Posts Tagged ‘obituaries

25
Jan
15

1.25.15 … Oh, no, no more yetis or Easter Island statues!! Or dog water bowls that look like toilets!! …

SkyMall, bankruptcy, WSJ:  Oh, no, no more yetis or Easter Island statues!! Or dog water bowls that look like toilets!!

The company behind the in-flight catalog SkyMall filed for bankruptcy protection, a victim of evolving rules and technology that now lets airline passengers keep their smartphones and tablets powered up during flight.

After 25 years selling quirky products like a Darth Vader toaster or a paper towel holder with USB ports, SkyMall LLC is seeking a court supervised sale of its assets, according to papers filed Thursday with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Phoenix.

“We are extremely disappointed in this result and are hopeful that SkyMall and the iconic ‘SkyMall’ brand find a home to continue to operate,” acting Chief Executive Scott Wiley said in a statement Friday.

The company, which started in 1989, fully suspended its retail catalog operation Jan. 16, and also laid off 47 of its 137 employees, according to court papers. SkyMall’s parent company Xhibit Corp. , which acquired the business in 2013, is also seeking Chapter 11 protection.

via SkyMall Files for Bankruptcy – WSJ.

And I’ve mentioned Skymall before … more than once …  5.5.14 … SkyMall: A Tour Of The American Psyche … We hurt … We don’t want to look fat … We love our home and our pets … we don’t know where to store our shoes … We wish we had the money to order an 8-foot-tall silverback gorilla statue or a small, motorized gondola that moves around a pool while a 2-foot-tall gondolier named Luciano Pool-varotti sings … | Dennard’s Clipping Service.

and …

travel, random:  OK, I admit it … while John does the Sudoku puzzles in the magazines, I look through SkyMall to see what ridiculous think I want this trip … and the winner this month is … one or two?

via 6.22.2010 … summer … | Dennard’s Clipping Service.

labyrinth, Lauren Artress:

“The labyrinth is a mandala that meets our longing for a change of heart, for a change of ways in how we live together on this fragile island home, and for the energy, the vision, and the courage to meet the challenges of the 21st century.” – Lauren Artress

Jean-Claude Baker (‘Son’ of Josephine Baker), obituaries, NYTimes.com: “irrepressible impresario of his own improbable life” … I had to think about that one.

He told a few friends last week that he had finished his will, an impressive gesture even for the famously unbridled Jean-Claude Baker, irrepressible impresario of his own improbable life.

Over the nearly three decades since wresting his bustling night spot Chez Josephine from the X-rated morass of West 42nd Street, Mr. Baker — who had been mothered as a destitute teenager in France by the fading erotic stage sensation Josephine Baker — had delivered exhausting bonhomie to celebrity-rich audiences of pre- and post-theater diners.

But at 71 he was finding it increasingly wearisome.

“I’ve been a little bit under the blue weather lately,” he emailed me in late November, on why he had proposed lunch and then gone missing. Last summer, he wrote, “It’s becoming very difficult to keep the dream alive” and “my brain is tired.”

Still, it seemed easy to discount his mood swings.

“He’d been saying for 25 years, ‘I can’t go on, I’m going to kill myself,’ ” said Richard Hunnings, one of Mr. Baker’s oldest friends and general manager of Manhattan Plaza, the artist-friendly rental complex across 42nd Street at Ninth Avenue.

Yet there he was, night after night, in his Shanghai Tang silks, red mandarin outfits and black soutane, embracing patrons, dispensing gigs to needy musicians and leaking juicy self-promotional tidbits to the gossip columns.

Last Thursday morning, he was found dead in his Mercedes that had been running in the enclosed garage of his East Hampton, N.Y., home.

via Jean-Claude Baker, ‘Son’ of Josephine Baker, Is Remembered – NYTimes.com.

Krista Tippett, Why I Don’t Do Christmas | On Being: Christmas is troubling in a secular world with family members who have beliefs all over the spectrum.  So I like her conclusion: “As I said, we need each other. And that impulse, surely, is deep in the original heart even of the most secular things like Santa Claus and surrounding your home with lights: examining what we are to each other and experiencing that, sometimes when we do this, something transcendent happens.”

Here’s what I take seriously. There is something audacious and mysterious and reality-affirming in the assertion that has stayed alive for two thousand years that God took on eyes and ears and hands and feet, hunger and tears and laughter and the flu, joy and pain and gratitude and our terrible, redemptive human need for each other. It’s not provable, but it’s profoundly humanizing and concretely and spiritually exacting. And it’s no less rational — no more crazy — than economic and political myths to which we routinely deliver over our fates in this culture, to our individual and collective detriment.

So here’s what I’m thinking about this Christmas. Recently I followed up on a promise I’ve been making myself for years: to wash and sort and give away all the good clothing my kids have outgrown as they’ve left childhood behind. It’s embarrassing that I never took the time to do this all along. In the course of digging around for where to donate, I stumbled on the site of a charity that works with homeless teenagers. It turns out that they’re not asking in the first instance for all these Levis and good-as-new, cool t-shirts. They’re asking for donations of socks and coats. They’re asking for newly purchased underwear, noting that most of us take for granted our ever-renewable supplies of clean underwear that fits.

I’m not going to buy any presents this year. We will go shopping as a family for these homeless teenagers, and I’ll try to be honest about the equivalent I would spend on my own children on the commercial holy days if I believed in them. I report this in some hope of feeding a little rebellion I sense many of us are quietly tending. But I also make it public to be sure I follow through.

As I said, we need each other. And that impulse, surely, is deep in the original heart even of the most secular things like Santa Claus and surrounding your home with lights: examining what we are to each other and experiencing that, sometimes when we do this, something transcendent happens.

via Why I Don’t Do Christmas | On Being.

 

21
Aug
13

8.21.13 … Morning has broken … Davidson’s matchmaker: Scotty Nicholls, RIP… Always Go to the Funeral … Marconi Union: Weightless by Just Music Label

Unapologetically EpiscopalianUnapologetically Episcopalian – I love this page’s posts. What a nice way to start the day. “Morning has broken … ”

via ▶ St Mary’s choristers, Edinburgh : Morning has broken – YouTube.

Scotty Hastie Nicholls, RIP, Obituaries:  Matchmaker … she set up freshman roommates for years, also one of the original Tarradiddle Players at Children’s Theater.  RIP

Both Scotty and Peter found jobs at Davidson College and both retired from there. She worked two decades as college’s housing director.

She also was a longtime local volunteer, serving on public boards commissions and on the board of the Ada Jenkins Center, a regional social services center in Davidson. She also acted in local theatrical productions with the Davidson Community Players.

In 2007, the town of Davidson gave Scotty its G. Jackson Burney Community Service Award. The award has been given annually since 2004 in memory of Mr. Burney and his contributions to the town.

via Scotty Hastie Nicholls, 95 | Obituaries.

Always Go to the Funeral, NPR, advice:  Definitely agree. My grandparents and parents taught me this. Also go visit the elderly.

I remember two things from the funeral circuit: bottomless dishes of free mints and my father saying on the ride home, “You can’t come in without going out, kids. Always go to the funeral.”

Sounds simple — when someone dies, get in your car and go to calling hours or the funeral. That, I can do. But I think a personal philosophy of going to funerals means more than that.

“Always go to the funeral” means that I have to do the right thing when I really, really don’t feel like it. I have to remind myself of it when I could make some small gesture, but I don’t really have to and I definitely don’t want to. I’m talking about those things that represent only inconvenience to me, but the world to the other guy. You know, the painfully under-attended birthday party. The hospital visit during happy hour. The Shiva call for one of my ex’s uncles. In my humdrum life, the daily battle hasn’t been good versus evil. It’s hardly so epic. Most days, my real battle is doing good versus doing nothing.

In going to funerals, I’ve come to believe that while I wait to make a grand heroic gesture, I should just stick to the small inconveniences that let me share in life’s inevitable, occasional calamity.

via Always Go to the Funeral : NPR.

Marconi Union, Weightless by Just Music Label:

[https://soundcloud.com/justmusiclabel/weightless-marconi-union]

via ▶ Marconi Union – Weightless by Just Music Label.

“In 2011, a group of sound therapists and a band called Marconi Union put their heads together to create, what they claim to be, the most relaxing song ever. “Weightless,” a track that maintains a constant 60 BPM, synchronizes listeners’ heart rates and brainwaves — the latter, a phenomenon known as entrainment. Sound a little far fetched? While more research is needed, one review of the literature found that “BWE,” as it’s known, could have a benefit when it comes to targeting stress.

“While listening, your heart rate gradually comes to match that beat,” says Lyz Cooper, founder of the British Academy of Sound Therapy. “The fall in heart rate also leads to a fall in blood pressure.”

▶ Marconi Union – Weightless by Just Music Label.

20
May
13

5.20.13 … I’d love to walk Paris …

Europe,  walks, Paris,  NYTimes.com: 

5. Paris Promenade

In the 2004 film “Before Sunset,” Jesse, an American (Ethan Hawke), and Celine, a Frenchwoman (Julie Delpy), spend an afternoon traversing Paris as they flirt with love. At one point they ascend a staircase to an elevated park called the Promenade Plantée.

The 2.8-mile-long parkway, inaugurated in 1993, follows the abandoned Vincennes railway line; it was the inspiration for New York City’s High Line. In the film, Mr. Hawke and Ms. Delpy use the staircase midway along the promenade. I prefer to start at the staircase entrance at the promenade’s western end, which rises from the Viaduc des Arts, the red-brick arches filled with boutiques and galleries.

Tunnels, embankments and trenches have been preserved. Benches and trellises have been installed. Wild moss, lichens and bamboo grow wild. Lime, quince, cherry and holly trees, climbing roses and honeysuckle are among the plantings.

Visitors can peek into windows and look down at narrow streets. On the left is the steeple of the St.-Antoine des Quinze-Vingts Church. On the right is a police headquarters decorated with a dozen reproductions of Michelangelo’s “Dying Slave.” (The original sculpture sits in the Louvre.)

For much of the way, the flâneur (stroller) reigns supreme. “The practice of jogging is tolerated to the degree that it does not annoy the walkers,” a sign tells visitors.

At the midway point, the promenade descends to the Jardin de Reuilly, an expanse of grass, trees and statues.

At the eastern end of the promenade it is a short walk to the National Center of the History of Immigration. Built in neo-Classical style for the 1931 international colonial exhibition, it is now celebrated as an Art Deco-era masterpiece. The interior, with its original marquetry, lighting fixtures, staircases and mosaics, has been frozen in time. Bas-reliefs on the facade by Alfred Janniot celebrate the success of the French empire. It is a brilliant work of propaganda: tropical plants, animals, colonial faces and agricultural and mineral riches extracted from the colonies. France, naturally, is an allegorical figure of abundance at the center. — ELAINE SCIOLINO

via Europe, in 9 Walks – NYTimes.com.

politics,  state governments, G.O.P., NYTimes.com:

Still, the news for Republicans has been reasonably good at the state level, where their candidates have been freer from the partisan dysfunction in Washington.

via In State Governments, Signs of a Healthier G.O.P. – NYTimes.com.

Constitutional rights, search and seizure, suburbia, DavidsonNews.net:

The citizens of Davidson are lucky to have a close and trusting relationship with our police officers. Our police department has earned its trusted status in our community. Unfortunately, such close relationships between the police and the public do not exist everywhere. Fourth Amendment rights should not depend on your zip code. It can be easy to overlook the loss of the Fourth Amendment freedoms, the simple right to be left alone, when you have never experienced police overreaching. Some citizens feel the sting of being randomly seized far more frequently than they should, not just on a lone day in March at Exit 30.

via Search and seizure in suburbia | DavidsonNews.net.

obituaries, The New York Times, statistics: 

Results: Male obituaries outnumbered female (813 vs. 186), and the mean age of death was higher for males than females (80.4 ± 0.4 vs. 78.8 ± 1.1 years). Younger ages of death were evident in sports players (77.4 years), performers (77.1) and creative workers (78.5), whereas older deaths were seen in military (84.7), business (83.3) and political (82.1) workers. Younger deaths were more often associated with accidents (66.2 years), infection (68.6) and organ-specified cancers (73.0). ‘Old age’ was more often the cited cause of death for philanthropists, academics and doctors, and less often for sportsmen, performers and creatives. Cancer deaths occurred most often in performers and creatives, with lung cancer commonest among performers and least common in professionals.

Conclusion: Fame and achievement in performance-related careers may be earned at the cost of a shorter life expectancy. In such careers, smoking and other risk behaviours may be either causes or effects of success and/or early death.

via Death in The New York Times: the price of fame is a faster flame.

05
Apr
13

4.5.13 … space and death … “I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner. All is well.”

Thomas Henry Marshburn, Davidson College, ISS, Expedition 34/35, The Nile and Cairo, Bahamas, It’s a Great Day to be a Wildcat: 

I was on the receiving end of two calls from space this weekend.

The first was on Saturday and appeared to me from TX USA. I almost didn’t to answer it, but am so glad I did. It was Davidson friend Thomas Henry Marshburn, an astronaut on the ISS. He was calling to say hello. 🙂 John, Tom and I discussed his photos which he posts on twitter and life on the ISS. We discussed his recent shot of the Nile and Cairo by moonlight and his favorite view, the Bahamas by day.

 

At the end of the call, Tom graciously agreed to call again the next evening at 6 pm EDT (10 pm GMT … Tom stays on GMT while on the ISS), so we could gather some students at the McCrorey YMCA in Charlotte. Forgetting that it was Easter, we only had three kids, but they had a life-changing 13 minute call where he answered questions. “Have you posted pics of Mt. Everest?” (Yes, he posts pics almost daily on twitter (@astromarshburn)) “Where is the bathroom?” (There are two, one in the Russian side of the ISS and one in the American/European/Canadian/Japanese side.) “How is the food?” (Actually, pretty good.) “What do you do to relax?” (He enjoys looking out the window!).

Tom made our weekend and that of three kids in North Charlotte. I bet they have fun telling people about their call from space.   I know I have. Thanks, Tom.

It’s a great day to be a Wildcat!

If you want  to follow Expedition 34/35, I have found this useful …

Back in November, the astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) began Expedition 34, and entered into the 13th year of its continuous human habitation. Some of the research goals for Expedition 34 included investigations into the human cardiovascular system in microgravity, the gravity-sensing systems of fish, and the impact of changes in the sun’s electromagnetic radiation on Earth’s climate. The crew of six astronauts from the United States, Russia, and Canada also took hundreds of photographs of life aboard the ISS and the spectacular views from orbit. Collected here are scenes from Expedition 34, and a few from the current mission, Expedition 35.

via The International Space Station: Expedition 34 – In Focus – The Atlantic.

obituaries, ashes to ashes:  In light of my high of being on the receiving end of such a wonderful call, I was also aware of the death of a very special mum, whose funeral I was able to attend.  Funerals, if done well, are  uplifting and give closure to all participants.  Marian Ward’s certainly did.  For the second time in a week I heard the words, ” earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust.”  The first was Easter at the Avondale Sunrise Service.

FORASMUCH as it hath pleased Almighty God of his great mercy to take unto himself the soul of our dear brother here departed, we therefore commit his body to the ground; earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust ; in sure and certain hope of the resurrection to eternal life through our Lord Jesus Christ; who shall change the body of our low estate that it may be like unto his glorious body, according to the mighty working, whereby he is able to subdue all things to himself.

via 1928 Proposed Book of Common Prayer: Burial.

But I then found out about Tom’s mom’s passing last week while he is on the ISS.  I understand that Tom attended via  skype and his wife attended  escorted by a fellow astronaut.  If I had known, I think I might of gone.  Gladys Grier Marshburn must of been a great lady to have created such a great son.  (I hope that is not diminishing her own achievements as the NYT did by stating that a rocket scientist made a mean stroganoff).  RIP Mrs. Marshburn.

The mother of Statesville’s favorite son, astronaut Dr. Tom Marshburn, has died.

Marshburn was in space on the International Space Station when his mother and longtime Statesville resident Gladys Grier Marshburn died on Tuesday, four days after her 90th birthday.

via Astronaut Marshburn’s mother dies – Statesville Record & Landmark: News.

dark matter,  ISS, Scientific American: WOW  …  the long-sought dark matter, the hypothetical massive particles that constitute some 27 percent of the universe … massive dust/big ashes?

A $2-billion particle detector mounted on the International Space Station has registered an excess of antimatter particles in space, the experiment’s lead scientist announced April 3. That excess could come from fast-spinning stellar remnants known as pulsars and other exotic, but visible sources within the Milky Way galaxy. Or the antiparticles might have originated from the long-sought dark matter, the hypothetical massive particles that constitute some 27 percent of the universe.

via Dark Matter Signal Possibly Registered on International Space Station: Scientific American

obituaries, Rosamunde Pilcher, helpful quotes:  And Marian Ward’s daughter posted this … and I love the closing … “I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner. All is well.”

“…Death is nothing at all. It does not count. I have only slipped away into the next room. Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was.  I am I, and you are you, and the old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged. Whatever we were to each other, that we are still. Call me by the old familiar name. Speak of me in the easy way which you always used. Put no difference in your tone. Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow. Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes that we enjoyed together. Play, smile, think of me, pray for me. Let my name be ever the household word it always was. Let it be spoken without effort, without the ghost of a shadow upon it. Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was. There is absolute and unbroken continuity. What is this death but a negligible accident? Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight? I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner. All is well.”

via Goodreads | Quote by Rosamunde Pilcher: …Death is nothing at all. It does not count. ….

11
Jul
11

‎7.11.2011 PT and dentist in one morning … anxiety attack … :(

anxiety, dentists:  Actually the modern-day dentist is not so bad … but still it is engrained in me to be anxious.

consumer market, China, KFC:  Interesting thought … Chinese consumers … and very interesting as to why KFC is so successful.

Some Western consumer-goods firms that are also-rans at home do surprisingly well in China. Back in America, Kentucky Fried Chicken KFC, part of Yum! Brands is dwarfed by McDonald’s. In China it has 3,300 restaurants—more than three times as many as its rival—and opens a new one each day. The secret of its popularity is local managers with the freedom to adapt KFC’s offerings to the Chinese palate. That means fewer bargain buckets of wings and more congee, a rice porridge with pork, pickles or mushrooms.

Bernstein could have added: beware. The rules in China are still being written. Different arms of government may interpret them differently (see next article). And if someone in power changes his mind, there is not much you can do about it.

Will the Chinese government allow Nestlé to buy Hsu Fu Chi? In 2009 it rejected a $2.4 billion bid by Coca-Cola to buy Huiyan Juice Group, a drinks firm, for no apparent reason. Analysts say that this is unlikely to happen again, however. “The company is not strategically important and together Nestlé and Hsu Fu Chi would control only about 5% of the market,” says Jon Cox at Kepler Capital Markets in Zurich. As the world’s largest chocolate-maker Nestlé has high hopes for a market of more than a billion people who currently eat shamefully little chocolate.

Much could go wrong. Many economists think Chinese households save too much. Some fear a property bubble or a banking crisis. The risks of selling consumer goods in China are immense. But so is the opportunity cost of staying away.

via Consumer goods: The mystery of the Chinese consumer | The Economist.

tv, Bones:  Love Bones … can’t wait for next fall.

If you think Bones’ seventh season is just going to be about diaper-changing and nap time, think again: The show is introducing a new villain, TVGuide.com has learned.

“This is someone who is an extremely odd and fearless foe,” executive producer Stephan Nathan tells us, comparing the character to such past serial killers as Gormogon and The Gravedigger. “Only he’s going to be much more of a 21st-century, tech-savvy foe.”

Fox announced last week that Bones won’t premiere until Nov. 3, which will allow the network to air six episodes in the fall before star Emily Deschanel takes her maternity leave. Nathan says those six episodes will primarily focus on expectant parents Booth (David Boreanaz) and Brennan (Deschanel) preparing to raise their child together, but they will also introduce the new killer, who will take a while to subdue.

via Bones Exclusive: Who’s the New Gravedigger? – Today’s News: Our Take | TVGuide.com.

Civil War, history, journalism, Frank Law Olmsted:  I found this a very interesting historical tidbit.

Frederick Law Olmsted is rightly remembered as an eminent landscape architect, but in 1861 it was his work as a journalist and an administrator that brought him acclaim.

In February of that year, he agreed to edit his three earlier volumes, “A Journey in the Seaboard States” (1856), “A Journey Through Texas” (1857) and “A Journey in the Back Country” (1860) and reissue them as a two-volume work titled “The Cotton Kingdom: A Traveller’s Observations on Cotton and Slavery in the American Slaves States.”

The idea came from his London publisher, who assumed that the secession crisis would create great interest in such a work in England; Olmsted’s New York publisher quickly agreed. There was reason to believe they were right: one influential journalist and admirer later concluded that Olmsted’s writing “was more powerful and convincing than ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin.’” While that overstates the case, the book drew a wide readership keen to learn about the nature of Southern society.

via Frederick Law Olmsted’s Writing About the South – NYTimes.com.

ethics, business:  I was always told if I wasn’t willing to put my name on it, then I shouldn’t send it out.

Put your name on it

Is there a simpler way to improve quality and responsiveness?

If you can’t sign it, don’t ship it.

Easy to say, hard to do. Many people choose to work for a big organization precisely so they can avoid signing much of anything.

via Seth’s Blog: Put your name on it.

slime bags, perp walk:  I never thought about how they did this in other countries … but now that I am thinking about it, it does give the impression of guilt.

IT WAS one thing for the French public to hear that Dominique Strauss-Kahn had been arrested. It was quite another to see him grim-faced, handcuffed and in the custody of New York detectives. To Americans, this was just the “perp walk”.

This practice gives the newspapers and television images for stories and lets police and prosecutors show off the big game they bagged. J. Edgar Hoover, first head of the FBI, paraded arrested mobsters before the cameras. Lee Harvey Oswald, Kennedy’s assassin, was killed during a perp walk. It was a favourite tactic of Rudy Giuliani when he was a federal prosecutor.

If she means adversarial, she is correct. American trials pit two lawyers and two narratives against each other; a jury decides which is more plausible. The French have juries only in the most serious cases (including rape). Defendants lack fifth-amendment protections. Adversarialism may mean Mr Strauss-Kahn was roughed up in a way he would not have been in France; but it also meant that, when his accuser was found to be unreliable, the case began to collapse.

Hence a final argument against perp walks: they can be risky for prosecutors. Contrary to many French objections, Cyrus Vance, Manhattan’s district attorney, has behaved well. He dealt fast with a serious allegation against a rich suspect who was about to leave the country for one with which America has only a limited extradition treaty. He also moved quickly when the case against that suspect began crumbling. As for pictures of Mr Strauss-Kahn in handcuffs, the French may see a famous politician treated like a common criminal. Mr Vance—and the New York voters who elect him—may see another high-profile suspect whom he failed to convict.

via America’s judicial system: That guilty look | The Economist.

LinkedIn, social networking:  Are you on?  Do you use it?  I am on … don’t use it except to monitor the postings by Davidson grads.

Professional networking service LinkedIn blasted through the 100-million-user mark in March, making it even more powerful for finding a job, keeping up with colleagues and promoting your resume.

LinkedIn is growing so quickly, it’s adding a new member each second. As the size of its network grows, LinkedIn is steadily getting more useful. But how are people really using the fast-growing service? Researchers at Lab 42 asked 500 LinkedIn users that question and many more, and came up with a variety of answers in this infographic.

Among the fun facts they uncovered: We found it interesting the way top level executives use the service in vastly different ways from entry-level workers. Let us know in the comments how you like to use LinkedIn, or if you don’t use the service, why not?

via How Are People Really Using LinkedIn? [INFOGRAPHIC].

Betty Ford, obituaries, RIP:  Rest in peace, Betty Ford:  When I think of you I think of courage and your hair … 🙂

Honesty in marriage, like in politics, can be a gift or a weapon. Betty Ford’s husband Jerry loved her fizzy candor, her firm commitment when she believed in something and her refusal to pretend when she didn’t. She wore a mood ring, but that was redundant; she wasn’t one to hide an attitude anyway, any more than she’d hide how much her psychiatrist had helped her or what she thought of her children’s sex lives or which of her breasts was removed by doctors when she got cancer. So as the U.S. wrestled with the role it wanted women to play, she marched with Betty Friedan in support of the Equal Rights Amendment. As the political stars realigned for a generation around Roe, she called the court’s abortion ruling “a great, great decision.” As the trauma of Vietnam lingered, she discussed amnesty for draft dodgers. When after six weeks in office she discovered the cancer, she bared her pain in public. She was unlike any other First Lady and yet perfectly suited to her time — 29 months in the White House, during which America was catching its breath and checking its pulse to see if basic institutions and assumptions could survive the shock of the Nixon presidency. Her long combat against addiction brought all kinds of suffering out of the shadows. When she died Friday, July 8, at the age of 93, America lost one of its most unlikely and unmatched healers.

via In Memory: Betty Ford, Former First Lady, Clinic Founder – TIME.

Apple, iPhone:  low-cost version … I’m ok with that.

Citing a source that has been reliable in the past, the report says Apple will introduce both a revamped iPhone 5 and a low-price iPhone that could work with prepaid networks.

The site’s Seth Weintraub is quick to point out that Apple already has two models of the iPhone on the market — the 3GS and the iPhone 4 — but writes that he believes the cheaper phone won’t simply be the iPhone 4 with slashed pricetag. The cheaper model, he thinks, could look more like the iPod Touch, which is also expected to get a refresh this fall.

via Apple will launch low-end iPhone this fall, report says – Faster Forward – The Washington Post.

 

 

08
Dec
10

12.08.2010 … enjoying the bright cold of an early winter day …

Advent:  For about 10 years we have had an advent wreath on our dinner table which we light most nights and read the Christmas cards that came for the day as well as a passage from an advent book. Late this year, we just started two nights ago, and last night I just played a piece from the Unapologetically Episcopalian FB page … Elizabeth Poston – Jesus Christ the Apple Tree (1784).

Of course it wasn’t one of our ususal Presbyterian hymns so when Molly and John gave me a strange look, I quipped that I would put on Alvin and The Chipmunks: The Christmas Song.  And I did!

In response to this post on FB, a friend sent me a great Advent resource from her home church in Atlanta.  Advent Calendar 2010.  Enjoy!

RIP, news, media, headlines, obituaries, Elizabeth Edwards, :  Is Elizabeth Edwards death news justifying headlines that are at best merely factual … but more often titilating/demeaning or an obituary where the wording should be respectful?  I go for the latter. What do you think?

CNN This Just In Blog:

Elizabeth Edwards dies after battle with cancer

via Elizabeth Edwards dies after battle with cancer – This Just In – CNN.com Blogs.

The Huffington Post – (Note first word is Ariana):

Arianna On Elizabeth Edwards’ Passing, Strength And Legacy

via HuffPost TV: Arianna On Elizabeth Edwards’ Passing, Strength And Legacy.

WSJ – Front Page Blurb in In Today’s Paper Column:

Died: Elizabeth Edwards, 61, campaigner and adviser whose battle with cancer and family travails drew sympathy.

via In Today’s Paper – WSJ.com.

WSJ:

Feisty Campaigner Drew Sympathy Amid Tragedy

via Elizabeth Edwards Dies of Cancer – WSJ.com.

NYT:

ELIZABETH EDWARDS, 1949-2010

A Political Life Filled With Cruel Reversals

via Elizabeth Edwards Dies of Cancer at 61 – Obituary – NYTimes.com.

Politics Daily (AOL):

Elizabeth Edwards, Rest in Peace

via Elizabeth Edwards, Rest in Peace.

CNN:

Elizabeth Edwards loses battle with cancer

via Elizabeth Edwards loses battle with cancer – CNN.com.

NPR:

Elizabeth Edwards: Resilience Remembered

via Elizabeth Edwards: Resilience Remembered : NPR.

Chicago Tribune:

Elizabeth Edwards dies at 61; wife of Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards

Elizabeth Edwards was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004, the year her husband ran for vice president with John F. Kerry. The couple’s marriage unraveled years later when it was revealed that John Edwards was having an affair with a campaign videographer.

via Obituary: Elizabeth Edwards dies at 61; wife of Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards – chicagotribune.com.

Atlanta Journal – Constitution:

Elizabeth Edwards’ legacy: toughness amid tragedy

via Elizabeth Edwards’ legacy: toughness amid tragedy  | ajc.com.

Charlotte Observer:

Death is a quiet closing to a full and public life for Elizabeth Edwards

She won admiration for resilience amid illness, infidelity

via Death is a quiet closing to a full and public life for Elizabeth Edwards – CharlotteObserver.com.

The Daily Tarheel:

Elizabeth Edwards dies after battle with cancer

Was wife of John Edwards, UNC alumna, local business owner

via The Daily Tar Heel :: Elizabeth Edwards dies after battle with cancer.

facebook, Elizabeth Edwards:  FB allowed Elizabeth to control her own last words to the public.

Edwards also posted the following to her Facebook page:

“The days of our lives, for all of us, are numbered,”  she wrote. “We know that. And yes, there are certainly times when we aren’t able to muster as much strength and patience as we would like. It’s called being human. But I have found that in the simple act of living with hope, and in the daily effort to have a positive impact in the world, the days I do have are made all the more meaningful and precious. And for that I am grateful.”

via A Look Into Elizabeth Edwards’ Facebook Post on Her Worsening Cancer Condition – Mike Isaac – Social Medium – Forbes.

religion, faith:  I really liked this entry from the Nouwen site today.

God’s Timeless Time

There is no “after” after death. Words like after and before belong to our mortal life, our life in time and space. Death frees us from the boundaries of chronology and brings us into God’s “time,” which is timeless. Speculations about the afterlife, therefore, are little more than just that: speculations. Beyond death there is no “first” and “later,” no “here” and “there,” no “past,” “present,” or “future.” God is all in all. The end of time, the resurrection of the body, and the glorious coming again of Jesus are no longer separated by time for those who are no longer in time.For us who still live in time, it is important not to act as if the new life in Christ is something we can comprehend or explain. God’s heart and mind are greater than ours. All that is asked of us is trust.

via December 6, 2010 – God’s Timeless Time.

random anniversaries, music: Today is the 30th anniversary of John Lennon’s death. I truly enjoyed his music.  Do you think John Lennon’s death is an event that warrants the questions, “Do you remember where you were when John Lennon died?”

YouTube – Imagine – John Lennon. — Don’t agree with the words … but sounds beautiful …

architecture, Chicago: good question …

In one of these essays, “New York, New York: Pluralism and Its Possibilities,” first published in 1979, Stern writes of New York’s place as a center of ideas–a nexus of distinguished architecture schools, journals, museums and newspaper criticism that no other American city could match. He goes on:

“One comes to New York to see architecture being made, and not so much to see it. How different from Chicago, where the products of Mies’s talents and those of his followers are everywhere to be seen. Chicago is like Detroit or Hollywood–the product and the place are one; architecture is Chicago’s dominant plastic art, just as film is Holywood’s chief artistic product; they are company towns, urban villages grown up to produce and market one or two things. New York is a metropolis, a world capital; architecture is dreamed here, realized everywhere.

Did Stern correctly characterize Chicago in 1979? And now, 31 years and a host of changes later, where is he right and where is he off base?

via Cityscapes | Chicago Tribune | Blog.

architecture, Chicago:  I was so looking forward to the Spire.  What is the last great skyscraper built in the US?

The Spire is so over

Irish developer Garrett Kelleher has lost control of the site on which he hoped to build architect Santiago Calatrava’s design for a twisting, 2,000-foot skyscraper, The Tribune’s Mary Ellen Podmolik reports.

via Cityscapes | Chicago Tribune | Blog.

apps, art, Paris: Brushes is one of my favorite iPad/iphone apps.  Now there is a whole art exhibit done with the apps.  I want to go!

David Hockney thinks his current exhibition may be the first one that’s ever been 100 percent e-mailed to a gallery. The 73-year-old artist is standing in the space in question — the Pierre Berge-Yves St. Laurent Foundation in Paris — trying to talk about the works, when his iPhone rings.

via In Paris, A Display From David Hockney’s Pixelated Period : NPR.

Davidson:  Davidson sports … intentional, holistic, communal  … Don’t you love those words.

Fully one-quarter of Davidson’s 1,900 students are varsity athletes, and a preponderance of the student body practice some intramural sport, from crew to flickerball. You haven’t lived until you’ve seen a bunch of brawny senior Wildcat hoopsters coaching a first-year flickerball practice on Chambers Lawn.

As has been well-documented in the “hoops and books” publicity surrounding our recent run to the Elite Eight, Davidson College is intentional and holistic in how it treats sports: as an integral part of the college experience, for athletes as well as for non-athletes. That makes for a strong sense of communal investment in the Wildcats’ seasons that is well worth witnessing.

via » A Different Kind of Sports Fan.

Apple:  I hope so.  I have a mobile me account primarily for the syncing … It needs some work.

Steve Jobs: MobileMe to ‘Get A Lot Better’ Next Year

Apple’s “MobileMe” service costs $99 per year and isn’t justifying its price with at least one user, who e-mailed Steve Jobs directly to complain. Jobs’ response: “It will get a lot better in 2011.” Sent from his iPhone.

Source: MacRumors

via TechFast: Google’s Notebook, Steve Jobs’ E-mail, and More – Techland – TIME.com.

news, college, stupid: How to screw your life up …

Each of the five students in the apparently well-coordinated network allegedly specialized in selling a certain type of drug, authorities said. During a five-month investigation, undercover New York Police Department officers made 31 purchases from the students, totaling nearly $11,000, said Bridget Brennan, the city’s special narcotics prosecutor.

According to Ms. Brennan, the sales took place in the common areas or bedrooms of three fraternities and two dorms and involved the peddling of cocaine, marijuana, ecstasy, Adderall and LSD, the latter of which was sometimes used to lace Altoids or Sweet Tarts candy.

Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said the bust was the biggest at a college “in recent memory.” He said the investigation began after a tip from a confidential source. A law-enforcement official with knowledge of the case said at least one student came forward to police with information about the narcotics exchange at the school.

via Columbia Drug Bust ‘Operation Ivy League’ Snares Five – WSJ.com.

apps, NYCBroadway by iPhone: TKTS Launches App – Metropolis – WSJ.

NYC, travel:  Ten Things Not to Do in New York City in Hot Spots on Concierge.com.

gLee:  I always wonder about the guys playing the instruments … why they are not ever characters. So I found this amusing. … Brad Ellis: ‘Glee’s’ Piano Man, Perfectly Happy With The Silent Treatment : Monkey See : NPR.

Apple: OK, Mac — does that make me “a spendthrift fetishist?”

PC or Mac? It’s the longest-running question in personal technology — along with the Mac itself, the debate turns 27 next month — and probably the most contentious one. A small but noisy percentage of computer owners consist of people who aren’t content to pick a computing platform and leave it at that. Instead, they question the IQ and/or taste of anyone who makes a buying decision different from their own. Hence the classic stereotypes: the Windows user as a clueless sucker for punishment, and the Mac fan as a spendthrift fetishist. (Apple has fanned the flames with PC-bashing ads for years, and Microsoft has gotten snarky about Macs in some recent commercials.)

via PC vs. Mac Holiday Shopping: Which Computer Type Is Best? – TIME.

technology, iPhones, Charlotte:  So I have the worst cell phone service in a major metropolitan area AND I use the worst carrier!

Consumer Reports, the influential product review publication, says AT&T Inc. is again the worst-rated cellular service provider in the U.S., a blow to the carrier’s effort to rehabilitate its network and reputation.

via Consumer Reports Says AT&T ‘Worst-Rated’ U.S. Carrier – WSJ.com.




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