Posts Tagged ‘superstitions

02
Nov
11

11.1.2011… Nomaste and happy 18th birthday to Sarah (daughter of RA and Tim) and Scottie (son of Melanie)! … Rabbit, rabbit … never heard of this superstition …

11.1.11: 🙂

Women’s Quest

Welcome to this amazing day of oneness — 11/1/11 — this day will never happen again. Take it in and enjoy being one with every one – Namaste!

via Welcome to this….

superstitions, rabbit…rabbit: No wonder my friend with a British mum knew of this one!

“Rabbit rabbit” is a common British superstition. The most common modern version states that a person should say “rabbit, rabbit, white rabbit”, “rabbit, rabbit, rabbit”, “rabbits, rabbits, rabbits”,[1] “rabbit, rabbit” or simply “white rabbits” upon waking on the first day of each new month, and on doing so will receive good luck for the duration of that month. In the United States, the tradition is especially common in Nantucket, Cape Cod other towns within Massachusetts and throughout Vermont, notably in Middlebury and Chester.

[edit]Origins and history

The exact origin of the superstition is unknown, though it has appeared in print at least as early as 1922:

“Why,” the man in the brown hat laughed at him, “I thought everybody knew ’Rabbit, rabbit, rabbit.’ If you say ‘Rabbit, rabbit, rabbit’—three times, just like that—first thing in the morning on the first of the month, even before you say your prayers, you’ll get a present before the end of the month.”[2]

However, some reports place its origins even earlier, into the 1800s. Today it has spread to most of the English-speaking countries of the world, although, like all folklore, determining its exact area of distribution is difficult. This superstition is related to the broader belief in the rabbit or hare being a “lucky” animal, as exhibited in the practice of carrying a rabbit’s foot for luck. Some have also believed it represents jumping into the future and moving ahead with life and happiness.[citation needed]

via Rabbit rabbit – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

architecture, Louisville, real estate market: I was just telling someone that Louisville is more midwestern than southern in architecture … classic southern here!

Kentucky Greek Revival

11/01/11

Price: $2,950,000

Location: Louisville, United States

Type of Home: Detached Home

This house near Cherokee Park in Louisville, Ky., includes a Tuscan-inspired courtyard, as well as a sunroom and a wine room. The current owner designed the interiors, adding a mix of French, English, Chinese, Japanese and contemporary furniture. –Sushil Cheema

Dorothy Cherry says she and her late husband, Wendell Cherry, bought this Greek Revival home in Louisville, Ky., 33 years ago, just a month before they married. ‘I called it my honeymoon cottage,’ Ms. Cherry says. Mr. Cherry, the co-founder of hospital operator Humana, Inc., passed away in 1991 at the age of 55. Photo: John Nation

via Kentucky Greek Revival — Photos, House of the Day – WSJ.com.

Northeastern University (Boston),  regional campus, Charlotte:  Johnson & Wales made sense to me … but why would Northeastern University open a “regional campus” in Charlotte.

Northeastern University of Boston is officially laying down stakes in Charlotte today smack in the middle of the city at Trade and Tryon streets.

It is the venerable private school’s first venture outside Massachusetts, and likely won’t be its last — with campuses planned elsewhere, including in Seattle within a year.

In Charlotte, Northeastern will offer a doctorate in education and eight master’s-level programs tied largely to the region’s financial center. Those offerings will include masters of science degrees in finance, taxation, project management, sports leadership, leadership, education and health informatics.

The school is leasing 14,000 square feet of space in the 20-story 101 Independence Building at Trade and Tryon, including administrative offices on the ground floor near the entrance.

N.C. Lt. Gov. Walter Dalton and local officials plan to hold a ribbon-cutting this morning for the new uptown Charlotte campus.

via Northeastern University is opening regional campus today | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

‘History of the World in 100 Objects’, British Museum:   I loved following this when they were released daily … might be a good coffee table book.

IT was a project so audacious that it took 100 curators four years to complete it. The goal: to tell the history of the world through 100 objects culled from the British Museum’s sprawling collections. The result of endless scholarly debates was unveiled, object by chronological object, on a BBC Radio 4 program in early 2010, narrated by Neil MacGregor, director of the museum. Millions of listeners tuned in to hear his colorful stories — so many listeners that the BBC, together with the British Museum, published a hit book of the series, “A History of the World in 100 Objects,” which is being published in the United States on Monday.

via ‘History of the World in 100 Objects,’ From British Museum – NYTimes.com.

Teach for America, college football, Alabama, Coach Saban: “But in spite of this, the Board of Education plans to hire 110 Teach for America teachers over the next three years and put them in schools in poor neighborhoods.  These are recent college graduates, most of whom got degrees in something other than education and will receive a five-week crash course in how to teach before being sent off to work in the city’s most challenging schools.”

But in spite of this, the Board of Education plans to hire 110 Teach for America teachers over the next three years and put them in schools in poor neighborhoods.  These are recent college graduates, most of whom got degrees in something other than education and will receive a five-week crash course in how to teach before being sent off to work in the city’s most challenging schools.”

Anyone who pays attention to education knows that the most persistently poor-performing schools are those in impoverished neighborhoods.  For example, there are nine schools in the Huntsville system where more than 90 percent of students receive free-reduced lunches.  According to an analysis by the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama, none of these schools have reading and math scores where all grades (three through eight) are equal to or above state average.

By comparison, of the five schools where all grades are above state average, free-reduced lunches range from 4 to 25 percent.

But in spite of this, the Board of Education plans to hire 110 Teach for America teachers over the next three years and put them in schools in poor neighborhoods.  These are recent college graduates, most of whom got degrees in something other than education and will receive a five-week crash course in how to teach before being sent off to work in the city’s most challenging schools.

I don’t believe this is the way Coach Saban thinks.

But this rather convoluted logic is not the only concern raised by hiring Teach for America teachers.

Earlier this year the Board of Education released a substantial number of employees, citing continuing budget concerns as the reason.  Yet in addition to paying the salaries of the TFA teachers, the board will also pay an additional $5,000 per teacher to the TFA organization.

Teachers across the state have just had their pay reduced by the Legislature; Gov. Robert Bentley announced a few days ago that the state’s education budget will be $108 million less next year than in the current year, money for classroom supplies have been slashed to the bone and educators are being asked every day to do more with less.

Yet the Huntsville City Board of Education is considering signing a contract for $550,000 with Teach for America.

What am I missing?

via If football coaches used Teach for America logic – The Answer Sheet – The Washington Post.

clocks, time:  I like the art of this one …

Clock for an Acrobat – new clock by Pentagram’s Daniel Weil explores parallels in the way time moves in space and an acrobat’s moves along a wire. Related, 7 ways to understand time.Clock for an Acrobat – new clock by Pentagram’s Daniel Weil explores parallels in the way time moves in space and an acrobat’s moves along a wire.

via curiosity counts – Clock for an Acrobat – new clock by Pentagram’s….

Justice Clarence Thomas, Establishment Clause:  This is a mess … don’t usually agree with Thomas.

Justice Clarence Thomas on Monday said that the U.S. Supreme Courts establishment-clause jurisprudence is “in shambles.”Citing divergent lower-court opinions on the display of crosses, the Ten Commandments, and other religious messages in courthouses, city halls, and public schools, Thomas said “our jurisprudence has confounded the lower courts and rendered the constitutionality of displays of religious imagery on government property anyones guess.””Even if the court does not share my view that the establishment clause restrains only the federal government, and that, even if incorporated [i.e., applied to the states], the clause only prohibits actual legal coercion, the court should be deeply troubled by what its establishment clause jurisprudence has wrought,” Thomas said in a lone dissent from the courts denial of certiorari in Utah Highway Patrol Association v. American Atheists Inc. Case No. 10-1276.The Supreme Court on Oct. 31 refused to hear the case involving white crosses placed on or near spots where members of the Utah Highway Patrol were killed while on duty. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, in Denver, ruled last year that although the crosses were placed by a private group, their location predominantly on public property conveyed a message that the state of Utah endorsed Christianity.In his 19-page dissent, Thomas referred to a number of school cases that, in his view, reflect confusion or inconsistent application by lower courts of the Supreme Courts rulings under the First Amendments prohibition against government establishment of religion.

via Thomas: Establishment Clause Jurisprudence In Shambles – The School Law Blog – Education Week.

Tricia Rose Burt, fertility challenge:  Interesting …

New Story is Featured National Podcast on The StoryCollider

Vignette from new show Be Fruitful and Multiply begins airing Oct. 31

Just days after completing a successful run of I Will Be Good  at the FringeNYC Encore series, I was asked to perform at The StoryCollider  in Brooklyn. An audience favorite, the story was selected for their national podcast. Tune in here!

At The StoryCollider, all the stories told are about science, some by experts and some by everyday folks. My story  is based on my husband’s and my experience with fertility treatments several years ago. It’s both poignant and funny (well, as funny as invasive medical procedures can be) and is part of my upcoming show, Be Fruitful and Multiply (working title), currently in development. As always, I’d love your feedback — email me  or post your thoughts on my Facebook page.

via New story podcast nationwide!.

 …

The fertility challenge

A 40-year old artist struggles with fertility treatments.

via Tricia Rose Burt: The fertility challenge.

 …

“I’m mostly terrified of two things: One, having a baby and all of the freedom I’ll lose, and two, not having a baby, and all the joy that I will miss.”

via Tricia Rose Burt: The fertility challenge.

You Are Not So Smart: A Field Guide to the Psychology of Our Stupidity, book: Probably need this “field guide.”

We spend most of our lives going around believing we are rational, logical beings who make carefully weighted decisions based on objective facts in stable circumstances. Of course, as both a growing body of research and our own retrospective experience demonstrate, this couldn’t be further from the truth. For the past three years, David McRaney’s cheekily titled yet infinitely intelligent You Are Not So Smart has been one of my favorite smart blogs, tirelessly debunking the many ways in which our minds play tricks on us and the false interpretations we have of those trickeries. This month, YANSS joins my favorite blog-turned-book success stories with You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You’re Deluding Yourself — an illuminating and just the right magnitude of uncomfortable almanac of some of the most prevalent and enduring lies we tell ourselves.

The original trailer for the book deals with something the psychology of which we’ve previously explored — procrastination

via You Are Not So Smart: A Field Guide to the Psychology of Our Stupidity | Brain Pickings.




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