Posts Tagged ‘Pat Forde

10
Apr
13

4.10.13 … Storybook good … TWEET!

2013 NCAA Tournament, college basketball, Louisville Cardinals, Kevin Ware, Luke Hancock, Rick Patino, tattoo, Spike Albrecht, Pat Forde, Yahoo! Sports:  My husband came in dead tired from a business trip and although he is a native Louisvillian, he fell asleep … so I was left to watch on my own. I did love this pre-game prayer … LOL.  Little did I know how much they were going to need it!

One thing I truly enjoy about modern technology is watching on a big tv and following on twitter and social media. As the game was played I was amazed at the silence among my friends .. and said on FB: my, my … basketball fans are very quiet. Wolverine got the birdie’s tongue? … more silence.  But Louisville got the last TWEET!

Pat Forde nailed it in his followup article …

Not far away was Hancock, watching the video after scoring 42 points in two games in a brilliant display of clutch shooting. When Michigan raced to a 12-point first-half lead on the strength of little-known freshman Spike Albrecht’s stunning 17 points, Hancock provided the emphatic answer. He scored 14 points in 2 minutes and 33 seconds, stroking four 3-pointers in a dazzling eruption, and signaling that the Wolverines were not going to get away from Louisville.

Hancock’s gravely ill father, Bill, was watching from the front row behind the Louisville bench – the first games he’s been able to attend this NCAA tournament. What Luke did to calm Kevin Ware in Indy, he did to inspire his dad here. When it was over, Hancock went to his frail, 70-year-old father and repeated the question he asked him Saturday night, “How was that?”

It was good. Storybook good.

“I kind of feel like this pushed him,” Ware said of Hancock. “Going out there and playing for his dad.”

via Kevin Ware’s inspirational story gets picture-perfect ending with Louisville’s national title – Yahoo! Sports.

I’ve commented that I am Not a fan of Patino … but very impressed with his team. I look on him more favorably after this article … He’s human. And I can’t wait to see the tattoo!

Postgame, there was a bit of everything. There were moments of silliness and joy, such as Pitino laughing about how he was going to live up to a deal he made with his players about getting a tattoo if they won the national title. With an 82-76 victory over Michigan accomplished, his fate was sealed.

Sixty years old and for decades the most polished and properly presented coach in America, one who never let a thread of an Armani get frayed, Pitino was going to get inked up. “He would’ve killed us if we had gotten a tattoo,” his son Richard said before shaking his head at the thought of his dad, of all people, with art.

via Rick Pitino makes sure to share spotlight with whole family after years of tragedy and scandal – Yahoo! Sports.

22
Mar
13

3.22.13 … six awful seconds lead to heartbreak …

Davidson College, Davidson Basketball, Pat Forde, Yahoo! Sports:  Thanks, Pat … I think you “get” Davidson.

 Six awful seconds lead to heartbreak, blown opportunity at upset for Davidson – Yahoo! Sports.

The Irishman from New York who found a home at Davidson and never left, despite many opportunities, has a philosophical side that fits well with his school. Five years ago, when he and Curry took Davidson to the Elite Eight, McKillop was fond of saying, “La vita e bella” – life is beautiful. He has perspective, in a profession that often lacks it.

Thursday afternoon, he tried to find the beauty and perspective in a brutal loss.

“I’ll never forget this moment,” he said. “I’ll never forget this experience – the joys this team has given me. I’ll try to put it in perspective and think about people that are in pain they can’t control, think of the good things in my life.”

How long will that take?

“I’m putting it in perspective now,” McKillop answered, straightening his white dress shirt, trying to restore personal order. “I’m pretty disciplined about these things. I understand it. It doesn’t get any easier or more explicable, but I understand it.”

This is March Madness. For every team it lifts up, another is dashed. It is a zero-sum game with a ruthless bottom line.

That’s the understanding Davidson is dealing with today.

via Six awful seconds lead to heartbreak, blown opportunity at upset for Davidson – Yahoo! Sports.

16
Nov
11

11.16.2011 … On the megabus :) — at I 85 … mega-glad that I made it safely to mega-ATL … and safely to Lenbrook for Veggie plate including vegetarian egg rolls and then bingo … Nice evening with the Lenboook ladies — with Mary-Stewart and Mamma at lenbrook square.

Megabus, Atlanta, bingo, kith/kin:  First day of Megabus service to Atlanta … a little slow … but arrived safely and had a great visit with the Mom.

.

via http://stageus.megabus.com/routemap.aspx

holidays, photos, tips: Get Creative! … I am certainly glad imperfection is perfectly OK!!

Imperfection Is Perfectly Okay

Capturing a technically good image takes a lot of learning and practice. That said, I like to grab seasonal shots even in their imperfection — like this scene through a bus window during a New York City downpour on Central Park West. Shoot as many pictures as you want, because with digital — unlike when I started shooting two decades ago — there’s no film to process, and you’re not burning through a lot of film (or through your wallet) every time you take a dozen photos. Mind you, the downside is that you might not think through your shots as clearly as you do when you have to manually focus and change film cartridges every 36 pictures.

via Holiday Photo Tips: Get Creative! – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

college students, human memory, learning:  Great article…

I expect that most of us can identify personally with the connection between cues and memories. The power of cues helps explain why a particular song may remind you of a memorable afternoon in Paris, or why, for me, the smell of stale beer always draws up vivid memories of my first-year dorm room.

Further reflection is likely to yield more-intellectual examples. One long afternoon over winter break in my sophomore year in college, I sat in a chair in my parents’ living room and had my life changed by Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh. Whenever I sat in that chair, for many years afterward, detailed memories of O’Neill’s play and its impact on my life would return to me. And I can walk into certain classrooms on my campus and immediately recall formative experiences I had in my development as a teacher.

But while we may be able to draw up endless examples of how our minds have created such connections between learned information and the contextual cues that accompanied our first encounter with that information, those examples don’t translate very easily—as Miller points out—into concrete pedagogical practice.

If it turns out that the greatest memory challenge our students face is retrieving information from their long-term memories when they need it to perform on exams and assignments, and if that retrieval ability depends on the use of contextual cues during the information-encoding process, what does that mean for our job description as teachers? Do we have any control over the cues that accompany the encoding of information in our students’ brains? Can we help them develop effective cues?

via Teaching and Human Memory, Part I – Do Your Job Better – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

NBA lockout, college hoops, Pat Forde:  Enjoyed this article!

A long-lost friend is knocking on your front door, sports fan.

Open up and let him in.

Look who’s there – it’s college basketball. You remember him – used to be a lot of fun to be around, especially in March. Amid the more serious entities on the sporting cocktail circuit – college and pro football, the NBA, Major League Baseball – he was the life of the party. A weeknight at the gym (or just watching on TV) was always a good time.

The return of UNC’s Harrison Barnes and others is among the many reasons college basketball is flying high so far this season.

Then the old friend got wayward. He became irresponsible, with scandals cropping up constantly. He hung around sketchy characters – greasy third parties who attached themselves to star players. And then even the stars themselves became transient properties, just passing through on their way to the NBA, never sticking around long enough to develop a bond with the fans.

After a while, the product just wasn’t very good – not the players, not the teams. As problems kept surfacing, the credibility went the way of boxing. And all those other sports looked like better alternatives.

College basketball hit the skids.

But like the prodigal son and Britney Spears, college hoops is back after some rough years. And not looking too bad.

This is the chance to reacquaint with your old friend, sports fan. What else are you going to do, watch the NBA?

That league appears intent on alienating its fan base with a prolonged lockout that could eradicate the entire season. Already, 26 percent of the games have been canceled. The players union and ownership are at the breaking point. So is the faith of the customers.

You won’t see LeBron and Kobe and Dirk on Friday nights anytime soon – maybe not until next fall. So if you love hoops, what’s the alternative?

Let in your old friend.

The college game still has tremendous problems – cheating, hypocrisy and a corrosive cult-of-the-coach mentality among them. But this 2011-12 season is college hoops’ big chance to regain its seat at American sports’ main table.

The opportunity is there, and the product should be good enough to take advantage of that opportunity.

The talent on the floor – individually and from a team perspective – is as good as it’s been since 2008 at least.

When Harrison Barnes and Tyler Zeller of North Carolina, Jared Sullinger of Ohio State and Terrence Jones of Kentucky all said no to the NBA draft and came back to school, the game got a jolt of star power. Casual fans who like watching pro-level talent perform have something to tune into.

The return of those players helped guarantee that the Tar Heels, Buckeyes and Wildcats all would be better than they were last year. In fact, all three programs are probably better than any team was last year.

Let’s face it: if the talent level weren’t massively down in 2010-11, we wouldn’t have had both Virginia Commonwealth and Butler in the Final Four. They were great stories, not great teams. We wouldn’t have had the ninth-place team in the Big East (Connecticut) winning the national title while scoring 109 points in two games – the lowest Final Four total for the national champion since 1946.

When that fetid Final Four ended with Jim Calhoun – facing personal NCAA sanctions for violations within his program – holding up the national championship trophy after a weekend of horrible hoops, college basketball might have reached its nadir.

Now the game is climbing back up.

via NBA lockout opens door for college hoops – College Basketball – Rivals.com.

The Insanely Great History of Apple, posters, infographics: pretty cool …

The Insanely Great History of Apple is a cool new poster from PopChartLabs.com, where you can purchase the $25, 18”x24” poster for yourself (and many other great ones).

The world’s most comprehensive mapping of Apple products, this print shows every computer released by Apple in the last thirty years, from the original Mac through the MacBook Air. Products are sorted according to type, including the connections between various form factors which have arisen as Apple has invented—and reinvented—insanely great products.

via Cool Infographics – Blog – The Insanely Great History of Apple.

 college students, “Occupy Generation”, Occupy Wall Street:  Passing of the mantle?

As of today, Occupations are occurring in nearly 500 cities worldwide, according to Occupy Wall Street’s website. The protests have already been successful in one sense. The country is talking about ‘income inequality’ like never before. Since the protests began, the media has used the term 400% more this week than the week before the Occupation began according to a Politico metric.

So then, what next? In the words of Tom Hayden: “What happens next will be a collective judgment based on what they’ve been through. History awaits their decision.”

The country is waiting on these young people to act. They wanted to start a conversation, and they did. The question remains how they will be able to fix anything.

Will they form a political movement or continue changing the system from the outside? Will leadership emerge or will the difficult process of leaderless general assemblies succeed without it?

The answer might be found in Iowa. On January 4th, 2012, Occupiers from around the country will travel to Iowa to demonstrate at the First-In-The-Nation caucus. That is, if they can get organized. Much like Chicago, the cameras will be rolling in Iowa starting in early December. The demonstrators have a chance to affect the grassroots political process in historic fashion, if they are willing to engage it at all.

via Passing the mantle: The new Occupation Generation | USA TODAY College.

Benetton, advertising, controversial advertising: Benetton has the Pope kissing an imam, and Obama kissing Hugo Chavez in ad campaign. Doesn’t make me want to buy their clothes …

“Twenty-five years ago, Italian fashion label Benetton rode its controversial “United Colors of Benetton” ad campaign to global fame,” write the Journal’s Christina Passariello and Jennifer Clark.

Now, after having lost speed to competitors such as Inditex’s Zara and Hennes & Mauritz’s H&M, Benetton is trying for a second publicity coup.

On Wednesday, the house unveiled its first major brand advertising campaign in more than a decade, titled “Unhate.”

The images are of global leaders kissing: U.S. President Barack Obama locks lips with China’s Hu Jintao and with Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez.

A picture of the Pope embracing one of Islam’s leading figures, Ahmed Mohamed el-Tayeb, the imam of the al-Azhar mosque in Egypt, was hung from a bridge near the Vatican early Wednesday.

Alessandro Benetton anticipated that this ad would be the most controversial. “We could be excommunicated,” he said, only half-joking.

via Benetton’s Controversial Ad Campaigns, Featuring Obama, Chavez and the Pope – Heard on the Runway – WSJ.

Maria Popova, theoatmeal.com:  Another find from Maria Popova … Old but gold – top tweets illustrated …

I drew some tweets – The Oatmeal.

Coco-Cola, Arctic Home Coke Commercial, WWF, csr:   Protect the polar bears  … nice ad … but is this csr or just an advertising ploy.

This is the Arctic. This vast area of tundra, jagged peaks and frozen seas is the only place where the polar bear can live, hunt and breed. And it needs our help. Check this out, then join us at ArcticHome.com to learn about these amazing animals through video, pictures and bear facts from World Wildlife Fund. Together, we can help make sure the polar bear has a place to call home. http://CokeURL.com/ArcticHome

via Arctic Home Coke Commercial | Protect the Polar Bears – YouTube.

Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs, “journey for enlightenment”:

I don’t think it was just a question of liking him. I admired him, respected him, and found him unbelievably compelling even though he’s not your usual role model. I mean, he wasn’t the sweetest person I’ve ever met. But he was certainly the most interesting and, in some ways, mesmerizing person I’ve met.

SQ: If Jobs hadn’t been successful, would people still admire him?

WI: I tried to make it all come together in the book, which is the passionate perfectionism that causes him to be hard-driving and not put up with things that he considered mediocre. It’s what led him to create great products, but also to gather around him a loyal and talented team. So, to say that you can separate that passion for perfection and that demanding nature from the fact that he kept driving them like crazy to make the iPod perfect, is wrong. His personality is integrated into his success just like Apple products have the software and the hardware integrated with one another.

via Steve Jobs’s ‘journey for enlightenment’ – Under God – The Washington Post.


05
Nov
11

11.5.2011 … Afternoon with molls shopping at our favorite consignment shop … Then Dinner with the Forts … Great crockpot tex mex chili and wonderful cornbread (much better than my recent attempt!). Thanks, trobs and forts and dan for your love and support! You guys define friendship … and don’t forget to change your clocks

 

Daylight Savings Time, end of era:  Some people get really depressed when the time changes … I’m getting up at 5 am tomorrow … I’m excited because I get an extra hour of sleep!  So, don’t forget to change your clocks!

 

As the days get shorter and winter closes in, many people feel like hibernating. We start sleeping more, eating more, avoiding social contact. The effects can be particularly oppressive for people with depression, many of whom feel escalating dread as the end of Daylight Saving Time approaches.

8 Ways to Beat the Winter Blues

Beating the Winter Doldrums

Light Therapy

Socializing

Exercise

Deep Breathing

Massage

Caffeine

Supplements

Professional Help

via After Daylight Saving Time: How to Beat Winter Depression – – TIME Healthland.

 

Davidson College, Homecoming 2011, Career Networking Reception:  Plug for one of the Alumni Association’s events … Career networking Reception!

via Alenda Links – Online Community – Events.

Pat Forde, The Forde-Yard Dash, Yahoo! sports, friend of a friend:  Wish you well, Pat Forde … Definitely yahoo’s gain and ESPN’s loss.

Realignment news

In keeping with the times, The Dash Board of Directors (membership total: one) gave itself permission in mid-October to explore other options in terms of Internet affiliation. The Dash received interest from Yahoo! Sports. After careful consideration, The Dash applied for membership and was accepted by the worldwide leader in sports journalism.

Effective date: Nov. 1, 2011.

Exit fees from previous affiliation: zero.

There was no political involvement in the negotiations, and no threat of lawsuits. Orangebloods.com did not break the story. And travel to competitions will not be any different than it previously had been – The Dash, as most of you know, travels by Bus.

So that’s the scoop, for the much-appreciated readers who were wondering what happened the past couple weeks. The Dash is very happily back typing – same silly stuff, different web address. Let’s get back to it.

via The Forde-Yard Dash: Pat joins the Yahoo! party – College Football – Rivals.com.

Nick Saban, Les Miles, college football, media v. reality:

Nick Saban is the monomaniacal control freak who smiles once every lunar eclipse. Les Miles is the carefree strategic lightweight who gets by because every crazy gamble somehow works.

The contrast makes for a compelling storyline, one that you’ve probably heard reiterated plenty of times this week. Too bad it’s not entirely true.

Certainly, there is some factual basis to the reputations of both men. Saban is indeed famously focused and as prone to frivolity as a Secret Service agent. Miles is indeed a walking wildcard of unpredictability.

But to other coaches who have known them for decades, the stereotypes do a disservice to both men.

via Perceptions of Saban, Miles not always reality – College Football – Rivals.com.

Snowtober, twitter:  As of 11/2 …

@GMA

Good Morning America

Five days after #Snowtober more than 1 million homes and businesses in the NE are still without power

via (36) Twitter / Home.

 

 

27
Aug
11

8.27.2011 ‎… Last night, Midnight in Paris … In Charlotte :( … Off to the WNC XC Carnival … Run, Molly, Run … Go Hawks! ‎… and I am feeling guilty because so many friends are in harm’s way … stay safe those in the path of Irene.

Hurricane Irene: Charlotte and western and central NC really got nothing.  I actually am feeling guilty because so many friends are in harm’s way … stay safe those n the path of Irene. My beloved OBX was hit hard.  🙂

This photo from the New York Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) shows something never seen – and certainly not on what should be a busy Saturday afternoon in August: an empty Grand Central Station. With all transit in the New York area closed, the terminal is a big empty barn. If you’re watching TV news they’ll probably call it “Death Central Station.”

via Hurricane Irene-emptied Grand Central Station looks like the end of the world.

CLS XC, WNC Cross-Country Carnival,  UrbanSpoon, Mean Mr. Mustard’s Cafe, Hendersonville, NC,  kith/kin: What a great race … very well-organized and wonderful park –  WNC Cross Country Carnival  at Jackson Park, Hendersonville, NC.  Afterwards, we used Urban Spoon app to find Mean Mr. Mustard’s Cafe in downtown Hendersonville … which was excellent.

‎Midnight in Paris, movies:  John and saw ‎Midnight in Paris on the recommendation of several.  I loved it and he enjoyed it.  He said if he had not read A Paris Wife and recently been there, he would not have enjoyed it nearly as much.  Molly adored seeing the Eiffel Tower lit up at 11 pm. Toward the end they showed the Eiffel Tower lit up and it  just made me smile.

apps, photography apps: Another interesting photo app.  Luminance for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad on the iTunes App Store.

twitter, Daniel Pink, Steve Jobs tribute, Apple:  Daniel Pink finds some really fun stuff.

Daniel Pink (@DanielPink)
8/27/11 12:24 PM
RT @runkeeper: Tribute to Steve Jobs: 21km Apple Logo http://j.mp/rmJ4RT by @tamegoeswild#artofrunning

 Art of Running – A Tribute to Steve: 21KM Apple Logo « Joseph Tame.

apps, FutureTap, Urban Spoon, travel, food:  We used the similar Urban Spoon, in  Hendersonville NC and found a great restaurant.  First time I have ever really had success with these apps.  Anybody tried this one?

Discover your next destination.

Where To? makes it incredibly easy to locate the closest steakhouse, bank branch, billiard club or anything else you may be looking for, at the drop of a hat! Finally you can find local businesses without any typing, using a slick, intuitive user experience.

via Where To? – Discover your next destination | FutureTap.

Navy SEALs, Hawkeye, man’s best friend, pets, followup, photography, iconic images, followup:  I actually did not post this story, but I loved it and wondered what would happen to Hawkeye (what a great name for a dog!) … now we know.  I think this photo may become an iconic image of the continued war on terror.

Hawkeye — not a military dog, but Tumilson’s personal pet — “led the family into the gym” where the funeral was held, as the Des Moines Register reports. And then he lay down.

A poignant picture taken by Tumilson’s cousin, Lisa Pembleton, has gotten lots of attention since then. So too have video reports aired and posted by local TV stations and the news networks.

Our colleagues at KPBS’ Home Post blog in San Diego were among the outlets that helped spread the word about Hawkeye. Today, they write that many readers wanted to know what was going to happen to Hawkeye and wondered if they could adopt him. There’s good news: According to Home Post, “Tumilson’s friend, Scott Nichols, will be Hawkeye’s new master.”

via Navy SEAL’s Loyal Dog Now With Master’s Friend : The Two-Way : NPR.

Gadhafi, Libya Uprising, personality cults, dictators, megalomaniacs:  Unfortunately, those that choose this route can negatively affect international politics for years …

In contrast, Gadhafi showed absolutely no interest in fleeing abroad during the six months that elapsed between the start of the Libyan uprising in February until Tuesday, the day the rebels stormed into his compound in Tripoli.

For months, the rebels encouraged Gadhafi to leave, and it seemed he would have had relatively little trouble finding a new home. Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez was often mentioned as a possible host.

Now Gadhafi is presumed to be in hiding in Libya, and the rebels have put a bounty out on him. If captured, he is likely to be prosecuted at home or abroad.

Personality Cults

Absolute power, it seems, not only corrupts — it can also confuse.

“There’s a healthy dose of megalomania in these guys,” John Norris, a security analyst at the Center for American Progress, says of dictators who refuse to surrender power. “If I had to find one common thread, it’s a profound and fundamental miscalculation that the end is near.”

Dictators who rule unchallenged for decades — like Gadhafi or Saddam Hussein — have the hardest time accepting the fact that it’s time to leave, says Natasha Ezrow, a lecturer in government at the University of Essex and author of two books about dictators.

via A Dictator’s Choice: Cushy Exile Or Go Underground : NPR.

Game of Thrones, bookshelf, tv, HBO: A friend has highly recommended both the Game of Thrones tv show and the book.  Books are ordered from Amazon and will watch the show … Anybody read the books or watching the show?  HBO: Game of Thrones: About.

food – wine, viticulture,  oenology, Stellenbosch, South Africa, apartheid:  This is a great story.  We have been to SA’s wine country and Kwala-Zulu Natal, and the contrast is amazing.  What a wonderful story of post apartheid success.

Her choice of study was a fluke. Though she had been a good student, none of her grant applications for college were approved until an airline, hoping to promote diversity, offered to pay her way to study viticulture and oenology: grapes and wine. What was wine? the young woman wondered, guessing it was another name for cider.

She had never been outside the eastern province of KwaZulu Natal, but she boarded a bus and traveled across South Africa to the wine country of the Western Cape. She gazed at the immense mountains. She puzzled over the short, thin trees planted in perfect rows. She had no idea what they were.

Finally, Ms. Biyela tasted the beverage she had come such a distance to study. She and a handful of other black scholarship students met with a wine connoisseur, Jabulani Ntshangase. He opened a superb red, raised the moist cork to his nose and talked rapturously about the wine’s fruitiness and color and fragrance. She was expecting to sip something sublime when handed the elegant, long-stemmed glass. Instead, she was stunned. It was disgusting.

Ms. Biyela, having definitely adapted her tastes, is now one of this nation’s few black winemakers in an occupation that has been dominated by white people for 350 years. Her blends of merlot, cabernet sauvignon and pinotage have won gold medals and four-star ratings. She was named South Africa’s Woman Winemaker of the Year in 2009. Last month, she was busy judging the country’s entries for the International Wine and Spirit Competition.

“Somehow I fell in love with the ever-changing content of wine,” she said as if still surprised by her own journey. “Wine is never the same today as it is tomorrow. It even depends on where you drink it and who you are with and what mood you are in. It’s a very, very nice thing.”

Though apartheid has been swept away, this country is still a racially divided society. Ms. Biyela is a pioneer in its transformation, not someone elevated through political connections, but a rural woman who made it on grit.

via Black South African Goes From Never a Sip to Vineyard Fame – NYTimes.com.

UGA, PSAs, REM: Great PSA.  Thanks UGA and REM.

R.E.M., one of Athens, Georgia’s biggest rock exports, has lent their song, “Oh My Heart” from Collapse Into Now to the University of Georgia for a beautiful, new public service message. The University of Georgia reached outside the arches, teaming with an alumni group, to create the in-game public service announcement for the upcoming 2011 football season.

via R.E.M. Lends Song to University of Georgia for New PSA.

UGA_PSA_Skylabb.mov – YouTube.

twitter, college football, LSU, LOL, Pat Forde:

@espn4d

Pat Forde

Even Imelda Marcos is impressed by Jordan Jefferson’s shoe collection. Forty-nine pairs, nearly one for each week of the year.

via Twitter / @espn4d: Even Imelda Marcos is impr ….

college basketball:  I really do like college basketball

…25 consecutive hours of game action highlighted by Champions Classic doubleheader with College GameDay on-site; 17 men’s games; two women’s games for first time; and 11 ESPN telecasts

For the fourth consecutive year, ESPN will celebrate the opening of the college basketball season with a marathon of college basketball coverage across ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU and ESPN3.com. This year’s College Hoops Tip-off Marathon Presented by Disney Parks Tuesday, Nov. 15, beginning at midnight ET, will include 19 live matchups – 17 men’s and two women’s – in a minimum of 25 hours, highlighted by ESPN’s 11 game telecasts and a special one-hour College GameDay Driven by State Farm. ESPN3.com will offer two exclusive games as well as a simulcast of every ESPN and ESPN2 telecast.

The schedule will feature four of the sport’s winningest programs – Duke, Kansas, Kentucky and Michigan State – in the inaugural State Farm Champions Classic doubleheader, 14 teams that played in last year’s men’s NCAA Tournament, including Final Four participant Kentucky; and four women’s NCAA Tournament teams from last year, including defending National Champion Texas A&M.

via ESPN Celebrates Opening of Hoops Season with Fourth Annual College Hoops Tip-Off Marathon | ESPN MediaZone.

17
May
11

5.17.2011 … seems the world is filled with intrigue today …

Annecy, Talloires, France, small world, kith/kin:  Ran into Cat K. yesterday … and small world … she and John honeymooned in Talloires and Annecy .. now I have some more hotels, etc.  to research.

“In a Cezanne painting”

Nestled in the hollow of a protective massif, Annecy Lake is one of the world’s purest lakes.

A gorgeous place that inspired Paul Cezanne who painted “The Lake of Annecy”.

“Auberge du Père Bise is settled in a unique location that takes all its magnificence with lights’ reflections over the lake. No one could have imagined a better place… More than a splendid location, your eyes and your taste buds will be taken to a new world of pleasure with the cuisine of Sophie Bise.”

“A legendary hotel set on the bay of Talloires”

via → AUBERGE DU PERE BISE TALLOIRES – LUXURY HOTEL ANNECY-OFFICIAL WEBSITE -4 STAR HOTEL LAKE ANNECY PERE BISE.

Royal Family, Queen Elizabeth II, Republic of Ireland, historic firsts, bomb threat:

Brushing aside bomb threats, Queen Elizabeth II embarked on the first visit by a reigning British monarch to the Irish Republic on Tuesday — a visit heavy on symbolism after decades of hostility and mistrust, and protected by some of the tightest security Dubliners could recall.

Hours before she arrived, the Irish Army carried out a controlled explosion of a pipe bomb discovered in a tote bag in the luggage compartment of a bus heading for the capital, police officials said.

The bus was traveling from Ballina in the west of Ireland toward Dublin and the device was found in Maynooth, 40 miles from Dublin. About 30 passengers had left the bus when it was stopped and searched, apparently after a tip by an informant, the police said.

via Bomb Found in Ireland Hours Before Queen Arrives – NYTimes.com.

Osama bin Laden Death:  Article reads like a spy novel …  AP sources: Raiders knew mission a one-shot deal  | ajc.com.

art galleries, Paris, culture, travel:  Several articles here … am getting excited about Paris!

Every spring art galleries in the Saint-Germain-des-Pres neighborhood, long famed as home to artists, writers and musicians, open their doors to the public, in a block party called Art Saint-Germain-des-Pres. With what might be the highest concentration of galleries in the world, it’s an ideal area to find a variety of art, from primitive to contemporary and sculpture and painting to photography, jewelry and antiques. This year’s event, from May 19 to 22, will include at least 60 galleries. As an example of the event’s breadth, La Galerie Artco-France will show works by the Surrealist René Magritte and La Galerie Frédéric Got Fine Art photographs by Elliott Erwitt.

via An Art-Themed Block Party in Paris – NYTimes.com.

Over the first few days of April, the Art Paris fair draws crowds of collectors to the Grand Palais exhibition hall. This year the organizers are offering an additional attraction: Les Nuits Parisiennes, an evening art stroll on April 1 and 2 that links 15 art installations in nine locations across the city center.

“We wanted to make art more accessible, to create an emotional encounter that everyone can appreciate,” said Marie-Ann Yemsi, one of two young curators who conceived and put together the program.

“We wanted to show art in another way, other than in a white cube gallery or museum space — to let the artists’ imagination play with the city,” added her partner, Agnes Violeau.

via Seeing Art in Paris as the Sun Sets – NYTimes.com.

“The Book Club” is a party that occurs on the last Wednesday of every month at newly refurbished Le Carmen cafe and bar. The event has one simple rule: bring a book, and make sure to swap it by the end of the night. Forget keys or clothes, this is a more modern way to meet people, the event founder Rosa Rankin-Gee believes. “Books don’t spill,” she said. “They are pocketable, holdable, durable, lovely and say so much about the person who brought them.” The next event is scheduled for May 25.

The venue (22, rue de Douai; 33-1-45-26-50-00; http://www.Le-carmen.fr) is a 19th-century private mansion once inhabitedΩ by Georges Bizet, where he supposedly wrote the opera of the same name. The space, with its ornate moldings and plush velvet seats, recreates the ambience of “the literary salons of yesteryear, but brings them up to date,” said Ms. Rankin-Gee. “And democratizes them, in a sense, because just by turning up with a book, every single person contributes.” The atmosphere is rounded out by a selection of retro cocktails and live piano music.

The Book Club goes hand in hand with an upcoming arts journal called A Tale of Three Cities, to be released soon.

via At Monthly Paris Gathering, Swapping Conversation and Books – NYTimes.com.

iPad, Apps, libraries, New York Public Library:   I always loved the NY Public library’s Reference book … that should be an app … but i will enjoy this, too.

Now, the New York Public Library has created a new iPad app that bring the library’s research collections into “the palms of the public’s hand,” as library officials put it in a statement released Tuesday. “Biblion: The Boundless Library” is the name for a series of apps available on Apple’s tablet computer that highlight different elements in the library’s collection. It was developed by the library and the design firm Potion.

via New York Public Library Launches iPad App – NYTimes.com.

Forbidden City, China, Jasmine Revolution:  Love the intrigue here …

For 600 years, the Forbidden City, with its vermilion walls, labyrinthine passageways and sloping tiled roofs, has stood in the heart of Beijing as the ultimate symbol of power, the inner sanctum from which authority emanates across a vast land.

It is the last place one would imagine as a base for the overthrow of the Chinese Communist Party.

Yet, photographs have circulated on the Internet over the last few days that seem to hint at exactly that. On Friday, officials in charge of management of the Forbidden City handed two ceremonial banners to local police officers to congratulate them on nabbing a thief who had stolen curios from an exhibition at the ancient palace earlier this month. The slogan on one of the banners said: “To shake the great strength and prosperity of the motherland, and to safeguard the stability of the capital.”

The treasonous slogan instantly set the Chinese Internet aflutter, spreading as quickly as court gossip.

Barring the possibility of a secret revolutionary cabal inside the palace, the problem has to do with a common headache in Mandarin Chinese: homonyms. The pronunciation of the word for “shake” – han, with a falling tone – is exactly the same as that for “guard,” even though the written characters are different. In other words, the first phrase should have read to “to guard” rather than “to shake.”

Embarrassingly, no officials at the ceremony seemed to notice the gaffe. Ji Tianbin, vice-director of the Forbidden City, handed out the banner, and Fu Zhenghua, head of the Beijing police, was in attendance.

By Monday, photos of the ceremony had ignited derision across the Internet. Many Chinese mocked the bad grammar of the person had designed the banner, and Chinese news organizations demanded an explanation.

The management office issued a brief apology on its microblog on Monday: The banners had been designed by the security department, it said, and no official had examined them “due to a lack of time.”

It added that the security department had defended the mistake and had refused to apologize. Officials have “investigated the incident and criticized and educated the security department,” the managers said.

Even more scandalous is talk that a luxury private club has been established in the Jianfu Pavilion, a part of the Forbidden City that has been restored through monies from a preservation fund in Hong Kong. The club’s membership, supposedly limited to 500 people, costs one million renminbi each, or $154,000, according to a microblog posting last week by Rui Chenggang, an anchor for China Central Television. Officials at the Forbidden City quickly denied the existence of any such club, but Beijing News reported on Sunday that an opening ceremony had already been held.

Chang Lingxing, a spokesman for Forbidden City, said in a telephone interview on Tuesday that the management office had hired a private company, the Beijing Forbidden City Culture Development Company, to organize lectures and salons. Instead, the company had started handing out “membership sign-up forms.” The management office has told the company to stop, according to a written statement.

One microblog post making the rounds succinctly sums up the three humiliations: “The Forbidden City: the commercial company sold memberships without the officials’ permission; the security department printed the banner without the officials’ approval; the thief stole the exhibits without the officials’ approval!”

But perhaps one should not underestimate the enduring nature of the building. Geremie R. Barme, the prominent Australian scholar of China, wrote this in his book on the history of the Forbidden City: “While its buildings were subject to decay and change, the China of secretive politics, rigid political codes and autocratic behavior continued to exert an influence far beyond the walls of the former palace.”

via Embarrassments Mount at China’s Forbidden City – NYTimes.com.

Davidson College, changes:  New dorms … to accommodate growth to 2000!

Davidson College officials will be at the Design Review Board Wednesday, May 18, seeking final approval for a new 5-story dormitory that will house 250 students as the college boosts enrollment from the current 1,800 to 2,000 in the coming years. The Town of Davidson planning staff is recommending approval of the plan.

The new building would be completed by fall 2012. College officials weren’t sure Monday how much the building would cost. They said they’re still negotiating contracts with construction and design firms.

The new brick building will be designed to fit in with the college’s existing “Neo-Georgian” residential architecture. It would have one 5-story and one 4-story wing, connected by a 1 1/2-story entrance.

The building also would have a fitness center and a meeting space.

via College seeks design approval for new dorm | Real Estate.

Steph Curry, Davidson College:  Steph does others things besides play basketball beautifully … and his business ventures are with his Davidson friends … makes you realize that he was truly integrated into the college.

Stephen Curry becomes a video star today.

A former Davidson All-American, he is working with two of his former teammates, Dan Nelms and Steve Rossiter, in launching a website (www.amzini.com) designed to raise awareness of the many social networking sites available online.

Curry will be featured in two videos shot this year in San Francisco with the intention of drawing more people – and their videos – to the site.

“The idea is there are all these different social opportunities out there that people aren’t aware of,” said Nelms, president of Amzini Enterprises LLC.

via Curry & Co. launch website | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

Charlotte, The Charlotte Observer, media, anniversaries, kudos:  Kudos and happy 125th The Charlotte Observer!

Happy 125th birthday to The Charlotte Observer, a newspaper that first began telling Charlotte’s story when it was yet a dream.

Along the way, the Observer has put forward some dreams of its own, helping to shape our region in significant ways. Some will say for the better, others for the worse, depending on a particular issue or outcome. But there is no denying that the place where we live today is a blended legacy of an aspiring city and its newspaper.

That legacy continues now as Charlotte shakes off a devastating collapse of the banking industry and the Observer rewires itself for the digital age. Neither job will be easy, which makes it an especially good time to remember how far both have come.

via A part of your world, every day for 125 years | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

Apple, iPhone:  Maybe not a 5 … but an upgraded 4.

The tech-community’s hunch is that a new iPhone will be unveiled in the fall and rolled out in time for the holidays.

via New ‘iPhone 4S’ might come to Sprint, T-Mobile – CNN.com.

college basketball, Pat Forde: Already thinking basketball … It is my favorite college sport.  Ten things I can’t wait to see in 2011-12 college basketball season – ESPN.

college, internships, first jobs:  More and more,  it appears the key to that first job is an internship.

Even though companies say that, on average, they’ll hire 19% more new graduates this year than they did in 2010, some graduates might find that a good portion of companies’ incoming classes are already filled.

That’s because companies say that nearly 40% of this year’s entry-level positions will be filled by former interns, according to a survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

via Interns Get a Head Start for Jobs – WSJ.com.

09
May
11

5.9.2011 … The flooding Mississippi R. is 3 miles wide at Memphis … I can’t imagine … prayers …

natural disasters, flooding, Mississippi River, Memphis, prayers:  

At a late Sunday afternoon press briefing, Col. Vernon Reichling of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said the Mississippi River in Memphis, usually a half-mile wide, now measures 3 miles across. Reichling said he expected the river to crest Tuesday at 48 feet, just below the record set in 1937 of 48.7 feet; it is the first time the Mississippi River has exceeded even 41 feet since that record 1937 flood.

via Sunday flood updates: River now 3 miles across in Memphis » The Commercial Appeal.

Jasmine Revolution, China:

The clampdown is concentrated on foreign groups or activities that have significant ties to foreign governments, run prominent outreach programs, encourage free speech or promote Internet freedom.

Senior Chinese officials appear to believe that the United States in particular helped set off and sustain the uprisings that toppled dictators in the Arab world. In mid-February, messages appeared on the Chinese Internet calling for people to hold similar protests across the nation. Some of the people spreading word of the so-called Jasmine Revolution are Chinese who live overseas.

One message called for Chinese to protest on Feb. 20 at a McDonald’s outlet on Wangfujing, a popular shopping street in Beijing, and the government became concerned when Jon M. Huntsman Jr., who was then the American ambassador to China, appeared that afternoon outside the restaurant.

Embassy officials said Mr. Huntsman, who left his job at the end of April, was not aware of the calls for a protest, but the Chinese government quickly began canceling outreach activities sponsored by the American Embassy. That included one-time appearances by Mr. Huntsman in Chinese cities and regularly scheduled education programs in which American officials meet with Chinese students, according to interviews with foreigners and Chinese.

“The cynic in me believes that, given the likely timing of this decision and of the onset of the Egyptian protests, this is not really about money or the value of international conferences, but about minimizing extended face-to-face dialogues with foreigners who might share ideas that were ‘bu shufu,’ ” said one American involved in cultural events, using the Chinese phrase for “discomforting.”

Foreign journalists have also faced unusually direct harassment from security officials. Starting in late February, scores of journalists were warned about their coverage and visited at their homes.

In meetings in February and March with one American journalist, security officers tried to make the case that American officials, together with foreign journalists and others with ties overseas, were conspiring to stir up chaos in China. They talked about the appearance of Mr. Huntsman at the McDonald’s on Feb. 20, and they mentioned a meeting that he held with foreign journalists at the embassy on March 10, citing them as proof of the United States’ hand in fanning the flames of revolution.

via China Blames Foreigners for Trying to Foment Unrest – NYTimes.com.

Osama bin Laden death, Dalai Lama, moral issues, forgiveness:

But the Dalai Lama’s camp responded almost immediately, claiming this was not at all the gist of his remarks, emphasizing his appeal for us to distinguish between “the action” and “the actor” and stressing that, as a fellow human being, even bin Laden deserves our compassion and forgiveness. But, he stressed, “forgiveness doesn’t mean forget [sic] what happened.”

via Dalai Lama: Osama bin Laden Deserves Compassion – Global Spin – TIME.com.

Osama bin Laden death, Maureen Down, moral issues: Know where she stands … “We have nothing to apologize for.”

But within days, Naval Seal-gazing shifted to navel-gazing.

There was the bad comedy of solipsistic Republicans with wounded egos trying to make it about how right they were and whinging that George W. Bush was due more credit. Their attempt to renew the debate about torture is itself torture.

W. preferred to sulk in his Dallas tent rather than join President Obama at ground zero in a duet that would have certainly united the country.

Whereas the intelligence work that led to the destruction of Bin Laden was begun in the Bush administration, the cache of schemes taken from Osama’s Pakistan house debunked the fanciful narrative that the Bush crew pushed: that Osama was stuck in a cave unable to communicate, increasingly irrelevant and a mere symbol, rather than operational. Osama, in fact, was at the helm, spending his days whipping up bloody schemes to kill more Americans.

The really insane assumption behind some of the second-guessing is that killing Osama somehow makes us like Osama, as if all killing is the same.

Only fools or knaves would argue that we could fight Al Qaeda’s violence non-violently.

President Obama was prepared to take a life not only to avenge American lives already taken but to deter the same killer from taking any more. Aside from Bin Laden’s plotting, his survival and his legend were inspirations for more murder.

If stealth bombers had dropped dozens of 2,000-pound bombs and wiped out everyone, no one would have been debating whether Osama was armed. The president chose the riskiest option presented to him, but one that spared nearly all the women and children at the compound, and anyone in the vicinity.

Unlike Osama, the Navy Seals took great care not to harm civilians — they shot Bin Laden’s youngest wife in the leg and carried two young girls out of harm’s way before killing Osama.

Morally and operationally, this was counterterrorism at its finest.

We have nothing to apologize for.

via Killing Evil Doesn’t Make Us Evil – NYTimes.com.

Paris, France, travel, lists, Question:  Anything else YOU think should be on the list?

From impassioned revolutionaries and ostentatious royals to the world of ancient Gaul, the history of Paris is filled with drama, intrigue and excitement. Thus, it is of little surprise that this is not only one of the world’s most beautiful and romantic cities, but that it is also brimming with fantastic historic sites. The following are our top ten historic sites of Paris.

via Top Ten Historic Sites of Paris.

travel, lists, places, hotels:

Location, location, location. This real estate mantra is something to live by when seeking out the perfect hotel. For history buffs, a hotel setting can be key to a stay.

From balcony panoramas of World Heritage sites to hidden ancient baths in the basement, some hotels have that little something extra to really immerse their guests in history. So, where can one find these perfect places from which to enjoy the sites of cultures past?

We asked our friends at historical travel website Historvius.com to put together a selection of just some of the very best hotels for history lovers.

via 15 Great Hotels For History Lovers (PHOTOS) – AOL Travel News.

Harvard Initiative, Advanced Education:  This seems exciting to me …

In short, the program represents a new, “third stage” in higher education, says Rosabeth Moss Kanter, the initiative’s co-founder and director, and one of the three Harvard professors who in 2005 first envisioned a wider role for the nation’s colleges and universities. Such institutions have long launched young adults into the world from undergraduate and graduate/professional programs. Now, she says, these schools need to do the same for older adults.

Doug Rauch, former president of Trader Joe’s, works on his project for getting ‘excess’ food to the hungry with Prof. Fernando Reimers, a co-chairman of Harvard’s leadership program.

“Clearly, we need additional leaders to take on social challenges—and here we have this large population of adults leaving first careers who are going to live for another 20 or 30 years,” Prof. Kanter says. Higher education “can be the resource that gives these individuals the skills and direction they need.”

For now, the Harvard initiative remains small: About 20 to 30 fellows a year take part. That said, Prof. Kanter expects the program to grow steadily—and, ideally, to be replicated at schools across the country.

Indeed, the initiative is a “sign of things to come,” says Marc Freedman, chief executive of Civic Ventures, a San Francisco nonprofit focused on expanding the contributions of older Americans. Already, he notes, a growing number of resources—community colleges, webinars, alumni groups and life coaches, among others—are helping the 50-plus crowd transition into jobs and careers in the social-service and nonprofit arenas.

Eventually, these multiple pathways, Mr. Freedman adds, will “enable individuals in the second half of life to move seamlessly from ‘what’s last’ to ‘what’s next.’ ”

That platform could soon be adopted elsewhere. A meeting in Miami in June will give other schools a chance to learn about Harvard’s model for educating advanced leaders, Prof. Kanter says. She likens the effort to the growth of the nation’s business schools, which began to appear at the turn of the 20th century and are now a familiar part of the academic landscape.

“We think someday this will be a stage of higher education that many colleges and universities will want to have,” Prof. Kanter says. “We want to make this a movement.”

via It’s Not Too Late to Go to Harvard – WSJ.com.

bookshelf, Three Cups of Tea:  Well, I have had this book next to my bed for several years … Nothing like controversy to make me fish it out and begin.

Greg Mortenson, author of the bestseller “Three Cups of Tea,” was sued for fraud on Friday in a class-action case accusing him of fabricating much of his story to promote the book and his Montana-based charity.

The lawsuit comes nearly four weeks after Mortenson and his Central Asia Institute (CAI) came under fire in an expose aired on the CBS television news program “60 Minutes,” which sparked an investigation by the Montana attorney general.

The “60 Minutes” report challenged the credibility of biographical details in Mortenson’s memoir and said his institute, founded to build schools for girls in Afghanistan and Pakistan, was largely being used to promote the book.

via Lawsuit accuses Three Cups of Tea author of fraud | Reuters.

Paris, Jim Haynes, Sunday Dinner, kith/kin:  I am jealous … a good friend is going next Sunday … when she told me about it … and I looked it up … I remember this Jim Haynes’ NPR interview.  I can’t wait to hear about it.

Every week for the past 30 years, I’ve hosted a Sunday dinner in my home in Paris. People, including total strangers, call or e-mail to book a spot. I hold the salon in my atelier, which used to be a sculpture studio. The first 50 or 60 people who call may come, and twice that many when the weather is nice and we can overflow into the garden.

Every Sunday a different friend prepares a feast. Last week it was a philosophy student from Lisbon, and next week a dear friend from London will cook.

People from all corners of the world come to break bread together, to meet, to talk, connect and often become friends. All ages, nationalities, races, professions gather here, and since there is no organized seating, the opportunity for mingling couldn’t be better. I love the randomness.

I believe in introducing people to people.

via Jim Haynes.

How to make the gods laugh: tell them your plans! Nevertheless I hope the future includes my continuing to live here in my Paris atelier, travelling to see friends, writing newsletters and books, hosting friends, organizing the Sunday dinners, and enjoying every minute of life. For me, happiness is an intellectual concept, and I decided years ago to be happy. In spite of (and because of) everything, I love life. It has been good to me, and I hope that I have been good to it.

via Jim Haynes.

137th Kentucky Derby, Pat Forde: “The Derby almost always has a jarring plot twist or two. But this was an all-timer.” … read on …

Instead, the hugely accomplished Velazquez wound up riding the colt that would take him to his first Derby victory after years of heartache. And just like that, the 37-year-old Albarado — who won a stakes race Saturday on the Derby undercard — wound up watching his mount surge to glory on the home stretch with a complete stranger on his back.

The Derby almost always has a jarring plot twist or two. But this was an all-timer.

“The proper thing to do is to congratulate Graham and Johnny,” said Albarado, who has won many big races but never the Derby. “Johnny rode a great race. But you get taken off the day before? It’s kind of sad.”

One jockey’s sadness became another jockey’s elation. Velazquez has himself been bruised by the Derby gods, losing top-shelf contenders the week of the race three straight years. Before Uncle Mo there was Eskendereya, the likely heavy favorite in 2010 who was scratched just days before the Derby, and before that was Quality Road, scratched the Monday of Derby week with a hoof injury.

via Robby Albarado and John Velazquez: A tale of two jockeys at the Kentucky Derby – ESPN.

Boulder, places, happiness, Gretchen Rubin, kith/kin:  My two boys would agree … it is a wonderful place …

He says where he lives is a huge component of his happiness. “I lived in San Francisco, lived in Miami, New York City, Chicago, and I just think that this community, for me and what I wanted to do, it just fit.”

“This community” is Boulder, Colorado, where Dave – who owns a restaurant called (what else?) Happy – is far from the only one mainlining the vibe of well-being.

“There’s an energy here you just don’t feel in other places,” said one resident, Sean.

Ingrid Asmus wouldn’t walk her dog Strider anywhere else.

“Up there the spring beauties are blooming and the bluebells are out and the sand lilies are starting to come out,” she remarked. And she’s only five minutes from downtown.

If happiness is a state of mind, then Boulder is its capital.

What Gretchen re-discovered is the wisdom of that old saying: Happiness is a journey, not a destination, and one best guided by daily … incremental changes in lifestyle… with one above all:

“Ancient philosophers and contemporary researchers agree that maybe the key the happiness, if you had to pick just one thing, is strong relationships with other people,” she said. “So take the trip to see your sister’s new baby, go to the reunion, throw a party. Connections – anything that’s going to make you feel more connected with other people is going to add to your happiness.”

via The pursuit of happiness – CBS News.

LOL:

YouTube – Most interesting thing I ever saw done to a dog..mp4.




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