Posts Tagged ‘resort living

20
Feb
11

2.20.2011 … we’ve seen alot today … north and south …

Egypt Uprising, Middle East Unrest, Bahrain, military might:

There comes a moment in the life of almost every repressive regime when leaders — and the military forces that have long kept them in power — must make a choice from which there is usually no turning back: Change or start shooting.

The Legacy of 18 Days in Tahrir Square (February 20, 2011)

Egypt’s military, calculating that it was no longer worth defending an 82-year-old, out-of-touch pharaoh with no palatable successor and no convincing plan for Egypt’s future, ultimately sided with the protesters on the street, at least for Act 1.

In so doing, they ignored the advice of the Saudis, who, in calls to Washington, said that President Hosni Mubarak should open fire if that’s what it took, and that Americans should just stop talking about “universal rights” and back him.

As the contagion of democracy protests spread in the Arab world last week, Bahrain’s far less disciplined forces decided, in effect, that the Saudis, who are their next-door neighbors, were right. They drew two lessons from Egypt: If President Obama calls, hang up. And open fire early.

via When Armies Decide an Uprising’s Fate – NYTimes.com.

Jane Austen: 🙂

In this book, Rachel M. Brownstein considers Jane Austen as heroine, moralist, satirist, romantic, woman, and author, along with the changing notions of these categories over time and texts. She finds echoes of many of Austen’s insights and techniques in contemporary Jane-o-mania, a commercially driven, erotically charged popular vogue that aims to preserve and liberate, correct and collaborate with old Jane. Brownstein’s brilliant discussion of the distinctiveness and distinction of the novelist’s genius clarifies the reasons why we read Jane Austen—or why we should read her—and reorients the prevailing view of her work. Reclaiming the rich comedy of Austen while building a new narrative of authorship, Brownstein unpacks the novelist’s fascinating entanglement with her readers and admirers.

via Why Jane Austen?.

Harry Potter, parenting:  Since the HP books and movies were such a big part of my kids childhood, I loved looking back on these images of Harry, Hermione and Ron as they grew up in the movie versions.

http://www.instyle.com/instyle/package/general/photos/0,,20164501_20440996_20873748,00.html.

culture:  Very interesting perspective …

The paper posits a triangle, with the family, the individual, and the state in the corners, and argues that the Nordic countries prioritise a different dynamic than Germany or the United States. As Bagehot summarises:

Americans favour a Family-Individual axis, this suggests, suspecting the state as a threat to liberty. Germans revere an axis connecting the family and the state, with a smaller role for individual autonomy. In the Nordic countries, they argue, the state and the individual form the dominant alliance. The paper cited, by the way, is entitled: “Pippi Longstocking: The Autonomous Child and the Moral Logic of the Swedish Welfare State”. It hails Pippi (the strongest girl in the world and an anarchic individualist who lives without parents in her own house, with only a monkey, horse, a bag of gold and a strong moral compass for company) as a Nordic archetype.

This framework provides a way to think about how Americans think about the state. My colleague notes below that America has an exceptionally small government, and that the reasons may be historical, cultural, or institutional, or all of the above, and that the causal connections reinforcing the small-state approach would be difficult to untangle. Whatever the causes of America’s underlying moral logic, though, it’s interesting to think how this plays out today. It makes sense that if America posits a strong family-individual axis—as a hedge in the absence of state support, if not in opposition to it—that Americans would be more preoccupied with issues that pertain to individuals and the family, and would drag those issues into the political realm. (This new bill from South Dakota, however, which would make it a “justifiable homicide” if you kill someone to prevent them from killing a fetus, is taking it rather far.)

via Family and the state: The underlying moral logic | The Economist.

gift ideas, whiskey:  We have a few single malt lovers in my family!

Anyone can drink and enjoy booze, but if you really want to know about a certain type of liquor, you’re gonna need to try more than what you’ll find at the local state store.

via 101 Whiskies to Try Before You Die | Uncrate.

random, resort living:  Wouldn’t that be fun instead of a golf cart!

Inspired by Audi’s classic racers and based on a limited-edition pedal car model, the rear wheel-drive Type C is powered by a small electric motor and a lithium-ion battery that propels one human — up to 5′ 11″ — at speeds of up to 18 mph, and as far as 15 miles. Sure, it’s not a speedster by any means, but it’s a much sportier way to get around the island than that golf cart you’ve been driving.

via Audi Auto Union Type C E-Tron Study | Uncrate.

NBA basketball:

But the fact is that Griffin jumped over a car and dunked an ally-op thrown from a sunroof; McGee dunked three balls on a single jump; Serge Ibaka dunked after snatching a stuffed animal from the basket with his teeth. These are not meaningful feats, but they are impressive nonetheless. Griffin admitted afterward that he worried about meeting the astronomical expectations. Just think what they will be like next year.

via Once again, Clippers rookie Blake Griffin dunks over high expectations – Lee Jenkins – SI.com.

random, history, WWI: You go girl!

Florence Green, from King’s Lynn, Norfolk, was 17 years old when she joined the Women’s Royal Air Force, in the late summer of 1918. Come the 11th day of the 11th month, she was working as a waitress at RAF Marham, when the pilots greeted news of the German surrender by clambering into their planes and bombing nearby RAF Narborough airfield with bags of flour. Narborough, not to be outdone, retaliated with their own daring raid, this time dropping bags of soot.

Yesterday the Air Force marked Mrs Green’s birthday with the delivery of a rather more traditional nature: a cake. At 110, Mrs Green joins a highly exclusive club of “supercentenarians” – only around one in 1,000 of those with a letter from the Queen on the mantelpiece push on to this next landmark.

via Florence, the last Great War veteran in Britain, turns 110 – News, People – The Independent.

green, bicycles, London:  I still have never been able to rent a bike …

Two-thirds of London’s “Boris bikes” have had to undergo repairs in their first six months of operation, new figures on the state of the capital’s fleet of cycles for hire have revealed.

Transport for London (TfL) has disclosed that their repair teams are being called out to fix the rental bikes at the rate of more than 30 every day of the week, as the strain of millions of journeys takes its toll.

via Two-thirds of London’s Boris bikes need repairs – Home News, UK – The Independent.




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