Posts Tagged ‘Neel Reid

15
Jan
19

1.14.19 … “Hiraeth describes a deep, inborn sense of yearning for a home, a feeling, a place or person that is beyond this plane of existence”

FPC – Charlotte, TMBS, vocabulary, word nerd, hireath, thin places: We began our FPC – Charlotte TMBS with a discussion of hiraeth and thin places.

1.8.19

Breadcoins, Cary Umhau, Washington DC:

I’m so excited by this article about Breadcoin. Cary is a co-founder!


Quentin Wilson, 56, uses a “Breadcoin” to buy breakfast Friday from Naomi Banks at the Mission Muffins food truck. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

Jeffrey Carter, who is homeless, carried two gold-colored coins in his palm as he approached the Mission Muffins cafe trailer in Northwest Washington to exchange them for a breakfast burrito and apple juice.

The quarter-size coins — each worth $2.20 and inscribed with part of the Lord’s Prayer and an image of wheat — were “Breadcoins,” a new form of currency in the District intended for people in need.

Inspired by the popularity of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, Breadcoins have circulated in the District since 2016, but they are still relatively unknown. They are an option for people who worry that giving money to those in need might be used to fuel an addiction.

Source: ‘Breadcoin’ is a new currency in D.C. for people in need – The Washington Post, https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2019/01/11/breadcoin-is-new-currency-dc-people-need/

1.11.19

Kith/kin, UNC-CH, student mental health: For years I have received the DTH daily email. I rarely read it. But today, I clicked on it and there was the daughter of one of my best friends. Nice shout out to e, Eleanor!

Does CAPS' referral system work?

Eleanor Murray, a first-year public policy and global studies major, at the James A. Taylor Building, where Counseling and Psychological Services is located, on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019.  “As someone who did not realize I had mental health issues, it was helpful and resourceful and I felt supported while trying to find a therapist,” Murray says of her experience with CAPS. Murray would recommend CAPS and likes the multiple treatment options offered at CAPS.

Source: Does CAPS’ referral system work? – The Daily Tar Heel, https://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2019/01/caps-short-term-therapy-experiences-0114

1.14.19

Georgetown SC, DeBordieu: One of my favorite places …

From surf and sand to sightseeing and beyond, Myrtle Beach is always a good idea. But, when it’s time for a break from the buzz of the Grand Strand, head less than an hour south to Georgetown, one of six towns that make up the Hammock Coast. Here, you’ll have easy access to a multitude of activities, museums, and dining options. Read on for our affordable guide to the highlights of South Carolina’s third oldest city.

Source: Southern Hospitality Meets Modern Style in Georgetown, South Carolina, 
https://www.shermanstravel.com/advice/easy-southern-escapes-georgetown-south-carolina

1.8.19

Coffee Shops, Third Place, Burney’s Sweets and More, New places: Barb and I enjoying this just opened bakery, as in yesterday. And I will go back!

Barb and I were discussing where to meet. I receive a daily email called Charlotte Agenda which had just this day mentioned this new bakery. I had not realized it was it’s second day until they asked if they could take our picture.

Give Burney’s a try! Bakery known for its fried stuffed croissants now open near Uptown – Charlotte Agenda, https://www.charlotteagenda.com/153909/bakery-known-for-its-fried-stuffed-croissants-now-open-near-uptown/

And I think this could be a great “third place.”

I recently read a book by Ray Oldenburg – The Great Good Place – which suggested another happy place candidate, perhaps the most viable of all. The book is scholarly but accessible, an anthropological / sociological analysis of cafés, coffee shops, bars, and other hangouts. The book introduced to me a new term – third place – that made instant sense.

Third places are where people congregate other than work or home. England has pubs, France has cafés, and Austria has coffee houses. Once upon a time in the United States, common third places included country stores, post offices, barber shops, hair salons, soda shops, and taverns.

As described by Oldenburg, third places share common features. First, they are neutral, meaning that all people can come and go without penalty. If you don’t go to your third place for a few days or weeks, your return is greeted with interest and enthusiasm. Contrast that with work or home, where your eventual return after days of absence would be greeted with a pink slip or divorce papers.

Source: Happy Places: Third Places | Psychology Today, 
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-good-life/200912/happy-places-third-places

cider v cider, I remember the first time …,

I remember discovering alcoholic cider when I traveled to England with my sis in 1978. I liked it!

In the American state of New Hampshire, the state beverage of apple cider is like unfiltered apple juice. Usually, mulled spices are added, turning it into a spiced, piping hot drink. But in the famed cider-growing region of Britain’s West Country, cider is a fermented, alcoholic beverage. Look further across Europe and you’ll find that America’s version of apple cider is the outlier—cidre in France and sidra in Spain are both akin to British hard cider, rather than the American mulled beverage. So, how did Americans end up with such a unique form of apple cider?

People have been making cider for thousands of years. Wild apples, Malus sylvestris, grew naturally in the ancient British Isles. The Romans encouraged apple cultivation for cider, and when Christian monks established monasteries, they also made the beverage. When European settlers traveled to North America, they took cider with them.

Source: Why Cider Means Something Completely Different in America and Europe – Gastro Obscura, https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-is-american-cider-nonalcoholic

1.10.19

Street art, public art, Charlotte NC: And some Charlotte street art … I have a few favorites.

Charlotte’s mural scene is on the rise. Large-scale painting events like Talking Walls Mural Festivaland #nodacanjam help bring local and national artists together to crank out multiple pieces at the same time. And developers and businesses are catching on to the value of investing in public art, as you’ll see in places like South End’s Design Center, as well as at a number of apartment complexes.

The following is a hefty guide to where you can find more than 60 murals around town.

Source: The definitive guide to 60+ Charlotte street murals, mapped – Charlotte Agenda, https://www.charlotteagenda.com/153556/the-definitive-guide-to-60-charlotte-street-murals-mapped/

Neel Reid, Brookwood Hills, Atlanta GA,

Some Neel Reid and Brookwood Hills history for you.

The house is perfectly balanced, and though the facade appears plain at first sight, the bold ornaments draw the eye — the pediment across the front, balanced above a smaller pediment over a wide, ornate doorway topped by a sunken half circle.

These elements tell you the work you are looking at is not by your average architect but by an artist — a poet if you will — a man who brought beauty and precision to everything he touched.

Built in 1922, the house at 14 Palisades Road is the last man standing in a way.

It is one of seven Neel Reid designed just north of Ansley Park, a small settlement of houses designed by one of the South’s preeminent architects before there was a Brookwood Hills, and when Buckhead was several miles north on Peachtree Road.

Source: Brookwood Hills home one of seven originals and the last standing | Opinion | mdjonline.com, https://www.mdjonline.com/neighbor_newspapers/northside_sandy_springs/opinion/brookwood-hills-home-one-of-seven-originals-and-the-last/article_7400e9bc-1495-11e9-9300-cbcd24a794df.html

Longest Shutdown, Peggy Noonan:

I’ll throw in some­thing else I think we agree on. Gov­ern­ing by shut­down is ig­no­rant, cow­ardly and de­struc­tive. It is un­just to the in­no­cent, who are forced to deal with re­duced ser­vices, closed agen­cies and missed pay­checks. It’s dan­ger­ous: Some­thing bad will hap­pen with air se­cu­rity, food in­spec­tion—some­thing. It’s de­mor­al­iz­ing: It makes Amer­ica look in­com­pe­tent in the world, un­sta­ble, like an empty ad­ver­sary and in­ca­pable friend. It harms the de­mo­c­ra­tic spirit be­cause it so vividly tells Amer­i­cans—rubs their faces in it—that they’re pawns in a game as both par­ties pur­sue their self­ish ends.

Source:
End This Stupid Shutdown

1.10.19

Shutdown, Youngstown Steel, SCOTUS, Presidential Powers, US Constitution:

Justice Hugo Black delivered the majority opinion for the Court. Although it was the decision of the majority, it was clear that the Justices were split on a number of issues, as there five concurring opinions entered as well. Justice Black’s decision found for the steel industry, declaring that “[t]he President’s power, if any, to issue the order must stem either from an act of Congress or from the Constitution itself. There is no statute that expressly authorizes the President to take possession of property as he did here. Nor is there any act of Congress…from which such a power can be fairly implied.” The Court also found that, “[i]n the framework of our Constitution, the President’s power to see that the laws are faithfully executed refutes the idea that he is to be a lawmaker.”

Amongst the concurring opinions, and even compared to the majority opinion, Justice Robert Jackson’s still stands out today as the most useful in assessing the extent of executive power. Justice Jackson rejected strict boundaries between Congressional and Presidential power, and instead divided Presidential authority into three categories of legitimacy. First, and most legitimate, were cases in which “[t]he President acts pursuant to an express or implied authorization of Congress.” Second, is when Congress has been silent on the issue. And finally, “[w]hen the President takes measures incompatible with the expressed or implied will of Congress, his power is at its lowest ebb.”

President Truman was shocked by the decision. He immediately ordered the return of the steel mills to their owners, and the workers went on strike right away. The strike lasted more than 50 days. The effect of the Court’s decision limiting Presidential powers, however, has continued to impact executive decision-making throughout our nation’s history.

Source: Youngstown Steel: The Supreme Court stands up to the President – National Constitution Center, https://constitutioncenter.org/blog/youngstown-steel-the-supreme-court-stands-up-to-the-president

1.8.19

Shutdown:

There’s a lot at stake here — much more than just the next craft beer to be discovered and Instagrammed.

What spiritual practices is your congregation taking on in the new year? … such as ….walking a labyrinth … And a shout out to Katie Crowe!

For some, that means a deepening commitment to spiritual practices – to a regular, intentional discipline of taking the time to draw closer to God.

Congregants at First Presbyterian in Conway, Arkansas, learned about various postures for prayer – raising their arms as a passage from Mark’s Gospel was read, to worship God with all their souls.

People both inside and outside of churches are using all sorts of practices – such as centering prayer or walking a labyrinth or using lectio divina to read Scripture. Some have roots in ancient practices of early Christianity. Some involve silence; some seek God’s presence through art or movement.

Some tap into technology – using apps such as Pray as You Go, which draws from Ignatian spirituality and gives folks material to listen to while out for a walk or commuting to work or school.

Practicing a spiritual discipline can be communal work as well.

Quotes: I collect quotes. This is a good place to share a few.

I’m reading the preview chapter of “A Light So Lovely: The Spiritual Legacy of Madeleine L’Engle, Author of A Wrinkle in Time” by Sarah Arthur.

I love the dedication.

“For my young sons, Micah and Sam. May you tesser well.”

https://media.harpercollinschristian.com/files/z/PDF/LightSoLovely_samptxt.pdf

When old age shall this generation waste,

Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe

Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou sayst,

“Beauty is truth, truth beauty,” – that is all

Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.

— Ode on a Grecian Urn”

To be silent does not mean to be inactive; rather it means to breathe in the will of God, to listen attentively and be ready to obey.

– Dietrich Bonhoeffer, “Meditating on the Word”

“Manners are what hold a society together .. that and a reliable postal system. Propriety is concern for other people. When that goes out the window the gates of hell are surely opened and ignorance is king”

– Jane Austen

It is an ongoing temptation to think of ourselves as living under a curse. The loss of a friend, an illness, an accident, a natural disaster, a war, or any failure can make us quickly think that we are no good and are being punished. This temptation to think of our lives as full of curses is even greater when all the media present us day after day with stories about human misery.

Jesus came to bless us, not to curse us. But we must choose to receive that blessing and hand it on to others. Blessings and curses are always placed in front of us. We are free to choose. God says, Choose the blessings!

Source: Henri Nouwen Society | Daily Meditation | Henri Nouwen Society,

https://henrinouwen.org/resources/daily-meditation/

LOL, Art School of Fish:

05
Dec
18

12.5.18 … Greenwood Ice Cream, nuf said …

Driving Mama Lindsey, Greenwood Ice Cream Company, chocolate orange ice cream, Ansley Park, Brookwood Hills, Neel Reid, Georgia’s Old Governor’s Mansion, Christmas Traditions Pineview GA

I must note that before our drive I visited the Greenwood Ice Cream Company factory store. They do not sell ice cream retail, only institutional sales to clubs and restaurants, and the store is decrepit. But if you grew up here you probably grew up on it. My brother has a favorite, Chocolate Orange, and I agreed to pick up the 1.5 gallon container. i

Back to the drive … We began the drive about 2 pm. It feels cold, but is gloriously sunny in Atlanta today. So we bundled up and headed out.

We started by heading south on I 85 and got off at Peachtree Street/Spring Street. We came up beside Rhodes Hall and talked about The Yellow Lantern, a small bookstore that was in the strip across the the street. We used to take my grandmother there when I was little. I remember being confused because she would “rent books.”

After that we drove through Ansley Park and discussed the usual friends and family who had lived there. Then as we were finishing up our route and were on The Prado, I noticed a small historical marker: The Granite Governor’s Mansion. Very interesting.

And then we headed north on Peachtree to Brookwood Hills. As we headed north, we discussed the 1958 Temple Bombing. Mom didn’t remember much, but she does remember visiting the Temple with a Bible Class. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_Benevolent_Congregation_Temple_bombing)

Brookwood Hills looks good. And we talked about how we hope the family that bought 139 Brighton from her in 2001 loves the house and neighborhood as much as we did. We made a few loops around the other streets, and as we exited on Palisades, we noticed that the Luxenburger’s house is on the market. They have lived there 50+ years. What a great house!

This architecturally significant Neel Reid gem has not been on the market in over 50 years! James Means heart of pine library and private garden addition is a rare treat. This home offers 10′ ceilings, spacious rooms & impeccable details throughout. Private gardens feature a slate patio, many original plantings, and an Ivan Bailey fountain.

(Source: Zillow, https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/14-Palisades-Rd-NE-Atlanta-GA-30309/35900238_zpid/)

And then out to Peachtree again. As we neared Peachtree Battle, she asked to stay on Peachtree all the way to Lenbrook.

So we creeped along noting all the new tall buildings.

I decided to ask her about her childhood memories in Pineview GA.

She prefaced the conversation by saying Christmas was not a big deal.

She and her mom would go to the woods and cut a tree, set it up and decorate it. Her mom did not cook because she had cooks, but she did bake cakes. She never remembers sharing a holiday meal at her grandmother’s house, but does remember sometimes going to Aunt Bertha and Uncle Josh’s house. She doesn’t remember any special presents. So in general Christmas was not a big deal. No wonder she always seemed overwhelmed by the big fuss my dad and his family made of it.

Another great ride.

12.5.18

10
Apr
14

4.10.14 … “‘It was the landscape of his childhood.’ … It was the landscape, in other words, of unfiltered experience, of things felt rather than thought through, of the world in its beauty absorbed before it is understood, of patterns and sounds that lodge themselves in some indelible place in the psyche and call out across the years.”

In Search of Home – NYTimes.com:  Excellent essay. Today, i was researching modern era sense of space, time and matter, and this just fits right in.

In a fascinating recent essay in The London Review of Books, called “On Not Going Home,” James Wood relates how he “asked Christopher Hitchens, long before he was terminally ill, where he would go if he had only a few weeks to live. Would he stay in America? ‘No, I’d go to Dartmoor, without a doubt,’ he told me. It was the landscape of his childhood.”

It was the landscape, in other words, of unfiltered experience, of things felt rather than thought through, of the world in its beauty absorbed before it is understood, of patterns and sounds that lodge themselves in some indelible place in the psyche and call out across the years.

That question is worth repeating: If I had only a few weeks to live, where would I go? It is a good way of getting rid of the clutter that distracts or blinds. I will get to that in a moment.

And it’s that essential openness of America, as well as the (linked) greater ease of living as a Jew in the United States compared with life in the land of Lewis Namier’s “trembling Israelites,” that made me become an American citizen and elect New York as my home. It’s the place that takes me in.

But it is not the place of my deepest connections. So, what if I had a few weeks to live? I would go to Cape Town, to my grandfather’s house, Duxbury, looking out over the railway line near Kalk Bay station to the ocean and the Cape of Good Hope. During my childhood, there was the scent of salt and pine and, in certain winds, a pungent waft from the fish processing plant in Fish Hoek. I would dangle a little net in rock pools and find myself hypnotized by the silky water and quivering life in it. The heat, not the dry high-veld heat of Johannesburg but something denser, pounded by the time we came back from the beach at lunchtime. It reverberated off the stone, angled into every recess. The lunch table was set and soon enough fried fish, usually firm-fleshed kingklip, would be served, so fresh it seemed to burst from its batter. At night the lights of Simon’s Town glittered, a lovely necklace strung along a promontory.

This was a happiness whose other name was home.

Wood writes: “Freud has a wonderful word, ‘afterwardness,’ which I need to borrow, even at the cost of kidnapping it from its very different context. To think about home and the departure from home, about not going home and no longer feeling able to go home, is to be filled with a remarkable sense of ‘afterwardness’: It is too late to do anything about it now, and too late to know what should have been done. And that may be all right.”

Yes, being not quite home, acceptance, which may be bountiful, is what is left to us.

via In Search of Home – NYTimes.com.

2 Vernon, Atlanta GA, Neel Reid, BuckheadA beautiful Neel Reid home was lost last week in a fire. Many of you knew the Hull family. All were safe including beasts.

I never knew the home’s facade on Vernon, but it’s rear, which you can see from Habersham, has always been a favorite of mine. I was so happy to read that they have all the original plans from the 20’s and hope to restore it. 

 

THE LOSS OF A NEEL REID DESIGNED HOME

 

An important Neel Reid (1885-1926) designed residence has fallen victim to a devastating fire that occurred late afternoon on Tuesday. The Atlanta based architect (with roots in Jacksonville, AL & Macon, GA) is revered for his classic designs, constructed around the early 20th century. I pulled my copy of James Grady’s Architecture of Neel Reid in Georgia (1973), and felt a sense of bittersweet to see the home proudly featured on the back cover (picture above). This Buckhead residence was designed for Mr. Cam Dorsey in 1925, and at the time Grady’s book was published, was owned by Mr. J. C. Fraser. It had 2 access points, the main off of Vernon Road, and secondary off of Habersham Road. A key focal point was the semihexagon designed front entrance porch. Photos below include details from Architecture of Need Reid in Georgia, followed by images of the home from the last 48 hours.

*Mr. Ferguson and I feel very fortunate to have had the opportunity to attend a party at this house, hosted by the current owners, and we are beyond heartbroken for them….   They took great care in preserving Reid’s original vision.

via {dF} Duchess Fare: The Loss of a Neel Reid Designed Home.

KEDL_Buckhead_mansion_2

 

A Buckhead family is in high spirits despite losing the main part of its historic home to a fire Tuesday.

Gerry Hull, owner of the house designed by renowned architect Neel Reid, said it will be rebuilt in the same design. The main part of the house, which is about 7,000 square feet, is a total loss, but the two additions on each end were mostly saved, he said.

According to William R. Mitchell Jr.’s book, “J. Neel Reid: Architect of Hentz, Reid and Adler and the Georgia School of Classicists,” the home was built for Cam Dorsey in 1923 and ’24.

“I’m going to put up a big sign, 6 feet tall, to say, ‘Sorry for the inconvenience. Neel Reid’s house will rise again, like the Phoenix,’” Hull said. “We have the original plans for Neel Reid and we have all the drawings and plans for the work that has been done subsequent to Neel Reid, so it will be put up so you won’t be able to tell the difference.”

Despite reports the fire started in the attic, Hull said it began at about 6:15 p.m. by a roofer who had been working on the home. He did not know the roofer’s name.

via Neighbor Newspapers – Historic Buckhead home destroyed by fire.

What Suffering Does – NYTimes.com:

But notice this phenomenon. When people remember the past, they don’t only talk about happiness. It is often the ordeals that seem most significant. People shoot for happiness but feel formed through suffering.

The right response to this sort of pain is not pleasure. It’s holiness. I don’t even mean that in a purely religious sense. It means seeing life as a moral drama, placing the hard experiences in a moral context and trying to redeem something bad by turning it into something sacred. Parents who’ve lost a child start foundations. Lincoln sacrificed himself for the Union. Prisoners in the concentration camp with psychologist Viktor Frankl rededicated themselves to living up to the hopes and expectations of their loved ones, even though those loved ones might themselves already be dead.

Recovering from suffering is not like recovering from a disease. Many people don’t come out healed; they come out different. They crash through the logic of individual utility and behave paradoxically. Instead of recoiling from the sorts of loving commitments that almost always involve suffering, they throw themselves more deeply into them. Even while experiencing the worst and most lacerating consequences, some people double down on vulnerability. They hurl themselves deeper and gratefully into their art, loved ones and commitments.

The suffering involved in their tasks becomes a fearful gift and very different than that equal and other gift, happiness, conventionally defined.

via What Suffering Does – NYTimes.com.

Barbara Brown Taylor, Learning to Walk in the Dark:  She talked on the topic at Davidson two years ago and I loved her. I heard her last fall and she was awful. She was way too focused on the minutiae of her research. I’m hoping the book reflects her more broad and anecdotal approach. And I’ve started the book and I am happy to say, the intro follows the approach at Davidson!!

IMG_9607

How did darkness become a synonym for everything wicked, sinister, or wrong? In her new book, Barbara Brown Taylor decides not to believe everything she hears about the dark. Instead of turning away from it she heads into it instead, embarking on a year-long journey that takes her into dark caves, underground nightclubs, subterranean chapels, and unlit cabins in the woods on nights with no moons. Along the way she discovers a spirituality of darkness that provides a life-saving antidote to the full solar spirituality available in the marketplace.

via Publications – Barbara Brown Taylor.

scrabble words, geocache:  🙂

Good Morning AmericaVerified account

‏@GMA

The new #Scrabble word is “Geocache”! #ScrabbleWordShowdown

via Twitter / GMA: The new #Scrabble word is ….

Most Popular Starbucks Drinks By City – Business Insider:  Funny. I match right up to Charlotte.

starbucks_beverage_preferences_mapbuilder_004

The most popular drinks nationwide were brewed coffees and lattes. The map lists the drinks that are ordered more often in each city than anywhere else.

The data also revealed that Seattle, Boston and Memphis are among the cities that prefer Starbucks’ dark brews, while Chicago, Philadelphia, Denver and Charlotte prefer the chain’s light offerings.

via Most Popular Starbucks Drinks By City – Business Insider.

Latta Arcade, Charlotte, Crisp:  The other day I had lunch in one of my favorite Charlotte venues, Latta Arcade … I’m going to Crisp and John to Fujiyama. I love this space … and its 100 this year.1966288_10152390436504052_1152134376091405997_o 10155448_10152390436509052_2691226617192916895_n

 

The Commission bases its judgement on the following considerations: 1) Latta Arcade was designed by important Charlotte architect, William H. Peeps, and built in 1914; 2) Latta Arcade was developed by Edward Dilworth Latta and his Charlotte Consolidated Construction Company, which was instrumental in the development of early twentieth century Charlotte; 3) the Latta Arcade was built as part of large scale commercial construction program undertaken by Latta during the boom years of the early twentieth century when Charlotte emerged as the largest city in North Carolina; and 4) the Latta Arcade has already been listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and the interior of the Latta Arcade has designated as a local historic landmark by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission.

via THE LATTA ARCADE.

Vidalia Onions: A Crop With an Image to Uphold – NYTimes.com, kith/kin:  I grew up with Vidalias, love them cooked  on the grill in a foil pouch with butter, salt, peeper and a bouillon cube! They were only available from May to the 4th of July … great memories of my dad.  🙂

onions

VIDALIA, Ga. — Like the rush to be the first to get bottles of Beaujolais nouveau to Paris or an Alaska Copper River king salmon to Seattle, the pressure to sell the first Vidalia onions of spring is intense. The identity of this town rests on the squat, sweet onion. This time of year, just before the first of the Vidalias are pulled from the sandy soil, the green tops farmers call quills cover nearly every field.

Mostly, Vidalias mean money in this corner of southern Georgia. The crop brings in about $150 million a year to legally registered growers in the 20 counties that make up the official Vidalia growing region.

But there is trouble in the onion fields. Three Vidalia growers took the state to court last year. Instead of shipping out their onions on April 21, a date set by the state for this year as a way to protect the Vidalia brand and to keep the playing field level, the growers wanted to send out some onions early.

via Vidalia Onions: A Crop With an Image to Uphold – NYTimes.com.

 

 

 

02
Jul
13

7.2.13 … The 696 Peachtree Street Apartments on the National Register of Historic Places …

696 Peachtree Street Apartments, Neel Reid, National Register of Historic Places, kith/kin, Atlanta INtown Paper | Atlanta INtown Paper:  My mom always said she would like to live here if she ever moved from Brookwood Hills.  She always has had excellent taste.

 

696 Peachtree

The 696 Peachtree Street Apartments on Peachtree Street in Atlanta have been listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The property owners sponsored the nomination and Georgia State University graduate students prepared the nomination materials.

Built 1922-1923, the apartment building is one of the last works of noted architect Neel Reid before his death in 1926.

via Peachtree St. apartment building now in historic register – Atlanta INtown Paper | Atlanta INtown Paper.




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