Posts Tagged ‘Paris

23
Jan
16

1.23.16 … Let it freezing rain …

View from front steps …

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Massive snowstorm blanketing the East Coast, NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly: A slightly different perceive …

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NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly Like This Page · Yesterday ·   Massive snowstorm blanketing the East Coast clearly visible from the International Space Station! Stay safe! #YearInSpace

Source: (1) Massive snowstorm blanketing the East Coast… – NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly

CLT weather, freezing rain/sleet/snow, WSOC-TV – PHOTOS:

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PHOTOS: Freezing rain, sleet and snow fell in the region today and viewers sent us hundreds of photos like this one from @EmilyKozel #CLTSnow MORE PHOTOS

Source: WSOC-TV – PHOTOS: Freezing rain, sleet and snow fell in the region…

 geometric drawings, walking: 

Higher Perspective Simon Beck creates incredible geometric drawings by walking in the snow!

Source: (3) Higher Perspective

 Ice Melt: 

easiest way to make the ice melt — The ingredients needed are:

1/2 a gallon of warm water

2 ounces of rubbing alcohol

6 drop of liquid dish detergent

Source: To Make Ice Melt, He Mixes These Three Ingredients. Its Effectiveness Surprised Me!

Cape Winelands , South Africa, travel, The best places to visit in 2016, lists, Business Insider:

The Cape Winelands is where some of the world’s most popular wines are produced, making it an ideal destination for wine tasting. The area’s wineries are lined along some of the most scenic routes, including a historic wine estate that dates back centuries. Enjoy top-notch wine alongside a variety of locally produced cheese, olives, fruit, and organic produce, or try a meal at one of Franschoek’s many acclaimed restaurants.

Source: The best places to visit in 2016 – Business Insider

Sacred Harmony of Geometry,  Sacred Geometry Really Is,  EnergyFanatics.com:

There will come a day when music and its philosophy will become the religion of humanity. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan What Sacred Geometry Really Is Sacred Geometry means literally “The Sacred Measure of the Earth”. But it could also be called “The Blueprint of all Creation”. In reality, Sacred Geometry is a profound spiritual science, which has been taught for thousands of years in spiritual traditions around the world. This is because Sacred Geometry reveals the actual patterns by which Spirit creates our World.1 There are a Ton of esoteric teachings with Sacred Geometry all through them. Yet no one really knew what Sacred Geometry REALLY represented: The segmented BLUEPRINTS to ENERGY; The Mathematical Formula of CREATION. Sacred Geometry represents the Segmented Blueprints of Magnetic Currents & Neutral Particles of Matter.2 One of the most important discoveries of the new quantum physics is that of the holographic nature of the universe. The geometric language of light, that forms the underlying matrix of this hologram, is the alphabet of the new paradigm. The primary infrastructure of all existence is written in the Sacred Geometric language of light. All is light … all is geometry. Sacred Geometry is the ‘graphic code’ that reveals the processes of inherent order underlying all of creation. The mathematical laws of Sacred Geometry govern every system of growth, every motion in the universe, from atomic bonds to spiraling galaxies.3

Source: Sacred Harmony of Geometry: What Sacred Geometry Really Is | EnergyFanatics.com

Remote Year, Travel the World for a Year While You Keep Your Job, Brit +: 

Here’s the deal: You love your work. You love to travel. Unfortunately, you can’t always have the best of both worlds (at least not with out a major career change) – but what about when you can? Enter: Remote Year, a company that will essentially arrange a trip around the world for you while you work remotely.

Source: This Company Will Help You Travel the World for a Year While You Keep Your Job | Brit +

Anshuman Ghosh, @moography, quirky, street photography,  fusion between what was real and what was not, phone framing:“I’ve got crazy ideas in my head when it comes to how I would like to see the world,” says Anshuman Ghosh (@moography), an Indian business developer based in South Africa. He was initially drawn to street photography, but Anshuman wasn’t able to create the world he imagined in his mind — one that was less serious and more quirky. “I wanted to create something that was a fusion between what was real and what was not,” he says. “I came up with this technique I call phone framing.” Anshuman sketches a drawing on paper, cuts it out and aligns everything together to create a seamless visual illusion. “Placing the phone in the picture gives me the freedom to trick my audience into believing the phone is more than something that it is.”

Source: Instagram Blog

Novel’s First Sentence, A Secret History | Electric Literature:

A great first sentence is very important. In a novel, it’s a “promise,” a “handshake,” an “embrace,” a “key.” Great first sentences are celebrated everywhere literature is cherished and mandated everywhere it’s taught. They’re a pleasure and a duty—the “most important sentence in a book,” everyone agrees. But they haven’t always been important. When Daniel Defoe wrote the first English novel, Robinson Crusoe, in 1719, first sentences weren’t important, and so he wrote, “I was born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not of that country, my father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull.” When Charlotte Brontë wrote Jane Eyre in 1847, first sentences still weren’t important, and even so she wrote, “There was no possibility of taking a walk that day.”

Source: In Search of the Novel’s First Sentence: A Secret History | Electric Literature

Neural Algorithm, ‘Paint’ Photos, Van Gogh To Picasso, Bored Panda:

A group of researchers at the University of Tubingen, Germany, have developed an algorithm that can morph an image to resemble a painting in the style of the great masters. Technically called “deep learning” algorithms, they are already in use by companies such as Google for image recognition and other applications. “The system uses neural representations to separate and recombine content and style of arbitrary images, providing a neural algorithm for the creation of artistic images,” the researchers wrote in their paper. “Here we introduce an artificial system based on a Deep Neural Network that creates artistic images of high perceptual quality.” A photograph of apartments by a river in Tubingen, Germany was processed to be stylistically similar to various paintings, including J.M. Turner’s “The Wreck of a Transport Ship,” Van Gogh’s “The Starry Night,” and Edvard Munch’s “The Scream.”

Source: New Neural Algorithm Can ‘Paint’ Photos In Style Of Any Artist From Van Gogh To Picasso | Bored Panda

Paris, Bookstore Shakespeare &Co., VICE | United States:

George died in 2011 at the age of 98, by which point he had upgraded from a bed in the shop to a flat on the third floor in the same building. I’m living here now, in his former apartment, ostensibly to finish my second novel. But more practically and pressingly, I’m a “homeless wanderer.” People have been asking me how I got this position, whether it was hard to obtain. The short answer is no, and the long answer is yes: I parted ways with a partner I loved, leaving the home where we’d lived together, and lost a contract I was relying on, so I asked Sylvia if I could stay for a while. She said, without question or hesitation, that I could stay for as long as I needed. George called Shakespeare & Company a “socialist utopia masquerading as a bookstore,” and I feel infinitely grateful to George and Sylvia for creating and maintaining a space that prioritizes community.

Source: What It’s Like to Live Inside the Legendary Paris Bookstore Shakespeare & Co. | VICE | United States

Shakespeare, religion, OUPblog: 

In this play, as in others, Shakespeare calls on the ambiguous associations of Catholic figures, images and ideas, as a means of engaging his audience with the problems he frames. He seems to revel in the pleasures of slippery meaning. By flirting with stereotypes and sectarian expectations he makes his audience think more deeply about the difficulties of the plays and their own culture. Whatever Shakespeare’s personal religion was, the religion he put on stage was both playful and probing.

Source: What was Shakespeare’s religion? | OUPblog

23
Jan
15

1.23.15 … I’ve never been North … bucket list …

labyrinths, beach labyrinth, kith/kin:  In 2013, I built a beach labyrinth.  It was a very fun day with an old friend.  I wish I had seen this video.  I could have done it quicker and enjoyed it longer.

Denny Dyke creates labyrinths in sand and other media. This video shows him creating one of his sand labyrinths at the Oregon Coast at Bandon. It shows Denny’s process, the use and the demise of one of his beautiful, fleeting works of art.

via Circles in the Sand on Vimeo.

SURPRISE, SURPRISE! For several years I have contemplated creating a labyrinth on the beach. And to my great dismay, I have discovered that there are only a few people in this world who would even consider creating a beach labyrinth with me.

via 8.1.13

Minnesota, North, bucket list:  I think we would all like to define ourselves!!

“North” has a special meaning in Minnesota these days, and it is gradually gaining a stronger following. Though most Americans consider the state part of the Midwest, a number of local influencers are proposing to redefine Minnesota as a region that the U.S., officially at least, currently lacks: the North. They want their region to be recognized for its innovative, sturdy character, honed by long, cold winters.

Supporters of “North” say that being lumped in with the Midwest causes people to lose sight of their region’s special nature. “We don’t behave like the rest of the Midwest,” says Andrew Blauvelt, senior curator of design, research and publishing at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, which recently hosted a standing-room-only symposium on Minnesota’s regional identity.

via Minnesota’s New Cool Image as ‘the North’ – WSJ.

parody, New England Patriots: Cialis Inflate-a-Ball helps the Patriots avoid hefty fines and loss of draft picks by giving their balls that extra pump for the big game.

Parody of the Cialis commercials featuring the New England Patriots. You’re headed to the Super Bowl, but your game still feels a little bit flat. Cialis Inflate-a-Ball helps the Patriots avoid hefty fines and loss of draft picks by giving their balls that extra pump for the big game.

▶ New England Patriots Cialis Commercial Parody (For Deflated-Balls) [Benstonium.com] – YouTube.

Another … I do believe the social media thinks the patriots are guilty.

The New England Patriots’ march to Super Bowl XLIX got a bit slippery yesterday, when the NFL announced an investigation into the deflation of 11 easier-to-catch Pats game balls during their 45-7 win in Sunday’s AFC Championship Game. This isn’t the first time that the Patriots have been accused of cheating — and it probably won’t be the last time they appear on the box of the cereal aisle’s most notorious product.

via Tom Brady and Bill Belichick’s New Cereal Endorsement | Mad Magazine.

Elementary: I’ll be watching for the bartender!!

Watch Elementary tonight at 10 on CBS. My nephew Roe is the bartender !

Oodles of noodles force closure of Interstate 95 in North Carolina – The Washington Post:

The ramen carnage, however, was extensive.

At least it didn’t rain, said two people sitting near this reporter.

All the jokes!

via Oodles of noodles force closure of Interstate 95 in North Carolina – The Washington Post.

portmanteaux, vocabulary:

Motel, brunch, and sitcom are obvious. But these portmanteaux are undercover.

1. Apart from giving us the word portmanteau to describe these things, you can also thank Lewis Carroll for chortle, a combination of snort and chuckle, first used in 1871’s Through the Looking-Glass.

via 10 Words You Might Not Know Are Portmanteaux | Mental Floss.

American Sniper:  I’m still digesting this movie …

American Sniper may be quickly stealing the title of the most politically controversial film this Oscar season, but screenwriter Jason Hall maintains he just penned a portrait of a beleaguered soldier — not a political statement. The biopic of Chris Kyle, who the Navy credits with the most kills in American military history, broke January records with a whopping $90.2 million at the box office over the weekend in spite of — or perhaps because of — critics who say the film glorifies a murderer, not to mention a war America never had any business fighting in the first place.

“People see the movie poster, and it’s got a guy and the American flag, and they know Clint Eastwood — the Dirty Harry guy and the Republican convention guy — directed it,” says screenwriter Jason Hall. “So they think it’s some jingoistic thing. I would challenge that in a big way. Chris was a man who believed in something and who therefore was useful to a government that needed him to go to war. It cost him his physical health, his mental health and almost cost him his family — but Chris probably would have paid the price over and over again if he’d been asked, which is both patriotic and totally tragic.”

via American Sniper Screenwriter Jason Hall: ‘I Bled for This Thing’ | TIME.

Musée Nissim de Camondo, The Hare With Amber Eyes: After visiting this museum and telling several people about it, every one told me I had to read The Hare With Amber Eyes. The Museum enhances the book and the book enhances the museum.

One of my favorite museums is the Musée Nissim de Camondo. The collection of 18th century furniture and art objects on display in what was once a private mansion always make me feel as if I’ve stepped back in time. When you visit, be sure to get an audioguide to hear the tragic story of the de Camondo family. For more information, there’s a link for a blog post in the comment section. #tbt #museum #art #Paris #France #decorativearts — at Musée Nissim de Camondo.

13
Jul
14

7.13.14 … “Not a vacation, but a time out of time.”

In one month we will begin … at first just by car then for one week au pied … I’ve been collecting suggestions.  here goes …

Road to Santiago (Directions) by Kathryn Harrison: 

In the spring of 1999, Kathryn Harrison set out to walk the centuries-old pilgrim route to Santiago de Compostela. ”Not a vacation,” she calls it, ”but a time out of time.” With a heavy pack, no hotel reservations, and little Spanish, she wanted an experience that would be both physically and psychically demanding.

via The Road to Santiago – National Geographic Store.

Road to Santiago (Directions): Kathryn Harrison: 9780792237457: Amazon.com: Books.

Camino to Santiago de Compostela Information 2014:  So far this year …

Numbers are starting to increase and we have been a little concerned about waiting times but more staff have been engaged and a new office where organised groups are being received has been opened.

Here are the numbers for the year so far:

June 2014

33008 pilgrims registered at the Pilgrims’ Office during the month of June 2014.

This compares to 29364 pilgrims who arrived in June 2013.

This is an increase of 12.5%

The Year to Date

82734 pilgrims registered at the Pilgrims’ Office in the period 1 January to 30 June 2014

75530 pilgrims registered in the same period last year.

This is an overall increase of 9.5%

via Camino to Santiago de Compostela Information and stories about the pilgrimage routes to Santiago.: All the pilgrim numbers from Santiago for the first 6 months of 2014.

 Saint Francis of Assisi and the Camino:  

The information that I found suggested that St Francis made his Pilgrimage on the Northern Way although the precise route that he took seems to be unclear (as far as I can work out he was on his way to Morocco in 1213 sometime after May but illness made him stop in Spain which does fit in).

According to legend the Convento de San Francisco de Valdedios was founded by Saint Francis when he reached Santiago at Val de Dios – ‘Valley of God’ (and the land for it bought from the monks of San Marino for a symbolic annual rent of a basket of trout a tradition that continued until the late 18th century). Cotolay, a coal man who greeted Saint Frances with his family when he entered Santiago, was charged with building the Convento. Cotolay could do this because of the finding of some treasure (possibly he found this near a source of coal after a message from God – the translation of the Spanish document I’m reading is a little unclear or it could have been found near the hermitage of San Paio do Monte).

Another version of the story tells that whilst praying on a mountain Saint Francis was notified by God that his order should build convents starting in Santiago after which Saint Francis suffered a fever and was rendered blind. Cotolay then promised to build the convent on his behalf and convinced the abbot of Saint Martin’s Monastery to give them a piece of land the same size as the skin of a bull for a basket of fish which was agreed on but Cotolay cut the skin into narrow strips to mark out a large plot of land. Then he asked Master Mateo to give them a stack of stones and loggers, in a competition of might, took these to the land. After the Convent was built Saint Franis went to the building and his sight returned.

via On the Camino: Saint Francis of Assisi and the Camino.

Traveled Earth » Camino de Santiago by the Numbers – Our Budget and Stats.

Iron Cross: 

After visiting Burgos, Léon and Astorga by bus, we will hike to the highest point of the Camino in the spectacular Irago Mountains and leave a pebble at the foot of the Iron Cross – the enigmatic Cruz de Ferro.

via amaWalkers Camino – Home.

miracles: 

The incredulous Mayor, who was preparing to have dinner with friends, responded: “That boy is as alive as these two roast chickens we are about to eat,” and suddenly, the chickens came to life, sprouted feathers and beaks and began to crow, and so, to this day there is a saying about the town which goes: “Santo Domingo of the Way, where the roosters crow after being roasted”.

via Miracles and biography of St. Domingo García..

Paris, Buvette:

Love love love this restaurant. I can’t show you all the good stuff because I already ate it. Tarte tatin to die for! — at Buvette..

via Donna Morris.

02
Mar
14

3.2.14 … “Take a seat. it’s a good place to be still. And I promise to say nothing. ” …

Netflix binge, Monarch of the Glen: bingeing on Netflix … no, not House of Cards … Monarch of the Glen … So in a few days I have made it to the midway point of Series 2.  🙂

8th Best British Television Show on Netflix Instant: Monarch of the Glen

Monarch of the Glen is a drama from BBC One. Monarch of the Glen is loosely based on the Highland Novels written by Compton Mackenzie. Monarch of the Glen is about a restaurant owner that returns home when he hears his father is sick. When he arrives home his mother informs him he has inherited his father’s estate and castle and that he must restore order.

via 10 Best British Televlsion Shows on Netflix Instant – Yahoo Voices – voices.yahoo.com. 

and I loved this quote … “Take a seat.  it’s a good place to be still.  And I promise to say nothing. ”

Fnac La Défense, Paris, interesting:

Fnac La Défense, an entertainment store in Paris, uses this eye-twisting carpet as a marketing tool. The floor is flat, but visitors might find they have an excuse for hours spent browsing—time slowed down in the store. Sadly, there don’t seem to be videos of customers edging around the store trying to avoid getting sucked into a gravity well, but that is a hole ‘nother story.

Image credit: Alex Kortling

Via: AsapSCIENCE

via I fucking love science.

 Veriditas, spirituality, labyrinth, emerging paradigm, Reverend Dr. Lauren Artress:

The labyrinth is undergoing a worldwide resurgence in human consciousness because it orders chaos, encourages our intuitive knowing, enlivens the body, embraces the receptive, feminine archetype and opens the reflective, contemplative world where symbols resonate within. The singular circuitous path offers a clear, profound and shared metaphor for life’s journey, the human pilgrimage we are all on together. Above all, it addresses our soul’s hunger for meaning and to be of service in our struggling world.

Join this Veriditas pilgrimage in Chartres, France to learn more deeply about the labyrinth that is embedded in the floor of Chartres Cathedral since 1201. Discuss the present day spiritual issues with like-minded people, enjoy the medieval village and experience the cathedral at night in a private group ritual that ends with a candlelit labyrinth walk.

via Veriditas – The Spirituality of the Labyrinth: Nurturing the Emerging Paradigm in our Lives with the Reverend Dr. Lauren Artress.

18
Feb
14

2.18.14 … salt and sochi … It was a dark and stormy night …

salt, 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics:

A senior adviser to the Sochi Olympics convened an emergency meeting late last week with top winter sports officials at the Park Inn hotel in the Alpine village here.

A situation had grown dire. It was not security, attendance or doping that was the problem. It was salt.

Four months earlier, Hans Pieren, one of the world’s leading experts on salt and snow, had told Sochi officials that the Alpine skiing events required more than 19 tons of salt, a crucial ingredient for melting soft snow so it can refreeze into a hard surface.

But the organizers did not listen, to their great regret. Now, with 10 days of competition remaining, many of the Games’ signature events were in jeopardy of being compromised, and even canceled.

Tim Gayda, a Canadian consultant who is a senior adviser to the Sochi organizers, called the meeting Thursday night, according to some people who were there. He told the group that the strongest kind of salt, the large-grain variety, was simply not available in Russia. Mr. Gayda asked the group an urgent question: Does anyone know how we can get 25 tons of salt — tonight?

via A Mad Dash for Salt Rescues Olympic Slopes – NYTimes.com.

Rachel Ries, Urban-Rural Split,  Ghost of a Gardener, NPR:  Really good NPR segment from Sunday.

Sometimes you need to get away from the thing you love. NPR’s Rachel Martin talks to singer Rachel Ries about her new album, Ghost of a Gardener, which she produced after taking a couple years off from music.

via Rachel Ries’ Album Reflects Her Urban-Rural Split : NPR.

via ▶ Rachel Ries ‘Mercy’ – YouTube.

Humans of New York,  Susie’s Senior Dogs:  Loved this …

I’ve got to tell you guys about all the amazing things happening over at Susie’s Senior Dogs. So we started this page on a whim last week, for the purpose of placing old dogs in new homes. (And by we, I mean 95% my girlfriend, and 5% me– let’s be honest.) Nearly 100,000 people “liked” the page in 24 hours.

We’ve posted about 11 dogs so far, and 6 of them have been adopted– from all over the country. It’s just been an incredible success. Almost all of these dogs were ten years or older, and many of them had been in shelters for a long time. Check out these pictures of the pups in their new homes. Remember, these guys were sleeping in cages just last week.

From Left to Right: Nina (13), Fancy (12), and Max (10).

A Wrinkle in Time, favorites:  A Wrinkle in Time was a favorite book of my early reading life. Truly started me on my love of reading path.

Photo: Happy 52nd anniversary to the beloved Mighty Girl classic A Wrinkle in Time! Madeleine L'Engle’s 1962 Newbery Medal-winning fantasy novel about the adventures in space and time of Meg Murray, her brother Charles Wallace and friend Calvin has been capturing the imaginations of young readers for generations. In recent years, the novel has also appeared in new forms including a wonderful graphic novel adaptation and on a t-shirt for teen and adult fans. </p><br /> <p>To learn more about the original novel, recommended for ages 9 and up, visit http://www.amightygirl.com/a-wrinkle-in-time</p><br /> <p>To check out the graphic novel adaptation, visit http://www.amightygirl.com/a-wrinkle-in-time-the-graphic-novel</p><br /> <p>To view Out of Print's t-shirt for teens and adults featuring artwork from the novel's first edition 1962 cover, visit http://www.amightygirl.com/a-wrinkle-in-time-t-shirt </p><br /> <p>And, to view the 5-book box set of The Wrinkle In Time Quintet, visit http://www.amightygirl.com/the-wrinkle-in-time-quintet-box-set

“It was a dark and stormy night.

In her attic bedroom Margaret Murry, wrapped in an old patchwork quilt, sat on the foot of her bed and watched the trees tossing in the frenzied lashing of the wind. Behind the trees clouds scudded frantically across the sky. Every few moments the moon ripped through them, creating wraithlike shadows that raced along the ground.”

Happy 52nd anniversary to the beloved Mighty Girl classic A Wrinkle in Time! Madeleine L’Engle’s 1962 Newbery Medal-winning fantasy novel about the adventures in space and time of Meg Murray, her brother Charles Wallace and friend Calvin has been capturing the imaginations of young readers for generations. In recent years, the novel has also appeared in new forms including a wonderful graphic novel adaptation and on a t-shirt for teen and adult fans.

To learn more about the original novel, recommended for ages 9 and up, visit http://www.amightygirl.com/a-wrinkle-in-time

Winnie-the-Pooh, favorites:  And another favorite …

“And then, all of a sudden, Winnie-the-Pooh stopped again, and licked the tip of his nose in a cooling manner, for he was feeling more hot and anxious than ever in his life before.”

On February 13, 1924, Punch magazine published a short poem titled “Teddy Bear” by Alan Alexander Milne, one of the magazine’s editors and a frequent contributor. The poem, inspired by the stuffed teddy bear so dearly beloved by Milne’s four-year-old son Christopher Robin, was included in Milne’s collection of children’s verses, When We Were Very Young, illustrated by Punch staff cartoonist E. H. Shepard and published later that year. But the bear’s very first appearance in Punch was the birth of Winnie-the-Pooh, which Milne released two years later and which went on to become one of the most timeless children’s books ever written.

In the summer of 1929, the Dominion Gramophone Company set out to capture prominent British authors reading from their work. In this rare recording, Milne reads the third chapter of his classic, “In Which Pooh and Piglet Go Hunting and Nearly Catch a Woozle,” made all the more delightful by his enchantingly melodic voice — please enjoy:

https://soundcloud.com/brainpicker/a-a-milne-reads-from-winnie-the-pooh

via Happy Birthday, Winnie-the-Pooh: A Rare 1929 Recording of A.A. Milne Reading from His Beloved Book | Brain Pickings.

 Buckhead’s  Beltline,  Path400, Parks & Recreation, Curbed Atlanta, multi-use trail:  Another multi-use trail!

DSC_0442-thumb.JPG

Great news for multi-use trail zealots: The first phase of PATH400, a Beltlineian trail that will wend for 5.2 miles through Buckhead parallel to Ga. 400, is set to break ground Feb. 17. Officials are hoping the path will lend Buckhead the same sense of interconnectedness the Beltline’s Eastside Trail has provided neighborhoods east of downtown and Midtown. “PATH400 will be a tremendous asset,” Jim Durrett, executive director of Buckhead CID, said in a press release. “Our community will enjoy new pedestrian access to schools and the local business district, opportunities for outdoor recreation and a greater sense of connectedness. It’s a wise investment for Buckhead.” PATH400’s first phase will be a half-mile stretch from Lenox Road at Tower Place up to Old Ivy Road. Extensions could soon follow.

via Buckhead’s Answer To Beltline Will Break Ground This Month – Parks & Recreation – Curbed Atlanta.

Worth your time …, Molly Wilmer Barker:  Loved this post!

With the recent drug overdose of Philip Seymour, comes up (again) the age-old conversation about whether addition and abuse of drugs and alcohol is the result of a disease or just a really bad habit to overcome…I’ve got a thought that is somewhat unrelated to either, but perhaps worth considering.

Addicts and Alcoholics, with a few years of good, grounded sobriety under their belt, are some of the absolute coolest people on the planet. They have an outlook that carries with it a good dose of humility. Many have been to the depths of their own darkest despair and, through a variety of ways, climbed out, up, through or over, whatever beliefs, obstacles, brain chemistry that bound them to a behavior that dimmed the bold, light-filled people they really are.

The addicts and alcoholics I know…who live daily expressing the humility and gratitude their recovery brings…are also some of the most creative souls on the planet.

One in four people are affected by addiction…either in their own lives or in the lives of their loved ones, co-workers, acquaintances.

Today, rather than debate the best route to recovery/treatment, I will hold those still suffering…in this space…a gentle reminder that even in the darkest moments, there is hope.

via Molly Wilmer Barker.

 “Le Tricorne”, Picasso: Tapestry travesty.

Most people agree that the fate of “Le Tricorne” rests squarely in Mr. Rosen’s hands. The interior of the Four Seasons was given landmark designation in 1989, canonizing the achievements of Mies van der Rohe, the architect who designed the 38-story skyscraper, and Philip Johnson, who designed the restaurant, the costliest ever constructed when it opened in 1959. The Picasso, however, was excluded from the designation because, as the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission explained in a statement, it was owned separately and could be moved.

via At Four Seasons, Picasso Tapestry Hangs on the Edge of Eviction – NYTimes.com.

Stephen Curry,  Bay Area Warriors, Davidson College, CharlotteObserver.com:

Marsten said it’s telling that every Warriors fan seems to know Curry went to Davidson, the small, academically elite college north of Charlotte.

“He’s very proud of his roots, very proud of Davidson. Warriors fans understand about that,” Marsten said. “If you asked them where (Warriors forward) David Lee played, I don’t know that they’d know. And he won two national championships at Florida.”

This works because it’s not an “image.” It’s who Dell and Sonya Curry raised their three kids to be.

via Stephen Curry loves the Bay Area and the Bay Area sure loves him back | CharlotteObserver.com.

Europe’s 12 most impressive metro stations, lists, CNN.com:  Very fun!

But as the following stations show, more than 150 years after the London Underground opened, there\’s a lot more to a great subway stop than getting from A to B.

via Europe’s 12 most impressive metro stations – CNN.com.

Passing on body hatred, Essential Mums:  A good lesson …

But all of that changed when, one night, we were dressed up for a party and you said to me, ”Look at you, so thin, beautiful and lovely. And look at me, fat, ugly and horrible.”

At first I didn’t understand what you meant.

”You’re not fat,” I said earnestly and innocently, and you replied, ”Yes I am, darling. I’ve always been fat; even as a child.”

In the days that followed I had some painful revelations that have shaped my whole life. I learned that:

1. You must be fat because mothers don’t lie.

2. Fat is ugly and horrible.

3. When I grow up I’ll look like you and therefore I will be fat, ugly and horrible too.

Years later, I looked back on this conversation and the hundreds that followed and cursed you for feeling so unattractive, insecure and unworthy. Because, as my first and most influential role model, you taught me to believe the same thing about myself.

via Passing on body hatred | Essential Mums.

Paris,  Metro Makeovers for the Abandoned Stations of Paris,  Messy Nessy Chic Messy Nessy Chic:  Very cool!

Anyone who wants to make a swimming pool out of an abandoned metro station neglected for 75 years, has definitely got my attention. The ghosts of the Parisian underground could soon be resurrected if city voters play their cards right in the upcoming mayoral elections. Promising candidate, Nathalie Koziuscot-Morizet, who would become the first female to ever hold the post in the capital, has released the first sketches of her plans to reclaim the city of light’s abandoned stations.

via Metro Makeovers for the Abandoned Stations of Paris | Messy Nessy Chic Messy Nessy

GI Joe, Yahoo News, kith/kin: I always liked to play with my brother’s dolls … and now they are 50. Makes me feel old.

The birthday of what’s called the world’s first action figure is being celebrated this month by collectors and the toy maker that introduced it just before the nation plunged into the quagmire that would become the Vietnam War — a storm it seems to have weathered pretty well.

Since Hasbro brought it to the world’s attention at the annual toy fair in New York City in early 1964, G.I. Joe has undergone many changes, some the result of shifts in public sentiment for military-themed toys, others dictated by the marketplace.

via GI Joe, the world’s first action figure, turns 50 – Yahoo News.

Nathan Edmondson, alphacomics, @nathanedmondson: I love being able to claim a connection to a graphic artist writer … Second cousin once removed.

Embedded image permalink

Written by @nathanedmondson both Black Widow and Punisher are new tomorrow. pic.twitter.com/OZ2zsKvYEI

via Twitter / alphacomics: Written by @nathanedmondson ….

Future of Transportation, The Atlantic Cities:  world without car ownership …

If connected vehicle technology becomes mandatory in American cars, as the Department of Transportation recently suggested it might, the most obvious benefit would be safety. Cars that can tell other cars their speed and position are far less likely to crash. But as David Zax pointed out at Cities earlier this week, that’s just the beginning. Combine connected vehicle technology with intelligent infrastructure and driverless cars and you get a commute that’s both quicker and hands-free. You could even rely on autonomous taxis to chauffeur you from home to work.

In that sense, a world without car crashes may just be the first step to a world without car-ownership.

via Imagine: A World Where Nobody Owns Their Own Car – Eric Jaffe – The Atlantic Cities.

google doodles, Harriet Tubman

Musée Nissim de Camondo,  Letter From France | How to Visit Some of Paris’s Finest Museums but Skip the Crowds: Donna Morris took us to Musée Nissim de Camondo … opened up a whole world of interesting historical research!

Richard Harbus for The New York Times

The Musée Nissim de Camondo boasts one of the great collections of 18th-century decorative arts.

It also holds a tragic story. When Camondo died in 1935, he left his mansion and collections to France’s Musée des Arts Décoratifs. His only condition was that the house be turned into a museum and named after his son, Nissim, who died as a combat pilot for France in World War I.

The family felt protected when the Nazis occupied France. A marble plaque at the entrance to the house states otherwise. It announces that Camondo’s daughter, son-in-law and two grandchildren, his last descendants, were deported by the Germans between 1943 and 1944. They died at Auschwitz.

The French government kept its word, turning the house into a museum and naming it after Camondo’s son.

via Letter From France | How to Visit Some of Paris’s Finest Museums but Skip the Crowds.

Martin Luther, history:  Today is the anniversary of the death of Martin Luther.  He was one interesting guy.  Among other things, he introduced congregational singing of hymns …

Martin Luther was born November 10, 1483. His intellectual abilities were evident early, and his father planned a career for him in law. Luther’s real interest lay elsewhere, however, and in 1505 he entered the local Augustinian monastery. He was ordained a priest April 3, 1507.

In October 1512 Luther received his doctorate in theology, and shortly afterward he was installed as a professor of biblical studies at the University of Wittenberg. His lectures on the Bible were popular, and within a few years he made the university a center for biblical humanism. As a result of his theological and biblical studies he called into question the practice of selling indulgences. On the eve of All Saints’ Day, October 31, 1517, he posted on the door of the castle church in Wittenberg the notice of an academic debate on indulgences, listing 95 theses for discussion. As the effects of the theses became evident, the Pope called upon the Augustinian order to discipline their member. After a series of meetings, political maneuvers, and attempts at reconciliation, Luther, at a meeting with the papal legate in 1518, refused to recant.

Luther was excommunicated on January 3, 1521. The Emperor Charles V summoned him to the meeting of the Imperial Diet at Worms. There Luther resisted all efforts to make him recant, insisting that he had to be proved in error on the basis of Scripture. The Diet passed an edict calling for the arrest of Luther. Luther’s own prince, the Elector Frederick of Saxony, however, had him spirited away and placed for safekeeping in his castle, the Wartburg.

Here Luther translated the New Testament into German and began the translation of the Old Testament. He then turned his attention to the organization of worship and education. He introduced congregational singing of hymns, composing many himself, and issued model orders of services. He published his large and small catechisms for instruction in the faith. During the years from 1522 to his death, Luther wrote a prodigious quantity of books, letters, sermons and tracts. Luther died on February 18, 1546.

via February 18: Martin Luther, Theologian, 1546 | Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music.

01
Dec
13

12.1.13 … so many places to go …

Paris:

Some of her Traveling with Gal Pal Paris Tips are priceless such as:.

– Don’t be high maintenance !

– You must like food and wine and shopping. You cannot nibble or pick at food. You cannot order just salad or the wine volume will make you ill.

– Don’t use words like garçon when referring to waiters.

– Don’t be a rude American – we have enough already handling that for us and don’t want to be associated with them!

– Pack what you want, then take half of it out. The goal is to not check any bags so you can avoid baggage claim in Paris.

– Pack in an expandable suitcase so you have room for souvenirs on the way back.

– You must not sleep late in the morning no matter how late we are out the night before. You can sleep back in the U.S.A. Here in Europe we are never too old or too tired to enjoy Paris 24/7!

via Weekend In Paris – Blogger Shout Out – The Daily Basics.

This Hotel Left Bank St. Germain is my current favorite place to recommend to price conscious travelers who want a charming but reliable, albeit small hotel.

via Hotel Left Bank St. Germain *** |.

South Africa:  Diamond Mines!!

South Africa is known for its diamonds. Next to the Kimberley mine (famous for the process of the same name) the Cullinan may be the most well known.  Why so famous? Well in 1905 they unearthed the largest rough gem-quality diamond ever found, at 3,106.75 carats!  If you’ve ever been to London and visited the British Crown Jewels at the Tower of London, you’ve seen one of the stones that were cut from the Cullinan diamond – the 530.4 carat Great Star of Africa, mounted in the head of the royal scepter.

via How to Visit a Diamond Mine – Style Hi Club.

toilets:  This was just funny …

Best Bathrooms in the World: See Photos of the 7 Weirdest Restrooms on EarthSo, It’s World Toilet Day: Here Are 7 Public Bathrooms Nicer Than Our House

By NATE JONES

11/19/2013 at 06:00 PM EST

via Best Bathrooms in the World: See Photos of the 7 Weirdest Restrooms on Earth : People.com.

22
Oct
13

10.22.13 … secrets, secret places and secret lives …

 

China, Harbin China, pollution:  In the heat of the summer it was bad … but never this bad!  

The Harbin government reported an air quality index (AQI) score of 500, the highest possible reading, with some neighborhoods posting concentrations of PM2.5 — fine particulate matter that are 2.5 microns in diameter or smaller and especially harmful to health — as high as 1,000 milligrams per cubic meter, according to the China News Service.

(By comparison, the air quality index in New York was 41 on Monday morning.)

The Chinese government describes air with an AQI between 301 and 500 as “heavily polluted” and urges people to refrain from exercising outdoors; the elderly and other vulnerable populations are supposed to stay indoors entirely. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses a similar index that labels any reading between 301 and 500 as “hazardous.”

Both scales reach their limit at 500, leaving creative citizens of polluted cities to come up with their own labels when the air gets worse. Foreign residents in Beijing declared an “airpocalpyse” last January when the U.S. Embassy reported an AQI equivalent of 755, with a PM2.5 concentration of 866 milligrams per cubic meter. The World Health Organization has standards that judge a score above 500 to be more than 20 times the level of particulate matter in the air deemed safe.

via ‘Airpocalypse’ Hits Harbin, Closing Schools – NYTimes.com.

Lewis Grizzard, The South:  I always loved Lewis’ columns … still do …

He would tell Yankee immigrants who found fault with the South: “Delta is ready when you are.”

via Lewis Grizzard | Today In Georgia History.

Paris, Ernest Hemingway, quotes, kith/kin:  How long do you have to “live ”  to feel this way?

source: Pinterest.

travel, shoes, good informationBest Walking Shoes for Travel – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

Norma Kamali, Provence FR, olive orchards, bucket list:  Never thought of doing a tour of olive vineyards …

So began the first of what would become a decade of road trips from Barcelona along the coast of Spain and into France and Italy. But of all the orchards that Ms. Kamali has ever visited along the way, her favorite is in Provence, in the South of France, where she thinks the best olive oil in the world is made. “If there was a description of what heaven looks like,” she said, “I would say this is it.”

THE DESTINATION

Ms. Kamali’s Provence is an autumnal watercolor of what she describes as endless vineyards against a backdrop of mountains and sea. France’s sole A.O.C. (Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée) olive-oil designation — a sought-after status that verifies the oil’s contents, as well as the method and origin of production — is in Provence. The region is also home to five of France’s seven A.O.P. (Appellation d’Origine Protégée) olive-oil designations, a classification system used throughout the European Union.

WHY SHE GOES BACK

Despite having been to orchards from Spain to Italy, Ms. Kamali always returns to Provence for the quality of the oil, the taste of which depends on many factors, including sun (is the orchard on the shady side of a hill?), terrain (are the trees on flat land?) and neighbors (what’s planted nearby?). “In France it’s often living next to lavender,” Ms. Kamali said, “so there are some olive oils that have a lavender scent.”

The fragrance may be delicate, but “the olive trees are in themselves just very stoic,” she said.

“They lasted through wars and all kinds of weather conditions,” she continued. “History just counts the olive tree as part of the marking of time.”

When in Provence, Ms. Kamali stays at a friend’s chateau, but she said that you can still immerse yourself in the culture by staying at a villa on an orchard.

via Steal My Vacation – Norma Kamali’s Provence – NYTimes.com.

Frank Law Olmstead, Biltmore, John Singer Sargent: I stood for several minutes and stared at this portrait on my last visit to Biltmore.  it is huge and I love the outfit and cane.  Now that I know that his son wore the outfit and posed toward the end, I think it even more interesting.  Olmstead’s impacted almost every city I love in the US … nothing better in a city than a really good park!

As a National Historic Site it is also a modest place, considering the huge scope of the legacy left by the man who lived and worked there. Olmsted is best known as the creator of Central Park, a design he completed with his partner Calvert Vaux. With that celebrated project he may be said to have invented the field of landscape architecture, going on provide most of the major cities in America with a legacy of his genius. To name a few, the great parks of Boston, Chicago, Brooklyn, Milwaukee, Louisville, Rochester, Buffalo, Baltimore, Denver, Seattle, all bear his signature. He designed the grounds of the U.S. Capitol and all or parts of the campuses of Stanford, Cornell, Amherst, Yale, Bryn Mawr, Wellesley, Smith, Mount Holyoke, and many others.

Olmsted by Sargent

The final work project of his life, though, was for a private client, George Washington Vanderbilt, who in 1895 had just completed The Biltmore, the largest private residence ever built in the United States. It was a 250-room chateau outside of Ashville, North Carolina. Olmsted worked to landscape the place. Perhaps recognizing that his 73-year-old landscape designer was in poor health, Vanderbilt arranged for Olmsted’s friend, the artist John Singer Sargent, to come down from Boston to paint his portrait on the grounds of the estate. Sargent chose to place his subject in a setting of thick vegetation. It is a poignant picture of an old man leaning on a cane and somehow receding slightly into the mass of greenery around him. Flowers and flowering bushes had never been Olmsted’s forte; he had always preferred to plant trees that took little tending. In Sargent’s portrait, the flowers seem slightly out of control, reaching to overtake the elderly gentleman standing in their midst.

via Frederick Law Olmsted, John Singer Sargent, and Nature’s Design.

Entering a city park can be almost surreal, like encountering a desert mirage–smells of hot garbage are replaced instantly with cut grass and forsythia, sounds of screeching subway brakes are traded for birdcalls and quiet. Former Vogue editor and New York Public Library chairman Catie Marron had a lifelong love for these green respites from cacophony and claustrophobia. “I always gravitate towards city parks. In the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris when I was 23, something moved me internally, almost brought me to tears,” Marron tells Co.Design. “I really wanted to find books on parks for myself, but I didn’t find any. They didn’t seem to exist.”

She decided to change that, and rallied an impressive collection of authors and public figures–including Bill Clinton, Zadie Smith, Andre Aciman, Colm Toibin, and Nicole Krauss–to pen poignant odes to twenty-one city parks the world over. The resulting book, City Parks: Public Places, Private Thoughts, captures the enchantment of urban green spaces with intimate essays and Oberto Gili’s full color photographs, which appear almost three-dimensional in their depth and richness.

via The Secret Lives Of City Parks | Co.Design | business + design.




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