Posts Tagged ‘Osama bin Laden’s death

12
May
11

5.12.2011 … Happy birthday not so prime husband 51 is NOT a prime number! … but you are definitely prime in every other way …

culture, psychology, fear of failure:  Interesting …

While failure may be an integral prerequisite for true innovation, the fact remains that most of us harbor a deathly fear of it — the same psychological mechanisms that drive our severe aversion to being wrong, only amplified. That fear is the theme of this year’s student work exhibition at Stockholm’s Berghs School of Communication and, to launch it, they asked some of today’s most beloved creators — artists, designers, writers — to share their experiences and thoughts on the subject. While intended as advice for design students, these simple yet important insights are relevant to just about anyone with a beating heart and a head full of ideas — a much-needed reminder of what we all rationally know but have such a hard time internalizing emotionally.

via Famous Creators on the Fear of Failure | Brain Pickings.

consumers, material things, Great Recession:  It’s good I always liked Target and Costco!

Bentleys and Hermès bags are selling again. Yet the wealthiest Americans are emerging from the financial downturn as different consumers than they were.

Lyndie Benson says she now mentally calculates the “price per wear” of designer clothing. As the wife of saxophonist Kenny G, Ms. Benson, a photographer, can afford what she wants. She used to make a lot of impulse purchases, she says. But when shopping in Malibu, Calif., recently, she stopped herself before buying a gray Morgane Le Fay suit she’d tried on. “I walked outside and thought, ‘Hmmm, I don’t really love it that much,’ ” she says with contentment.

A number of surveys released in the past six weeks suggest Ms. Benson’s new selectiveness is widespread among the wealthiest Americans. Though many of these people might seem unscathed by the financial crisis—they didn’t lose their homes, jobs or retirement savings—they were deeply affected by what took place around them. “If you’re conscious at all, it just seeps in,” Ms. Benson says.

via Post-Recession, the Rich Are Different – WSJ.com.

photography, organization: Overwhelming is right!

It’s easy to post your photos on Facebook. What’s not so easy is managing them—organizing all your digital files so that you can find individual pictures without scrolling through hundreds.

Bradly Treadaway, digital media coordinator and faculty member at the International Center of Photography in New York, knows how overwhelming the task can be. He recently digitized about 5,000 printed photos and slides from his family, some of which date back 180 years. Developing a system for managing your photos is “like learning a new language,” he says.

The key to staying organized is doing a lot of work up front to sort and label the photos when you first transfer them from camera to computer. Mr. Treadaway keeps his main collection on a hard drive, rather than in a Web-based archive, because he feels that photo-management programs for computers offer more choices for how to edit, share and retain the photos.

Mr. Treadaway uses Adobe Photoshop Lightroom; for nonprofessionals, he suggests programs like iPhoto or the desktop version of Google’s Picasa.

via Make Organizing Your Photos a Snap – WSJ.com.

food, favorites, recipes:  Pasta Primavera is one of those dishes that I still remember how good it tasted the first time I had it ….

Pasta primavera, which means “springtime pasta,” is an American invention — at least as American as, say, fettuccine Alfredo. It first appeared on the menu at Le Cirque in the 1970s, and Sirio Maccioni, that restaurant’s owner, not only takes credit for it but was also quoted in 1991 in The Times saying, “It seemed like a good idea and people still like it.”

But with all due respect to Mr. Maccioni, is pasta primavera still a good idea? Which is to say, pasta tossed with every vegetable under the sun, spring or not — broccoli, tomatoes, peas, zucchini, asparagus, mushrooms, green beans, you name it — and enough cream to smother any hint of freshness? I’m all in favor of pasta with vegetables, but I want to be able to taste them. And I want them to be prepared thoughtfully.

via Mark Bittman – The Pasta Primavera Remix – NYTimes.com.

food, Paris, blog posts:  Fun post from Gourmet Live – App Exclusive: French Women Heart Frites. And Nine More Parisian Lies — Gourmet Live.

high school, testing, SAT, Apps:  I may utilize this list …

Apps that help teenagers study for the SAT (or, for those not living on either coast, the ACT) are improving, as traditional test-prep businesses like Princeton Review and Kaplan refine their mobile software to compete with start-ups.

Several to consider on this front include Princeton Review’s SAT Score Quest for iPad (free) and SAT Vocab Challenge for iPhone ($5), Kaplan SAT Flashcubes (free) and SAT Connect ($10 for Apple). For math, Adapster ($10 on Apple) is designed nicely.

via New and Better Apps Help Students Study for SAT – NYTimes.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, twitter:  Tweeting for a missing snake is one thing … this one disturbs me.  Let him rest in peace, wherever he is.

In the days after Osama bin Laden was killed, a number of anonymous parodists created fake bin Laden Twitter accounts, tweeting what they called excerpts from the terrorists’ journal, his thoughts as a ghost, and observations from his new residence in hell.

via Osama bin Laden tweets from the dead – BlogPost – The Washington Post.

tv, soap operas, end of an era:  I loved watching soaps when I visited my grandparents in the summer … and in law school.  I wonder if my children even know what a soap opera is?

In today’s Academic Minute, Quinnipiac University’s Paul Janensch discusses the radio roots of a rapidly disappearing entertainment genre, the soap opera. Janensch is emeritus professor of journalism at Quinnipiac.

via Demise of Soap Operas / Academic & Pulse / Audio – Inside Higher Ed.

iPhone Lite: Rumors, rumors, rumors …

These are all tweaks that would significantly reduce the production price without necessarily degrading the user experience (particularly relevant is the smaller memory, which means the phones would benefit from Apple’s overhaul of MobileMe, widely expected to be cloud-centric). A drop in price like this would let Apple sell an iPhone Lite at a knock-down price, much as it has done previously with earlier edition iPhones, without necessarily fragmenting its platform, and enabling it to scoop up more of the low-end market that it’s partially ceded to Android.

via More Evidence That An iPhone Lite Is En Route | Fast Company.

iPhone Apps, neighborhood watch, Brookwood Hills:  Beware kids … when we started a neighborhood watch in Brookwood Hills in the 70s, our block volunteer was the wonderful “old maid” across the street. Well, a college girl was home for the summer … she loved about ten houses down … her parents were out of town … and her boyfriend would come stay every night and leave his car in front of Ms. Mackie’s house … guess what she did … she called the police!

It’s not the only instance of becoming the virtual. Home Elephant bills itself as “the world’s first app for neighbors to connect.” It serves as a sort of virtual neighborhood watch.

via Mister Rogers’ App | Fast Company.

libraries, architecture, University of Chicago:  UofC’s new library does from the outside what a library is intended to do … opens up the world to the user.

The library’s reading room, which sits directly beneath the building’s curving dome of steel and glass, will be open to university students, faculty and staff. But books and other printed materials won’t be moved to the library’s underground storage area until next fall. The dedication of the library won’t happen until October.

via Cityscapes: Reading room of Jahn’s U. of C. Mansueto Library to open next week.

To Kill a Mockingbird, movies, bookshelf,  Hey, Boo: Harper Lee & To Kill a Mockingbird, 
documentary:

Fifty years after it won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, filmmaker Mary Murphy’s documentary explores the continued influence of “To Kill a Mockingbird” through interviews with Oprah Winfrey, Tom Brokaw, Wally Lamb, as well as author Harper Lee’s family and friends.

via The Real Story Behind ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ – Speakeasy – WSJ.

guerilla improv/spontaneous musicals, new term:  “Guerilla improv”  … don’t you just love the term.

Guerrilla improv troupe Improv Everywhere struck again last month at GEL Conference, the annual gathering of tech/social media/business voices in New York City.

With the help of GEL founder Mark Hurst, the covert entertainers pulled off one of their signature “Spontaneous Musicals” at the top of Twirlr founder John Reynolds’ presentation. Just as he tells the audience to politely turn off their mobile devices, a man suddenly rises and begins singing about the audacity of the request.

via ‘Gotta Share’ The Musical: Improv Everywhere Strikes Again At GEL Conference (VIDEO).

Coca-Cola, culture, quotes:  “Coke ‘started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. … A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good.'”

The 125th anniversary of the first Coca-Cola sold — on May 8, 1886, for 5 cents — has inspired the release of “Coca-Cola,” a collection of images of the beverage, in realms real and imagined, from Assouline. Arguably the world’s most ubiquitous brand, the jolly red logo has been pasted on just about every susceptible surface on the planet, and this book serves to remind us youngsters of the breadth and endurance of its appeal, just in case it wasn’t already stitched into the fabric of our pop culture psyches. Indeed, at times, “Coca-Cola” seems less a birthday tribute to the stamina of a yummy, fizzy black taste with mysterious origins and more a tribute to several generations of successful advertising. And let’s not forget its importance as a symbol of what’s great about our republic. As Andy Warhol, no stranger to ubiquity or commercialism, contests on Page 8, Coke “started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. … A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good.”

via Pop Culture – NYTimes.com.

Three Cups of Tea, bookshelf:  Lots of discussion … I am reading it now … it is a good book … sad that it is fabricated.

With the first cup of tea, you are a stranger. With the second cup of tea, you are an honored guest. With the third cup of tea, you become family. This Balti proverb lends Greg Mortenson’s book, Three Cups of Tea, its name. But with a class action lawsuit filed against him in early May following investigations by writer John Krakauer and 60 Minutes, what is needed now is three cups of compassion.

The story of Greg Mortenson’s journey in his first book, Three Cups of Tea, tells the story of a young man listening and learning from those in a distant valley in Pakistan and the good that came from it. Krakauer in his Three Cups of Deceit tells how this story of a heart in the right place has been prettied up for publication and followed with financial mismanagement, as well as building schools in places unprepared to begin educating students in the buildings. As we act on Jesus’ teaching in Matthew 25 that we are to feed the hungry and give drink to the thirsty, we must not lose sight of those in developing nations as fellow members of the Body of Christ with gifts to offer and wisdom born of a deeper understanding of the local geography, weather, and culture. We must learn from each other and work together, not merely applying a solution from elsewhere, even another valley in the same mountains, to a new setting unthinkingly.

via Episcopal News Service – COMMENTARY.

The one thing in this story that makes me eternally grateful

is that we still have a 60 Minutes and New York Times doing investigative reporting and practicing real journalism. In an era where opinion-spewing and celebrity-swooning routinely pass for news, it’s good to know a few people are out there doing the hard work of covering–and uncovering–things we need to know.

via Three cups of humility. | What Gives 365.

consumerism, material things:  OK, I like this iPad case … in case you want to get me a present. 🙂

Image of iPad case in red and white gingham wool

Thrillist.com.

alcoholism, recovery, AA:  Very interesting …

But I believe that when people are in positions of power related to addictions — treatment providers, policy makers, etc. — it’s imperative that they be transparent about their associations and connections. It’s fine to be anonymous about your own path to recovery when you are the only one being affected, but it’s not appropriate when you seek to influence public health or policy.

via Taking the ‘Anonymous’ Out of AA: Should Recovering Addicts Come Out of the Closet? – – TIME Healthland.

ObL Family: 

But at the end, his rosy portrayal of being married to jihad was sorely tested. His family must have driven him nuts. During his last days in Abbottabad, Pakistan, bin Laden had to contend with three wives and 17 noisy children under one roof. He had no escape from the din, save for furtive pacing around the garden late at night or vanishing into his so-called Command and Control Center, a dank, windowless room. Swathed against the Himalayan chill in a woolen shawl, he recorded rants that displayed an ever widening disconnect with the daily grind of terrorism: his last oddball offerings were on climate change and capitalism.

via Big Love: Bin Laden Tried to Keep Wives Separate but Equal – TIME.

2012 Presidential Election, Mitt Romney, healthcare, states’ rights:

Mitt Romney says last year’s Democratic-passed health care law is a federal government takeover of health delivery. But he says his somewhat similar Massachusetts law was right for his state.

The likely Republican presidential candidate on Thursday defended the law enacted in 2006 when he was Massachusetts governor. Both the state and federal laws require people to obtain health insurance.

Romney said his program was a state solution to a state problem. He said the Obama-backed law is a power-grab by the federal government to impose a one-size-fits-all plan on all 50 states.

via Mitt Romney Tackling Health Care Vulnerability.

11
May
11

5.11.2011 … birthday eve at Chez T … Loved this description from ABC: “The Real Housewives of Abbottabad” …

food, kith/kin:  My sister served this last year … when I heard about it I acted like a 5-year old … i.e. YUCK … but it is very good and I think I will serve it tonight!

Watermelon and tomato are two fruits that complement each another in an unusual way. When you cut up and combine them, their distinctions become a little blurry and each masquerades as the other. The tomato’s acidity becomes tamed, as does the melon’s sweetness; their juices mingle, and even their flesh seems to meld.

via Recipe of the Day: Watermelon and Tomato Salad – NYTimes.com.

gLee, tv, Rebecca Black’s “Friday”, pop culture:  Last night’s episode didn’t work too well for me … but I find it interesting how ” Rebecca Black’s inane, idiotic autotuned song ‘Friday'” is making its way through pop culture.

That bit of lyric from Rebecca Black’s inane, idiotic autotuned song “Friday” got a treatment so … darn good and infectious that you just have to tip your hat to Artie, Sam and Puck for starting prom night jumpin’. They lit up the crowd, simultaneously mocking and honoring the vapidness of a YouTube pop anthem. Artie’s rap made it more legit.

via ‘Glee,’ Season 2, Episode 20, ‘Prom Queen’: TV Recap – Speakeasy – W

fashion, Kate Middleton:  I am not a huge fashion person … I have my uniform … but I like this column where they tell you where to find a celebrity’s outfit …

Where did Kate Middleton go for her first public appearance since Wedding Weekend? Grocery shopping! The newlywed grabbed some necessities at her local Waitrose supermarket in Anglesey, Wales last week, where she topped off her skinny black jeans and white sweater with acozy cashmere shawl by knitwear brand Minnie RosePeople reports. Similar styles by the designer are available at Saks Fifth Avenue for $280 and The Girls Room for $298. The new Duchess of Cambridge also trotted to the store in a pair of brown patent crocodile ballet flats by British footwear company London SoleThe $165 “Pirouette” shoes feature fabric lining and working drawstrings, and are currently in stock atLondonSole.com

via http://news.instyle.com/2011/05/10/kate-middleton-grocery-shopping/.

travel, in-flight entertainment: Something new …

TWO massive pieces of news from the giddy world of in-flight entertainment. Firstly, passengers flying with American Airlines (AA) may soon be able to stream films and TV shows from an in-flight library direct to their own Wi-Fi-enabled media players. Rather than watch on the sometimes rather poky players embedded in the seat in front, they can enjoy “The Fast and the Furious” on the larger screens of their laptops and iPads. AA is testing the technology on two planes, but it could be rolled out across more flights in the autumn if the Federal Aviation Administration is happy.

Elsewhere in the sky, Singapore Airlines has launched its new e-Magazine. Twenty publications, including Bloomberg Businessweek and Elle, have been made available for perusal via the in-flight entertainment systems on the carrier’s Airbus A380 and Boeing 777-300ER services. This roll-out follows a successful trial with three of Singapore Airlines’ in-house magazines. The future plan is to serve even more magazines on more flights.

via In-flight entertainment: Entertaining improvements | The Economist.

high school, superlatives, questions:  Were you most likely to succeed?  What do you think?  Any long-term impact?

Schools Shunning Senior Polls

An estimated 1 in 4 high-school senior classes this month are conducting the ritual pre-graduation vote to choose one or two members “most likely to succeed.” But the trend may not last much longer.

Schools are veering away from senior-class “superlatives” polls. Kelly Furnas, executive director of the Journalism Education Association at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kan., estimates that about 25% of high-school yearbooks still name one or more students “most likely to succeed,” down from about 75% two decades ago. One reason, says Mike Hiestand, an attorney in Ferndale, Wash., and legal consultant to the nonprofit Student Press Law Center, Arlington, Va., is that some labels, such as “worst reputation” or “most likely to have a conversation with himself,” can raise legal concerns about damaging students’ future prospects.

via ‘Most Likely to Succeed’ Burden – WSJ.com.

iPhone, Apps:  I already have this App … now I know something to do with it.

Google’s “Goggles” app does many things, all of which revolve around using your phone to take a picture of something. Google then analyzes that picture using dark magic known as image recognition and returns relevant information to you. Take a photo of a famous piece of artwork, for instance, and you’ll get information about its artist, its value and so on.

One of the more useful features is Goggles’ ability to capture images of business cards and, with the latest version of the Android app, parse the relevant information from a particular card and add it under the appropriate headings of a new contact entry.

via Google Goggles’ Business Card Recognition Works like a Dream – Techland – TIME.com.

fifty-somethings, health, Dave Barry:  Good incentive to just do it.

And then it was time, the moment I had been dreading for more than a decade. If you are squeamish, prepare yourself, because I am going to tell you, in explicit detail, exactly what it was like.

I have no idea. Really. I slept through it. One moment, Abba was shrieking “Dancing Queen! Feel the beat from the tambourine . . .”

. . . and the next moment, I was back in the other room, waking up in a very mellow mood. Andy was looking down at me and asking me how I felt. I felt excellent. I felt even more excellent when Andy told me that it was all over, and that my colon had passed with flying colors. I have never been prouder of an internal organ.

But my point is this: In addition to being a pathetic medical weenie, I was a complete moron. For more than a decade I avoided getting a procedure that was, essentially, nothing. There was no pain and, except for the MoviPrep, no discomfort. I was risking my life for nothing.

via Dave Barry: A journey into my colon — and yours – Dave Barry – MiamiHerald.com.

google doodles, Martha Graham, dance, arts:  Loved this one …

The line. The leap. The leg kick. It is arguably the most elegant Google Doodle yet.

The folks at Google celebrate what would have been pioneering dancer/choreographer Martha Graham’s 117th birthday with a beguiling short animation by “motiongrapher” Ryan Woodward .

via GOOGLE DOODLE: Today’s animation celebrates dance pioneer Martha Graham – Comic Riffs – The Washington Post.

natural disasters, flooding, history, lists:  None of the historical floods impacted my areas …. but interesting to think about what you remember of the ones in your lifetime.

In light of the current flooding of the Mississippi River, TIME’s Kayla Webley spoke to Robert Holmes, a flood expert with the U.S. Geological Survey, about some of the largest floods in America’s history

via Mississippi River, 1927 – Top 10 Historic U.S. Floods – TIME.

Albert Einstein,  scientists, people, icons:  Don’t you just want to hug him … great article … read on.

He was the embodiment of pure intellect, the bumbling professor with the German accent, a comic cliche in a thousand films. Instantly recognizable, like Charlie Chaplin’s Little Tramp, Albert Einstein’s shaggy-haired visage was as familiar to ordinary people as to the matrons who fluttered about him in salons from Berlin to Hollywood. Yet he was unfathomably profound–the genius among geniuses who discovered, merely by thinking about it, that the universe was not as it seemed.

World War II, Einstein became even more outspoken. Besides campaigning for a ban on nuclear weaponry, he denounced McCarthyism and pleaded for an end to bigotry and racism. Coming as they did at the height of the cold war, the haloed professor’s pronouncements seemed well meaning if naive; Life magazine listed Einstein as one of this country’s 50 prominent “dupes and fellow travelers.” Says Cassidy: “He had a straight moral sense that others could not always see, even other moral people.” Harvard physicist and historian Gerald Holton adds, “If Einstein’s ideas are really naive, the world is really in pretty bad shape.” Rather it seems to him that Einstein’s humane and democratic instincts are “an ideal political model for the 21st century,” embodying the very best of this century as well as our highest hopes for the next. What more could we ask of a man to personify the past 100 years?

via Albert Einstein (1879-1955) — Printout — TIME.

nature, astronomy, news:  Might have to get up early and look …

It was the Mayans — or maybe the Romans or the Greeks or the Sumerians — who called the shot this time, evidently on a day Nostradamus phoned in sick. Apparently, a rogue planet named Nibiru (which frankly sounds more like a new Honda than a new world) is headed our way, with a cosmic crack-up set for next year. No matter who’s behind the current prediction, there are enough people ready to spread and believe in this kind of end-of-the-world hooey that you have to wonder if the earth isn’t starting to take things personally.

Regrettably, the Nibiru yarn got a boost in recent days with the very real announcement that an alignment of several of the very real planets will be taking place this month, offering a fleeting treat for stargazers willing to get up before sunrise and take a look. Even this genuine cosmic phenomenon, however, may be a bit less than it appears.

Beginning today and lasting for a few weeks, Mercury, Venus, Jupiter and Mars will be visible in the early morning sky, aligned roughly along the ecliptic — or the path the sun travels throughout the day. Uranus and Neptune, much fainter but there all the same, should be visible through binoculars. What gives the end-of-the-worlders shivers is that just such a configuration is supposed to occur on Dec. 21, 2012, and contribute in some unspecified way to the demolition of the planet. But what makes that especially nonsensical — apart from the fact that it’s, you know, nonsense — is that astronomers say no remotely similar alignment will occur next year.

via Six Planets Will Be Aligning, but the Earth Will Not End – TIME.

Osama bin Laden’s death, ObL family, moral issues:  Like I said … great international law exam/bar question

The sons of Osama bin Laden have issued a statement that accuses the U.S. of violating international law by killing an unarmed man and dumping his body in the ocean.

via Osama Bin Laden Son Omar: U.S. Broke Law in Killing Their Father – ABC News.

Osama bin Laden’s death, ObL family:  “The Real Housewives of Abbottabad”  – interesting short piece on his wives. VIDEO: Osama Bin Laden’s Widows to Come Forward – ABC News.

08
May
11

5.8.2011 … happy mother’s day … I have only Molly home today … so I am enjoying great peace … tomorrow all my boys roll in …

Mother’s Day:  … stolen from Ginger S. on Facebook …

To all the amazing mothers I have known, starting with my own, I would like to take this opportunity to wish you a wonderful day and send you my love. To the many mothers out there who struggle, either physically, emotionally, financially, or otherwise, with the challenges of this critical role, you are in my thoughts as well. This is our day to celebrate, embrace each other, and our precious children!

xoxo

Dennard Lindsey Teague

(Aside – My mother is  great … she adored my dad and each of her children for their uniqueness … but you have to wonder why she would let me go to the WH looking like that!)

Mother’s Day, music:

YouTube – I’ll Always Love My Mama by The Intruders.

Mother’s Day, Tina Fey, quotes:  I don’t usually quote Tina Fey … but her prayer was good!

Lead her away from Acting but not all the way to Finance. Something where she can make her own hours but still feel intellectually fulfilled and get outside sometimes And not have to wear high heels. What would that be, Lord? Architecture? Midwifery? Golf course design? I’m asking You, because if I knew, I’d be doing it, Youdammit

via A Mother’s Prayer for Her Child By Tina Fey | Write In Color.

137th Kentucky Derby, Animal Kingdom, follow-upAnimal Kingdom wins the 2011 Kentucky Derby – CBS News.

137th Kentucky Derby, traditions – Southern, culture:  OK … there must be some other southern tradition to compare to the Kentucky Derby … “Moonshining, barn-raisings, hominy-poundings, quiltings, fox hunting, homecomings, and hog-killings are but memories”

“Many institutions of Southern culture are vanishing,” Judy McCarthy wrote in “God Save the Kentucky Derby.” “Moonshining, barn-raisings, hominy-poundings, quiltings, fox hunting, homecomings, and hog-killings are but memories. The Kentucky Derby,” she added, “has been a sustaining… vestige of Southern life. Its appeal, of course, extends far beyond the Old South.”

Part of the extension into history is the hat, one of the most identifiable trademarks of race day.

“Any style of hat can be appropriate, from wide styles to bowlers to small-fitted cloches with netting,” said Rita Manzelmann-Browne, head buyer for Miss Jackson’s in Tulsa, who sometimes works with Eileen McClure, an Oklahoman, whose grandmother grew up on a Kentucky plantation. “It’s all about having fun and expressing yourself.”

So, how many hats adorns the closet of an Okie with Kentucky roots? McClure has 15 hats to choose from come Derby Saturday, and, she notes, she always watches the Kentucky Derby in one.

“Derby has character, it has history,” says McClure. “And part of that history is hats.”

via Hats Off: The Kentucky Derby Highlights a Southern Tradition by Shane Gilreath | LikeTheDew.com.

Versailles, France, travel: Q: Should we/must we go to Versailles to make our trip to France “complete?”

This former home of French kings epitomizes royal elegance in the style of Old Europe. Versailles originated in 1631 as a humble hunting lodge for Louis XIII. But his son Louis XIV built the now familiar palace on the site outside Paris and moved the nation’s government and court to Versailles in 1682.

Versailles remained the epicenter of French royal power, home to government offices and courtiers alike, until 1789—when a hungry and agitated group of mostly female revolutionaries stormed the palace and essentially evicted Louis XVI and his queen, Marie-Antoinette. The mob sent the royal couple back to Paris on the first steps of a journey that led eventually to their beheadings.

Versailles’ sprawling, stunning palace is matched by the splendor of the gardens in which it is situated. A pleasurable visit can be spent simply perusing paths and admiring fountains and flowers without setting foot inside the palace or Versailles’ other notable buildings.

via Versailles — World Heritage Site — National Geographic.

pirates, Captain Kidd, museum, Dominican Republic, travel:  Underwater snorkeling museum!  I’m game …

The submerged wreck of Captain Kidd’s pirate ship will become a “Living Museum of the Sea” reports Science Daily.

The Quedagh Merchant was found a couple of years ago just off the coast of the Dominican Republic. It’s only 70 feet from the shore of Catalina Island and rests in ten feet of water, so it’s a perfect destination for scuba divers or even snorkelers.

Underwater signs will guide divers around the wreck, and like in above-ground museums, there’s a strict “don’t touch the artifacts” policy. Often when shipwrecks are found the discoverers keep the location secret to protect them from looting. Hopefully this bold step of allowing visitors to swim around such an important wreck will help inform the public without any harm being done. One can only hope!

Captain Kidd is one of the most famous and most controversial of pirates. For much of his career he was a privateer, a legal pirate with permission from the King of England to loot enemy ships and hunt down other pirates. Privateers were one of the ways the big empires of the day harassed one another.

Kidd shouldn’t have gone to New York. He was lured to Boston by a supposed friend and then arrested and shipped to England to be put on trial for piracy. The judge found him guilty and sentenced him to hang. His body was left hanging over the River Thames in an iron cage called a gibbet as a warning to others. The museum will be dedicated on May 23, the 310th anniversary of Kidd’s execution.

via Captain Kidd’s pirate ship to become underwater museum | Gadling.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, media, twitter:  Interesting analysis of the spread of the news via twitter.

That trustworthiness, in a universe of tweeters spouting all sorts of speculation, is more important than ever. Urbahn, 27, didn’t shout about his insider connections, but enough people read his bio to understand that he was likely to have good sources inside the Pentagon. And for all the talk of Twitter making journalists of us all, it seems we still desire validation from a reporter from a major media organization.

And maybe — just maybe — the number of followers you have on Twitter matters less than who and how active they are. Urbahn didn’t have a record-breaking number of followers (who then numbered a little more than 1,000, or about 6,000 fewer than he has now), but his tweet went viral nonetheless, thanks to those followers going to bat for him. Stetler has more than 55,000 followers and tweets obsessively, but ultimately his influence was slightly less important here than Urbahn’s.

“Keith Urbahn wasn’t the first to speculate Bin Laden’s death, but he was the one who gained the most trust from the network,” writes Social Flow. “And with that, the perfect situation unfolded, where timing, the right social-professional networked audience, along with a critically relevant piece of information led to an explosion of public affirmation of his trustworthiness.”

via How Bin Laden News Exploded on Twitter: A Visualization.

Osama bin Laden’s death, US Intelligence:

In reality, bin Laden was living comfortably in the bustling town of Abbottabad, known for its good schools and relative affluence. He was living in a walled compound in a military town, hundreds of miles from the mountainous, lawless tribal regions. There were no heavily armed security guards, as some intelligence officials assumed there would be. Thanks to a satellite dish, which officials believe was for television reception only, bin Laden would have been able watch American security forces chase him around the wrong part of the country.

“I was surprised that Osama bin Laden was found in what is essentially a suburb of Islamabad,” former national security adviser and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said Tuesday as news of the daring pre-dawn helicopter raid dominated the news.

America’s belief that bin Laden was hiding on the Pakistani frontier was based on two assumptions, former intelligence officials said. The first was that bin Laden would stay close to his devotees for protection, and al-Qaeda has thrived in the tribal areas of North and South Waziristan. The second was that if bin Laden had ventured into more civilized areas, his presence would be noticeable, first by locals and then by Pakistani and U.S. intelligence services.

via Why U.S. had it wrong about bin Laden’s hide-out – USATODAY.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, media, photograph, history, follow-up:

“Those were 38 of the most intense minutes,” Clinton says today. “I have no idea what any of us were looking at at that particular millisecond when the picture was taken.”

The shot, taken as the raid unfolded in real time, shows Clinton covering her mouth with her right hand.

via Clinton discusses hand gesture in riveting Situation Room photo –.

Osama bin Laden’s death, President Obama, quotes:  funny …

When bin Laden’s corpse was laid out, one of the Navy SEALs was asked to stretch out next to it to compare heights. The SEAL was 6 feet tall. The body was several inches taller.After the information was relayed to Obama, he turned to his advisers and said: “We donated a $60 million helicopter to this operation. Could we not afford to buy a tape measure?”

via Death of Osama bin Laden: Phone call pointed U.S. to compound — and to ‘the pacer’ – The Washington Post.

culture, names, kith/kin:  I hope my children understand the thought John and I put into their names.

“To me, the most important gift parents can give is a story behind their name,” Diamant says. “The more names you have and the stories of how you came to a name, the more stories are attached, the richer the name could be.”

via Biblical names abound in popular baby names list – Faith & Reason.

Apple, business culture, Steve Jobs:  I do not think I would have wanted to be in that auditorium that day …

In response to the MobileMe flop, Steve Jobs assembled the team that worked on the service and chewed them out, according to Adam Lashinsky at Fortune, who has a big story on Apple, available only on newsstands or the iPad right now.

He gathered the troops at the auditorium Apple uses on its campus to do demos of small products for the press.

He asked the team what MobileMe was supposed to do. Someone answer, and Jobs said to that person (and everyone else), “So why the fuck doesn’t it do that?”

He continued, “You’ve tarnished Apple’s reputation … You should hate each other for having let each other down … Mossberg, our friend, is no longer writing good things about us.”

Right there and then he named a new executive to run the MobileMe service.

via What It’s Like When Steve Jobs Chews You Out For A Product Failure.

Pat Forde, espn, twitter:  Pat is a friend of a friend  I started following because of his great coverage of Steph Curry … It’s amazing who adapts to new technology!  ESPN’s Pat Forde Goes From Anti-Tweet to the King of All Media Tweeters.

LOL:  Here are a few that are just fun:

YouTube – Matrix Reloaded MTV Parody.

Loving Donald Trumps newest comb-over. Image courtesy of the DU

via Facebook

06
May
11

5.6.2011 …it seems Osama bin Laden got my attention today … and cardinals …

Stephen Curry, Davidson College, Davidson basketball, NBA, kudos: Well, he went to Davidson …

Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors is the recipient of the Joe Dumars Trophy presented to the 2010-11 NBA Sportsmanship Award winner, the NBA announced today.

Curry (Pacific) was one of six divisional winners, which included Charlotte’s D.J. Augustin (Southeast), Chicago’s Luol Deng (Central), New Jersey’s Deron Williams (Atlantic), Portland’s LaMarcus Aldridge (Northwest), and San Antonio’s George Hill (Southwest).

Curry received 88 first-place votes (2,445 total points) of a possible 347. The NBA will make a $10,000 donation on behalf of Curry to Habitat For Humanity East Bay, which uses volunteers to build affordable homes in Alameda and Contra Costa counties.

via WARRIORS: Stephen Curry Wins 2010-11 NBA Sportsmanship Award.

faith and spirituality, favorite blogs, Davidson College, kith/kin:  I love the cardinal guest post by college friend Diane on college friend Cary’s blog, a favorite of mine. I don’t have a great redbird story other than I have always been told to wish on a cardinal because it will bring you good luck.  Read on …

Yesterday I requested “cardinal stories” from readers, since several told me (in response to a post on hope on Tuesday) that they’d had cardinal encounters recently (what’s going on?)  So for the next couple of days, I’ll stick with the cardinal theme.

Here’s a post from a college friend, Diane Cooper.  Let me tell you a little about her first:

Diane Cooper is the mother of four children, including sweet David Cooper, her seventeen-year-old son who died suddenly two years ago from Athlete Sudden Cardiac Arrest while rowing with his crew team at McCallie School in Chattanooga.

via Guest Post by Diane Odom Cooper « Holy Vernacular.

Let us always make sure that it is protected and never take it for granted. Whenever you see a cardinal, smile and say, “Thank you!” You have received one of the ultimate blessings of Nature.

via The ultimate backyard bird | Backyard Birder | a Chron.com blog.

Osama bin Laden’s death, President Obama, photography:  As they say a picture is worth a thousand words … I enjoyed this insightful analysis of this picture.

President Barack Obama and his national security team watch updates on the mission to capture Osama bin Laden on Sunday.

Most commentators have focused on the historic nature of the photo: Obama staring at the screen with a grim intensity; Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, covering her mouth to repress her reaction — the epicenter of U.S. military power hunting down its most hated foe.

But look deeper and that photo becomes historic in a more subtle way. It’s a snapshot of how much this nation’s attitudes about race, women and presidential swagger are changing, several scholars and historians say.


“The photo is visually suggestive of a new American landscape that we’re still crossing into,” says Saladin Ambar, a political science professor at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania.

“When Obama was elected, there were some people who thought that we had crossed a racial threshold,” Ambar says. “What his presidency is revealing is that there are many crossings.”

via What ‘Situation Room Photo’ reveals about us – CNN.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, OBL’s family: Never understood the concept of mail order bride … do you think she loved him …

While little is known about Bin Laden’s daughter, his wife, Amal, “was a kind of mail-order teenage bride from Yemen, whom he married while living in Afghanistan during the 1990s, according to the account of bin Laden’s former Yemeni bodyguard,” according to Steve Coll, the author of “Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the C.I.A., Afghanistan and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001.”

….

Although it is far from clear what will happen to Bin Laden’s surviving family members in Pakistan, or if we will ever hear directly from them about what they saw when the American commandos shot Osama bin Laden, his wife, Amal, did speak to the media at least once. In March 2002, she granted an interview to Al Majalla, a Saudi magazine in London, which was reprinted by The Guardian.

In the interview, she explained that, following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States, her husband had arranged for her to be transported from Afghanistan with her children and handed over to Pakistani authorities. On that occasion, she was, reportedly, allowed to return to Yemen.

via Left Behind: Bin Laden’s Wife and Daughter – NYTimes.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, law:  Can you imagine what a nightmare of a bar exam question this would be???

International law recognizes a country’s inherent right to act in self-defense, and it makes no distinction between vindicating these rights through a drone strike or through a boots-on-the-ground operation. Administration officials have described the raid as a “kill or capture” mission and asserted that the SEALs would have taken Osama bin Laden alive had he surrendered and presented no threat to U.S. personnel or the others in the compound that night. This, according to official accounts, did not happen.

Much has been made of the disclosure that Osama bin Laden was unarmed, but this, too, is irrelevant in determining whether the operation was lawful. The SEALs entered the compound on a war footing, in the middle of the night, prepared to encounter hostile fire in what they believed to be the enemy leader’s hideout. They reported that they became embroiled in a firefight once inside; they had no way of knowing whether Osama bin Laden himself was armed. Even if he had signaled surrender, there is no reason to believe that danger had evaporated. As Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) said during a congressional hearing on Wednesday: “From a Navy SEAL perspective, you had to believe that this guy was a walking IED,” prepared to blow up himself and those around him or possibly to detonate an explosive that would have engulfed the entire house.

It is easy in the light of day to second-guess decisions made in the heat of war. It is particularly easy for those who refuse to acknowledge that war in the first place. Based on information released by the administration, the covert military operation that brought down the most wanted terrorist in the world appears to have been gutsy and well executed. It was also lawful.

via In killing Osama bin Laden, U.S. had the law on its side – The Washington Post.

Osama bin Laden’s death, covert operations:  Amazing …

The SEALs did the shooting inside bin Laden’s compound, but an elite Army unit called Task Force 160 flew them there and back, and the pilot of one of the Blackhawk helicopters may have been the difference between success and failure, CBS News national security correspondent David Martin reports.

The SEALs were about to fast rope into the courtyard in front of bin Laden’s house when the Blackhawk lost lift. Imagine what would have happened if it had crashed into the courtyard with all its SEALs still aboard.

Chris Marvin doesn’t have to imagine. It happened to him in Afghanistan.

“How close did he come? As close as any helicopter pilot can, maybe closer,” said Marvin, “but he had or she had the talent and skill level to land the aircraft safely and let everybody off without injuries.”

via Blackhawk pilot’s quick thinking credited in raid – CBS News.

Osama bin Laden’s death, covert operations:  Anatomy of a Raid: Osama bin Laden’s Final Moments – Video – TIME.com.

05
May
11

5.5.2011 … cinco de mayo … and the testing begins …

parenting, empty nesters, women’s issues, me:

As far as I can tell, my own generation of mothers doesn’t really do the empty nest thing, no matter how large the hole left behind and no matter how pressing the grief. Unlike our mothers, we generally don’t go back to school to finally launch careers or, like our grandmothers, embrace the newly won status of matron and then grandmother. Unlike past generations, today’s middle-agers typically started their careers before marriage and motherhood. As for our wardrobe choices, my own concession to aging mainly involves wearing low-heeled shoes, but otherwise, like practically every woman I know, I continue to dress like I did in my student days. You know the uniform: jeans and a T-shirt or blouse, with clogs or sneakers or sandals.

There are other reasons we don’t stop to realize that we’re fretting over our empty nests. With the endless options for instant communications, we’re able to check in with the kids, or vice versa, on an embarrassingly regular basis. When my eldest went off to college four years ago, a friend of mine who was a year ahead of me in the kid-launching game reassured me. Don’t worry, he said: His wife and their college-age son “text at least once a day.” Another friend, whose eldest is studying abroad, told me that she regularly talks to him. “I can Skype daily without any big buildup or pressure that this is the big, expensive, long-distance call,” she said. “It’s easy to communicate, and it doesn’t cost anything.”

via Women on the Verge of an Empty Nest – Ideas Market – WSJ.

Swan House, Atlanta, places, kith/kin:  My father’s close friend grew up in the Swan House.  I can’t look at a picture of the house without smiling …. great stories …

Swan House.

education, public education, Atlanta:  A new high school for Buckhead ….

Atlanta Public Schools finalized this week the purchase of a 56-acre site in northwest Atlanta for the city’s new Buckhead-area high school. Final cost of the purchase totaled $55.3 million.

The site, at the former IBM complex on Northside Parkway, will replace North Atlanta High School on Northside Drive. The new school is scheduled to open in August 2013. The North Atlanta campus will then be converted into a second middle school in Buckhead, relieving an overcrowded Sutton Middle School on Powers Ferry Road near Chastain Park.

via APS finalizes land deal for new Buckhead high school  | ajc.com.

science, Albert Einstein, kudos: … Scientists affirmed “his theory of relativity after studying the most perfect spheres ever made as they orbit around the Earth.”

The longest experiment in space physics began with three men in a university swimming pool arguing about Einstein. It ended Wednesday, after 52 years and $750 million, with scientists affirming his theory of relativity after studying the most perfect spheres ever made as they orbit around the Earth.

Called Gravity Probe B, the exotic experiment measured how the revolving mass of Earth imperceptibly twists the fabric of space in a test of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. By one finding, the distortion amounts to 1.1 inches off true across the 24,900-mile circumference of Earth.

via Researchers Spent $750 million—and 52 Years—Affirming Theory of Relativity – WSJ.com.

food/drink, beer, George Washington: 🙂

We cannot tell a lie: Even George Washington needed to take the edge off sometimes.

The founding father and first president of the republic was a man of the people when it came to his drink of preference. His “Notebook as a Virginia Colonel,” dated from 1757, includes a handwritten recipe for “small beer.”

George Washington’s recipe for “small beer”. For a larger version, scroll to the end of this post.

That recipe, along with many of Washington’s other papers, is part of the New York Public Library’s collection. This month, the library is partnering with Shmaltz Brewing Company to recreate a modern version of the porter, to celebrate the centennial of its Stephen A. Schwarzman building.

Just 15 gallons will be brewed and offered for tasting. Local brewers Peter Taylor and Josh Knowlton have taken the liberty of tweaking the recipe, which the NYPL has dubbed “Fortitude’s Founding Father Brew.”

The brewers made batches of the beer, one with molasses — which Washington used — and one without, substituting malted barley for the fermentable sugar.

“Back then, they didn’t really have quite the same understanding of brewing science that we do now,” said Josh Knowlton.

Of Washington’s beer, “it’s pretty light, pretty dry, medium-bodied but roasty,” Knowlton said. “We used some roasted malts in there so it’s definitely got some of a roasted, chocolaty, little bit of a coffee flavor.”

via New York Public Library’s Tasty Treasure: George Washington’s Beer – Metropolis – WSJ.

news, Charlotte, Uptown power outage:  John and I have lived and worked in Charlotte for almost 30 years … power outage with no weather cause.

Duke Energy has restored power after an outage in uptown Charlotte that impacted a portion of Bank of America Plaza.A number of employees told the Observer that the power went out around midday at the Bank of America Plaza building.Duke Energy reported about 230 power outages in Mecklenburg County, most of them near Center City.The company also said more than 100 customers near the intersection of Trade and Tryon streets were without power.Duke Energys website showed that power was restored to the area by 4:30 p.m. Officials have not yet said what caused the outage.

via Power restored in uptown Charlotte | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

food:  Yuck …

What is often in shredded cheese besides cheese?

Powdered cellulose: minuscule pieces of wood pulp or other plant fibers that coat the cheese and keep it from clumping by blocking out moisture.

Cellulose can improve the texture of packaged food products, including bottled chocolate milk shakes.

One of an array of factory-made additives, cellulose is increasingly used by the processed-food industry, producers say. Food-product makers use it to thicken or stabilize foods, replace fat and boost fiber content, and cut the need for ingredients like oil or flour, which are getting more expensive.

Cellulose products, gums and fibers allow food manufactures to offer white bread with high dietary fiber content, low-fat ice cream that still feels creamy on the tongue, and allow cooks to sprinkle cheese over their dinner without taking time to shred.

via Packaged-Food Producers Increasingly Turn to Cellulose – WSJ.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, War on Terror, man’s best friend:  Didn’t realize they used dogs in this capacity.

While many Americans are anxious to meet and commend the team of Navy SEALs who raided the compound in Abottabad, Pakistan, and killed Usama bin Laden, one team member would be happy just to receive a doggie treat.

Among the commandos was a heroic canine – a bomb-sniffing dog who was attached to a team member as the SEALs were lowered from a Black Hawk helicopter into bin Laden’s hideout, The Sun reports.

The four-legged soldier has not yet been identified, but some speculate the breed was either a Belgian Malinois or German shepherd, a breed used frequently in raids in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The dogs are well-protected in these dangerous situations, armed with ballistic body armor, protective gear to shield against bullets and shrapnel, and infrared night-sight cameras that provide crucial feedback to troops and warn of potential ambushes, The Sun reports.

There are currently 600 dogs serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, Ensign Brynn Olsen of U.S. Central Command told the New York Times. In 2008, Gen. David Petraeus, current U.S. commander in charge of Afghanistan and soon to be CIA director, called for an increase in the number of dogs used by the military.

via Military Dog Used in Bin Laden Compound Raid – FoxNews.com.

 Osama bin Laden’s death, War on Terror:  Actually I am tired of this …

Steve King was the first member of Congress to float the inevitable question. “Wonder what President Obama thinks of waterboarding now?” the Iowa Republican tweeted shortly after Obama announced the death of the world’s most infamous terrorist. In the days since, even as they maintain the tacit truce that bans partisan potshots in the wake of bin Laden’s killing, Capitol Hill Republicans have advanced the idea that Bush-era “enhanced-interrogation techniques” were responsible for the tip that led intelligence officials to Osama bin Laden’s Abbottabad compound.

At least two members of the Senate Intelligence Committee have made this claim. “The information that eventually led us to this compound was the direct result of enhanced interrogations; one can conclude if we had not used enhanced interrogations, we would not have come to yesterday’s action,” North Carolina Senator Richard Burr told CNBC Tuesday.

via Republicans Split Over Waterboarding’s Role in bin Laden’s Death | Swampland.

 Osama bin Laden’s death, War on Terror:  Why didn’t they suspect?

ABBOTTABAD, Pakistan – When a woman involved in a polio vaccine drive turned up at Osama bin Laden’s hideaway, she remarked to the men behind the high walls about the expensive SUVs parked inside. The men took the vaccine, apparently to administer to the 23 children at the compound, and told her to go away.

The terror chief and his family kept well hidden behind thick walls in this northwestern hill town they shared with thousands of Pakistani soldiers. But glimpses of their life are emerging — along with deep skepticism that authorities didn’t know they were there.

Although the house is large, it was unclear how three dozen people could have lived there with any degree of comfort.

via Bin Laden’s neighbors noticed unusual things – CBS News.

food, North Carolina:  North Carolina … sweet potatoes???

.Fodmap

The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More




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