral college): Do you boil your hot dogs? Grill them?

According to this article … Mere child’s play! Check out these 10 weird cooking methods, from sous vide to solar power to (gulp!) electrocution …

Photo: Do you boil your hot dogs? Grill them? Mere child's play! Check out these 10 weird cooking methods, from sous vide to solar power to (gulp!) electrocution >> http://bonapp.it/178ZIch

COOKING TIPS

10 Weird Ways to Cook Hot Dogs, from Sous Vide to Electrocution

It doesn’t get much easier than throwing a hot dog on the grill. But it does get harder–if you so choose. We rounded up 10 alternative ways to cook a hot dog, then checked in to see what the Bon Appetit Test Kitchen had to say about them.

via 10 Weird Ways to Cook Hot Dogs, from Sous Vide to Electrocution: BA Daily: Bon Appétit.

Metropolitan Museum,  baseball cards, NYTimes.com:  Add this exhibit to the list … loved baseball cards, especially the famous Honus Wagner card.  Why you ask?  I loved reading this book to my son Edward … Honus and Me: A Baseball Card Adventure: Dan Gutman.

Tinker to Evers to Chance. Tinker to Evers to Chance. I don’t care that much about the All-Star Game, but Tinker to Evers to Chance.

Please don’t misunderstand. In my boyhood my life was so defined by baseball that I often conflated the Yankees starting lineup with the Twelve Apostles (batting leadoff and playing second base, Horace Clarke; batting second and playing center field, Simon who is called Peter). But the use of performance-enhancing drugs — by the players, not me — and the related corruption of once-sacrosanct statistics have cooled my enthusiasm. Not for baseball so much as for the baseball of today.

I prefer a more innocent time. A time when the same ball might last the entire game, and fielders wore gloves not much larger than their hands, and batters strived to hit ’em where they ain’t. A time when ballplayers brawled with fans, and tobacco companies used baseball cards to entice the young, and a small group of corrupt baseball heroes from Chicago could throw the World Series, and …

In truth, the dead-ball era was about as innocent as the gyrations of Little Egypt, the Dita Von Teese of the day. But this distant time — a two-decade period between the close of the 19th century and the ascent of a true game changer, the home run hitter Babe Ruth — was far more colorful, helping to cement baseball’s claim as the national pastime.

Now, as if to please wayward fans, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has reached into its bottomless duffel bag of curiosities to present an exhibition of early and extremely rare baseball cards. Rows and rows of long-dead ballplayers stare out from the past like the mug-shot denizens of the New York Police Department’s once-famous Rogues Gallery.

via Metropolitan Museum Opens Huge Show of Baseball Cards – NYTimes.com.

and yes, the Honus Wagner card is part of the exhibit …

And while it may not be a masterpiece from the Northern Renaissance, Ms. Spira also has a rare T206 Honus Wagner card, the size of a matchbox and valued at hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not millions. Its worth derives partly from the supposed back story: that Wagner, a shortstop for the Pittsburgh Pirates and perhaps the greatest all-around player in history, blocked continued production of the card because he did not want to help promote cigarettes to children.

Beyond that, the card is striking for the rugged nobility conveyed in the face of its subject. He was the awkward son of hardscrabble immigrants, big-chested, bowlegged and with shovel-like hands that threw rocks and dirt to first base along with the ball. But he was baseball royalty, and his expression on this card says he knew it.

via Metropolitan Museum Opens Huge Show of Baseball Cards – NYTimes.com.

The Periodic Table of the Muppets, Mike BaBoon Design: fun …

A comprehensive depiction of many memorable Muppet characters from throughout the years (and some not-so-memorable ones as well).

Each square represents a different character and indicates the primary Muppeteer(s) for that character, as well as the year and production in which the character made its debut. Borders align with hair/hat colour, background aligns with skin/fur colour, and colour of the abbreviated name represents nose colour (for characters with noses that is).

The separate sections are based on the show the characters were either created for or most often associated with. The icons within each section are then organized by year of creation.

via Mike BaBoon Design: The Periodic Table of the Muppets.

 Hugh Grant, Almost,  The Doctor,  Mental Floss:  Can you see Hugh Grant as The Doctor?

Romantic comedy lead Hugh Grant now seems an unlikely choice for a sci-fi hero, but he was one of the first actors approached when casting a Ninth Doctor for the 2005 series revival. Grant turned the part down due to skepticism about the show’s potential to succeed, but he later got a second chance of sorts when playing one of the Doctor’s regenerations in a 1999 spoof production for charity which also featured fellow would-be Doctor Joanna Lumley. With trademark self-deprecation, the actor notes that while he regrets his choice, it might have done the show some good, as he’d “probably make a mess of it” anyway.

via 11 People Who Almost Played The Doctor | Mental Floss.




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