Posts Tagged ‘Open Culture

24
Feb
16

2.24.16 … “A walk on the labyrinth can give you the opportunity to “contribute” and ” take action” through prayer and meditation” …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2016 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (Walk 13/40), Avondale Presbyterian Church – Charlotte NC, daffodils, tulip trees:

Absolutely bizarre weather

When I left my house 30 minutes ago, it was pouring. And extremely windy. It is now bright sunshine, 71° and still very breezy.

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and a new brochure …

Calling all Walkers

Have you ever felt that you would like to contribute to a cause or take action to solve a problem but you didn’t know how or what to do? A walk on the labyrinth can give you the opportunity to “contribute” and ” take action” through prayer and meditation.

 

dampness,
in and out of the shadows,
ring of the chimes in the chime tower,
ever faintly the rushing water of the fountain,
rustling of the trees,
broken twigs,
(sign of how bad the storm was, It was not enough to bring down large limbs)
standing water in several areas of the Sacred Garden.

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Tulip trees are in bloom! Are they the first sign of spring every year.

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After my walk, I drove home in search of daffodils. They are late this year in Charlotte and I only found them a few places.

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And when I arrive back, it is pouring, again.

2.24.16

Montreat, Montreat Gate:

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Poor gate. Again.

 

The Guggenheim,  109 Free Modern Art Books Online, Open Culture:

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The Guggenheim Puts 109 Free Modern Art Books Online | Open CultureBack in January, 2012, we mentioned that the Guggenheim (the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed modern art museum in NYC) had put 65 art catalogues on the web, all free of charge. We’re happy to report that, between then and now, the number of free texts has grown to 109. Published between 1937 and 1999, the art books/catalogues offer an intellectual and visual introduction to the work of Alexander Calder, Edvard Munch, Francis Bacon, Gustav Klimt & Egon Schiele, Fernand Léger, and Kandinsky. Plus there are other texts (e.g., Masterpieces of Modern Art and Abstract Expressionists Imagists) that tackle meta movements and themes. Anyone interested in the history of the Guggenheim will want to spend time with a collection called “The Syllabus.” It contains five books by Hilla Rebay, the museum’s first director and curator. Together, they let you take a close look at the art originally housed in the Guggenheim when the museum first opened its doors in 1939.

Source: The Guggenheim Puts 109 Free Modern Art Books Online | Open Culture

 

 

WAZE GPS direction voice Morgan Freeman, http://www.ajc.com:  got it!

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The voice of God can tell you how to navigate traffic. Well, you can hear the voice of the man who has probably portrayed God more than any other actor. Like Kevin Hart and Arnold Schwarzenegger before him, Morgan Freeman is lending his voice to Google’s navigation app Waze is part of the promotion for a new movie. >> Read more trending stories “Far and away one of the most requested voices by Wazers, U.S drivers will now be able to have Mr. Freeman as their new executive copilot,” Waze said in a release Monday. Hart lent his voice to the app to promote “Ride Along” in 2013.

Source: You can finally get GPS directions from Morgan Freeman | www.ajc.com

 

Salisbury Cathedral UK,   ‘The Kiss’ Sculpture,  Texters Keep Bumping Into It;

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NEW YORK, Feb 22 (Reuters) – A British cathedral sought to reassure visitors on Monday that they could still view a massive sculpture following a Facebook post by the statue’s creator saying the church had moved it because people kept bumping into it while texting. The Salisbury Cathedral, located about 90 miles outside of London, said in a tweet on Monday under the Twitter handle @SalisburyCath: “Don’t worry, you can still see ‘The Kiss’ at theCathedral. We’ve moved the sculpture onto the lawn #Relationships.” “The Kiss” is a 20-foot sculpture of clasping hands by artist Sophie Ryder. On Tuesday, Ryder posted a video on Facebook of a crane moving the statue, with the comment “We had to move ‘the kiss’ because people were walking through texting and said they bumped their heads! Oh well!!”

Source: Cathedral Moves Sculpture Because Texters Keep Bumping Into It

 

 

 

 

14
Feb
16

2.14.16 … Happy Valentine’s day … What’s love got to do with it? …

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“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walkng, 2016 Labyrinth Walks (Walk 5/40), Almetto Howie Alexander labyrinth – McCrorey YMCA/Charlotte NC, Valentine’s Day:  I walked very early at the McCrorey YMCA.  John volunteered last night at Room in the Inn at the Y, so I joined him early for a cold early morning walk.  This is a nice labyrinth and I enjoy it every time I come.  I always find something new in the afro-centric themed art surrounding the classical Chartres labyrinth.  And of course I found a heart!  Happy Valentine’s Day!

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FPC-Charlotte, PW February 2016 Devotional:

What’s love got to do with it?

February is always an interesting month to me.  There is Valentine’s Day and usually the season of Lent begins at some point, this year it is early, February 10.  So what does love have to do with it?

In a recent editorial by New York Times editor David Brooks, Mr. Brooks states:

The art critic Frederick Turner wrote that beauty “is the highest integrative level of understanding and the most comprehensive capacity for effective action. It enables us to go with, rather than against, the deepest tendency or theme of the universe.” By this philosophy, beauty incites spiritual longing.

Today the word eros refers to sex, but to the Greeks it meant the fervent desire to reach excellence and deepen the voyage of life. This eros is a powerful longing. Whenever you see people doing art, whether they are amateurs at a swing dance class or a professional painter, you invariably see them trying to get better. “I am seeking. I am striving. I am in it with all my heart,” Vincent van Gogh wrote.

Some people call eros the fierce longing for truth. “Making your unknown known is the important thing,” Georgia O’Keeffe wrote. Mathematicians talk about their solutions in aesthetic terms, as beautiful or elegant.

Others describe eros as a more spiritual or religious longing. They note that beauty is numinous and fleeting, a passing experience that enlarges the soul and gives us a glimpse of the sacred.

The shift to post-humanism has left the world beauty-poor and meaning-deprived. It’s not so much that we need more artists and bigger audiences, though that would be nice. It’s that we accidentally abandoned a worldview that showed how art can be used to cultivate the fullest inner life. We left behind an ethos that reminded people of the links between the beautiful, the true and the good — the way pleasure and love can lead to nobility.

Source: When Beauty Strikes – The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/15/opinion/when-beauty-strikes.html?ribbon-ad-idx=3&rref=collection/column/david-brooks&module=Ribbon&version=context&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=David%20Brooks&pgtype=article

In Matthew 22, we find the THE Greatest Commandment:

34Hearing that Jesus had silenced the Sadducees, the Pharisees got together. 35One of them, an expert in the law, tested him with this question: 36“Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?” 37Jesus replied: “ ‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’c 38This is the first and greatest commandment. 39And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ 40All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.”

Over the past few months, we have looked at various gifts or fruits of the spirit as set forth in Galatians 5:22-25.  And the first listed is LOVE.

Do each of these uses of love mean the same thing?  We seek love to find truth and to enlarge our soul and give us a glimpse of the sacred, we are commanded by Jesus to love, and we are gifted love by the Spirit.

So I suggest that during February and continuing throughout Lent, you focus on love.  Instead of giving up something for Lent, give love and take up a spiritual practice where you focus on God’s love.  I have walked local labyrinths for the past 5 years as my Lenten practice.  Try something different:  pray daily, try centered prayer or meditation daily, tour a local church daily or walk a labyrinth.

Let us pray: Lord, let each of us encounter Jesus in our everyday lives and let us seek love, experience love and share love. Guide us to do as you command: to love you, Lord, with all our hearts and with all our souls and with all our minds. Amen.

Dennard Teague

February  2016

 

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, RIP:

Scalia’s death has far-reaching implications for the Supreme Court and a round of major cases the justices are set to decide this summer, including Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, which challenges the university’s affirmative action policy, plus a case that contests Obama’s immigration policy and another that reexamines the meaning of “one person, one vote,” said former U.S. Rep. Charlie Gonzalez.

Source: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia found dead at West Texas ranch – SFGate

Scalia-Ginsburg friendship, opposing ideologies, CNNPolitics.com: Several people in the media and social media have talked accused Justice Scalia of being misogynist, racist, elitist, etc.  But does anyone believe that Justice Ginsberg could think such things and be such a good friend?  Why can people no longer respect those they differ with, even if with respect to fundamental issues.

During a joint appearance with the woman he also has called his “best buddy” on the bench, Scalia said, “Why don’t you call us the odd couple?” “What’s not to like?” Scalia joked at the event hosted by the Smithsonian Associates. “Except her views on the law, of course.” The two justices and their families vacationed together. There was a trip to Europe where Ginsburg went parasailing, leaving Scalia on the ground to admire her courage but at the same time worry she might just float away.

Source: Scalia-Ginsburg friendship bridged opposing ideologies – CNNPolitics.com

It’s easy to mourn the lack of civility in contemporary American politics; politicians on both sides talk glowingly about the time when Ronald Reagan could invite Democratic House Speaker Tip O’Neill to the White House for a drink to work out a conflict. It’s just as easy to say that civility is for people who don’t have the courage of their convictions — that if people genuinely disagree about what is best for America, they shouldn’t have to put that aside for the sake of small talk. What makes Ginsburg’s statement remarkable is that it shows how superficial both sides of the civility argument are. The respect that Ginsburg’s statement shows for Scalia’s intellect — that she could trust him to point out the flaws in her arguments — also reveals a respect for her own, to know the difference between a genuine agreement of principle and an error that needed to be corrected. But more importantly, the statement shows that it’s okay for people in politics to spend time cultivating other interests — like opera — and that those can be a genuine basis for friendship in their own right. Arguably, that’s easier for appointed judges than it is for elected officials. It’s still rare. And it’s still worth celebrating. It’s not just atypical in contemporary American politics for people to be both ideological adversaries and close personal friends. It’s atypical for contemporary American political figures to even be close personal friends with each other. Justices Scalia and Ginsburg showed just how much everyone else was missing. That won’t be as significant to Scalia’s legacy as his jurisprudence, but maybe it should.

Source: Read Justice Ginsburg’s moving tribute to her “best buddy” Justice Scalia – Vox

Sri Srinivasan, Supreme Court justice in the making:  So who is next?

From his post feet away from the nine justices March 27, Srikanth Srinivasan (SREE-kont SREE-nee-vah-sun) calmly explained what Roberts called a “totally unprecedented” situation. Along the way, the mathematics professor’s son sprinkled in references to numerators, denominators and algorithms, the statutes 28 U.S.C. 530(d) and 28 U.S.C. 1254, and the precedents established by INS v.Chadha, United States v. Lovett and Turner Broadcasting v. FCC. Without notes. It was just the latest chapter in a stellar legal career that has taken the 46-year-old litigator known as “Sri” to a seat on the nation’s second most powerful court — and given him instant buzz as a potential Supreme Court justice himself. The Senate unanimously confirmed Srinivasan on Thursday as the first new judge since 2006 on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The vote was 97-0.

Source: Sri Srinivasan: Supreme Court justice in the making?

Biscuits: A Love Story,  Garden and Gun:  I love biscuits so I thought this was a fun Valentine Day story.

lent a hand. “Before he did the last fold, I’d punch the dough,” she says. “I’d leave a fist mark in it. Then I’d always claim that the biscuits turned out right just because I punched them.” He always saved a biscuit for her, and she joked that she’d marry him if he kept it up. Ten years later, she made good on that promise. They’ve been married for three months. She still punches the dough before he folds it, but she lets him do the rest of the work. “He makes them so well there’s no point,” she says. But she doesn’t agree with him on everything. She likes her biscuits with butter, and he prefers his with sausage and grape jelly.

Source: Biscuits: A Love Story | Garden and Gun

 Virtual Tour, Hieronymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights, Open Culture:  Bewildering is right!  I saw it at the Prado.  I would love to know what he was thinking ….

 

Art historians have argued about the meaning of The Garden of Earthly Delights—Hieronymus Bosch’s enormously sized, lavishly detailed, and compellingly grotesque late 14th- or early 15th-century triptych—more or less since the painter’s death. What does it really say about the appearance and fall of man on Earth that it seems to depict? How seriously or ironically does it say it? Does it offer us a warning against temptation, or a celebration of temptation? Does it take a religious or anti-religious stance? And what’s with all those creepy animals and bizarre pseudo-sex acts? “In spite of all the ingenious, erudite and in part extremely useful research devoted to the task,” said scholar Erwin Panofsky, “I cannot help feeling that the real secret of his magnificent nightmares and daydreams has still to be disclosed.”

Source: Take a Virtual Tour of Hieronymus Bosch’s Bewildering Masterpiece The Garden of Earthly Delights | Open Culture

15
Mar
14

3.15.14 … A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March …

Beware the ides of March, Shakespeare, quotes:

Caesar: Who is it in the press that calls on me? I hear a tongue shriller than all the music Cry “Caesar!” Speak, Caesar is turn’d to hear.

Soothsayer: Beware the ides of March.

Caesar: What man is that?

Brutus: A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.

via Beware the ides of March – Shakespeare Quotes.

And there is always someone who can add a new twist, LOL.

The ‘singing’ stones of Stonehenge, Bath Chronicle, favorites, thin places: Love this place and the ancient-ness of it. Now Ifind out it sings!  My sis and I visited when I was 18, and we hunted for her boyfriend’s initials which he supposedly had carved in a stone as a teen. You could walk all around the stones way back when …

It has long been a mystery to even the most learned expert of the Stonehenge monument – what is so special about the stone in west Wales that it was worth carting 180 miles to Salisbury Plain?

Most theories concentrated on how the famous bluestones of the Preseli hills in Pembrokeshire can be buffed up to a strikingly polished shine. But now experts in the arts, rather than archaeology, have come up with a different theory – and it is not to do with how they look, but how the sound.

Researchers from the Royal College of Art in London spent months taking one lump of stone and tapping it on more than 1,000 rocks in the Carn Menyn area of the Preseli hills, and discovered something so remarkable it may well rewrite the history books about Stonehenge.

The bluestones ‘sing’ when they are hit, resonating with an apparently unique twang that does not appear to reach the same pitch or musical note as other stones which merely ‘thud’.

Some previous theories surrounding Stonehenge’s sonic qualities – the way the stone circle would have captured and reverberated sound – had been rather dismissed by the experts concentrating on astronomy and landscape, but the new study appears to reinforce the importance of sound, and the sonic qualities of the stones themselves.

“We found it was a noteworthy soundscape, with a significant percentage of the actual rocks making metallic sounds like bells, gongs, tin drums, etc, when tapped with small, handheld ‘hammerstones’,” said Paul Devereux, the study’s co-leader, a research associate at the college and an expert in archaeo-acoustics.

It is a phenomenon anyone sitting inside the stone circle during the summer solstice celebrations each year amid the cacophony of a dozen or so drummers can attest to.

“The stones may have been thought to have magical, qualities, mana, because of their exceptional sonic nature,” he added.

via The ‘singing’ stones of Stonehenge | Bath Chronicle.

Sipho Mabona, Life-sized Origami Elephant from Single Sheet of Paper, Colossal, KKLB in Beromünster Switzerland: Colossal art!

Following a successful campaign on Indiegogo which raised nearly $26,000, artist Sipho Mabona followed through on his promise to fold a life-sized elephant from a single giant sheet of paper. The piece stands over 10 feet tall (3 meters) and took a team of nearly a dozen people over four weeks to fold. The final sculpture is on view at KKLB in Beromünster, Switzerland. Photos by Philipp Schmidli. (via My Modern Met)

via Artist Sipho Mabona Successfully Folds Life-sized Origami Elephant from Single Sheet of Paper | Colossal.

Delaware man’s self-penned obit takes internet by storm, abc11.com, Walter George Bruhl Jr.: I love a good obit! I “will do an unexpected and unsolicited act of kindness for some poor unfortunate soul in his name.”

Walter George Bruhl Jr. of Newark and Dewey Beach is a dead person; he is no more; he is bereft of life; he is deceased; he has rung down the curtain and gone to join the choir invisible; he has expired and gone to meet his maker.

He drifted off this mortal coil Sunday, March 9, 2014, in Punta Gorda, Fla. His spirit was released from his worn-out shell of a body and is now exploring the universe.

Everyone who remembers him is asked to celebrate Walt’s life in their own way; raising a glass of their favorite drink in his memory would be quite appropriate.

Instead of flowers, Walt would hope that you will do an unexpected and unsolicited act of kindness for some poor unfortunate soul in his name.

via Delaware man’s self-penned obit takes internet by storm | abc11.com.

shacking up before marriage, TIME.com:  Interesting.

“It turns out that cohabitation doesn’t cause divorce and probably never did,” says Kuperberg. “What leads to divorce is when people move in with someone – with or without a marriage license – before they have the maturity and experience to choose compatible partners and to conduct themselves in ways that can sustain a long-term relationship.”

So what’s the magic age? Kuperberg says it’s unwise to either move in or get married before the age of 23. But other family experts say that’s lowballing it. Economist Evelyn Lehrer (University of Illinois-Chicago) says the longer people wait past 23, the more likely a marriage is to stick. In fact, Lehrer’s analysis of longitudinal data shows that for every year a woman waits to get married, right up until her early 30s, she reduces her chances of divorce. It’s possible that woman may also be reducing her chances of marriage, but Lehrer’s research suggests later marriages, while less conventional, may be more robust.

via How Shacking Up Before Marriage Affects a Relationship’s Success | TIME.com.

 MH370: Can this be possible? This is from a few days ago.  this story keeps getting more and more unbelievable.  Sounds like a Clancy thriller.

U.S. investigators suspect that Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 stayed in the air for about four hours past the time it reached its last confirmed location, raising the possibility that the plane could have flown on for hundreds of additional miles under conditions that remain murky. http://on.wsj.com/1fsKDV5

Malaysian officials say they have no data indicating flight MH370 flew on for hours after last contact as reported by the WSJ. http://on.wsj.com/1kmANcz

impatient dog honks car horn for 15 minutes, Scotland, NY Daily News: She’s cute! Owner Graham Haddow, 58, from Liff, sits in his car with his boxer dog, Fern, at their home. Haddow was visiting a gallery when he heard Fern honking the horn of his car outside. The dog then became an internet sensation.

via ▶ Dog blasts car horn in Broughty Ferry – YouTube.

So the 18-month-old pup did what she thought was best: She laid on the horn for 15 minutes.

“I came out of the gallery and looked down the street about a hundred yards away and saw a crowd gathered around a car and heard a honking sound,” Graham said, according to the Daily Star. “Then I did a double-take and realized that it was my car and I wondered if it was anything to do with the dog. She was sitting in there casually honking the horn.”

Several onlookers snapped photos and took video of the scene.

“I heard it and thought it was an impatient driver,” one video commenter wrote.

The Express reports that Fern’s anger didn’t subside when she saw Haddow returning.

“Usually when Fern sees me she stands up and gets excited with her tail wagging,” Haddow said. “But this time she just gave me a sideways glance and kept on honking the horn.”

via Dog Honks Horn When Owner Takes Too Long To Return To Car.

The Harvard Classics,  Download All 51 Volumes as Free eBooks,  Open Culture:

Rather than simply curating for posterity “the best that has been thought and said” (in the words of Matthew Arnold), Eliot meant his anthology as a “portable university”—a pragmatic set of tools, to be sure, and also, of course, a product. He suggested that the full set of texts might be divided into a set of six courses on such conservative themes as “The History of Civilization” and “Religion and Philosophy,” and yet, writes Kirsch, “in a more profound sense, the lesson taught by the Harvard Classics is ‘Progress.’” “Eliot’s [1910] introduction expresses complete faith in the ‘intermittent and irregular progress from barbarism to civilization.’”

Over a hundred years, and several cultural-evolutionary steps later, and anyone with an internet connection can read all of the 51-volume set online. In a previous post, Dan Colman summarized the number of ways to get your hands on Charles W. Eliot’s anthology:

You can still buy an old set off of eBay for $399 [now $299.99]. But, just as easily, you can head to the Internet Archive and Project Gutenberg, which have centralized links to every text included in The Harvard Classics (Wealth of Nations, Origin of Species, Plutarch’s Lives, the list goes on below). Please note that the previous two links won’t give you access to the actual annotated Harvard Classics texts edited by Eliot himself. But if you want just that, you can always click here and get digital scans of the true Harvard Classics.

In addition to these options, Bartleby has digital texts of the entire collection of what they call “the most comprehensive and well-researched anthology of all time.” But wait, there’s more! Much more, in fact, since Eliot and his assistant William A. Neilson compiled an additional twenty volumes called the “Shelf of Fiction.” Read those twenty volumes—at fifteen minutes a day—starting with Henry Fielding and ending with Norwegian novelist Alexander Kielland at Bartleby.

What may strike modern readers of Eliot’s collection are precisely the “blind spots in Victorian notions of culture and progress” that it represents. For example, those three harbingers of doom for Victorian certitude—Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud—are nowhere to be seen. Omissions like this are quite telling, but, as Kirsch writes, we might not look at Eliot’s achievement as a relic of a naively optimistic age, but rather as “an inspiring testimony to his faith in the possibility of democratic education without the loss of high standards.” This was, and still remains, a noble ideal, if one that—like the utopian dreams of the Victorians—can sometimes seem frustratingly unattainable (or culturally imperialist). But the widespread availability of free online humanities certainly brings us closer than Eliot’s time could ever come.

via The Harvard Classics: Download All 51 Volumes as Free eBooks – Open Culture.

“Into the Wild” Moose Hunter Killed, News from the Field, OutsideOnline.com, Chris McCandless:

Samel was described as a passionate outdoorsman but also someone who had lived a troubled life. Late Sunday night, Samel was involved in a police chase after he was reported for drunk driving. Following a sustained pursuit, police units ultimately surrounded Samel as he sped toward an officer approaching on foot. The officer and another trooper opened fire on the pickup, killing Samel and injuring the other male passenger.

Samel had been under court orders to not drink after a DUI arrest in September, when he picked up two hitchhikers before crashing into a roadside ditch. Sunday night marked the end of a nearly 30-year criminal history for Samel.

In 1992, Samel was with a group of three moose hunters when they found McCandless almost three weeks after he died. According to Jon Krakauer, when the hunters arrived at the old Fairbanks city bus, a couple from Anchorage were already there but stayed back because of the stench and unsettling SOS note. It was Samel who eventually discovered McCandless in his sleeping bag.

via “Into the Wild” Moose Hunter Killed | News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com.

The Spring Break College Tour, A Survival Guide, WSJ.com: Been there, done that.

March Madness is upon us, by which I mean the tradition of taking your high school junior on a manic tour of college campuses. I’ve done it twice now, so I feel that I have some perspective on how to survive it.

As the parent, you have much to offer on this exciting and emotional journey—paying for it and doing the driving. But this limited influence does give you leeway to help design the trip, and here is where you can begin your subtle campaign of influencing where your kid goes to college. Keep your designs sub rosa, because the minute you say, “I’d love to see you at UMass Amherst,” she’ll set her heart on Sarah Lawrence. That one little sentence can cost you $40,000.

You’re only going to have a week or so on the tour, so you’ll have to pick your schools carefully. Most likely your kid will have already assembled a wish list of colleges to see. Don’t feel hurt if those places are far away from you—that is only because she wants to be really far away from you.

via The Spring Break College Tour: A Survival Guide – WSJ.com.

Jane Austen, real-life Mr Darcy,  sofa, Mail Online:

A vintage sofa that belonged to the real-life Mr Darcy from Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice has sold for more than twice its estimate bid at £2,300.

The George III mahogany framed sofa is thought to have belonged to Thomas Lefroy, a love interest of the famous author who is believed to have provided the inspiration for romantic hero Mr Darcy.

The upholstered Art Nouveau piece was expected to sell for just £1,000 at Moore Allen & Innocent in Cirencester but today shocked collectors as a fan took it for £2,300.

via Jane Austen’s real-life Mr Darcy sofa sells for TWICE its estimated bid at £2,300 as Pride and Prejudice fans snap up historic piece | Mail Online.

restaurants,  Spectacular Views: I’ve been to one!

Sierra Mar , Big Sur, Calif., U.S.A.

You’re sitting: on top of a cliff

At: Post Ranch Inn

Looking at: the Pacific Ocean

Ordering: the nine-course Taste of Big Sur tasting menu

via 32 Restaurants With Spectacular Views.

19
Jan
14

1.19.14 … book jackets and wine labels …

 “Ballet Shoes” , Nol Streatfeild, “You’ve Got Mail”, book jackets,  wine labels,  small independent bookstores: So, I saw a refernce on a FB page to  “Ballet Shoes” and asked, “Isn’t  the book that this film is based the one  that is refernced in one of the later scenes in You’ve Got Mail?”

A Mighty Girl Pick of the Day: “Ballet Shoes,” a 2007 BBC movie adaptation of the Noel Streatfield novel, starring Emma Watson of Harry Potter fame. This compelling film tells the story of three orphaned girls, Pauline (Watson), Petrova, and Posy, living together as sisters and being supported — barely — by one elder sister, Sylvia.

The three girls each have high ambitions: Petrova wants to fly airplanes, Posy wants to dance ballet, and Pauline wants to be an actress. The story follows the girls as each of them pursues their dreams and learns important lessons about kindness, love, and family.

These loving sisters and their determination to write their names in the history books are sure to inspire every watcher and their willingness to stand alongside one another in support is heartwarming. This lovely film is recommended for ages 7 and up.

via (3) A Mighty Girl.

And the answer is yes …

“Nol Streatfeild wrote Ballet Shoes and Skating Shoes and Dancing Shoes. Id start with Ballet Shoes its my favorite. Although Dancing Shoes is completely wonderful but its out of print.”

via Ramblings of an English Teacher: You’ve Got Mail.

And then I had a great FB conversation …

FB friend: ” I love that scene. We’ve come full circle here with only a small independent bookstore in my immediate area. I try to frequent it, but it is so hard to beat the price and convenience of Amazon.I still have to go in person for browsing fun. I am drawn to certain book jackets the same way i shop for wine by the wine labels.”

me: “I love book jackets and wine labels! I was in my independent bookstore yesterday, picking up an signed copy of a book for a “spiritual” basket for my church’s youth mission trip fundraiser. i asked if it had discounts because I needed 8+ books for the basket. (Long story, short: spiritual basket contains ministers and staffs’ favorite books with personal notes among other things) … I of course prompted a discourse on why they could not compete with Amazon…) As for wine labels, i was just commenting to my sister in law, that all the small vineyards John and I loved on our last visit to Napa 24 years ago, some because of their fun labels , are now big vineyards.”

Fyodor Dostoevsky, doodles manuscripts, Open Culture:  Puts Dostoevsky in a new light. 🙂

Few would argue against the claim that Fyodor Dostoevsky, author of such bywords for literary weightiness as Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov, mastered the novel, even by the formidable standards of 19th-century Russia. But if you look into his papers, you’ll find that he also had an intriguing way with pen and ink outside the realm of letters — or, if you like, deep inside the realm of letters, since to see drawings by Dostoevsky, you actually have to look within the manuscripts of his novels. Above, we have a page from Crime and Punishment into which a pair of solemn faces (not that their mood will surprise enthusiasts of Russian literature) found their way

via Fyodor Dostoevsky Draws Elaborate Doodles In His Manuscripts | Open Culture.

Tweet of the Day:  I’m really slow sometimes.

Huffington Post

(@HuffingtonPost)

1/15/14, 9:36 PM

Girl choir breaks stained glass ceiling at Canterbury Cathedral

CANTERBURY, England (RNS) Canterbury Cathedral, mother church of the 85 million-member worldwide Anglican Communion, will have its first girls’ choir perform since it was rebuilt nearly 1,000 years ago.

On Jan. 25, worshippers will hear the voices of 16 girls between the ages of 12 and 16 at a historic Evensong service, which will include the music of English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Until now, only male voices have been heard at the cathedral’s services.

via Canterbury Cathedral Will Have Girls’ Choir Perform For The First Time Ever.

The Best Airport Food, lists, WSJ.com:  I hate airport food and never venture beyond Starbucks or McDonalds. Anyone else with recommendations?

Middle Seat favorites: Urban Taco’s chicken tinga and Dos Equis Amber barbacoa tacos at DFW, Legal Sea Foods chowder and crab cakes in Boston or Philadelphia (and returning to Washington’s Reagan National this spring), and that incredible barbecue beef from The Salt Lick, which must be chased by Amy’s Mexican vanilla ice cream.

Farther afield, one of my all-time memorable meals was the salade gersoise at 8e Ciel at the airport in Toulouse, France. Every conceivable preparation of duck—and Toulouse is known for its duck—is nestled on greens and priced at about $26. The restaurant, a highlight of an otherwise dreary, small airport, features regional cuisine “advised” by chef Michel Sarran, with the added bonus, for aviation buffs, of a broad view of the Airbus factory flight line.

via The Best Airport Food in the U.S. and Beyond – WSJ.com.

And a few additions from FB Friends …

FB Friend: “The Varsity on Concourse C ATL”

FB Friend:  The article here mentions Legal seafood at Boston. I’ve had good seafood at BWI too. The new Delta concourse in NY (Kennedy?) has great restaurants. Houston has beer vendors with carts that roll down the concourses!

FB Friend: “Ditto on BWI. Used to be a great little gourmet restaurant in Bakersfield but I haven’t been back there in a while.”

1968 Artist Imagines What John Paul George & Ringo,  “When I’m Sixty-Four”, Open Culture:

When I get older losing my hair,

Many years from now,

Will you still be sending me a valentine

Birthday greetings bottle of wine?

Paul McCartney’s wistful song “When I’m Sixty-Four” was released on the Beatles’ 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. The next year, an artist named Michael Leonard tried to imagine what the young musicians might look like four decades later — on their 64th birthdays. We never got a chance to figure out whether he sized up Lennon and Harrison correctly. But we know that Paul, even at 71 today, never got jowly. And Ringo never went the suit route. You can see for yourself when the two perform at the Grammys on January 26.

via In 1968, Artist Imagines What John, Paul, George & Ringo Will Look Like When They’re 64 | Open Culture.

How sugar affects the brain, Nicole Avena,  Why Diets Fail by Nicole Avena, TED-Ed , YouTube:  My name is ______, and I am an addict, a sugar addict.

Sad, but true ..

I mentioned a new book called Why Diets Fail by Nicole Avena, a neuroscientist and research psychologist at Columbia University who has done a lot of work in this area. She\’s particularly interested in the neurotransmitters and brain receptors involved in eating. In lab experiments with rats, she\’s shown how overeating tasty foods (like sugar) can produce changes in the brain and behavior that resemble addiction.

The Salt

Is Sugar Addiction Why So Many January Diets Fail?

Science

Overeating, Like Drug Use, Rewards And Alters Brain

Avena has also just put out a clever TED-Ed video with colorful visuals to help explain the details of just why sugar makes our brains go bonkers.

As the video shows, the key player in the reward system of our brain — where we get that feeling of pleasure — is dopamine. Dopamine receptors are all over our brain. And doing a drug like heroin brings on a deluge of dopamine.

Guess what happens when we eat sugar? Yes, those dopamine levels also surge — though not nearly as much as they do with heroin.

via Why Sugar Makes Us Feel So Good : The Salt : NPR.

Elena Shumilova/Russian Mother,  Magical Pictures, Two Kids With Animals On Her Farm,  Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Bored Panda:  These are more than magical … 

These wonderful photographs by Elena Shumilova plunge the viewer into a beautiful world that revolves around two boys and their adorable dog, cat, duckling and rabbit friends. Taking advantage of natural colors, weather conditions and her enchanting surroundings, the gifted Russian artist creates cozy and heartwarming photography that will leave you amazed.

The boys in the photographs are the photographer’s sons and the animals belong to the farm she runs. “I largely trust my intuition and inspiration when I compose photos. I get inspired mainly by my desire to express something I feel, though I usually cannot tell exactly what that is” Shumilova explained to BoredPanda.

Rural settings, natural phenomena and the changing seasons seem to be the greatest stimuli in her works. “When shooting I prefer to use natural light – both inside and outside. I love all sorts of light conditions – street lights, candle light, fog, smoke, rain and snow – everything that gives visual and emotional depth to the image,” the photographer said.

Shumilova told us her passion for photography manifested in early 2012 when she got her first camera. Her most recent equipment includes the Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera and a 135mm lens. As a mother who doesn’t want to miss out on her growing children, she says she shoots every day and processes the images at night.

We suggest you take a cup of tea, lean back comfortably in your armchair and browse this beautiful collection of Elena Shumilova’s photographs.

via Russian Mother Takes Magical Pictures of Her Two Kids With Animals On Her Farm | Bored Panda.

Snowboarders, lawsuits,  Alta Ski Area, OutsideOnline.com, the Fourteenth Amendment(citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws): So I asked my guys, one ides, one skis, what do you guys think?  I think there are some valid arguments since it is on government land.

Four snowboarders and a Utah nonprofit corporation have sued Alta Ski Area and the U.S. Forest Service, challenging the resort’s skiers-only rule.

The lawsuit states that Alta’s policy prohibiting snowboarders from riding at the resort violates the Fourteenth Amendment, which addresses citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws.

Alta is one of three resorts in the country that does not allow snowboarding, and it is the only one that operates on public land controlled by the U.S. Forest Service, according to the lawsuit.

via Snowboarders Sue Alta Ski Area | News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com.

LOL, man’s best friend: Sounds like my house!!

Photo

19
Jan
14

1.19.14 … you go …

Lots of “you go” today! You go, President Quillen! You go, nice man on plane! You go, Christ the Redeemer! You go, Jason Brown! Well, you get the idea …

Davidson College, President Carol Quillen,  Air Force One, White House summit, DavidsonNews.net:  Ride of a lifetime … and she’s doing it on/for Davidson!

From @CarolQuillen via Twitter: "Thanks to President Obama for investing in manufacturing innovation in NC--and thx for the ride to DC!"

It had to be the ride of a lifetime: Davidson College President Carol Quillen flew to another DC – Washington, DC –  on board Air Force One Wednesday to participate in a White House meeting Thursday hosted by President Barack Obama on expanding college opportunity for low-income students.

Quillen was among dozens of college and university presidents and business and nonprofit leaders invited to the summit, which included First Lady Michelle Obama and Education Secretary Arne Duncan. Also on the flight from Raleigh to the capital were North Carolina State University Chancellor Randy Woodson and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol Folt.

via Davidson’s Quillen hops Air Force One to a White House summit  | DavidsonNews.net.

Song Binbin, New Apology, China’s Cultural Revolution, China Real Time Report – WSJ: My college sophomore daughter took a class on Historiography of China.  So this article jumped out at me.  Is Song Binbin rewriting history?

By denouncing a school administrator almost five decades ago, the daughter of a famous Chinese admiral helped spark a riotous summer in Beijing that left the administrator dead and earned her personal praise and a new nickname from Mao Zedong.

Now, Song Binbin says she is sorry, according to media reports.

In the latest public apology for actions during the chaotic Cultural Revolution, which consumed China starting in 1966 until Mao died a decade later, Ms. Song over the weekend visited her alma mater to express “eternal regret and sorrow.”

The daughter of Song Renqiong, one of China’s founding leaders known as the Eight Immortals, was in 1966 a senior leader among the leftist Red Guards at her girls’ school in Beijing. The Red Guard worked to overthrow China’s institutional frameworks to demonstrate their devotion to Mao.

In June of that year, she authored what is known as a big-character poster criticizing the school leadership, which led to escalating struggle sessions against teachers and administrators during the summer. It culminated with a deadly mob beating in August of the school’s Communist Party secretary and deputy headmaster, Bian Zhongyun.

Appearing at the Beijing Normal University-affiliated school in round glasses with gray hair along with another former student leader, Ms. Song said her actions were wrong. “I apologize for the first poster attacking the teachers and not protecting them over 40 years ago, and the aggressive and strange thoughts and behavior,” the newspaper quoted Liu Jin, another former student leader who apologized along with Ms. Song, as saying.

via Song Binbin Offers New Apology for Death of Teacher During China’s Cultural Revolution – China Real Time Report – WSJ.

grateful mother,  thank you,  autistic daughter, flight etiquette, Mail Online, power of the internet:  They connected! I cried when I read the letter, and I must admit that I’m misty eyed again.

A heartfelt open letter from a mother thanking a ‘kind stranger’ for entertaining her autistic daughter during a two-and-half-hour flight has been read more than 51,000 times with many deeming it a ‘touching’ and ‘beautiful’ story.

Shanell Mouland, 36, from New Brunswick, Canada, uploaded a note to her blog Go Team Kate last Thursday detailing how the mystery passenger engaged her three-year-old Kate in conversation instead of ignoring her.

‘Thank you for not making me repeat those awful apologetic sentences that I so often say in public,’ she wrote. ‘Thank you for entertaining Kate so much that she had her most successful plane ride, yet. And, thank you for putting your papers away and playing turtles with our girl.’

Grateful: Shanell Mouland, 36, from New Brunswick, Canada, penned an open letter thanking a stranger for being kind to her autistic daughter Kate during a two-and-half-hour plane journey – she has since been reunited with the man

Not only did Mrs Mouland’s letter attract thousands of hits but it also saw her reunited with the ‘hero’ in question.

One of Eric Kunkel’s relatives forwarded him the post and he was amazed when he realized he was the one being praised.

via Mother writes thank you to man who entertained her autistic daughter on flight | Mail Online.

Mag, Carl Sandburg, Poem-a-day:  I receive a poem-a-day.  Some I read, some I don’t.  The 1.18 poem jumped out at me.  It was very painful to read.  So I googled it and I realize that he was indeed this dark about his real life wife and about life.

Mag

by Carl Sandburg

I wish to God I never saw you, Mag.

I wish you never quit your job and came along with me.

I wish we never bought a license and a white dress

For you to get married in the day we ran off to a minister

And told him we would love each other and take care of each other

Always and always long as the sun and the rain lasts anywhere.

Yes, I\’m wishing now you lived somewhere away from here

And I was a bum on the bumpers a thousand miles away dead broke.

I wish the kids had never come

And rent and coal and clothes to pay for

And a grocery man calling for cash,

Every day cash for beans and prunes.

I wish to God I never saw you, Mag.

I wish to God the kids had never come.

via Mag- Poets.org – Poetry, Poems, Bios & More.

Hey, Jaycee, glad to see someone else care enough about this American Good Old Boy to know something about him. I don\’t think that Carl wrote this about his own marriage though. And he only had three daughters. He did struggle for money. In the early days, working as a newspaper reporter might have paid $25 to $50 a week. His poetry only brought in a few hundred dollars a year back then. The lecture tours you refer to did bring additional money, but there was another reason for them too. As Carl traveled about he collected additional information about Lincoln for the books he was going to write, and additional folksongs to add to his American Songbag collection.

But this poem shows the utter dispair of the working class. Carl was a champion of the working man. He was deeply disturbed knowing that while he struggled to raise a family on fifty bucks a week, some people were earning only six. As for Carl and Paula in later life, Paula had her own work going on at the family farm, and people were taking advantage of Carl when he was older, he had the social leaches plying him with booze and blowing smoke up his tailpipe. Carl did much performing in his latter years. I\’d rather remember him the way he was when he first started getting published, and his children were growing up. I think he was truly a great fellow.

Dave

| Posted on 2005-02-18 | by Sandburg

.: :.

Sandburg, makes full use of the first person to emphasise his harsh feeling about marriage and the responsibilities of a family. Although he remained married to his wife until her death, their marriage was not a happy one in it\’s later years.

The words of this poem reflect his bitterness from his marriage and his constant need for money due to his five children and medical bills. Sandburg was known to have fits of deep depression over family issues, and would go on lecturing tours to avoid being with his wife, and those pressures.

Inccidently his reference to being a bum, was first hand knowledge. He did ride boxcars across America living the life of the mentioned bum in his youth, so his lament may have been as much for that carefree life as the bitterness of the vision.

This poem is an example of why he was known as \”The People\’s Poet\”. His language is the standard American language of the working class, and represents their emotions and lifestyle. it\’s also timeless in it\’s theme of love fading in the face of the drudgery of everyday life.

jan

via Mag Analysis Carl Sandburg : Summary Explanation Meaning Overview Essay Writing Critique Peer Review Literary Criticism Synopsis Online Education.

Sadhguru, Jaggi Vasudev, quotes:  I liked the quote and with a name like Sadhguru, I had to research its author.

Sadhguru-Jaggi-Vasudev.jpg

Jaggi Vasudev also known as Sadhguru, is an Indian yogi and mystic. He founded the Isha Foundation, a non-profit organisation which offers yoga programs around the world, including India, United States, England, Lebanon, Singapore, Canada, Malaysia, Uganda and Australia. The Foundation is also involved in various social and community development activities, which have resulted in the Foundation being granted special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations.[1]

via Jaggi Vasudev – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Christ the Redeemer statue, Rio de Janeiro, lightning,  New York Post:  Pretty cool!

Lightning has broken a finger off the right hand of Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro.

Father Omar, rector of the shrine that holds the statue, told the Globo radio station that lightning frequently strikes the nearly 100-foot tall statue, a symbol of Rio that overlooks the Brazilian city from the peak of the Corcovado mountain.

Its right hand had been damaged sometime ago, but the finger finally broke off in a storm late Thursday.

via Lightning breaks finger off Christ statue | New York Post.

.followup, New Old Spice Ad, ‘Mom Song 60’,  Viral Ads,  WSJ.com:  I helped it go viral.  😦  Video – New Old Spice Ad, ‘Mom Song 60,’ Goes Viral With More Than 1 Millions Views – WSJ.com.

Jason Brown, Free Skate 2014 US Figure Skating Championships.  YouTube:

via ▶ Jason Brown Free Skate 2014 US Figure Skating Championships – YouTube.

Stop Everything And Watch This Kid’s Jaw-Dropping Figure-Skating Routine

If 19-year-old Jason Brown’s performance at the 2014 U.S. National Championships doesn’t get you pumped for the Olympics, nothing will.

via Stop Everything And Watch This Kid’s Jaw-Dropping Figure-Skating Routine.

Amazon, Digits – WSJ: Really?

Amazon.comAMZN +0.96% knows you so well it wants to ship your next package before you order it.

The Seattle retailer in December gained a patent for what it calls “anticipatory shipping,” a method to start delivering packages even before customers click “buy.”

The technique could cut delivery time and discourage consumers from visiting physical stores. In the patent document, Amazon says delays between ordering and receiving purchases “may dissuade customers from buying items from online merchants.”

So Amazon says it may box and ship products it expects customers in a specific area will want – based on previous orders and other factors — but haven’t yet ordered. According to the patent, the packages could wait at the shippers’ hubs or on trucks until an order arrives.

via Amazon Wants to Ship Your Package Before You Buy It – Digits – WSJ.

Gilligan’s ‘The Professor’, Russell Johnson,  The Two-Way : NPR: RIP the Professor “whose job it was to be the voice of reason and calm on an island of shipwrecked ninnies.”

Russell Johnson, the actor whose job it was to be the voice of reason and calm on an island of shipwrecked ninnies, has died at age 89, according to reports. Johnson\’s role as the Professor on the 1960s comedy Gilligan\’s Island endeared him to audiences who watched him build radios and generators from things like coconuts and palm branches.

Russell Johnson, the actor whose job it was to be the voice of reason and calm on an island of shipwrecked ninnies, has died at age 89, according to reports. Johnson\’s role as the Professor on the 1960s comedy Gilligan\’s Island endeared him to audiences who watched him build radios and generators from things like coconuts and palm branches.

via Gilligan’s ‘The Professor’ Has Died; Russell Johnson Was 89 : The Two-Way : NPR.

A lot of LOLs today …

Pissing off a frog…

You HAVE to watch this – I laughed out loud. Only 25 seconds. Thanks ~ Made my afternoon! Follow me !

via ▶ How to piss off a frog – YouTube.

paintings, Caravaggio, Vermeer, Great Masters, New Animated Video, “Beauty”,  Italian director Rino Stefano Tagliafierro, Open Culture: Beautiful, but strange …

via B E A U T Y – dir. Rino Stefano Tagliafierro on Vimeo.

With his short video “Beauty,” the Italian director Rino Stefano Tagliafierro takes “a series of well selected images from the tradition of pictorial beauty” and uses the “fire of digital invention” to animate sentiments lost on immobile canvasses. In the video above, you will see works by Caravaggio, Vermeer, Rubens and others put into digital motion. A complete list of the paintings included in the video can be found here.

via Paintings by Caravaggio, Vermeer, & Other Great Masters Come to Life in a New Animated Video | Open Culture.

Which Muppet Are You?: Hmmm … Scooter?  I am never who I expect.  🙂

Which Muppet Are You?

via Which Muppet Are You.

nursing home residents,   “Call Me Maybe”: How did I miss this one!!

Bruce Springsteen & Jimmy Fallon, “Gov. Christie Traffic Jam”/”Born To Run” Parody, Fort Lee NJ bridge scandal, political humor, YouTube: Politics aside … You just have to laugh.

via ▶ Bruce Springsteen & Jimmy Fallon: “Gov. Christie Traffic Jam” (“Born To Run” Parody) – YouTube.

 

27
Aug
13

8.27.13 … dishes restaurants’ chefs love … Siri sass … Buckminster Fuller’s Visionary Lectures …

restaurant dishes, restaurants’ chefs love, lists, Bon Appétit.

Some chefs work tirelessly to make their restaurants extraordinary, obsessing over everything from staff uniforms to the position of an herb on a plate. But just like us, they like to enjoy nice meals out on their days off, retreating to dining rooms where they’re not thinking about what’s going on behind the scenes. We asked some of our chef friends to name extraordinary dishes they’ve had at their peers’ restaurants around the country, and we got the recipes for our September issue’s RSVP column. We think we might just cook every single one before the summer’s over.

7 Restaurant Dishes That Other Restaurants’ Chefs Love – Bon Appétit.

Siri sass, Apple:

Siri has always had a sense of humor, albeit a relatively anodyne one. (Q: “Talk dirty to me, Siri.” A: “Humus. Compost. Pumice. Silt. Gravel.”) But it turns out Apple’s personal assistant can get a little testy when you call her (or him) by another personal assistant’s name.

via Siri: “OK, Glass” command prompts sass from Apple’s snarky assistant..

Buckminster Fuller’s Visionary Lectures, Free Online,  1975, Open Culture:

Think of the name Buckminster Fuller, and you may think of a few oddities of mid-twentieth-century design for living: the Dymaxion House, the Dymaxion Car, the geodesic dome. But these artifacts represent only a small fragment of Fuller’s life and work as a self-styled “comprehensive anticipatory design scientist.” In his decades-long project of developing and furthering his worldview — an elaborate humanitarian framework involving resource conservation, applied geometry, and neologisms like “tensegrity,” “ephemeralization,” and “omni-interaccommodative” — the man wrote over 30 books, registered 28 United States patents, and kept a diary documenting his every fifteen minutes. These achievements and others have made Fuller the subject of at least four documentaries and numerous books, articles, and papers, but now you can hear all about his thoughts, acts, experiences, and times straight from the source in the 42-hour lecture series Everything I Know, available to download at the Internet Archive. Though you’d perhaps expect it of someone whose journals stretch to 270 feet of solid paper, he could really talk.

via Everything I Know: 42 Hours of Buckminster Fuller’s Visionary Lectures Free Online 1975 | Open Culture.

07
Aug
13

8.7.13 … In my old age I think I would like to live in a joyful cottage in a Pocket Neighborhood … 474 Art FREE Catalogues Online! … CU is adding colleges … dun dun dundun, dun dun dundun, dun dun dun duun duuuun dundun…DUN DUN DUNDUN! … DealDash.com scams? …

A Joyful Cottage: All American Cottage Tour, Ross Chapin, Pocket Neighborhoods:  In my old age I think I would like to live in a joyful cottage in a Pocket Neighborhood.

But today I’m staying in the United States.  I’m going all American, and I’m delighted and privileged to feature the home designs of Ross Chapin Architects. This award-winning Whidbey Island firm has been featured in a plethora of newspapers and magazines, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Cottage Living and Metropolitan Home, just to name a few. Taunton Press books such as The New Cottage Home by Jim Tolpin, Cottage by M. Caren Connolly and Louis Wasserman, and The Distinctive Home by Jeremiah Eck have included Chapin designs. And Ross Chapin himself has written a book entitled Pocket Neighborhoods.

via A Joyful Cottage: All American Cottage Tour.

free, The Metropolitan Museum of Art,  the Guggenheim, Open Culture:  474 Art Catalogues Online!

If you like reading about visual art but don’t like spending the considerable sums required to build your own library of vintage exhibition catalogues, feel free to borrow from another collector. Or rather, feel free to borrow from two collectors, both based in New York, both of some repute: The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Early last year, we announced that the Guggenheim had made 65 art catalogues [now increased to 99] available for free online, offering “an intellectual and visual introduction to the work of Alexander Calder, Edvard Munch, Francis Bacon, Gustav Klimt & Egon Schiele, and Wassily Kandinsky” as well as “ other texts e.g., Masterpieces of Modern Art and Abstract Expressionists Imagists that tackle meta movements and themes.” That same post includes instructions on how to use the Guggenheim’s archive.

Late last year, we also announced the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s launch of MetPublications, which will “eventually offer access to nearly all books, Bulletins, and Journals” published by the Met since 1870. The collection now features a whopping 375 free art books and catalogues overall. Taken together, these collections examine in detail art from all eras of human history and all parts of the world. At the top of the post, you will see the cover for the Met’s The Art of Illumination. (Who doesn’t love illuminated Medieval manuscripts?) Below appears Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright, available from the Guggenheim. Given the presence of these and the other fascinating catalogues we’ve previously highlighted, word of these two museums’ online libraries certainly shouldn’t stay buried in our archives.

via Free: The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Offer 474 Free Art Catalogues Online | Open Culture.

CU, two new colleges on campus, media/communication/information, college  on environment/sustainability, 50 years:  Seems amazing given the changes over the last 50 years, that CU is adding colleges for the first time.

If approved these will be the first new colleges in 50 years. The proposed colleges will be: a college focused on media, communication and information, and also a college focused on environment and sustainability. Both colleges will have to be approved by the Board of Regents before building and transitioning begins.

The new college devoted to media will house journalism, advertising, design, communication, film production and studies and media studies.

“From this college, we will create working journalists, editors and media professionals, communication scholars, media experts, advertisers and media designers, filmmakers and film theorists, and experts in the emerging field of information architecture and design,” said Provost Russell L. Moore in a released statement. ”The possibilities are truly exciting.”

The college of environment and sustainability “will bring together in one college a concentration of faculty who represent some of CU-Boulder’s mostly highly ranked, and highly successful, research in environmental sciences,” Moore said.

The next steps according to Moore are to form committees, plan budgets and work to integrate the new institutions with the existing programs. The objective, according to Moore, is to have a proposal submitted to the Board of Regents within a year and begin enrolling students by 2015.

via Plans for two new colleges at CU announced | CU Independent.

TV,  Discovery’s Shark Week:  dun dun dundun, dun dun dundun, dun dun dun duun duuuun dundun…DUN DUN DUNDUN! … Did you know there are people who look forward to Discovery’s Shark Week?

great white

And why does everyone like Shark Week?

It’s shark week – and as any self-respecting shark week fan knows, that means hours and hours of footage of great white sharks breaching in slow motion, the better to chomp on some poor, unsuspecting seal. Indeed, Discovery has become so fond of these “air jaws” shots, it’s opening the week with a special devoted to them that includes a preview of another upcoming air jaws special. It’s followed by the two-hour special Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives (9 ET/PT) and the debut of Shark After Dark (11 ET/PT), a live late-night talk show hosted by Josh Wolf that will run each evening during shark week.

via Sunday TV: ‘The Killing,’ shark week begins.

DealDash.com, scams:  I think they need real actors, not real people, on DealDash.com ads … the real people seem less than bright.  Scam alert …

▶ DealDash – Real People, Real Savings – YouTube.




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