Posts Tagged ‘New Year’s Resolutions

06
Feb
13

2.6.13 … I would like to have style … 45 and goofy in Atlanta …

Coco Chanel, quotes, fashion:  

Media

via Fashion fades Coco Chanel wall decal vinyl sticker – Polyvore.

adult play, Spacious:  I personally think this is very funny … What do you think, O Spacious One , Cary Umhau?

Over the more than two decades that 10 middle-aged friends from Spokane, Wash., have been locked in a game of Tag, there have been years when almost nothing happened.

But already this week, ‘It’ has changed hands twice.

The game is live only in February so it resumed late last week. Mike Konesky was ‘It’ heading into this year’s action and he made his move on Sunday.

via In Epic Game of Tag, There’s a New ‘It’ – The Juggle – WSJ.

Civil War Sesquicentennial Commemoration,  Library of Congress, Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust, events:

Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust to Commemorate the Civil War Sesquicentennial at the Library of Congress

An estimated 620,000 Union and Confederate soldiers lost their lives in the Civil War. These deaths permanently transformed the character of American society.

Drew Gilpin Faust, 28th President of Harvard University and Lincoln Professor of History in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences, will join Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Ric Burns in exploring this theme on Wednesday, Feb. 27, at noon in the Coolidge Auditorium, located on the ground floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First Street, S.E., Washington, D.C.

This event is free and open to the public; no tickets are required.

The event is presented in conjunction with the Library of Congress exhibition “The Civil War in America,” which commemorates the 150th anniversary of the war and runs through June 1, 2013.

As part of the presentation, Burns will feature clips from his PBS documentary “Death and the Civil War,” which was based upon Faust’s book “This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War” (2008), winner of the Bancroft Prize in 2009 and a finalist for both a National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize. Faust will sign copies of her books immediately following the presentation. Also participating in the presentation will be Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

via Harvard University President to Commemorate the Civil War | News Releases – Library of Congress.

Georges Seurat, Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, followup, FB, Theartblab.com:  I have funny friends … Follow up to  yesterday’s post.

…the monkey was the answer to a Jeopardy question.

Ferris Bueller likes it too!

Is that Beyonce with the umbrella? it looks like she has a little bedunkadunk in the trunk. He is also a favorite artist of mine.

language,  Indian English, retroflex, The Economist:  I actually have wondered about this.

A FRIEND recently asked me what gives Indian English its unique sound. With 22 constitutionally recognised languages in India, and hundreds more spoken, how is it that many Indians’ English accents sound fairly similar? Part of the answer has to do with a set of sounds used across the country: retroflex consonants.

Indian retroflexes are fun to produce. Curl your tongue back and strike your palate, and you’re in position to articulate one. English distinguishes voiced and unvoiced consonants (the difference between [d] and [t], based on whether the larynx vibrates). Many Indian languages further distinguish consonants by whether a puff of air comes out or not (aspirated or unaspirated). So the retroflex consonants in, for example, Hindi, include ʈ (unvoiced unaspirated), ʈh (unvoiced aspirated), ɖ (voiced unaspirated), and ɖh (voiced aspirated). Most Indian languages also include two more retroflex consonants, ɳ and ʂ. It’s common for Indian English-speakers to substitute retroflex ʈ and ɖ where Western English-speakers use [t] and [d], which Indian languages don’t have. This substitution is part of Indian English’s special sound.

via Language in India: The humble retroflex | The Economist.

African elephants,  Serengeti National Park, ecology, BBC Nature: Having seen theses beasts in South Africa, they are truly sensitive beasts …

Wild African elephants prefer to live in safer, protected areas and become stressed when they leave them.

Scientists have found African elephants living outside Serengeti National Park are more stressed than those within the protected area.

More elephants also choose to live inside the park, suggesting they “know” which areas are safer to live in, and actively avoid humans.

Details are published in the African Journal of Ecology.

Serengeti National Park helps protect animals from threats such as illegal hunting and habitat disturbance.

via BBC Nature – African elephants prefer Serengeti National Park.

New Year’s Resolutions, Starbucks, Atlanta, Brookhaven – the historic neighborhood: I can only have lattes on weekends and they must be skinny. Exception: I can have one if I walk there … 45 and goofy in ATL this morning.Great morning walk to nearby Starbucks and then through my second favorite Atlanta neighborhood, Brookhaven – the historic neighborhood, not the new DeKalb County city.  Oh, And i meant 45 and foggy … Thank you, autocorrect.

real-time advertising,  2013 Super Bowl ads, 2013 Super Bowl blackout, follow-up:  Very interesting …

Sunday’s power outage provided the perfect surprise for brands to pounce on creatively. Tide shrewdly tweeted, “We can’t get your #blackout. But we can get your stains out.” In a dig at their luxury car rival, Audi tweeted, “Sending some LEDs to the @MBUSA Superdome right now…” At Mondelēz International, our Oreo brand team and their agency partners sat together in a war room and came up with this gem, which has since been re-tweeted more than 15,000 times:

This was a big, albeit unplanned moment, but the beauty of real-time content is that there’s always something interesting happening in the world, and always an audience who cares about it. The ubiquity of digital technology and mobile devices enables people at far corners of the globe to share moments together, regardless of where they’re located, their economic status, or how old they are. By focusing content development around these shared cultural moments, marketers can transcend the demographics-driven targeting that has for so long defined the industry, reaching more people in a more relevant way.

We saw firsthand the power of tapping into big cultural moments when we celebrated Oreo’s 100th birthday in 2012. We produced 100 consecutive “Daily Twists,” spotlighting global cultural developments, as they happened, through an Oreo lens. Covering everything from LGBT Pride Month to the Mars Rover landing, we were able to join the global conversation with fresh content, and this timeliness nearly tripled the level of consumer engagement compared to the three months prior to the campaign.

via The Power of Real-Time Advertising – B. Bonin Bough – Harvard Business Review.

Atlanta, labyrinth walking, Solvitur Ambulando – It is solved by walking, Lenbrook, kith/kin, The Cathedral of St. Philips, Swan House, Buckhead, Driving Mamma Lindsey, The State Botanical Garden of Georgia, Dr. Wilf Nicholls:  

So excited I will soon have a new outdoor labyrinth to walk in Atlanta!!   Found this via google from December …

.Photo: Great progress on the outdoor labyrinth!

A fun lunch at the Lenbrook Grill where i caught up with Katherine and her mom, uncle and cousin. She says hello to you, Catherine and Cary.

After lunch, mom and I took a drive. First stop … St. Philip’s where I walked their recently completed labyrinth.

A few notes from my walk … It’s an absolute perfect winter day in Atlanta. It must be 60° and the sky is clear blue.  I have gone over to the Cathedral of St. Philip  and walked their newly completed 11-curcuit labyrinth. There’s something special about walking the labyrinth for the first time. And there is also something special about walking a labyrinth that you know you will walk many times more.

When you know you’re going to walk it many times, you become very observant of the seasons and the plantings and the landscape around you.

This one is by far the most beautiful one that I have walked in the midst of skyscrapers. That is interesting to me because i grew up here, and when i grew up here, there were no skyscrapers.

Again it was an absolutely beautiful walk on an absolutely beautiful day. And I walked barefoot!!

           IMG_5465

IMG_5454

IMG_5455IMG_5460IMG_5461IMG_5458

IMG_5464IMG_5463IMG_5457IMG_5456

IMG_5462

Then we did our usual riding and telling stories … Driving Mamma Lindsey! We drove by the former home my cousins, the Mauldins, and those of Lillian, Catherine, Roline, Bryna, Lethea and Gregor.

And the gates were open to the Swan House.

And now I am back at Lenbrook listening to the director of The State Botanical Garden of Georgia, Dr. Wilf Nicholls. Current topic is rethinking landscape in light of the seasonal drought … Dr. Nicholls was a very good speaker … even though he doesn’t wear pants … he wears trousers (his joke not mine) … New botanical garden director gets ‘acclimatized’ | Online Athens.

A native of London, Nicholls spent the first 22 years of his career as a horticulturist in Vancouver, British Columbia, a temperate Pacific climate that, despite its northern latitude, is only a single zone cooler than our own. Nonetheless, the torrid temperatures that greeted him upon hisarrival in Athens in early September came as something of a shock. “Ninety-five degrees is just stunning!” he says, “But I’ll get acclimatized, I had to get acclimatized from Vancouver to Newfoundland.”

via New botanical garden director gets ‘acclimatized’ | Online Athens.

And a final birthday celebration with my mom and siblings and one in-law!

IMG_5473 IMG_5477

Julie Andrews, ‘Sound of Music’ Remake,  Speakeasy: Hmmmm … Why?

Speakeasy asked Andrews what she thought of NBC’s recently-announced plans to redo “The Sound of Music” with country singer Carrie Underwood in the lead role that Andrews helped make famous. We also asked Andrews if she planned to play a part in the remake.

“No, I don’t think I will,” Andrews replied. “Listen—how long ago was it out? 50 something years ago? … So, 48 years, probably time that a remake is allowed. Why not? ‘Cinderella’ has been done, ‘Mary Poppins’ has been put on stage in the theater. It’s all part of the process of those wonderful properties going out and reaching another audience. No, I won’t be in it, but I do endorse everything. I mean why not?”

via Julie Andrews Sounds Off on That ‘Sound of Music’ Remake – Speakeasy – WSJ.

Downton Abbey, Facebook, LOL:

via Downton Abbey Facebook Recap Season 3 Episode 3 | Happy Place.

Lenbrook, kith/kin:  They have cushions in Fine Dining, too … Helps the residents get up easier. 🙂

Monopoly, pop culture, RIP:  A cat?!? RIP, iron …

via A cat?!? RIP, iron ….

Monopoly fans voted in an online contest to add a new cat token to the property-trading game, replacing the iron, toy maker Hasbro Inc. said Wednesday.

Monopoly fans voted in an online contest to add a new cat token to the property-trading game, replacing the iron. George Stahl has details on Markets Hub.

The results were announced after the shoe, wheelbarrow and iron were neck and neck in the final hours of voting that sparked passionate efforts by fans to save their favorite tokens and businesses eager to capitalize on publicity surrounding pieces that represent their products.

via Cat Added to Monopoly’s Token Lineup – WSJ.com.

04
Jan
12

1.4.2012 … Iowa pig whisker … “The Brady Bunch” margin … ITSO

 Iowa Caucuses, 2012 Presidential Election, tweets:

AJC @ajc Close

Romney edges Santorum by an Iowa pig whisker. bit.ly/A06P6b

Jeff Elder @JeffElder Close

Unbelievable: Romney wins Iowa Caucus by EIGHT votes. He just won by a margin of “The Brady Bunch.” #iacaucus

The Washington Post @washingtonpost Close

Rick Perry spent more than $300 per vote in #Iowa; Santorum, only 73 cents wapo.st/zEltYa

Steve Jobs, Apple, action figures, icons:  Weird and expensive!

How long should you wait to cash in on the likeness of a universally beloved and recently deceased innovator? Just a few months, apparently, because Chinese company In Icons is looking to ship a disturbingly ultra-realistic 12-inch Steve Jobs action figure for $99 starting in February.

Accessories, no surprise, include Jobs’ standard uniform: glasses, black turtleneck sweater, jeans and New Balance sneakers. The action figure also comes with a “One more thing” backdrop so you can stage your very own mini product launch, although the to-scale iPad, iPhone 4 and first-ever Mac will cost you extra. The red apples (one with a bite taken out of it) should come in handy for any photo shoots you decide to set up in your living room.

via Chinese Company Selling Eerily Realistic Steve Jobs Action Figure | Techland | TIME.com.

careers, connectivity, lifestyle, culture, anxiety, ITSO:  I don’t work (outside the home), and I allow myself to be anxious that I might miss something in my world.

Now I know we’re all supposed to be grown-ups and switching off should be a simple enough decision, but the fact is addictions to BlackBerries and other hand-held devices are powerful and nobody expects addicts to self-administer the right medicine without some help. The Volkswagen decision reflects growing evidence of stress-related burnout tied to employees’ inability to separate their working and private lives now that developed societies live in a 24/7 paroxysm of connection.

Employee burnout has become an issue in socially conscious Germany — the object of a Spiegel cover story following the resignation in September of a prominent Bundesliga soccer coach, Ralf Rangnick of Schalke, who complained of exhaustion. A Volkswagen spokesman in Wolfsburg told Bloomberg News the company had to balance the benefits of round-the-clock access to staff with protecting their private lives.

Inside those German private lives, I’d wager, couples are experiencing the now near-universal irritation of finding conversations interrupted by a familiar glance toward the little screen, or conversations deadened by the state of near-permanent distraction from their immediate surroundings in which people live. Device-related marital rows must now be running close to back-seat driving and how to raise the kids as the leading cause of domestic discord.

Connectivity aids productivity. It can also be counterproductive by generating that contemporary state of anxiety in which focus on any activity is interrupted by the irresistible urge to check e-mail or texts; whose absence can in turn provoke the compounded anxiety of feeling unloved or unwanted just because the in-box is empty for a nanosecond; whose onset can in turn induce the super-aggravated anxiety that is linked to low self-esteem and poor performance.

Inhabiting one place — that is to be fully absorbed by and focused on one’s surroundings rather than living in some diffuse cyberlocation composed of the different strands of a device-driven existence — is a fast-dwindling ability. This in turn generates a paradox: People have never traveled as much but at the same time been less able to appreciate the difference between here and there.

To be permanently switched on is also to switch off to what takes time to be seen. A lot of good ideas, as well as some of life’s deeper satisfactions, can get lost that way.

Inability to switch off (ITSO) is a modern curse.

It’s the start of a new year, a time for resolutions. To each his own, but I know this: Nobody will ever lie on his or her deathbed and say: “I should have kept my device on longer.”

via A Time to Tune Out – NYTimes.com.

New Year’s Resolutions, journaling, blogging, Maira Kalman:  This is my resolution … I so admire maira kalman’s illustrated op-eds that I have decided that this is where I want to go with my creative efforts in 2012 … wish me luck.

The Creative Artist’s Journal

– Draw all the images and designs you’ve always said, ‘someday I’ll start to draw’. Doodle, jot ideas down, plan the new layout of your dream kitchen!

– Write all of the poetry you’ve kept stored up in your soul or just a sentence that might inspire you later on to write your masterpiece!

– Write or illustrate the things you dream about doing. It will be fun to look back later to see if you made them come true!

Go to Amazon.com for Artist’s Journal Workshop: Creating Your Life in Words and Pictures. The perfect guide to becoming a creative Journalista. In addition, log on to author, Cathy Johnson’s website, where she will jump start your creativity.

via http://thedailybasics.visibli.com/share/98se11

Tim Tebow, t-shirts, culture, faith and spirituality:  I will be interested to see how this one sells … Our culture would rather “worship” a player’s hair/moustache by wearing a t-shirt than wear this one … just a guess …

“Every Time Tebow Scores An Angel Gets Its Wings”

via Tebow T-Shirt Time | Thrillist.

 

04
Jan
11

1.4.2011 … last day with the boys in town … will miss them … but they have become night owls … not sure what they look like in daylight.

economists, ethics, Davidson:  When I was a senior, I remember a professor telling me I was an economist … I wondered what that meant … not much I guess.  I also remember a class at Davidson called “The Emergence of Professions.”  In that class we discussed the difference between an expert/ a specialist and a professional.  Only professionals were governed by a fiduciary duty to their customer (patient, client, student, etc.).

Economists are no purer than anyone else, and I share the view of my fellow Economix blogger Nancy Folbre that we all have room to become better people. But I’m skeptical that the A.E.A. is well suited to arbitrate the ethics of the economics profession.In one area, however, the A.E.A. can act productively: It can create clear conflict-of-interest disclosure rules for its prestigious journals.The film “Inside Job” raised disturbing questions about whether economists who regularly wrote or opined on various policy debates failed to report relevant background information, such as board memberships or consulting arrangements. The accusations are serious, and it seems clear that the profession has been carelessly cavalier about conflicts of interest.As individuals, most of us could do with higher moral standards, but what are the appropriate institutional remedies?It would be nice to think that the American Economic Association could lay down a code of ethics that would solve everything, but that would be a vast institutional overreach. The biggest problem with that approach is that the A.E.A. is not a licensing or accrediting association, like the American Bar Association.The A.E.A. publishes journals, organizes an annual meeting and gives out awards, such as the John Bates Clark Medal. Membership in the A.E.A. is not selective, and many economists choose not to join, without much harm to their professional reputation I think I’ve let my own membership lapse.

The American Economic Association has successfully operated for 125 years, and part of its success comes from staying above the fray. Its primary purpose is to encourage the exchange of ideas through meetings and journals. It can and should regulate those journals better, but it doesn’t have the authority to try to regulate other aspects of economists’ lives.

via Edward L. Glaeser: Where to Draw a Line on Ethics – NYTimes.com.

random, kudos, South Africa:

Project: Report 2010 is a partnership between YouTube and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, made possible by Sony and Intel. The contest invited aspiring reporters to share their stories with the world.

With two rounds over three months, short documentary assignments were judged on the quality of the stories reported and the production value of the videos. An expert panel led by the Pulitzer Center chose ten finalists from the first round to receive technology prizes from Sony and Intel. The ten finalists then competed to receive one of five $10,000 grants to work with the Pulitzer Center on an under-reported international story. See the official rules.

The winners were announced in May 2010. The five winners received travel grants to report on an under-reported international story with the Pulitzer Center.

The winners’ reporting projects are now underway:

And Mark Jeevaratnam , who explored the effects of mountain top removal mining in Kentucky, reports on how soccer may have the potential to improve the lives of South African youths.

food trucks, street art, random, quote:

“Pie is the new donut, or pie is the new cupcakes…and the truck thing, I don’t know how long that’ll last. I don’t know where they eat it, that’s what I can’t figure out about a truck. Where the hell do you eat it?”

via Mimi Sheraton on Food Trucks | The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More.

Apple, marketing: Amazing … “It’ll be the elephant in the Las Vegas Convention Center: the endlessly discussed outsider whose absence helps define the show.”

Slate PCs, smartbooks and the Que were rendered largely irrelevant by the iPad, which Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduced in San Francisco two weeks after last year’s CES. The fact that the most influential company in the business chooses to hold its own launch events on its own schedule further erodes CES’s usefulness as a predictor of next big things, but it doesn’t mean that Apple won’t be on everyone’s minds. It’ll be the elephant in the Las Vegas Convention Center: the endlessly discussed outsider whose absence helps define the show.

via The 2011 Consumer Electronics Show: What to Expect – TIME.

Great Recession, BofA:  I hope he is right.  🙂

Jim Cramer thinks Bank of America could break out after addressing its housing losses head on.

via Cramer: BofA Could Break Out JPM, C, WFC, BAC – TheStreet TV.

Politics, Congress, culture:  I wonder if this lack of spousal friendships is a factor in what is viewed as a lack of  congeniality among members of Congress.

In its midcentury heyday, 50 or so members of the Senate Wives’ Club, met at 10 o’clock each Tuesday morning, Democrats and Republicans alike, sitting together in Red Cross uniforms, rolling bandages and exchanging the intimate details of their lives. “We became close friends,” remembers Ellen Proxmire, whose late husband, William Proxmire, spent three decades in the Senate. “We all lived here. We would see each other on weekends.”

Today, the club, long ago renamed Senate Spouses in a nod to the growing number of women in Congress, meets about once a month, and fewer than a dozen attend. “A lot of the Senate wives don’t live here,” explains Proxmire, “so it would be harder to have a weekly meeting.” When Michelle Obama hosted the annual First Lady luncheon for the club this past July — harkening back to a time when the likes of Van Cliburn and Marvin Hamlisch played at the event– only 45 or so current Senate spouses showed for Jill Biden’s slideshow of her recent trip to Iraq, over crab cakes and grilled shrimp. The room was filled out by Proxmire and other wives of senators long-retired. “It wasn’t unusually well attended,” she says.

As the 112th Congress opens, the family lives of the nation’s lawmakers are in disarray. Newsweek recently reached 46 of the 107 freshman members of Congress, and only one—Mike Lee, the newly elected Republican senator from Utah—said he or she was planning to move to Washington with spouse and children in tow.

via No More Washington Wives and It’s Our Loss – Newsweek.

apps, New Year’s Resolution’s, me:  Hmmm, wonder which ones I should buy!  5 Fitness Apps to Get You Off the Couch – TIME Healthland – StumbleUpon.

history, France, Elizabeth Musser, kith/kin:  This article made me think of Elizabeth’s  early trilogy.

Algeria is not France’s Vietnam, he said, but something more ingrained. “It is much more complicated to exorcise it here, and then on top of that we have the pieds noirs and the harkis,” he said. “France is now getting slightly more involved in this part of its history,” with more documentaries on television. “But the French can’t, for now, see their tragedy on the big screen.”

via France’s Pain Over Algeria Reawakens With 2 New Films – NYTimes.com.

02
Jan
11

1.2.11 … the end of break approaches … :

movies: 🙂

YouTube – Filmography 2010.

270 films from 2010 were spliced into one single, fabulous, illuminating 6 minute video, by genrocks (“I’m a girl by the way”)

via 2010: the year through film « The Improvised Life.

culture: very interesting.  I am going to have to research Hans Rosling, since this is the my second YouTube post of his in less than a month.  Anyone know anything about him?

YouTube – Hans Rosling – 2020 Shaping Ideas.

movies, kudos:

YouTube – Man in a Blizzard.

This film deserves to win the Academy Award for best live-action short subject.

(1) Because of its wonderful quality. (2) Because of its role as homage. It is directly inspired by Dziga Vertov’s 1929 silent classic “Man With a Movie Camera.” (3) Because it represents an almost unbelievable technical proficiency.

via “Man in a Blizzard,” by Jamie Stuart – Roger Ebert’s Journal.

skiing/snowboarding, Edward/Jack:  very interesting … one boy skis; one boy boards … wonder what it says about their personalities?

Snowboarding, by contrast, was born not of a utilitarian desire to get around, but of unadulterated hedonism. It was conceived from the first to be fun. And all things considered, it seems the more natural way to get down a slope. In an outtake from “Lines”, a documentary about big-mountain snowboarding in Alaska, Mike Renquet, a legend of the sport, offers the following thought experiment. Imagine a caveman asked to choose how to get down a snowy mountain. Would he strap on two separate wooden slats and lean forward? Or rather stand sideways on a broader plank and lean back a little? Mr Renquet does not think the theoretical troglodyte would plump for the skis. Nor does Babbage. But then again, both he and Mr Renquet may be biased.

via Babbage hits the slopes: The science of skiing v snowboarding | The Economist.

history, Civil War:

Museum Collections Manager Catherine Wright let curiosity get the best of her and decided to crack open the bottle to see what message it was hiding from the world. After pulling the plug and enlisting a CIA code breaker to crack the encrypted message, the world was able to receive the message that Gen. Pemberton never did.

Wright explained that the Civil War messenger bearing the bad news likely turned back after seeing the U.S. flag flying over Vicksburg, indicating the Confederacy had surrendered, and making the message irrelevant. “It was just another punctuation mark to just how desperate and dire everything was,” she said.

via Civil War Message in a Bottle Decoded After 147 Years – TIME NewsFeed.

Gretchen Rubin, happiness, New Year’s ResolutionsThe Happiness Project: Recommended happiness reading.

-and-

YouTube – Try a Week of Extreme Nice..

snow, winter, science:  Probably learned this in middle school, but it is still interesting.

Rather than liquid freezing, snow comes from water vapor — the gaseous form of water — changing directly into the solid, ice phase, a process known as deposition. The water molecules link together in a beautiful hexagonal crystal, like so.

via Happy Snowy New Year! : Starts With A Bang.

31
Dec
10

‎12.31.2010 I’ll be singing … “Auld Lang Syne” …

New Year’s, music, history:

“Auld Lang Syne” (Scots pronunciation: [ˈɔːld lɑŋˈsəin]: note “s” rather than “z”)[1] is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in 1788[2] and set to the tune of a traditional folk song (Roud # 6294). It is well known in many English-speaking (and other) countries and is often sung to celebrate the start of the New Year at the stroke of midnight. By extension, its use has also become common at funerals, graduations, and as a farewell or ending to other occasions.

 

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind ?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and old lang syne ?

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll buy your pint cup !
and surely I’ll buy mine !
And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have run about the slopes,
and picked the daisies fine ;
But we’ve wandered many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine ;
But seas between us broad have roared
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

And there’s a hand my trusty friend !
And give us a hand o’ thine !
And we’ll take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

via Auld Lang Syne – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

New Year’s, music, history, Peggy Noonan:  It is not often Peggy Noonan and I are not on the same wavelength.

Christmas, technology, YouTube: fun … but who has time to do this? YouTube – THE DIGITAL STORY OF THE NATIVITY.

technology, lists:  Some good ideas here. 10 Ways to Get the Most Out of Technology – NYTimes.com.

New Year’s Resolutions, marketing, Great Recession:  last year Molly gave up soda … and I am trying. Obviously it has had little effect on soda sales. 🙂

Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc. Chief Executive Larry Young says retail soda-price increases have started to stick after a summer of steep discounts, but consumers are still being frugal.

via Dr Pepper Sees Sticky Prices Sweetening Profits – WSJ.com.

random, prostate cancer, health:

A new study found that men whose index finger is longer than their ring finger are at lower risk to develop prostate cancer, according to the British Journal of Cancer.

via Research Report: Linking Index Finger Length to Prostate Cancer Risks – WSJ.com.

random, movies: Very interesting … YouTube – Banksy’s Exit Through The Gift Shop.

random, travel, Jekyll Island GA, Georgia:  I just liked this one … maybe I’ll visit and find one.

During the months of January and February, Jekyll Island commissions a group of highly skilled artisans from across the U.S. to create an array of stunning, hand-worked glass globes. Then, during this 2 month long program, “Beach Buddies” hide these floats along Jekyll Island’s beaches for lucky visitors to find. For the lucky ones that find an Island Treasure, it is theirs to take home.

via Island Treasures – Georgia Events – Overview – Explore Georgia.

30
Dec
10

12.30.2010 … Since all the stores tell me to get organized for 2011 … as they do for every other year … here I go …

RIP, end of an era: Rest in Peace, Kodachrome!  Oh, how I do hate change …

That celebrated 75-year run from mainstream to niche photography is scheduled to come to an end on Thursday when the last processing machine is shut down here to be sold for scrap.

In the last weeks, dozens of visitors and thousands of overnight packages have raced here, transforming this small prairie-bound city not far from the Oklahoma border for a brief time into a center of nostalgia for the days when photographs appeared not in the sterile frame of a computer screen or in a pack of flimsy prints from the local drugstore but in the warm glow of a projector pulling an image from a carousel of vivid slides.

In the end, it was determined that a roll belonging to Dwayne Steinle, the owner, would be last. It took three tries to find a camera that worked. And over the course of the week he fired off shots of his house, his family and downtown Parsons. The last frame is already planned for Thursday, a picture of all the employees standing in front of Dwayne’s wearing shirts with the epitaph: “The best slide and movie film in history is now officially retired. Kodachrome: 1935-2010.”

via For Kodachrome Fans, Road Ends at Photo Lab in Kansas – NYTimes.com.

vocabulary, faith, acts of God:  Another one to make you think:

First, during a period of wonderful, calm, sunny weather we do not read of Nature’s “love” or “mercy” or that we are being “blessed” or “rewarded.” The good we take for granted, as our due. The bad we assume is wrathful and punishment of some kind.

I do not want to make too much of this, but my simply drawing attention to it makes the point. It seems almost natural (!) to refer to the storm as “wrath” and “punishing” while it would be strikingly odd to read a weather report referring to a sunny day as “merciful.”

Why is this? Is it because we assume we deserve everything to be perfect or at least unchallenging? That the norm for us is bland perfection? That somehow we deserve grace and favor, which, of course, is a contradiction?

In short, “who do we think we are?” Maybe we simply don’t think!

via Grapes of wrath? « Hopelens Blog.

Davidson, history: Andrew Carnegie, a 19th century Bill Gates”  … interesting to think that Andrew Carnegie would need to be defined.

With the prospect of a new year ahead, the last blog of 2010, will celebrate the 100th anniversary one of the loveliest buildings on campus.  Now known as the Carnegie Guest House, it was dedicated on September 10, 1910 as the Carnegie Library.Interior of Carnegie Library from Cornelia Shaw scrapbookThe name comes from Andrew Carnegie, a 19th century Bill Gates – who took some of the monies made by his companies and helped build libraries across the nation. Most were public libraries but a number of colleges, including Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, received funding as well.

via The Davidson College Archives & Special Collections blog — Around the D.

historical preservation, Atlanta, memories:  The golden grandeur of the Fox Theatre is not diminished one bit in knowing that it is plaster, aluminum and paint!

While they appear to be made from exquisite metals, most of the ornate decor in the Fox Theatre is actually plaster. The Restoration Department identifies damaged or worn pieces and recreates each piece using a historic mold.

Once the plaster has been poured, set, and hardened, a fine, adhesive glue called “size” is applied. The plaster and size will sit untouched for 8-12 hours until it achieves a high level of stickiness.

The artisans then gild the plaster pieces using a paintbrush and extremely thin sheets of aluminum leaf or imitation gold leaf, also known as Dutch metal. The process is repeated until the plaster is concealed.

After the metal has been applied, a piece of cheese cloth is used to burnish or smooth out the creases. Finally, the aluminum is treated with orange shellac and a burnt umber glaze to give the appearance of gold. The imitation gold leaf is treated with a burnt umber glaze to deepen the appearance and add age.

via The Fox Theatre, While they appear to be made from exquisite….

random:  Don’t you just wonder who buys theses things?

Now, Harlan Ellison, a self-identified blue-collar fantasist who has written over 1,000 short stories, screenplays, essays, and criticisms, has listed his Remington noiseless portable for $40,000. Ellison penned “I, Robot,” “Soldier,” which James Cameron drew from for “The Terminator” and “The Outer Limits,” to name just a few. Speakeasy spent some time on the phone with Ellison, who dominated the conversation with anecdotes and allusions of times past.

..

No it’s all tied up in the fact that I’m 76 and I’m very ill and like a sage old dog I can smell when certain signs are there. We are trapped in a medical eddy, this mad meat house of medicine where we cannot get the help we need. I’m not a bag lady, I live in a particularly good house that I’ve been living in since 1966, but we don’t have anywhere near the chance of getting Marcus Welby to fix my problems. As a consequence we have to get some money and as time goes by you get more and more famous and less and less wealthy. I literally have to start eating my past and turning into the actually dollar all of the artifacts that have made me who I am. I am eating my past.

via Would You Pay $40,000 For An Antique Typewriter? – Speakeasy – WSJ.

technology, trends, stocks, Apple, Google, Facebook, Twitter: So if Walt Mossberg is right, I should be buying Apple, Google, Facebook and Twitter.

It has been a big year in personal technology, from the debut and early success of Apple’s iPad, to the rise and continuous improvement of Google’s Android smart phone platform, to the continued surge in social services led by Facebook and Twitter.

via Walt Mossberg’s What’s In Store for Technology in 2011 | Walt Mossberg | Personal Technology | AllThingsD.

Apple, technology:

If patents are to be believed, Apple is working on the creation of the world’s first glasses-free 3D display that would produce holographic images using a screen made up of “pixel-sized domes” that would be read differently by the human eye depending on where they’re viewing from.

via Is Apple Planning A Holographic 3D TV? – Techland – TIME.com.

New Year’s Resolutions, me: #1 – Get organized.




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 625 other followers

July 2018
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031