Posts Tagged ‘sermons

14
Apr
13

4.14.13 … random stuff … Megabus ride … You never know who you will meet …

MegaBus:  You never know who you will meet.  We had a spirited conversation about politics and education.

Nathaniel White Jr. graduated from Duke and went on to become director of the Public Health Sciences Institute at Morehouse College.

via Duke University to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Its Racial Integration : The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education.

Downton Abbey Season 4, spoilers, Wetpaint:  S I’m missing DA

We’ve already read that she’ll be getting a new boyfriend. But, thankfully, we shouldn’t expect more major character deaths. “We don’t want it turning into Midsomer Murders, where they live in the same village and 450 people get murdered,” Julian laughed. So no other actors are allowed to suddenly leave the show!

via Downton Abbey Season 4 Spoilers Roundup: Who’s Coming, Who’s Going, What’s Next? – Wetpaint.

sermons, education, teaching:  Very interesting …

 Discipleship. Our generation may be drowning in ideas, but we’re starving for real human contact.

The problem is, our churches are structured to deliver sermons and music. If there’s any energy left, we disciple people.

What if we could turn that around? What if there were a way of organizing believers around a weekly discipleship experience, instead of a weekly lecture-and-singalong?

Universities are doing it. They’re moving lectures to the web, and turning classroom time into small group and individual “discipleship.”

Funny. That’s exactly what the early church was like. Sermons were for nonbelievers, but the church was essentially a small group discipleship experience. Perhaps it’s time to experiment once again with this ancient strain of church planting, less reliant on a weekly sermon, and more dependent on believers spurring one another on toward good works.

via Are sermons becoming obsolete?.

Thunderclap, Twitter, Facebook, AllThingsD:  

 To do that, they’re using Thunderclap, a startup designed solely to promote mass social media messaging. It works by getting Twitter and Facebook users to essentially hand over control of their feeds in order to broadcast a single message, at a given time, for a specific campaign.

via Laurene Jobs Uses Thunderclap to Push Issue on Twitter, Facebook – Peter Kafka – Social – AllThingsD.

Tiger Woods, Vanity Fair: Article is very good, if you can get past the scintillating parts.

Earl was always convinced that this child would achieve greatness. When the boy was less than a year old, Earl gave him a golf club. At the age of 2, Tiger putted with Bob Hope on The Mike Douglas Show, at 5 he appeared on That’s Incredible!, at 13 he received his first recruitment letter from Stanford University, and by the time he was 14 he had won five Junior World Championship titles. His dad was always at his side.

“My heart fills with so much joy when I realize that this young man is going to be able to help so many people,” Earl told an audience at an awards dinner to honor his son as America’s outstanding college golfer of 1996, just before Tiger reached 21 and turned pro. “He will transcend this game and bring to the world a humanitarianism which has never been known before. The world will be a better place to live in by virtue of his existence and his presence. I acknowledge only a small part in that, in that I know that I was personally selected by God Himself to nurture this young man and bring him to the point where he can make his contribution to humanity.”

Earl Woods told Sports Illustrated’s Gary Smith, “Tiger will do more than any other man in history to change the course of humanity.” Anyone?, Smith asked. More than Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Arthur Ashe, Mandela, Gandhi, Buddha? “Yes,” Earl answered.

‘Hello, world,” Tiger announced at a press conference when he turned pro, in 1996. That year brought the first major endorsement deal of his career: $40 million over five years from Nike. There is a pivotal, untold story from that time, and to hear it I have to find Woods’s early adviser, a pioneering African-American attorney named John Merchant, who had known him since the early 90s. We have dinner in a dimly lit restaurant in Bridgeport, Connecticut, where Merchant, now 77, loudly and emotionally laments the fall of not only a sports superstar but also a universal symbol of hope. “This is worse than one of Shakespeare’s tragedies,” he says.

It’s the result of ignorance and greed, Merchant declares, and it all began when IMG, founded in 1960 by the agent Mark McCormack and the golf legend Arnold Palmer, entered the picture. In the mid-1990s, an agent named Hughes Norton spoke with Merchant, hoping to negotiate a deal. “Just out of curiosity, for a person of this stature, what kind of commission does IMG get?,” Merchant says he asked Norton. “And he said, ‘Our regular commission is 25 percent.’ And I said, ‘Hughes, you don’t know me and I don’t know you. But I bet you a dollar that you know something about American history, don’t you? Well, Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves, and I’m not about to let you or IMG make a slave out of this young man. Twenty-five percent is ridiculous.”

via The Temptation of Tiger Woods | Vanity Fair.

quotes, Twitter:  I’ll have t.o remember this one next time I go through a breakup with a young person

“@efasheefaa: Dont kill yourself over a boy, hell bring another girl to your funeral.”

via 7 Twitter.

greenhouse, greenhouse kit, backyard:  Really like this greenhouse … It’s made from a kit!

Plus, isn’t it a lovely idea to nurture creativity inside a structure designed to nurture plants? While weight and price were practical considerations, Vendrolini says the warmth of a greenhouse also appealed to him.

via See how an inventive work-from-home designer made an office from a greenhouse, for some inspired thinking in the backyard.

Phillips Academy Andover Election, culture, Christina Huffington: Unlikeable?  Really?  Another, I thought we had moved beyond that…

Girls — and later women — decide not to run for office because they don’t want to be unlikeable, not because they are lacking leadership qualities. We often hear that the more successful a woman is, the less likable she becomes. Let’s try to change that.

via Christina Huffington: Andover Election: The Girls Are Not All Right.

Smash,  tv, Marilyn Monroe, Speakeasy – WSJ:  Always the case … just when I start likeing a show, it gets cancelled, or at least probably cnaceled.

The fledgling Broadway show “Bombshell,” about Marilyn Monroe, holds a dress rehearsal for invited guests, and among the technical problems is a costumemalfunction that leaves lead actress Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty) naked at the end of a scene with the actor playing President John F. Kennedy.

The positive audience reaction–and jump in ticket sales–prompts producer Eileen Rand (Anjelica Huston), director and composer Tom Levitt (Christian Borle), and book writer and lyricist Julia Houston (Debra Messing) to ask Ivy to keep the nudity in the show. She wants time to think it over.

via ‘Smash’ Recap: Naked Truth about Marilyn Monroe – Speakeasy – WSJ.

The Bible: Miniseries, Mark Burnett, Roma Downey,  Satan-Obama Controversy:  Would they really do that?

Downey hadn’t expected public discussion about “The Bible” series to center on Satan at all; rather, she’d expected people to be talking about Jesus. “The night before that [Satan-Obama controversy] broke in the news, Jesus had made his first appearance on the screen,” she tells Oprah in the clip. “And I was so looking forward to [the next day], knowing that Jesus would be on the lips of everyone… For Satan to be the point of conversation was really heartbreaking.”

In the clip, Downey also points out that “The Bible” had been screened prior to airing on the History Channel and that no one had mentioned Satan’s resemblance to Obama — a resemblance, Downey says, that was completely unintentional. “We love the president,” she says. “We have nothing but respect for the president. We felt somehow hijacked.”

Burnett says that when you work on highly publicized projects as he and Downey did with “The Bible,” criticism comes with the territory. “It’s a free country,” he says. “And you’ve got to accept that.”

via ‘The Bible’: Miniseries Producers Mark Burnett, Roma Downey Respond To Satan-Obama Controversy (VIDEO).

Princeton Man, marriage market,  MRS. degree,  gender equality, WSJ.com:  Worth reading …

 Finally, at a time when women outrank men in education and income, it no longer makes economic sense for a woman to marry up in terms of education. The most economically productive marriages for professional women are ones in which husbands are freer to care for the needs of the family while the women focus on their lucrative careers.

In her letter to Princeton women, Ms. Patton acknowledges that these young women could delay marriage and “choose to marry a man who has other things to recommend him besides a soaring intellect.” On this point, she is right. In fact, economic theory predicts that this is exactly the decision that many Princeton women will make—not because they have to but because they can.

via Why Settle for a Princeton Man? The Marriage Market – WSJ.com.

14
Sep
11

9.14.2011 … anticipating the cooler weather … but not for 2 more days!

 Moses, 9/11, sermons, Marthame Sanders: Did not know where he was going here … Nice sermon, Marthame. “Today, I simply want to talk about the wilderness as a place framed by two simple truths: we are never above God’s judgment; and we are never beneath God’s grace.”

These are the stories we long for, where the line between good and evil is clearly marked, where the good triumph, and the evil perish. The good guys get away, and the bad guys are punished. And there is no doubt in our minds that it should be any other way.

How often does life end up being this cut-and-dried?

If we’re not careful, we might chalk this up to a distinction between fact and fantasy: life is tough, full of challenges; the Bible, on the other hand, sure is a nice idea…But when we see things this way, it means we have forgotten the rest of this story: the 400 years of enslavement that came before, and the 40 years of desert wandering that follows.

It’s this last piece which is the focus of our sermon series which begins today, this time in the wilderness. For the Israelites, it was almost like an experiential sorbet of sorts. The slavery of Egypt eventually became a thing of the past, and the land of promise lay just out of reach.

Forty years was enough time for two generations to pass away and two more to come along, meaning that the number of those who experienced both slavery and promise were few, if any. Not even the age-defying Moses got that pleasure, dying on a mountain overlooking where the people were headed.

But what does this Exodus story teach us? As a community of faith, as individuals struggling with what it means to be faithful, how can we connect? We may not be on a physical journey; but is there something that we can learn from this lesson about our own spiritual path and where we find ourselves on it?

Today, I simply want to talk about the wilderness as a place framed by two simple truths: we are never above God’s judgment; and we are never beneath God’s grace.

For some, 9/11 was a day that clarified our call as the most righteous of nations; for others, it was evidence that we are accursed and have strayed from God’s desires. The truth, unfortunately, is not so simple.

I do not believe that God caused or allowed the terrorist attacks, as some would claim. Nor do I believe that God gave us a righteous, holy mission as a result, either, as others would try to convince us. My faith convinces me that God’s mission that day was as God of courageous rescue and as God of the broken heart. And my faith also convinces me that, ten years on, God’s mission for us is still one of courage and compassion.

We all have our own memories. Elizabeth and I were living in a Palestinian village in the northern West Bank. But though we were a world away, we became aware of the attacks probably like many of you did. My mother-in-law called and told us to turn on CNN to see what was happening.

We watched in horror, worried about friends and family living in New York, working in the financial sector. We heard about the attack on the Pentagon and that there were several planes that were unaccounted for, one crashing in a Pennsylvania field. I remember an overwhelming feeling of dread, convinced that there was much more to come, and yet unable to pull away from the lure of the screen.

What was unique about our situation was location, location, location. In the simplified worldview that quickly developed in some corners, we found ourselves on the “wrong side”, and in “enemy territory”. We were Western American Christians living in an Arab Palestinian Muslim majority. But here’s the thing: we never once felt unsafe.

Friends and co-workers, Muslim and Christian alike, came by to offer their condolences. They, too, were concerned that we might have had family at Ground Zero. And they worried that we might begin to see all Arabs, all Muslims, all non-Westerners in a harsh light.

I’m convinced, regardless of location, that we can all learn something from the story of Red Sea partings. This is one of those clear cases where God has chosen sides, favoring the Israelites and disdaining the Egyptians. And yet, notice what the Israelites don’t do, at least not right away: they don’t celebrate. Their reaction to what has happened is not self-righteousness, but, as various translations put it, “awe”; “fear”. It is as though they have seen the mighty power of God and stand before it with mouths agape. They recognize that they have just been the beneficiaries of God’s direct intervention; but they also seem to recognize that this fearsome power could be turned against them.

We are never above God’s judgment.

And what about the Egyptians? Getting to the rest of their story is a bit more complex, since much of the stories of the Hebrew Bible are written with a nationalist lens, with warring between ancient Israel and ancient Egypt. But the most consistent Biblical image of Egypt is not that of slavery and Pharaoh; it is as a place of refuge. Both Abraham and Joseph’s brothers had fled there, seeking – and finding – respite. And as the infant Jesus was threatened with King Herod’s slaughter of the innocents, his parents wisely fled to Egypt where they found safety until Herod was dead and gone.

We are never beneath God’s grace.

via opc blog » Blog Archive » Parting Company.

Goddard College, alternative education, innovation:

Someone like Rod Crossman, at his stage in life and with his professional success, doesn’t often seek a way to reinvent himself. Yet Mr. Crossman—a painter, an assistant professor, and an artist in residence at Indiana Wesleyan University—felt that he was merely churning out pretty work to hang on gallery walls, increasingly feeling a schism between where his career had taken him and where his passion was telling him to go.

“My art practice had become marooned in the place where it was not connected to the world,” he says. “There were issues that my students were facing, and I didn’t think I had the tools to help them navigate those problems. Some of the issues they were facing were just the challenges of the world that we live in.” He wanted an interdisciplinary M.F.A. to reinvigorate his work at Indiana Wesleyan, where he has taught for 30 years.

He found a tiny college in rural Vermont that has blown itself up and emerged anew time and again: Goddard College. The birthplace of some important academic innovations, it has long bucked traditional notions of higher education and, like many experimental colleges, flirted with financial ruin. Its latest transformation may be its most remarkable: Reaching a nadir in its financial health in the early 2000s, it did what many colleges would consider unthinkable. The college shut down its storied, core residential program and adopted its low-residency adult program as its sole campus offering. It has since re-emerged with 10-year accreditation, the highest number of students in decades, money to spend on refurbishing its campus, a new campus in Port Townsend, Wash., and plans to expand its programs to other cities across the country. One administrator put the college’s turnaround in perspective: Today, Goddard is getting a $2-million loan to build a biomass plant, but 10 years ago the college couldn’t have gotten a car loan.

Innovation is the buzzword of higher education these days. People talk about leveraging technology and scaling up, about treating faculty members like hired guns, and about adopting industrial models to bring down costs and ramp up “production.” All of it in a bid to offer more college degrees—more cheaply, more quickly, and some worry, of a lower quality.

None of that is happening here. Goddard faculty members, who do not have tenure but are unionized, seem fiercely devoted to the college. Students say their open-ended studies are among the most rigorous they have ever experienced. And Goddard’s president, Barbara Vacarr, is downright heretical when asked how higher education can scale up and give more Americans college degrees.

via Goddard College’s Unconventional Path to Survival – Administration – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Sarah Palin,Doonesbury, political cartoons, 2012 Presidential Election:  If it makes people talk, yes, provided ….

Today’s Sarah Palin/Glen Rice ‘DOONESBURY’ strip: Would you run it? [POLL]

via Today’s Sarah Palin/Glen Rice ‘DOONESBURY’ strip: Would you run it? [POLL] – Comic Riffs – The Washington Post.

Missoni for Target, marketing, fashion, kith/kin:  I have to laugh.  This stuff looks like the crocheted afghans my grandmother made using up old yarn … awful color combinations …

Missoni for Target

Having trouble purchasing Missoni for Target? You’re not alone! After the 400-piece collection finally made its way to Target.comrecord-breaking crowds crashed the siteBut good news—not everything is sold out! As of this posting, there are still quite a few womens’ looks,lingeriekids’ clothes and hair accessories to go around. As for home goods, check back with the site and your local Target store—the retailer isslated to get periodic shipments of Missoni styles through October 22nd. Good luck!

apps, NPR, WFAE, Charlotte:  My local NPR station will have an app!

WFAE App for iPhone and Android

The free WFAE App allows you to listen to all three WFAE live streams, plus pause and rewind the live audio. You can also explore On Demand content, search for your favorite stories, and even bookmark a story for later.

via WFAE 90.7 FM.

The South, Southern culture:  “Well, Ma’am, I wasn’t born in the South, but I got here quick as I could.” She backed off only slightly, then muttered as she walked away, “Well, you did the best you could.”

I mentioned the table, especially the beauty of the columns, and inquired about their origin. Immediately, our hostess, the epitome of style, charm, and grace all evening long, turned bitter and sour and full of rancor. I would soon discover why.

She menacingly turned toward me, and with her face tightened down like a vice, said, “That’s all that’s left after they came and burned the courthouse down.” Then her eyes got even bigger. Sensing a foreigner in her midst, in a very cold and accusatory voice she said, “By the way Will, where are you from?”

I said a fast prayer. I needed a save, right here, right now. My prayer was granted. I took a breath and casually replied, “Well, Ma’am, I wasn’t born in the South, but I got here quick as I could.” She backed off only slightly, then muttered as she walked away, “Well, you did the best you could.”

via Southern Traditions: More Than Biscuits & Grits by Will Nelson | LikeTheDew.com.

2012 Presidential Election, journalism, media:  I enjoyed this … noticeable to anyone … I do not like my “news” telling me who to vote for.

LET’S START WITH the long shots. No Republican makes Fox squirm like Ron Paul. The network’s pundits and personalities were obviously defensive about accusations that they had neglected the Iowa Straw Poll’s runner-up. (An easy explanation for their discomfort: Paul acolytes are rabid Fox News viewers.) Neil Cavuto, the host of “Your World,” paused during an interview with Paul to note that he had appeared on his show 28 times since the 2008 election. “You could practically be my co-anchor,” Cavuto gushed. “I wanted to let your people know that we love having you on.”

Meanwhile, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum were each granted a single, respectful, prime-time interview and were otherwise mercifully left on the cutting-room floor. Herman Cain was invited on Sean Hannity’s show solely to refute comedian Janeane Garofalo’s absurd claim that he was running only to protect the GOP from charges of racism.

Jon Huntsman might welcome this sort of benign neglect. Cavuto began a Huntsman interview by highlighting his microscopic poll ratings and grilling him about his call for “shared sacrifice.” “A lot of Tea Partiers read that, sir, to say, well, maybe they should pay more in taxes,” Cavuto said accusingly. And what Fox commentators had to say about Huntsman behind his back was worse. To Michelle Malkin, a Huntsman profile in a glossy women’s magazine provided evidence of his liberal leanings. Appearing on the midday show “America Live,” she snapped, “The only [Republicans] that these liberal media people think are smart [are] the ones who are trashing conservatives and getting their pictures taken in Vogue magazine by”—she hissed—“Annie Leibovitz.”

When I began this undertaking, I was braced for a bacchanalia of Michele Bachmann coverage. Less than two weeks earlier, she had been the toast of conservatives after winning the Iowa Straw Poll. But I had failed to appreciate just how quickly the enthusiasms of Fox News would shift. Without a major gaffe or gotcha moment, Bachmann was almost entirely absent, like a Red Army general excised from the Great Soviet Encyclopedia after being purged by Joseph Stalin. She was almost never pictured on screen, even though she was on a four-day campaign swing through Florida. When her name came up, it was usually coupled with a glib dismissal of her chances.

Still, it wasn’t hard to infer where the preferences of most Fox personalities lie. Late-night Fox host Greg Gutfeld offered the most memorable summary on “The Five.” “Mitt Romney is like somebody you hook up with periodically until you get serious and you want to meet somebody serious,” he said. “He [is] friends with benefits. And Perry is marriage material.” Yikes.

via The Idiot Box | The New Republic.

science, teaching, YouTube:  These are great!

 minutephysics’s Channel – YouTube.

education, poverty, Purpose Built Communities, East Lake, Atlanta GA: Great article about a great organization!

Residents of Atlanta’s redeveloped East Lake community say the history of their neighborhood is a real-life Cinderella story.

East Lake, once known as “Little Vietnam” to the local police because of its sky-high crime rates, is now a paradigm of community revitalization that serves as a national model for Purpose Built Communities, a consulting group on neighborhood turnarounds that is gaining traction, primarily across the Southeast. Now in East Lake, mixed-income housing is woven between shops, local eateries, schools, a family center, a YMCA, and two golf courses.

Purpose Built Communities, based in Atlanta, grew organically out of the undertaking of East Lake’s revitalization. The nonprofit organization, now officially in its third year, is financed by three philanthropists: Tom Cousins, an Atlanta real estate developer; Julian Robertson, founder of the now-defunct Wall Street hedge fund Tiger Management Corp.; and Warren Buffett, the well-known chairman and chief executive officer of the Berkshire Hathaway corporate holding company.

The group targets communities seemingly locked in a cycle of endless poverty and works with local leaders to reverse a tradition of welfare, joblessness, and nominal education. Now established in six states, the group keeps the advancement of education at the core of its mission with each community it enters and stresses the involvement of local partners, such as universities, banks, and community centers, to help improve local housing, transportation, education, and employment options in its turnaround efforts.

Though the group is not as well known as the Harlem Children’s Zone project, which attempts to transform communities by enveloping families in a net of social and educational services, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan cited the Purpose Built Communities model in a 2009 keynote speech. He said East Lake and the Harlem Children’s Zone are “crafting similar solutions to the problems of concentrated poverty.”

via Education Week: A Community Approach Helps Transform Atlanta Neighborhood.

“Toddlers & Tiaras”, TLC, tv, over the top:  A three-year old dresses up as the prostitute in Pretty Woman … Has child services been called in … no she wins the pageant.

Last week, a little girl on TLC’s child pageant show, “Toddlers & Tiaras,” donned fake breasts and butt to dress up like Dolly Parton. It seemed pretty inappropriate. But surely it couldn’t get any worse than that. Right?

Enter a 3-year-old dressed up like a fictional prostitute.

Paisley (the show uses only first names) competes in an outfit that Julia Roberts’s character wears in the film “Pretty Woman.” No, not the reformed Vivian Ward who goes to Rodeo Drive and buys some nice dresses and lives happily ever after. The streetwalking version complete with black boots, a mini skirt and a blonde wig.

To be fair, one of the other mothers tells the camera she would “never ever do that to [her] little girl.” So it’s not like there was a gas leak and everyone had lost their minds.

Suddenly, dressing your kid up like Dolly Parton seems reasonable. This episode of “T&T” airs tonight on TLC. Watch the clip below.

via ‘Toddlers & Tiaras’ contestant dresses as ‘Pretty Woman’ prostitute – Celebritology 2.0 – The Washington Post.

blogging, WordPress: Thanks WordPress, good to know … 🙂

You used a total of 118 categories and tags. We suggest using 10 or fewer.

via ‹ Dennard’s Clipping Service — WordPress.

Walter Bonatti, mountaineering, RIP:

“The K2 story was a big thorn in his heart,” Ms. Podestà, 77, said in a telephone interview on Thursday while she and family members were taking Mr. Bonatti’s body from Rome to their home in Dubino, a village north of his birthplace, Bergamo, in northern Italy. “He could not believe that, even after all those many years, nobody had apologized or acknowledged the truth. This falseness has left a mark in his life.”

Mr. Bonatti became known as an angry loner who shied away from the bigger expeditions to take on new routes and new peaks his own way, sometimes at great risk.

“Bonatti was just a boy from Bergamo who in a very few years became the best climber in the world,” the mountaineer Reinhold Messner told the Italian newspaper La Repubblica on Thursday. Mr. Bonatti, he added, had been envied around the world because he was “too ahead of the curve, too alone, too good.”

David Roberts, a journalist who writes about mountaineering, said of Mr. Bonatti in an interview on Wednesday: “If you had a poll of the greatest mountaineers of all time, he might win it. It is that simple.”

via Walter Bonatti, Daring Italian Mountaineer, Dies at 81 – NYTimes.com.

LOL: Sometimes you just need a stupid joke!

One morning, a grandmother was surprised to find that her 7-year-old grandson had made her coffee. Smiling, she choked down the worst cup of her life. When she finished, she found 3 little green army men at the bottom. Puzzled, she asked “Honey, what are these army men doing in my coffee?” Her grandson answered, Like it says on tv, grandma. “The best part of waking up is soldiers in your cup”




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