Posts Tagged ‘NASA

06
Jan
14

1.6.14 … A few Epiphanies and a Polar Vortex … Happy Epiphany, BTW … God Bless!

Epiphany:  Every year I love the posts of this FB Page Advent!

January 6th is Epiphany, which means “to show” or “to make known” or even “to reveal”. On this day we as the body of Christ are reminded of our mission to seek to as best we can to be used by God to “reveal” Jesus to the world as Lord and King. With this we end the 12 days of Christmas and celebration of the Christmas Advent season. Next year we will start again. Hope this was a blessing to you. God bless!

via Advent – January 6th is Epiphany, which means “to show” or “to….

… and another good one from James Howell:

Usually I think of the word “Epiphany” in terms of looking up – to a star, a light in God’s immense sky; or perhaps we think of the dawn, the bright sun peering over the horizon, or a light bulb going off in your head.

But perhaps for there to be a real epiphany, a real revelation and discovery in our lives, we need to look down, deep, beneath the surface – like the iceberg, the bulk of the thing hidden, dangerous, very real even if unnoticed. Much of our life is lived on the surface – and sadly our religious life often is limited to some nice, observable acts: I go to church, say a quick prayer, volunteer once in a while, occasionally read my Bible.

But it’s only the tip of the iceberg; the bulk of my life remains untouched, submerged – and I may not even be familiar with the depth of my own life! But it’s down there. God is keenly interested in that submerged, unaddressed life. “Lord, you have searched me and known me” (Psalm 139:1).

Our goals in this series (and in life!)? To grow in emotional health, real compassion for others, to break free from destructive patterns, and be filled with grace; we can embrace weakness, accept the surprising gift of our limitations, learn to resolve conflicts, and forgive.

via Myers Park United Methodist Church | Charlotte Methodist Church, Methodist Churches Charlotte NC – Myers Park UMC.

holiday traditions, winter, paperwhite narcissus, kith/kin:

So if I stage it right, I have blooms from mid December to mid February. I friend who is not on FB gave me paper whites when I was in 8th grade. It has been a favorite winter and Christmas tradition ever since. Thanks, Marty!

Photo: So if I stage it right, I have blooms from mid December to mid February.  I friend who is not on FB gave me paper whites when I was in 8th grade. It has been a favorite winter and Christmas tradition ever since.  Thanks, Marty!

 Polar Vortex:

Meteorologist Eric Holthaus just posted this insane video of him turning boiling water into snow.

Shot in Viroqua, WI, near La Crosse, it was -21°F with a wind chill of -51°F.

via Watch Boiling Water Turn Into Snow – Business Insider.

via ▶ Boiling water vs extreme cold – YouTube.

What is a polar vortex? What distinguishes it?

The polar vortex, as it sounds, is circulation of strong, upper-level winds that normally surround the northern pole in a counterclockwise direction — a polar low-pressure system.  These winds tend to keep the bitter cold air locked in the Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere. It is not a single storm. On occasion, this vortex can become distorted and dip much farther south than you would normally find it, allowing cold air to spill southward.

Photos: Winter weather grips U.S.

How frequently does this polar vortex distortion occur?

The upper-level winds that make up the polar vortex change in intensity from time to time. When those winds decrease significantly, it can allow the vortex to become distorted, and the result is a jet stream that plunges deep into southern latitudes, bringing the cold, dense Arctic air spilling down with it. This oscillation is known as the Arctic Oscillation and it can switch from a positive phase to negative phase a few times per year. This oscillation — namely the negative phase where the polar winds are weaker — tends to lead to major cold air outbreaks in one or more regions of the planet.

via Frigid air from the North Pole: What’s this polar vortex? – CNN.com.

Photo: Be nice to the poor guy.

Definitely … we are just mostly missing the Polar Vortex … on a relative basis …  Sorry.

.Photo: Definitely ... we are just missing the cold front.  Sorry. :)

Emotional Intelligence: Interesting.

Shining a light on this dark side of emotional intelligence is one mission of a research team led by University College London professor Martin Kilduff. According to these experts, emotional intelligence helps people disguise one set of emotions while expressing another for personal gain. Emotionally intelligent people “intentionally shape their emotions to fabricate favorable impressions of themselves,” Professor Kilduff’s team writes. “The strategic disguise of one’s own emotions and the manipulation of others’ emotions for strategic ends are behaviors evident not only on Shakespeare’s stage but also in the offices and corridors where power and influence are traded.”

Thanks to more rigorous research methods, there is growing recognition that emotional intelligence—like any skill—can be used for good or evil. So if we’re going to teach emotional intelligence in schools and develop it at work, we need to consider the values that go along with it and where it’s actually useful. As Professor Kilduff and colleagues put it, it is high time that emotional intelligence is “pried away from its association with desirable moral qualities.”

via The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence – Atlantic Mobile.

wine, Trader Joe’s, Two Buck Chuck,  Thrillist Nation: Potentially useful info? Ok, not really …

Whether you were throwing a dinner for people you felt compelled to not impress, or just hate paying $2.01 and up for literally anything, at some point you’ve likely been in a position to load up a shopping cart with a crapload of Two-Buck Chuck, pray nobody from church sees you, and party down.

Here’s the thing, though: some of it’s actually pretty damn good, and could easily be sold as Nine-to-Eleven-Buck Chuck without anyone being the wiser.

So we brought in two devoted tasters to blindly drink eight different types of Charles Shaw Blend, hit us with detailed notes, and determine 1) which bottles are totally palatable and even enjoyable, and 2) which should be avoided as if they were made by Chuck Woolery, who, it turns out, makes terrible wine.

HOW MANY THEY GOT RIGHT

Sommelier: 4/8

Girlfriend: 3/8

THE FINAL SCORES, FROM BEST TO WORST

Merlot: 8

Chardonnay: 7.5

Shiraz: 7.75

Cabernet Sauvignon: 7.25

Pinot Grigio: 6

Nouveau: 3

Sauvignon Blanc: 2.5

White Zinfandel: Technically 1, but not really even.

via Wines Under 5 Dollars at Trader Joe’s – Cheap Wine – Thrillist Nation.

A Mighty Girl, Jeannette Piccard, NASA: I follow A Mighty Girl on FB.  It is one of my favorite sites!  I would love to be a “mighty girl”!

Following the famous flight, Jeannette Piccard went on to work with NASA, acting as a consultant and speaking publicly about the space program from 1964 to 1970. At age 79, in 1974, she also fulfilled a childhood dream when she became an ordained Episcopal priest as one of the Philadelphia Eleven, a group of eleven women who were ordained as the first female priests in the Episcopal Church.

Piccard’s spirit of adventure is best summed up in this quote to her father, when he asked her why she wanted to fly: “There are many reasons, some of them so deep-seated emotionally as to be very difficult of expression. Possibly the simplest explanation is that we started along this road… and I cannot stop until I have won.”

via (2) A Mighty Girl.

11
Nov
13

11.11.13 … “Lord, teach me to be grateful, for others, and to You. Uncover all I have not noticed, and nurture in me a thankful heart.” …

Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Thansgivukkah, holiday mashup: “Home cooks have been doing that for centuries, and this year’s supercollider is an invitation to make something new that lasts.”

But on Nov. 28, there will be three candles ready in the menorah by the time the turkey leaves the wood fire. (Hanukkah starts on Wednesday at sundown, so depending on how long this meal lasts, we’ll probably be lighting candles for the second night around the time the pie comes out.)

The challenge this year is to serve a meal that honors our traditions, makes room for fresh influences from our grown sons (both home cooks) and blends the best of both holiday menus into one epic feast. For help, we turned to the Dining section’s own Melissa Clark, who picked out the most promising notes in our family cookbooks and developed recipe combinations that pulled the meal together.

She suggested we add fresh horseradish to the matzo balls, a perfect nod to David’s grandfather, who liked to carve bits tableside from a huge, gnarly root. So festive. It was also Melissa’s idea to serve our Hanukkah brisket next to the turkey, as if she knew that David’s grandmother always served two kinds of meat at every holiday, a subconscious demonstration of abundance by a Holocaust survivor who understood privation.

We won’t be the only family crowding into the kitchen this year, mixing holiday flavors and inventing new customs on our feet. Home cooks have been doing that for centuries, and this year’s supercollider is an invitation to make something new that lasts. But not cranberry sauce with raisins.

via When Thanksgiving and Hanukkah Collide – NYTimes.com.

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, Audible, bookshelf: So I listened to The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry on Audible and I really enjoyed it.  But I quickly realized that I needed a map.

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

NANJING China, The Sifang Project, architecture, an architectural fantasy land in China:  This is really fascinating on many levels.

Wall Street Journal ‏@WSJ 39m

Take a multimedia trip to an architectural fantasy land in China: http://on.wsj.com/17dFayp

NANJING, China—China is famous for its warp speed of construction. The Sifang project near this ancient capital in southern China is a study in the opposite.

The construction of 24 uniquely designed buildings by various architects on 115 acres of land has been slow and extremely deliberate, even though 1 billion yuan (US$164 million) has been spent to date. So deliberate, in fact, that when this design fantasyland opens to visitors Saturday, only 11 of those 24 structures will be complete—a decade after the architects submitted their designs.

Scaffolding covers the recreation center, designed by late Italian architect Ettore Sottsass. Only foundations have been laid for a house by 2010 Pritzker Prize-winning Japanese duo Sanaa. Even some of the houses that are “finished” still appear to be missing details like electrical outlets.

Sifang Museum.

ENMESHED IN MID-AIR: THE NANJING SIFANG ART MUSEUM | 艺术界 LEAP.

China’s wealthy patrons like Mr. Lu’s family are underwriting a major cultural boom, spending billions of yuan on grand buildings to showcase impressive collections of art, antiques and other cultural rarities. Their largesse and ambitions echo American industrialists who sponsored the arts in the early years of the 20th century… — online.wsj.com

Recently in The Wall Street Journal, reporter Jason Chow interviewed real-estate developer Lu Jun and his son Lu Xun who finally opened the Sifang Art Museum for its first exhibition this past weekend in Nanjing, China after 10 years of construction.

Spearheaded by Lu Jun and curated by architects Liu Jiakun and Arato Isozaki, the $164 million project consists of 11 mixed-use buildings designed by an international mix of well-known architects including Wang Shu, SANAA, David Adjaye, Mathias Klotz, Steven Holl, and artist Ai Weiwei (the only non-architect). Three more buildings are expected to be completed within the next year.

During a rising cultural trend of private museums owned by China\’s wealthiest patrons, Lu Jun, his son, and some of the museum’s architects describe the doubts, challenges, and hopes in the construction and operation of the ambitious project.

via Sifang Art Museum – designed by 22 architects including Wang Shu, SANAA, Adjaye, Holl – opens its first exhibition | News | Archinect.

“Without money from the property development, how do you support the art? It’s unfair to judge us that way,” Mr. Lu said. “We’re not flipping art.”

U.K. art consultant Philip Dodd, who has organized private-museum forums in recent years to gather China’s budding patrons, says art museums have long been tied to the large egos and profits of businessmen, pointing to Andrew Mellon, the U.S. financier who died in 1937 and whose art collection was donated to establish the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

“I wouldn’t over-moralize this,” Mr. Dodd says. “Museums are often set up with sugar money.”

via Nanjing’s New Sifang Art Museum Illustrates China’s Cultural Boom – WSJ.com.

U.S. Postal Service,  Amazon packages , Sunday delivery,  latimes.com:  Interesting.  I’d like to see the numbers.

Giant online retailer Amazon.com Inc. is turning up the heat on rivals this holiday season and beyond under a new deal with the U.S. Postal Service for delivering packages on Sundays.

Starting this week, the postal service will bring Amazon packages on Sundays to shoppers’ doors in the Los Angeles and New York metropolitan areas at no extra charge. Next year, it plans to roll out year-round Sunday delivery to Dallas, New Orleans, Phoenix and other cities.

Getting packages on Sundays normally is expensive for customers. United Parcel Service Inc. doesn\’t deliver on Sundays, according to a spokeswoman. And FedEx Corp. said Sunday \”is not a regular delivery day,\” though limited options are available.

The deal could be a boon for the postal service, which has been struggling with mounting financial losses and has been pushing to limit general letter mail delivery to five days a week.

Spokeswoman Sue Brennan said that letter mail volume is declining “so extremely,” yet package volume is “increasing in double-digit percentages.”

The postal service’s Sunday package delivery business has been very small, but the arrangement with Amazon for two of the retailer’s larger markets, Los Angeles and New York, should boost work considerably.

To pull off Sunday delivery for Amazon, the postal service plans to use its flexible scheduling of employees, Brennan said. It doesn’t plan to add employees, she said.

Members of Amazon’s Prime program have free two-day shipping and, under the new deal, can order items Friday and receive them Sunday. Customers without Prime will pay the standard shipping costs associated with business day delivery.

via U.S. Postal Service to deliver Amazon packages on Sundays – latimes.com.

NASA, astronauts, Overview Effect:

Who would have thought traveling to outer space could be such a profound experience? OK, probably everybody, but these former astronauts really articulate it in a way that was just a little mind-blowing.

via Some Strange Things Are Happening To Astronauts Returning To Earth.

workforce, women in the workforce:

Why were women opting out, particularly the ones who looked like they should have the highest potential?”

via Mandy O’Neill: Why Do Highly Capable Women Not Always Realize Their Workforce Potential? | Stanford Graduate School of Business.

meditation, The Noble Eightfold Pat, bookshelf:  So I attended a intro session on meditation and this short book was recommended.

The Noble Eightfold Path: The Way to the End of Suffering by Bhikkhu Bodhi

via The Noble Eightfold Path: The Way to the End of Suffering.

labyrinths, Camus quote:

“Life’s work is nothing but the slow trek to rediscover, through the detours of art, those two or three great and simple images in whose presence one’s heart first opened.” ~ Albert Camus

On a recent trip to Serenbe, one of my favorite retreat spots in the Atlanta area, I walked the labyrinth. I remember feeling a paradoxical sense of peace and power, when I finally surrendered my need to ‘get’ some earth shattering insights.

Labyrinths are truly sacred places. The design itself is ancient, some say more than 4,000 years old. It combines the sacred geometry of the circle and the spiral into a meandering but purposeful path.

The ritual of walking the labyrinth silences the intellect and awakens your deep, intuitive nature. Walking a labyrinth is a metaphor for life’s journey, you will often discover parallels between your ‘walk’ and how you move about in the world.  As you navigate this sacred space, it awakens and activates your own sacred blueprint.

The labyrinth invokes your intuition, creativity, and imagination.  It is an invitation to adventure to the core of your Essence and come back to the world with an expanded experience of who you are.

via Walk the Labyrinth: Awaken Your Sacred Pattern, Activate Your Sacred Path – ADELA RUBIO.

Black Friday, Holiday shopping, Thanksgiving:  I would love to say I would do this, but even in the 70s I spent thanksgiving shopping. We would take all our holiday catalogs to Pineview and turn down the corners all afternoon. So, since I already shop on-line on Thanksgiving, I guess I can’t begrudge the brick and mortar stores for trying to get me back.  Well, I can, actually.

J.C. Penney now joining Macy’s and other stores that plan to open on Thanksgiving Day, prompting this pledge to circulate. No way do I want to shop that day – but maybe a lot of people will. What’s your position on this?

Add Macy’s to the list of retailers kicking off “Black Friday” and Thanksgiving Thursday.

Macy’s will open the doors at most of its 800 namesake department stores, at 8 p.m. on Nov. 28. The company said the shift was voluntary for workers and that the move was “consistent with what many rivals are doing.

Traditionally, retailers have waited until Black Friday, the day after the Thanksgiving, to start their end-of-the-year push for sales.

U.S. retailers have extended their hours on Black Friday, so named because it’s when most stroes go into the black, in recent years to get a jump on the holiday season sales.

via Macy’s latest retailer to open holiday shopping season on Thanksgiving – chicagotribune.com.

Georgia Bulldogs , 2012 College Football Team Valuations, Forbes, followup: Given my recent excerpt from an article on the highest paid officials in each state (11.4.13 … “When you raise a generation to believe that throwing a ball is more important than fulfilling their civic duty to make informed decisions, you allow charlatans to sell their lies to the public unchallenged.” … ), I thought this interesting.

5. Georgia Bulldogs

Current Value: $99 million

One-Year Change in Value: 10%

Football Revenue: $75 million

Football Profit: $52 million

Conference: SEC

Head Coach: Mark Richt

Georgia’s value to the SEC increased thanks to playing in the Outback Bowl, which brought $3.5 million in bowl revenue into the conference. The Bulldogs may see another bump in revenue next year thanks to hosting the Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate rivalry game against Georgia Tech and playing in the SEC Championship this season.

via Georgia Bulldogs – In Photos: 2012 College Football Team Valuations – Forbes.

06
Oct
13

10.6.13 … shutdown … I am not supportive … where are the heroes …

federal shutdown, NASA:

You know what I remember about the last shutdown. I was in San Franisco for Diane and Mike’s New Year’s Eve wedding and reception … one of my all time favorite weddings, and I had hoped to go to Alcatrez, but no, it was operated by the National Park Service and shut down. It didn’t matter … as John says, it’s not much. The wedding was still great fun!

However the shutdown of NASA and of NIH and our national security and the VA …

NASA was the hardest hit of all government agencies by the shutdown, fully 97 percent of its people were furloughed; people who want to work not because it’s just a job, but because the job itself inspires them. Our government may think of NASA as non-essential, but those people staying at home and forbidden from contributing certainly don’t feel that way. Neither do I, nor do many, many others.

The irony of this is palpable. While our government (and let’s not mince words: the Republican party which is now controlled by its fringe elements) makes us look the fools to the rest of the world, it is consistently NASA that makes us look the heroes. I wish the ideologues who have shut down our federal government were able to take a step back from the precipice, from their own petty political needs, and see what they’ve done. NASA is the tip of the iceberg, I know, but it’s a symbol of just how ridiculous, how embarrassing, and, frankly, how stupid this shutdown is.

via Government shutdown: NASA bears the brunt..

If the partial federal governemnt shutdown enters day four, eastern California radio news director Stacey Powells will enter Yosemite National Park, whether it is open open or not.

Public television station KCET reports that Powells plans to organize an “Occupy Yosemite Moment” on Friday afternoon. The road through Tioga Pass leading into the park is open for travel-only purposes during the shutdown, but no stops are permitted. If they can get through the entry station, Powells will stage a sit-in at Tuolumne Meadows, in the eastern section of Yosemite.

“I am outraged at what the Federal Government is doing. Closing our National Parks is absurd and is huritng all of us here in the Eastern Sierra,” Powells wrote in a letter the editor on sierrawave.net. “They cannot take away our access to our national parks which are on public lands. They can’t use this as a bargaining chip. Isn’t that against the law?”

via Radio news director staging Occupy Yosemite Friday. | News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com.

26
Sep
13

9.26.13 … GREAT DAY TO BE A CLASS OF ’82 WILDCAT… @AstroMarshburn comes home …

Davidson College Class of ’82, Tom Marshburn, NASA, ISS, @AstroMarshburn, public art, Jaume Plensa!:  It was a GREAT DAY TO BE A CLASS OF ’82 WILDCAT … Thanks, Tom (and Ann & Grace).  We walked the campus. Love the new sculpture (which looks a bit like Tom in his spacesuit loaded into the Soyuz rocket!)*

IMG_8293**

Then we gathered for a reception and dinner at Carol Quillen, President of the College.

IMG_8294

We then ambled down to Duke Performance Hall   where Tom spoke for about an hour.  Tom was great.

IMG_8295

IMG_8302

IMG_8304

John and I with Davidson’s own Big Bang Theory cast! — with Tom  Marshburn and others.

IMG_0673

Dr. Bill Marshburn

And here’s a summary of his talk …

The fact that people a hundred years ago could figure out the laws of physics, how things move, without seeing it, is really amazing,” Marshburn said.

Marshburn described an experiment one of his fellow astronauts conducted during his spare time, in which granules of salt loose in an air-filled plastic bag began to clump together, something that could never be seen on Earth. This discovery was important to the way physicists theorize the formation of the universe.

“We understood how basketball-sized objects could come together to form planets, but we didn’t understand how particles could come together to form basketball-sized objects,” Marshburn explained.

Other experiments conducted on the space station have important real-world application here on Earth. One such experiment looked at capillary action, the process by which water flows through narrow spaces without the assistance of outside forces. What astronauts on the ISS learned about capillary action is currently being used to develop a handheld device that could conduct simple blood tests that currently require an entire medical laboratory.

“The reason why fluid engineers and physicists were doing the experiment was because it would be nice to have fuel tanks in space that don’t need pumps,” Marshburn said. “It turned out there were engineers on the ground that figured out that fluids in space act like very tiny amounts of fluid, microliters of fluid, [act] on the ground … That’s one of my favorite [experiments] because the medical application is so clear. A spaceflight need translated into a solution for NASA, but also for a medical purpose on Earth.”

While he’s unsure if his future holds a second sojourn aboard the ISS, Marshburn said that the most beautiful thing he saw in space was looking at the Earth and knowing it was his home.

“Looking at the planet Earth, the thing that jumps out at everyone first is the Bahamas, the emerald greens and blues. But over time as I looked at the Earth, I began to fall in love with the Earth again. And you learn to recognize places … and after that, my favorite place to look at was my home.”

via Back at home, Marshburn recounts the ‘magic of space’ | DavidsonNews.net.

*(updated 9.26.13 @ 10;00PM) John Syme writes the best Davidson College stories and now I’m thinking that sculpture at the beginning really does look like Tom 🙂 …

At the end of his presentation, when Marshburn’s PowerPoint relinquished the screen to his computer’s desktop, the juxtaposition of astronaut and regular guy came into focus: next to desktop folders marked “Cosmonauts” and “Award Debriefs” were others marked “Invest and Retire” and that old, familiar standby, “Files I Never Use.”

And in the “Launch Pad Tunes” folder? U2’s “It’s a Beautiful Day,” Joe Satriani’s “Summer Song” and Muse, maybe a little “Uprising”?….

He also regaled us with the story of the “party of the century,” held in the JJ House that year, a costume party with the theme of dressing up as your repressed desire. Already as a 20-year-old, though, he knew his own desire to be an astronaut, and showed up wrapped in tin foil and sporting a borrowed motorcycle helmet….

via Daybook Davidson.

**(updated 9.27.13 @ 9:00AM) One friend spotted the picture of the sculpture and recognized it as a Jaume Plensa.  It is indeed a Jaume Plensa!

IMG_8292

23
Jul
13

7.23.13 … Boeing’s CST-100 Mock-up: “So we don’t want to burden them with an inordinate amount of training to fly this vehicle. We want it to be intuitive.”

Boeing, CST-100 Mock-up, Astronauts, NASA:  Intuitive? Really? You have got to be kidding me … there is nothing intuitive (Adjective; 1. Using or based on what one feels to be true even without conscious reasoning; instinctive. 2. (chiefly of computer software) Easy to use and understand. via intuitive – Google Search) about flying into space.  But I am glad we are getting back into the game, the space game, that is. Kudos!

The CST-100 test vehicle was optimized to seat five crew members, but the spacecraft could accommodate up to seven or a mix of crew and cargo. While the spacecraft may resemble Boeing’s heritage Apollo-era capsules from an exterior perspective, its interior is a reflection of modern technology. From the ambient sky blue LED lighting and tablet technology, the company ensured the CST-100 is a modern spacecraft.

“What you’re not going to find is 1,100 or 1,600 switches,” said Ferguson. “When these guys go up in this, they’re primary mission is not to fly this spacecraft, they’re primary mission is to go to the space station for six months. So we don’t want to burden them with an inordinate amount of training to fly this vehicle. We want it to be intuitive.”

via Boeing Unveils CST-100 Mock-up, Astronauts Climb Aboard | NASA.

16
Jul
13

7.16.13 … Shakespeare and phrases you use … Apple TV Ad-Skipping … spacewalks …Newsroom’s Best Moments … bookworms and old age … War on Women and political humor … Atlanta Zoo’s twin pandas … 2013 summer weather … CS Lewis on God …

Grammarly, Shakespeare, phrases you use: Which of these phrases do you use the most?

Apple TV Ad-Skipping, Variety:

Apple may be ready to revolutionize the TV business after all …

Following years of rumors of all sorts of newfangled products supposedly in development to take over the living rooms, there’s fresh scuttlebutt that Apple is in discussions to create a service that would allow viewers to engage in ad-skipping. The initial report comes courtesy of former Wall Street Journal reporter Jessica Lessin.

And here’s the grabber: Apple would supposedly pay the TV networks for the ad revenue they missed out on due to to the skipped commercials.

The particulars are few and far in between, but Apple CEO Tim Cook and senior veep Eddy Cue apparently made the rounds at the Allen & Co. conference in Sun Valley last week talking up the new technology to various entities in the TV business. How much consumers would pay for such a product is uknown.

via Apple TV Ad-Skipping: New Service in the Works | Variety.

Amid Falling Enrollment, Law Schools Are Cutting Faculty – WSJ.com.

Law schools across the country are shedding faculty members as enrollment plunges, sending a grim message to an elite group long sheltered from the ups and downs of the broader economy.

Having trimmed staff, some schools are offering buyouts and early-retirement packages to senior, tenured professors and canceling contracts with lower-level instructors, who have less job protection. Most do so quietly. But the trend is growing, most noticeably among middle- and lower-tier schools, which have been hit hardest by the drop-off.

via Amid Falling Enrollment, Law Schools Are Cutting Faculty – WSJ.com.

NASA, @AstroMarshburn, spacewalks:

NASA ‏@NASA 3h

.@AstroMarshburn talks spacewalks & more with @Newseum 8amET: http://go.nasa.gov/16F3Hvg . Spacewalk coverage begins 7am: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv .

via (1) Twitter.

The Best Moments,  ‘The Newsroom’ Season One, Movies News | Rolling Stone, lists:  I think its a sign of a good show that I can remember each of these “best moments.”.

Charlie yells, Jim and Maggie flirt and Will gets baked

via The Best Moments From ‘The Newsroom’ Season One | Movies News | Rolling Stone.

bookworms, old age, Mental Floss:

“Our study suggests that exercising your brain by taking part in activities such as [reading, writing, and playing with puzzles] across a person’s lifetime, from childhood through old age, is important for brain health in old age,” says study co-author Robert S. Wilson, PhD, senior neuropsychologist at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center.

For six years prior to their deaths, 294 people took cognitive tests, which examined their memory and clear thinking. The subjects also recounted how frequently they exercised their brains by reading a newspaper or book (or favorite blog, ah hem); writing a letter; playing a thinking game like chess or Sudoku; or visiting a museum or theater. All the subjects, part of the Rush Memory and Aging Process, donated their brains to science so that the researchers could examine them after death. (Currently, the only way to definitively determine if someone suffers from Alzheimer’s is to look at the brain post-mortem for tangles, lesions, and plaques, hallmarks of the disease.)

via Bookworms Have Better Brains in Old Age | Mental Floss.

Manhattanhenge, NYC: I’d like to see “Manhattenhenge.”

 

Manhattanhenge occurs when the setting sun is perfectly aligned with Manhattan’s rectangular grid of streets, lighting up the north and south sides of every cross street. The pretty spectacle happens four times a year, on two sets of two consecutive days, typically in May and July.

This photo, taken by Lou Barber, shows how the setting sun casts warm, orange light along the street corridors.

via Manhattanhenge Gallery: Photos of NYC’s Special Sunsets | LiveScience.

Funniest Responses to the War on Women, LOL, political humor:

Funniest Responses to the War on Women: http://bit.ly/12rNNrN

via (2) Political Humor.

Atlanta Zoo, twin pandas:

Kim Severson ‏@kimseverson 5m

Lun Lun had some fun fun. Twin pandas born at Atlanta zoo. http://on.thec-l.com/146LryQ

via (10) Twitter

ATLANTA — A giant panda named Lun Lun gave birth Monday at Zoo Atlanta to two tiny cubs, the first twin pandas born in the United States since 1987, zoo spokeswoman Keisha Hines announced.

The 15-year-old panda went into labor Monday afternoon and gave birth to the first cub at 6:21 p.m. EDT and the second two minutes later. Hines said zookeepers who had been anticipating only one cub based on a recent ultrasound were surprised by the first-ever twin panda births at Zoo Atlanta.

“We have twins!” Zoo Atlanta announced on its website.

via Twin pandas born at Zoo Atlanta | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com.

2013 summer weather

CS Lewis, quotes:

@CSLewisDaily: “He who has God and everything else has no more than he who has God only.” ‪#‎cslewis‬

 

 

15
Jul
13

7.15.13 … Astronaut Tom Marshburn: “The space station is an incredible machine, the greatest engineering achievement human beings have ever put together” …The Cuckoo’s Calling, publishers’ embarrassment … Hugh Grant: “It has Hugh Grant in it who is a bit tiresome at this point, but it is from 1995 before he got so caught up in his own stereotype” … The Rosetta Stone 1799 … kids on feminism – amusing …

Astronaut Tom Marshburn, ISS, NASA, CharlotteObserver.com:  “The space station is an incredible machine, the greatest engineering achievement human beings have ever put together.”

Astronaut and Statesville native Tom Marshburn returned to Earth on May 15 from the International Space Station, but he’s still feeling the effects of his five months in space.

“I don’t have all of my stamina back,” Marshburn said in telephone interview this week. But that’s to be expected, Marshburn said, and he’s now lifting weights as he follows NASA’s regimen to restore returning astronauts to full strength.

Marshburn and two fellow flight engineers launched aboard their Soyuz TMA-07M spacecraft in December from Kazakhstan for a two-day journey to the International Space Station.

He landed back in Kazakhstan with Expedition 35 Commander Chris Hadfield of Canada and Soyuz Commander Roman Romanenko of Russia.

Marshburn will be in his hometown in September for events being arranged by Statesville Mayor Costi Kutteh, he said.

Marshburn, 52, graduated from Davidson College in 1982 with a bachelor’s degree in physics and from Wake Forest University in 1989 with a doctorate in medicine.

He joined NASA in 1994 as a flight surgeon.

He made his first spacewalk July 20, 2009, when he stepped out of the International Space Station’s hatch and stayed out most of the afternoon.

On his latest trip, Marshburn said, International Space Station crew members conducted 130 experiments dealing with questions such as how fluids form and how fire propagates. The space station has six crew members virtually all of the time, he said.

They handled two emergencies: a coolant leak near the end of their stay and an earlier temporary loss of communication with Mission Control in Houston.

Fresh perspective of Earth

“At the space station right now, we have a spacewalk going on with two of my good buddies,” Marshburn said. “The space station is an incredible machine, the greatest engineering achievement human beings have ever put together.”

Marshburn was a prolific tweeter from space, sharing photos of Earth and thoughts on its splendor.

“Was greeted this AM by some spectacular hues,” Marshburn tweeted from his @AstroMarshburn Twitter account one morning. “U can always tell ur over Australia by the brilliant brick red color.”

He had 42,666 followers as of Wednesday afternoon. His July 8 tweet: “Rainfall never looks the same after living in space. I’ll love the sight and sound for the rest of my life.”

“Part of our job is to tell people about space, what it is like to live in space,” Marshburn said. “They have paid (for the missions) with their tax dollars, so we want to let them know about this incredible, life changing experience.”

via Q&A: Astronaut Tom Marshburn recovering from space journey | CharlotteObserver.com.

The Cuckoo’s Calling, publishers’ embarrassment JK Rowling, Telegraph:

The Cuckoo’s Calling was published in April under the name of “Robert Galbraith”, who according to his biography was a former plainclothes military policeman who had left the Army in 2003 to work in the private security industry.

It achieved glowing reviews and laudatory quotations for the cover from well-known crime writers.

However, suspicions were aroused by the author’s assured writing style and skill at describing women’s clothes and people’s appearances, leading some readers to speculate that an established female novelist might be behind the book.

Further detective work by The Sunday Times uncovered the fact that Mr Galbraith and Miss Rowling shared the same publisher and editor, and on Sunday she confessed to the deception.

via The Cuckoo’s Calling: publishers’ embarrassment at turning down JK Rowling detective novel – Telegraph.

 Hugh Grant:  What a great description of Hugh Grant … thanks, Liz!

Watched one of my favorite movies tonight: “The Englishman Who Went Up A Hill But Came Down A Mountain.” It has Hugh Grant in it who is a bit tiresome at this point, but it is from 1995 before he got so caught up in his own stereotype. Check it out if you want a sweet movie with humor and a happy ending.

The Rosetta Stone,  1799, Linear B,integral linguistic finds:

SI Associates ‏@SmithsonianTSA 58m

The Rosetta Stone was discovered today in 1799. Do you know about Linear B, another integral linguistic find? http://s.si.edu/186KdpO

Retweeted by Smithsonian

via Twitter.

kids, feminism,  Brain Pickings: amusing …

Recently my nine-year-old son and I were looking around the house for a ruler for his homework assignment. I observed to him that when I was growing up, most rulers had the golden rule printed upon them. “What’s that?” he asked. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you,” I replied. “Oh,” he said, “I know where you got that. You got that at all those ERA [Equal Rights Amendment] meetings.” Click!

Betsy Brinson

Richmond, Virginia

August 1980 Issue

via Kids on Feminism: Amusing and Poignant Responses from Children in the 1970s-1980s | Brain Pickings.

03
Jun
13

6.3.13 … I mentioned a few weeks ago that I had caught the bug … the bug is following the ISS and its dwellers … Currently i love to follow @AstroKarenN

ISS , NASA, Tom Marshburn,  Karen Nyberg, @AstroKarenN, education, space, science:  I mentioned a few weeks ago that I had caught the bug … the bug is following the ISS and its dwellers … I have to thank Davidson classmate Tom Marshburn for this new hobby.  Although I am missing the personal connection to Tom, I currently am following   Karen Nyberg, @AstroKarenN.  If you have school age children, I cannot think of a better way to introduce them to space and science. Oh, I  am waiting for her to answer questions about her hair …

Sunday morning Space Coffee House. Double Mocha Cappuccino and a Cinnamon Scone. Life is good in LEO. pic.twitter.com/nYqzpo0IbI

via Twitter / AstroKarenN: Sunday morning Space Coffee ….

Soyuz Launch

NASA’s Karen Nyberg, the European Space Agency’s Luca Parmitano and Russia’s Fyodor Yurchikhin are scheduled to launch to space from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan onboard a Russian Soyuz spaceship at 4:31 p.m. EDT (2031 GMT), arriving at the space station about six hours later.

via Soyuz Launch Today To Send Astronauts, Cosmonaut To ISS.

25
May
13

5.25.13 … random and/or interesting or both …

NYC Subway,  Riders’ Quirks,  Studies, Sophie Blackall, NYTimes.com: I love to take pictures of people on subways … they often do not like it, but no one has ever asked me to delete a picture. I also love it that the poster above the passengers is by Sophie Blackall, the artist commissioned for NYC subsway which I have commented on before.

The decisions arrive with each approaching train, testing the hard-won instincts of the New York City subway rider — world-weary, antisocial and at all times strategic.

Riders on the A train in Manhattan on Monday. A study shows that some prefer to stand, even when seats are available.

Stand, or sit in a crowded row, brushing thighs with strangers?

Surrender a seat to a shuffling elder, or pretend not to notice his buckling knees? Remain in the same seat throughout the ride, or contend for a more desired seat near a door?

Now, the daily seating calculations of subway riders have been recorded for academic use, as part of an observational study conducted by researchers of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. A draft of their report, published on the Web site of the Transportation Research Board, drew on data collected over three weeks in late winter 2012.

Some of the findings might seem intuitive to the veteran subway rider, even if the rationale is not.

When a subway car has more passengers than seats, the study found that an average of 10 percent or more of the seats were not taken. And even when a subway car is less than half-filled, the authors found that a small percentage of riders would inevitably choose to stand.

via Subway Riders’ Quirks Studied – NYTimes.com.

3D food printer, technology, NASA,  world hunger, Fox News: interesting …

3d-printer-schematic.jpg

A schematic diagram shows how a 3D printer for food would work. (SMRC)

NASA has announced it is to fund construction of the world’s first ever 3D food printer.

The American space company has given a $125,000 grant to mechanical engineer Anjan Contractor, who has already designed the machine. And the space agency hopes it will eventually be able to provide food for astronauts on long-distance journeys through space.

Some commentators also say the design is just as exciting for Earth-dwellers, as the machines could eventually become a standard kitchen appliance. Families would then be able to simply print off their dinner, rather than spend time preparing it.

Once it is up and running, Contractor will test the machine by trying to print a pizza, which was an obvious choice due to its flat shape.

The dough will be printed first, then the tomato base, then the “protein-layer” topping.

3D printing hit headlines recently when a group of American anarchists created a 3D printed gun and published the designs globally, allowing anyone with a 3D printer to create a firearm.

..

‘We eventually have to change our perception of what we see as food.’

– Mechanical engineer Anjan Contractor

via NASA to fund world’s first 3D food printer | Fox News.

Gilmore Girls, Madeleine Albright, kith/kin: One if my favorite episodes is this one with Madeleine Albright.

Photo: It's finally Friday, whew! Kick off your shoes and snuggle up with a pal. How do you plan on celebrating this three day weekend?

It was a dream in which Madeline’s character (herself) was recounting Rory’s birth instead of her mother who always does the same thing

via Gilmore Girls.

The Princess Bride, kith/kin: This one’s for my niece (happy birthday by the way!)

via The Princess Bride.

10
Apr
13

4.10.13 … It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! …

Thomas Marshburn, NASA, ISS, live event, It’s a Great Day to be a Wildcat!:  I’m headingup …

 

Right on cue, NASA Astronaut Tom Marshburn ’82 and his International Space Station crewmates will fly over campus tonight, in a 230-mile-high orbital preview to this Friday’s live video downlink in the 900 Room.

It’s been fun and an honor to be in the middle of planning for the downlink event, which will also be live-streamed on the Internet (see below). Trivia tidbit: My newsroom office in the college’s Julia Johnston House on Main Street is directly below the room where Tom roomed as a sophomore!

via It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s a Wildcat Astronaut!.

 




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