Posts Tagged ‘“Solvitur Ambulando”

11
Feb
16

2.11.16 … words, words, words …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2016 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (Walk 2/40), Myers Park Baptist Church – Charlotte:

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It’s another cold day. It’s 31°. However, just like yesterday, it is gloriously sunny.

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(And I love it that this center stone was quarried from the same quarry in France as the stones used to create Chartres Cathedral.)

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and this is what struck me from my morning devotional so …

Words, words, words:

“Still, the word has the power to create. When God speaks, God creates. When God says, “Let there be light” (Genesis 1:3), light is. God speaks light. For God, speaking and creating are the same. It is this creative power of the word we need to reclaim. What we say is very important. When we say, “I love you,” and say it from the heart, we can give another person new life, new hope, new courage. When we say, “I hate you,” we can destroy another person. Let’s watch our words.

How can you use words today to bless someone else?”

Source: http://www.thespiritlife.net/facets/exchanged/63-motivated/motivated-reflection/2757-february-11-devotional-henri-nouwen

So today I will try to keep wonderful joyful words and thoughts in my head and share them …

Sunshine
Chirping
Old dogs
Savory
Smile
Child of God

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Blessings!

2.11.16

29
Jan
14

1.29.14 … “Snow days are our Sabbath days. They bring with them a commandment to pause, to curl up by a fire, stay in your pajamas or go outside and catch a snowflake and marvel at its tiny beauty. Or do nothing … Be Still.” … if I could choose a perfect birthday …

If I could choose a perfect birthday, it would include any combination of the following: time with or hearing from friends and family, snow, early daffodils outside and perfect timing for my forced paperwhites inside (I also love London for my birthday! :))

I am blessed to have some glorious combination every year, and this year has been no exception.  Thank you, family and friends, for making my day perfect!!

So as I went to sleep yesterday, this was my last thought … I can’t wait to check outside tomorrow. It will be magical.

So I had the chance to check at 4:50 am.  Thank you Old Dogs! And the report  … It was a wee bit icy, actually more ice than snow. So after a few minutes … we all agreed: we would be  happier in bed.

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A Gift From Above/Wrapped in White, snow day = Sabbath Day, Be Still, washingtonpost.com:

 One of the first things I discovered  on this snow day!

What a nice way to look at the the world this morning.

Snow days are our Sabbath days. They bring with them a commandment to pause, to curl up by a fire, stay in your pajamas or go outside and catch a snowflake and marvel at its tiny beauty. Or do nothing.

Snow Sabbath days are the kind of days when your mother can actually catch you on your home phone and ask, “Hey, can you talk? What are you doing?”

“And you say, ‘I’m doing nothing’ ” — this time, without exasperation. “How are you, mama? I have nothing to do, so tell me about every single thing that is happening at home.”

And she does.

And you listen as you look out the window and the snow is falling. And you have all the time in the world because the snow has given you permission to have nowhere to go.

Snow days are our Sabbath days. They remind you of the note you came across lying in the snow in Connecticut. The plain paper held down by a single, cold stone beckoned you to go inside the college chapel because, as the note promised, it was the most quiet place in the world. And you went inside because you had a few minutes before you had to rush to catch an airplane. And the silence inside was so thick it commanded you to “Be still.”

And you did.

And the snow, this snow in Washington, reminds you that we have been too much in a hurry, pulled along by our collars, stressing, trying to make the clock slow down, beat the light, “making more and more money, but not getting any peace,” as a friend’s grandmother in Louisiana said. “More and more money and ain’t getting no peace.”

The snow is a bookmark in a loud world. Ordering respite, quiet, poetry.

via A Gift From Above, Wrapped in White (washingtonpost.com).

And with the light of day … Winter magic!!

Photo: Winter magic!!

kith/kin, coffee, cities, urban planning, via Discovering Urbanism,  City: Rediscovering the Center, William Whyte: Great discussion about cities at coffee this morning with wonderful friends. Thanks for the birthday coffee. I think I did read some of his stuff in the 80’s. I would love to have the syllabus for my 1981 economics seminar on urban planning.

Discovering Urbanism: City: Rediscovering the Center

Great discussion about cities at coffee this morning with some very old friends, Davidson friends. Thanks for the birthday coffee. I think I did read some of his stuff in the 80’s. I would love to have the syllabus for my 1981 economics seminar on urban planning.

William Whyte was the foremost empiricist of cities in the 20th century. He sought to turn the planning and design process on its head – to start with detailed observations of how the smallest scale of an urban place is used by people and work outward from there, designing places and writing codes accordingly. City: Rediscovering the Center begins with lessons drawn from sixteen years of meticulously recording plazas, streets, small parks, and marketplaces with time-lapse video and scientifically parsing out the patterns of behavior. Once the basic observations of human nature have been identified, he launches into an evaluation of the health of downtowns in their entirety.

What jumps out right away from Whyte’s study is the attention he pays to the most basic human needs. How does the provision of food impact the life of a place? Where do people use the bathroom? How can one find light on a cool day and shade on a sunny day? In other words, he doesn\’t travel very far up Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, which I find to be a refreshingly humble and practical disposition toward the power of physical space in our lives. He never reaches for transcendence by design; that’s reserved for what happens in these places.

This leads to Whyte’s most important insight of all, one that really underscores each chapter of the book, that is: people want to be around other people. We are inherently social beings. As simple as this insight seems, it actually ran head on against the prevailing notion in planning at the time that people want as much space for themselves as possible. Whyte noticed that not only did friends clump together when sitting in a plaza, but even strangers tended to take seats in reasonable proximity to each other rather than evenly disperse themselves throughout the space. Well-used places were safer, both in perception and reality. People who stopped for conversation on sidewalks would typically not step out of the way, preferring to be in the center of movement. Parks and sidewalks that were outsized for their activity tended to swallow up its life and repel visitors. People like to be crowded, but not too much.

via Discovering Urbanism: City: Rediscovering the Center.

southern winter storms,  2 Inches=traffic nightmare, Atlanta, Atlantic Mobile:  Amazing events in Atlanta …

How much money do you set aside for snowstorms when they’re as infrequent as they are? Who will run the show—the city, the county, or the state? How will preparedness work? You could train everyone today, and then if the next storm hits in 2020, everyone you’ve trained might have moved on to different jobs, with Atlanta having a new mayor and Georgia having a new governor.

Regionalism here is hard. The population of this state has doubled in the past 40-45 years, and many of the older voters who control it still think of it as the way it was when they were growing up. The urban core of Atlanta is a minority participant in a state government controlled by rural and northern Atlanta exurban interests. The state government gives MARTA (Atlanta’s heavy rail transportation system) no money. There’s tough regional and racial history here which is both shameful and a part of the inheritance we all have by being a part of this region. Demographics are evolving quickly, but government moves more slowly. The city in which I live, Brookhaven, was incorporated in 2012. This is its first-ever snowstorm (again, 2 inches). It’s a fairly affluent, mostly white, urban small city. We were unprepared too.

The issue is that you have three layers of government—city, county, state—and none of them really trust the other. And why should they? Cobb County just “stole the Braves” from the city of Atlanta. Why would Atlanta cede transportation authority to a regional body when its history in dealing with the region/state has been to carve up Atlanta with highways and never embrace its transit system? Why would the region/state want to give more authority to Atlanta when many of the people in the region want nothing to do with the city of Atlanta unless it involves getting to work or a Braves game?

The region tried, in a very tough economy and political year (2012), to pass a comprehensive transportation bill, a T-SPLOST, funded by a sales tax. It wasn’t perfect, but it was an attempt to do something. The Sierra Club opposed it because it didn’t feature enough transit. The NAACP opposed it because it didn’t have enough contracts for minority businesses. The tea party opposed it because it was a tax. That’s politics in the 2010’s. You may snicker, but how good a job has any major city done with big transportation projects over the past 30 years?

via How 2 Inches of Snow Created a Traffic Nightmare in Atlanta – Atlantic Mobile.

Emergency Update: APS will ‘shelter in place’ for the remainder of evening 1/28/14:  Just curious: Has this ever happened before?

January 28, 2014 at 11:03 pm Leave a comment

Atlanta Public Schools has called an emergency “shelter in place” for all students and staff who remain in schools due to inclement weather and adverse road conditions. We will continue to transport students who are already enroute on buses, and parents will still be permitted to pick up students. For students who are sheltered in our schools, we will ensure proper security, supervision, and food. District leadership will continue to monitor the weather to provide additional updates as they become available.

The district is contacting all parents of students impacted by this decision.

via Emergency Update: APS will ‘shelter in place’ for the remainder of evening 1/28/14 | Talk Up APS.

And the answer is … yes …

that’s exactly what happened in 1982. My sister (class of 1984) got home, but there were lots of kids who spent days at the school.

Drifting Snow On The Outer Banks, WUNC:

Caption from Twitter: Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse, beautiful even when surrounded by snow. 9:32 a.m. 1/29/14

Caption from Twitter: Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse, beautiful even when surrounded by snow. 9:32 a.m. 1/29/14

via VIDEO: Drifting Snow On The Outer Banks | WUNC.

Bank of America Stadium:  Ice up, son, ice up!

Solvitur ambulando, The Christian Century:  Great article …

It is hard to walk toward some things. We may have dangerous things to face in life: illness, divorce, dementia, death, tragedy of all sorts. We also have wonderful things to face: birth, marriage, graduation, new jobs, new starts. Life after illness; life after divorce. The good news is that we do not walk alone. We have each other: family, friends, coworkers, doctors, therapists, classmates, neighbors. And most of all. we have Jesus—who has already been wherever we are going, and who will walk with us. Solvitur ambulando.

via Solvitur ambulando | The Christian Century.

Artist Simon Beck, intricate snow art:  It is created by walking … for miles!

It’s possible you’ve never heard of Simon Beck, but after today, you won’t be able to forget him or his wintry works of art. Simon is an artist and is most well-known for making incredibly delicate and detailed art in the snow, just by walking over a fresh snowfall. He literally walks miles in the snow to create these pieces. And the part that blows our minds? He could spend hours upon hours creating one design, just to have it be covered by snowfall or blown away by the next day. But he still makes them.

Simon walks over layers of fresh snow in special shoes to create his mind-boggling art.

via Artist Simon Beck Creates Intricate Snow Art by Walking for Miles.

LOL, inclement weather and heavy traffic:

Due to inclement weather and heavy traffic on my street, (see photo) I’m closing the studio early and headed downstairs. Please go back home to your families. There’s not enough hot chocolate for everybody.

lavender labyrinth,  Mt. Shasta:  And I will close with this … one of my favorite birthday greetings! … sending love and lavender from Mt. Shasta …

13
Jun
13

6.14.13 … walking instructions …

Grace Cathedral SF CA, labyrinths. “Solvitur Ambulando”, fyi, bucket list:  OK, this one is on my list.

<td align="right">Photo courtesy of Niall Battson

General Information and Instructions

Walking the Labyrinths at Grace Cathedral

The labyrinth is an archetype, a divine imprint, found in all religious traditions in various forms around the world. By walking a replica of the Chartres labyrinth, laid in the floor of Chartres Cathedral in France around 1220, we are rediscovering a long-forgotten mystical tradition.

The labyrinth has only one path so there are no tricks to it and no dead ends. The path winds throughout and becomes a mirror for where we are in our lives. It touches our sorrows and releases our joys. Walk it with an open mind and an open heart.

Three stages of the walk

Purgation (Releasing) ~ A releasing, a letting go of the details of your life. This is the act of shedding thoughts and distractions. A time to open the heart and quiet the mind.

Illumination (Receiving) ~ When you reach the center, stay there as long as you like. It is a place of meditation and prayer. Receive what is there for you to receive.

Union (Returning) ~ As you leave, following the same path out of the center as you came in, you enter the third stage, which is joining God, your Higher Power, or the healing forces at work in the world. Each time you walk the labyrinth you become more empowered to find and do the work for which you feel your soul is reaching.

Guidelines for the walk

Quiet your mind and become aware of your breath. Allow yourself to find the pace your body wants to go. The path is two ways. Those going in will meet those coming out. You may “pass” people or let others step around you. Do what feels natural.

via Grace Cathedral – The Labyrinths of Grace Cathedral.

 

Monthly Candlelight Labyrinth Walks with Music

One Friday evening each month (usually the second Friday), we invite you to walk the labyrinth by candlelight and music and pray for peace in our hearts and peace in the world.

The walk is hosted by our Labyrinth Guild. Each month we feature a different musician and offer an introduction to the labyrinth.  This event is open to all who have an interest in the labyrinth or just wish to experience the cathedral in a way that is seldom possible.

Our next candlelight labyrinth walk is on Friday, June 14, from 6 – 8 p.m. Music will be provided by Musica Divina. Sign up here to be notified about future candlelight labyrinth walks.

via Grace Cathedral – The Labyrinths of Grace Cathedral.

25
Jan
13

1.25.13 … wintry mix …

weather:  wintry mix …

labyrinths, labyrinth walks, “Solvitur Ambulando” :  Wintry mix at the Davidson labyrinth today … But very enjoyable first wintry mix walk! Blessings!

 

NYC, labyrinths, The Labyrinth for Contemplation – Battery Park, YouTube: They actually filmed their walk …

The Labyrinth for Contemplation, Battery Park, New York – YouTube.

Jane Austen, Janeites, Pride and Prejudice 200:

In the last 200 years, Austen’s “darling child” has spawned hundreds of literary offspring, making it one of the most frequently adapted novels in history. The novel, which centers on the rocky romance between the spirited, obstinate protagonist Elizabeth Bennet and the proud, taciturn aristocrat Fitzwilliam Darcy, has been through countless parodies, film, TV, stage and Web adaptations and erotic retellings. It has been reimagined as a comic book, a board book for toddlers, mashed up with zombies and remade as a Bollywood musical. Austen acolytes have published hundreds of literary reboots.

Austen wrote anonymously, and died, unmarried, in her creative prime, leaving just six complete novels behind. But from this narrow canon, a vast industry took shape, and today her brand has become more marketable than ever.

In celebration of the 200th anniversary of ‘Pride and Prejudice,’ a homage to the illustrious author, Jane Austen.

Now the field’s about to get much more crowded. To mark the 200th anniversary of “Pride and Prejudice” this year, novelists, scholars, biographers and filmmakers are releasing a flood of new homages and critical studies to cash in on the seemingly bottomless appetite for all things Austen. More than a dozen books about the author will hit bookstores in coming months, including a new biography, a book that explores her cult status, two studies of Austen-era England and two books about Austen and economics.

“Austen really is inexhaustible,” says Claudia Johnson, a Princeton University English professor and author of the 2012 book “Jane Austen’s Cults and Cultures.” “Each generation tends to think they have discovered her.”

But for die-hard fans like Sandy Lerner, co-founder of Cisco Systems and founder of Urban Decay cosmetics, there will never be enough. Ms. Lerner discovered Austen in college in the 1980s. She has read “Pride and Prejudice” well over 100 times, and “Persuasion” more than 200 times.

When Cisco went public in 1990, Ms. Lerner used part of her fortune to buy Jane Austen’s brother’s estate in Chawton, England. She founded a library there and created her own publishing house, Chawton House Press, an imprint dedicated to publishing books about Austen and other 18th- and 19th-century English women writers.

Chawton House’s first title, released in 2011, was “Second Impressions,” a sequel to “Pride and Prejudice,” which follows Elizabeth and Darcy on a trip through Europe 10 years after their wedding. Ms. Lerner, who wrote it under the pen name Ava Farmer, spent 26 years researching the book. But she still feels the weight of her predecessor.

“I tried really hard, but I read some sentence she wrote, and it’s so much better than mine, it’s crushing,” Ms. Lerner said.

via Austen Power – WSJ.com.

As anyone who’s ever debated the finer points of Colin Firth vs. Laurence Olivier as Mr. Darcy will tell you, women have a bottomless appetite for the small oeuvre of Jane Austen. Every generation gets the Pride and Prejudice adaptation it deserves, each version performs well and reliably reignites sales of her books. She’s backlash-proof. Now the 200th anniversary of Pride and Prejudice is upon us, and the Wall Street Journal reports that a whole new cast of publishers and producers are lining up to cash in.

Universities are reportedly closing doors to Austen scholars, but Austen mania, and its direct descendants, Twilight mania and Fifty Shades mania, continues to prop up some corners of the dejected publishing industry. First, there are the cross-genre spin-off books: Death Comes to Pemberley (murder-mystery), Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (gore-parody), and Mr. Darcy Takes a Wife (erotic). Then there are the nonfiction homages — What Matters in Jane Austen? Twenty Crucial Puzzles Solved, Jane Austen: Game Theorist, and Jane Austen’s Guide to Thrift — all due this year. HarperFiction has commissioned remakes of all of her novels by well-known writers, including Prep author Curtis Sittenfeld.

via Women Will Buy Basically Anything Related to Jane Austen – The Cut.

Sundance Film Festival, “Smashed”, Speakeasy – WSJ:

Last year at the Sundance Film Festival, James Ponsoldt’s second film, “Smashed”—about a couple struggling with alcoholism—won the Special Jury Prize and got picked up by Sony Pictures Classics. This year, Ponsoldt returned to the U.S. dramatic competition with “The Spectacular Now,” a coming-of-age drama starring Shailene Woodley “The Descendents” and breakout star Miles Teller, who won raves for his portrayal of an alcoholic teen.“When I saw his audition I thought he has that John Cusack thing mixed with Elvis mixed with Bill Murray,” says producer Andrew Lauren following a Tuesday screening of the movie.The film’s plot, adapted from Tim Tharp’s novel by Scott Neustadter and Michael Weber “500 Days of Summer” centers around Teller’s character, Sutter Keely, a charismatic but often drunk high-school senior—the actor described him as a “sad clown” in a Q&A session—who falls in love with Woodley’s Amy, a brainy type with problems of her own. The film garnered positive reviews: The Daily Beast called it “one of the most poignant and gratifying films of this year’s Sundance” Critics drew comparisons to 1980’s John Hughes films, Cameron Crowe’s classic “Say Anything,” as well as last year’s teen hit, “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.””We never looked at [“Perks”] as our model,” says Mr. Lauren, who financed the film for under $5 million, less than a third of the budget of “Perks,” which starred Emma Watson and brought in nearly $30 million globally at the box office. “Hopefully we can have that kind of success.”The film, which was made for an “under $5 million” budget, was among the first features to sell following strong interest from multiple distributors. A24, a new multiplatform player announced that it bought the North American rights to the film on Monday, and has plans to release the movie theatrically this summer.“They think it has commercial viability which is very important to us,” said Mr. Lauren. “They see this as a ‘Garden State’ or a ‘500 Days of Summer’—the type of films that kids are dying to see.” As for the common theme of alcoholism all of Ponsoldt’s three feature films, Mr. Lauren says it is “coincidental.”

via Drunk Boy Meets Nerd Girl Love Story Wins Sundance Raves – Speakeasy – WSJ.

lists, AudibleAudible Essentials | Audible.com.

Vine, Twitter:  6 seconds or less…tweeting chats …

Today, we’re introducing Vine: a mobile service that lets you capture and share short looping videos. Like Tweets, the brevity of videos on Vine (6 seconds or less) inspires creativity. Now that you can easily capture motion and sound, we look forward to seeing what you create.

You can read more about the app on the Vine blog. Vine is currently available on the iPhone and iPod touch. You can download it for free from the App Store. We’re working now to bring it to other platforms, so stay tuned for that.

via Twitter Blog: Vine: A new way to share video.

Valentine’s Day, London:  Sounds like a nice combination. 🙂   Valentine’s Day in London – now.

Milky Way, technology, Maria Popova, @brainpicker:  Astounding zoomable tour of the center of the Milky Way galaxy!

This image is a 1 billion pixel RVB mosaic of the galactic center region (340 millions pixels in each R,V and B color). It shows the region spanning from Sagittarius (with the Milky Way center and M8/M20 area on the left) to Scorpius (with colorful Antares and Rho Ophiuchus region on the right) and cat paw nebula (red nebula at the bottom). This mosaic was assembled from 52 different sky fields made from 1200 individual images and 200 hours total exposure time, final image size is 24000×14000 pixels. The images were taken with a SBIG STL camera + Takahashi FSQ106Ed f/3.6 telescope and NJP160 mount from the clear skies of ESO Paranal Observatory in Chile. This mosaic is one of the three parts of the ESO Gigagalaxy Zoom project together with this incredible whole sky mosaic image by ESO/S.Brunier and this fantastic ESO mosaic image of the Lagoon nebula region.

via Galactic Center Mosaic by Stéphane Guisard/ESO, Los Cielos de Chile.

Edith Wharton,  Birthday:   11 Reasons The Author Was A Badass. 🙂

The phrase “keeping up with the Joneses” might be about Edith Wharton’s family.

Wharton was born Edith Newbold Jones. Her family, the Joneses, were a prominent, wealthy New York family. Some historians believe that this idiom may have been originally referring to her family (though there are also other guesses at to where it came from). (This image is Edith Wharton as a child. What a cutie).

She designed and built her own home.

She was great at garden designing and interior designing. She designed and built her home ‘The Mount,’ which is seriously one of the most beautiful buildings we’ve ever seen. Lots of weddings are now held there (hopefully one day that will include mine).

She was the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize!

via Edith Wharton Birthday: 11 Reasons The Author Was A Badass.

icons, American products, Made In The U.S.:

Over the past couple of decades, a number of brands have outsourced the production of some of America’s most iconic products to cut down on manufacturing costs. Even America’s greatest past time, baseball, is played with balls stitched together in Costa Rica.

via 12 Iconic American Products That Are No Longer Made In The U.S..

Michael R. Bloomberg, New York City, Sandy:

There are no panaceas or magic bullets. No matter what we do: the tides will continue to come in, and so we have to make our city more resilient in other ways, especially when it comes to our critical infrastructure. New Yorkers have never been shy about taking on big challenges, and taking our destiny into our own hands. I have every confidence that by confronting this challenge head on we will succeed, just as we have so many times before. There is no storm, no fire, no terrorist act, that can destroy the spirit of our city, and keep us from looking forward, envisioning a better tomorrow, and bringing it to life.

via Michael R. Bloomberg: Reshaping New York Citys Future After Sandy.

Out Of Sight (and Outside The Law), Sebstian Junger:  Really good speaker …

Whether covering ground wars, drug wars, or a war on terror, journalists undertake enormous risks to uphold Americans’ right to know what’s done in the name of democracy, revealing the human costs and truths veiled in secrecy. Sebastian Junger (Which Way Is The Front Line From Here?), Jeremy Scahill (Dirty Wars), Peter Bergen (MANHUNT), Shaul Schwarz (Narco Cultura), James Ball (We Steal Secrets), and moderator Stephen Engelberg (ProPublica) walk us through the war zones and the corridors of power.

via Out Of Sight (and Outside The Law) – Festival Program | Sundance Institute.




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