Posts Tagged ‘pocket neighborhoods

07
Aug
13

8.7.13 … In my old age I think I would like to live in a joyful cottage in a Pocket Neighborhood … 474 Art FREE Catalogues Online! … CU is adding colleges … dun dun dundun, dun dun dundun, dun dun dun duun duuuun dundun…DUN DUN DUNDUN! … DealDash.com scams? …

A Joyful Cottage: All American Cottage Tour, Ross Chapin, Pocket Neighborhoods:  In my old age I think I would like to live in a joyful cottage in a Pocket Neighborhood.

But today I’m staying in the United States.  I’m going all American, and I’m delighted and privileged to feature the home designs of Ross Chapin Architects. This award-winning Whidbey Island firm has been featured in a plethora of newspapers and magazines, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Cottage Living and Metropolitan Home, just to name a few. Taunton Press books such as The New Cottage Home by Jim Tolpin, Cottage by M. Caren Connolly and Louis Wasserman, and The Distinctive Home by Jeremiah Eck have included Chapin designs. And Ross Chapin himself has written a book entitled Pocket Neighborhoods.

via A Joyful Cottage: All American Cottage Tour.

free, The Metropolitan Museum of Art,  the Guggenheim, Open Culture:  474 Art Catalogues Online!

If you like reading about visual art but don’t like spending the considerable sums required to build your own library of vintage exhibition catalogues, feel free to borrow from another collector. Or rather, feel free to borrow from two collectors, both based in New York, both of some repute: The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Early last year, we announced that the Guggenheim had made 65 art catalogues [now increased to 99] available for free online, offering “an intellectual and visual introduction to the work of Alexander Calder, Edvard Munch, Francis Bacon, Gustav Klimt & Egon Schiele, and Wassily Kandinsky” as well as “ other texts e.g., Masterpieces of Modern Art and Abstract Expressionists Imagists that tackle meta movements and themes.” That same post includes instructions on how to use the Guggenheim’s archive.

Late last year, we also announced the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s launch of MetPublications, which will “eventually offer access to nearly all books, Bulletins, and Journals” published by the Met since 1870. The collection now features a whopping 375 free art books and catalogues overall. Taken together, these collections examine in detail art from all eras of human history and all parts of the world. At the top of the post, you will see the cover for the Met’s The Art of Illumination. (Who doesn’t love illuminated Medieval manuscripts?) Below appears Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright, available from the Guggenheim. Given the presence of these and the other fascinating catalogues we’ve previously highlighted, word of these two museums’ online libraries certainly shouldn’t stay buried in our archives.

via Free: The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Offer 474 Free Art Catalogues Online | Open Culture.

CU, two new colleges on campus, media/communication/information, college  on environment/sustainability, 50 years:  Seems amazing given the changes over the last 50 years, that CU is adding colleges for the first time.

If approved these will be the first new colleges in 50 years. The proposed colleges will be: a college focused on media, communication and information, and also a college focused on environment and sustainability. Both colleges will have to be approved by the Board of Regents before building and transitioning begins.

The new college devoted to media will house journalism, advertising, design, communication, film production and studies and media studies.

“From this college, we will create working journalists, editors and media professionals, communication scholars, media experts, advertisers and media designers, filmmakers and film theorists, and experts in the emerging field of information architecture and design,” said Provost Russell L. Moore in a released statement. ”The possibilities are truly exciting.”

The college of environment and sustainability “will bring together in one college a concentration of faculty who represent some of CU-Boulder’s mostly highly ranked, and highly successful, research in environmental sciences,” Moore said.

The next steps according to Moore are to form committees, plan budgets and work to integrate the new institutions with the existing programs. The objective, according to Moore, is to have a proposal submitted to the Board of Regents within a year and begin enrolling students by 2015.

via Plans for two new colleges at CU announced | CU Independent.

TV,  Discovery’s Shark Week:  dun dun dundun, dun dun dundun, dun dun dun duun duuuun dundun…DUN DUN DUNDUN! … Did you know there are people who look forward to Discovery’s Shark Week?

great white

And why does everyone like Shark Week?

It’s shark week – and as any self-respecting shark week fan knows, that means hours and hours of footage of great white sharks breaching in slow motion, the better to chomp on some poor, unsuspecting seal. Indeed, Discovery has become so fond of these “air jaws” shots, it’s opening the week with a special devoted to them that includes a preview of another upcoming air jaws special. It’s followed by the two-hour special Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives (9 ET/PT) and the debut of Shark After Dark (11 ET/PT), a live late-night talk show hosted by Josh Wolf that will run each evening during shark week.

via Sunday TV: ‘The Killing,’ shark week begins.

DealDash.com, scams:  I think they need real actors, not real people, on DealDash.com ads … the real people seem less than bright.  Scam alert …

▶ DealDash – Real People, Real Savings – YouTube.

16
Apr
11

4.16.2011 … It was a dark and stormy morning …

design,neighborhoods, cities, urban development, New Urbanism, pocket neighborhoods, quotes, Brookwood Hills, Atlanta, CAGE, Wilmette, Chicago:  “‘Biology is destiny’, declared Sigmund Freud. But if Freud were around today, he might say “design is destiny”—especially after taking a stroll through most American cities.” … And I still think BH is the perfect neighborhood … with the CAGE in Wilmette coming in a close second.

Biology is destiny, declared Sigmund Freud.

But if Freud were around today, he might say “design is destiny”—especially after taking a stroll through most American cities.

The way we design our communities plays a huge role in how we experience our lives. Neighborhoods built without sidewalks, for instance, mean that people walk less and therefore experience fewer spontaneous encounters, which is what instills a spirit of community to a place. That’s a chief cause of the social isolation, so rampant in the modern world, that contributes to depression, distrust, and other maladies.

You don’t have to be a therapist to realize all this creates lasting psychological effects. It thwarts the connections between people that encourage us to congregate, cooperate, and work for the common good. We retreat into ever more privatized existences.

Commons can take many different forms: a group of neighbors in Oakland who tore down their backyard fences to create a commons, a block in Baltimore that turned their alley into a pubic commons, or the residential pedestrian streets found in Manhattan Beach, California, and all around Europe.

Of course, this is no startling revelation. Over the past 40 years, the shrinking sense of community across America has been widely discussed, and many proposals outlined about how to bring us back together.

One of the notable solutions being put into practice to combat this problem is New Urbanism, an architectural movement to build new communities (and revitalize existing ones) by maximizing opportunities for social exchange: public plazas, front porches, corner stores, coffee shops, neighborhood schools, narrow streets and, yes, sidewalks.

But while New Urbanism is making strides at the level of the neighborhood, we still spend most of our time at home, which today means seeing no one other than our nuclear family. How could we widen that circle just a bit, to include the good neighbors with whom we share more than a property line?

That’s an idea Seattle-area architect Ross Chapin has explored for many years, and now showcases in an inspiring and beautiful new book: Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating a Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World.

He believes that groupings of four to twelve households make an ideal community “where meaningful ‘neighborly’ relationships are fostered.” But even here, design shapes our destiny. Chapin explains that strong connections between neighbors develop most fully and organically when everyone shares some “common ground.”

That can be a semi-private square, as in the pocket neighborhoods Chapin designed in the Seattle area. In the book’s bright photographs, they look like grassy patches of paradise, where kids scamper, flowers bloom, and neighbors stop to chat.

via How to Design a Neighborhood for Happiness by Jay Walljasper.

iPhone, kith/kin:  Edward will be so happy.

Since the initial announcement of the iPhone 4, many users have been clenching onto the opportunity of purchasing the elusive white variant. Plagued by manufacturing challenges such as peeling paint and bleeding of light, Apple has apparently managed to remedy those causes. According to Bloomberg, multiple sources have gleaned information that point to a release within the coming weeks for both carriers. Stay tuned for more information

via Rumor: White iPhone 4 Coming Soon | Hypebeast.

places, great stories, Greenbriar:  One of my favorite places is the Greenbriar.  I hope it gets its 5th star back!

The story since then, of how a coal miner returned the legendary resort to near-profitability in 18 months, with record occupancy rates, a PGA golf tournament and a glitzy casino, is partly a story about daring, financial risk and business vision. But mostly, it’s a story about one man and the little postage stamp of America he calls home.

“I knew I just couldn’t mess this up,” Justice mused one day in his office, with a gesture to the hotel. “I mean, the employees know where I live.”

The Greenbrier has been everything to the rural area since the resort’s mineral springs began drawing the well-heeled and socially connected before the Civil War. It employs about 1,850 in a county of 35,000. Everybody has a family member who works there or has dinner with someone who does.

But the grand dame lost her prestigious fifth star from the Mobil Travel Guide in 2000, and not even $50 million in upgrades by the hotel’s longtime owner, CSX Corp., could keep a slow decline from turning into a death spiral.

By 2009, the place was losing nearly $1 million per week. Half of the staff, about 600 workers, was laid off. It was declared bankrupt. There were nights when as few as 40 guests roamed the vast hallways, the ballrooms, the chandeliered restaurants. West Virginia’s then-governor and now U.S. senator Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) was so desperate to save the state’s “marquee attraction” that he called Donald Trump and asked the real-estate mogul to take it on.

Ah, no, said the Donald.

There was only one offer to keep the hotel alive. It required CSX to lend Marriott $50 million to take it over – against a sale for as much as seven years down the line that might net CSX as little as $60 million. The future was diminishment or dismemberment on the auction block.

via Reaching for the stars: W.Va. billionaire Jim Justice’s mission to restore the Greenbrier resort to glory.

art, collage, Romare  Bearden, Charlotte, public parks, public art: An artist worthy of a new park!

It’s no secret that Uptown Charlotte lacks green space, specifically a park where people can  lunch, exercise, or relax. Romare Bearden Park has been planned for over 10 years and due to delays construction hasn’t started. The park will be a full city block located at the corner of S. Church and 3rd St. right in the heart of Uptown Charlotte.  It will be a signature park for Uptown Charlotte.

via Romare Bearden Park in Uptown | CLT Blog.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the 20th century.  His work is currently on display in New York City’s  Michael Rosenfield Gallery to celebrate the centennial of Bearden’s birth. Read a recent article from the NY Times. There is a good biographical post of Bearden’s life on the Romare Bearden Foundation website.

via Romare Bearden Park in Uptown | CLT Blog.

Romare Bearden (1911-88) spent more than 30 years striving to be a great artist, and in the early 1960s, when he took up collage in earnest, he became one. A small exhibition at the Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, organized to celebrate the centennial of Bearden’s birth, delivers this message with unusual clarity. It contains only 21 collages, all superb, in an intimate context that facilitates savoring their every formal twist and narrative turn, not to mention the ingenious mixing of mediums that takes them far beyond collage.

via Romare Bearden at Michael Rosenfeld Gallery – Review – NYTimes.com.

To see a slide show of his work  click here: ‘Romare Bearden Collage’ – Slide Show – NYTimes.com.

random, technology, culture:  So, have you ever stolen a towel?

THIS will not be of any relevance to honest readers of The Economist, of course, but a company in America has come up with a way to stop hotel guests from stealing linens. The radio-frequency identification chips designed by Linen Technology Tracking can be put in towels, sheets and bathrobes to keep track of stock and, more importantly, to ensure their return when light-fingered guests forget their manners.

The market for such items sounds well developed. CNN quoted William Serbin of Linen Technology Tracking saying, “Any given month, [hotels] can lose 5 to 20 percent of towels, sheets and robes.” And the economies to be made from the tags, which will work through 300 washes, also sound rather impressive. One of the three hotels using them is reportedly saving $16,000 a month by reducing the number of pool towels stolen from 4,000—an almost unbelievable 130 a day—to 750.

via Hotel linen: The towel thieves’ comeuppance | The Economist.

random, entertainment, LeBron James:  Serials, like on tv, on YouTube … I guess I knew they were out there, but I never paid any attention.  Episode One of “The LeBrons” Hits YouTube | The Sporting Rave.

technology, culture, law, csr, apps, Apple, Google:  Found this very interesting … and the responses or lack thereof by Apple and Google.

FRIENDS don’t let friends drive drunk. If they can’t take their friend’s keys away, they take their smartphone. Why? The phone may have an app that can help them avoid sobriety checkpoints.

Enlarge This Image

A handful of smartphone apps, like Buzzed, track the locations of sobriety checkpoints so drivers can reroute around them.

Last month, Senators Harry Reid, Charles E. Schumer, Frank R. Lautenberg and Tom Udall asked Apple, Google and Research In Motion, the maker of BlackBerrys, to remove apps from their online stores that help drunken drivers evade sobriety checkpoints.

On March 23, the day after the letter went out, the group said BlackBerry agreed to pull the apps and thanked the group for bringing them to its attention.

Apple and Google? Nothing.

An Apple spokeswoman said the company would not comment. A Google spokesman said the apps did not violate the company’s content policies.

via Apps for Avoiding Sobriety Checkpoints Stir Controversy – NYTimes.com.




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