Posts Tagged ‘Susan G. Komen Foundation

16
Oct
11

10.16.2011 … worshipped at First Presbyterian Church of Charlotte … then Big sis came in for a quick visit …

FPC, Rev. Roland Purdue, The Wired Word: Worship at First Presbyterian Church of Charlotte was great.  I am loving having Rev. Roland Purdue as interim minister … he keeps us thinking … Today he preached on “Paradise Lost: Searching for the Garden of Eden.”  –  ” We already know the way home … ” And  The Wired Word is a great Sunday School class … This week we discussed “World-Changers Steve Jobs and Fred Shuttlesworth Die on Same Day.”  Ultimately it led to a discussion of vocation and whether we believe God has called each of us individually.

kith/kin:  Nothing better than weekend visits with friends and family … Big sis Mary Stewart came for a quick visit  after going to her college reunion … stories of fideles and golden goblets, hole in the wall gang.  Funny thing is we are more alike as we get older … Anyone else noticed that about a sibling?

Occupy Wall Street, GOP, politics, culture:  Interesting that Axelrod says GOP doesn’t get it … if you read each  GOP candidate’s response  Mitt clearly doesn’t get it (or is he merely trying to deal with it … see next section on humor).  I think Axelrod misrepresents the GOP response.

A senior political adviser to President Barack Obama is charging that the Republicans seeking the presidency don’t understand the American public’s pent-up anger over corporate excesses.

David Axelrod tells ABC’s “This Week” that the American people “want a financial system that works on the level. They want to get a fair shake.”

He appeared Sunday, a day after scores of demonstrators protesting corporate business practices were arrested in New York’s Times Square in a confrontation with police.

Axelrod faulted Republicans who have been pushing in Congress to soften or repeal the landmark legislation Obama pushed through last year, tightening regulation of business practices.

Axelrod said he doesn’t believe “any American is impressed” when hearing GOP presidential candidates who want to “roll back Wall St. reform.”

Speaking to small crowd at a retirement community in Florida on Oct. 4, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney expressed an unsympathetic view of the Occupy Wall Street movement. “I think it’s dangerous, this class warfare,” he said. Romney declined to comment further when asked about the protests by ABC. His response? “I’m just trying to get myself to occupy the White House.”

via David Axelrod On Occupy Wall Street: GOP Doesn’t Understand Protests, America’s Anger.

jokes, humor, crisis:  Interesting analysis … particularly interesting is that Romney tries the same joke in response to Occupy Wall Street and homelessness …

In June, the Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney found himself under attack for a joke he tried to make at a meeting with a group of unemployed people in Tampa, Fla. “I am also unemployed,” Romney announced, insinuating that the job he lacked was the presidency.

His mistake, of course, was to have ignored the very meaning of the economic crisis, including the class-based divisions and anxieties it has aggravated. His statement of identity and identification (“I am also X”) achieved the exact opposite effect, underscoring the unbridgeable gap between the “unemployed” multimillionaire and the out-of-work Floridians. But in a sense, the joke ultimately worked, though not in the way Romney intended: it showed, above all, his own cluelessness. The joke was on him.

The subsequent moralizing responses of Romney’s critics were remarkably uniform. They boiled down to the admonishment that the crisis is not a laughing matter, that poking fun at unemployment is disrespectful to the unemployed, and so forth. But what if, on the contrary, humor and crisis share a common provenance? What if humor invariably germinates in response to a crisis, as a reaction to the excessive splits between us and our social, political or economic reality; or to the divisions within us; or to the rifts within reality itself?

Humor is not, as some believe, a coping strategy or an outlet for the frustrations that cannot be expressed in any other way … or at least it is not just that. At its best, it is the self-consciousness of crisis.

….

How does humor relate to this future and how does it cope with this sentiment? Far from assuaging the anxieties stimulated by the unknown, it is a symbolic device that enables human beings collectively to confront their own finitude and ageing, not to mention the limits of their social, political and economic realities. In the insecure employment (even) of the investment banker and the melting away of savings, we recognize ourselves in the present and, more importantly, in the future, forming, perhaps, a basic bond of solidarity.

Hence: (1) the temporal fissure between the present and the future is the site of the crisis; and (2) humor puts this divide under a symbolic spotlight. But who, exactly, laughs at whom when the temporal structure of the crisis is made visible? Is it the present that laughs at itself? Does it chuckle at its grim future? Or is it our future, laughing at us in the present?

Paraphrasing Martin Heidegger, we might say that the essence of humor is nothing humorous; it is, rather, the separation, variously called “time,” “self-consciousness,” “critique” or “crisis,” of the I from itself and from the world it lives in. When humor responds to a crisis, it reverts back to its own essence, launching a tacit critique that retraces the divisions and contradictions from which the crisis has erupted. But while the essence of humor is nothing humorous, this should not prevent us from having a good, hearty laugh.

via Jokes and Their Relation to Crisis – NYTimes.com.

 genetics, happiness, nature v. nurture:  My mom always said, “money won’t make you happy, but it certainly makes unhappiness easier.”

THE idea that the human personality is a blank slate, to be written upon only by experience, prevailed for most of the second half of the 20th century. Over the past two decades, however, that notion has been undermined. Studies comparing identical with non-identical twins have helped to establish the heritability of many aspects of behaviour, and examination of DNA has uncovered some of the genes responsible. Recent work on both these fronts suggests that happiness is highly heritable.

As any human being knows, many factors govern whether people are happy or unhappy. External circumstances are important: employed people are happier than unemployed ones and better-off people than poor ones. Age has a role, too: the young and the old are happier than the middle-aged. But personality is the single biggest determinant: extroverts are happier than introverts, and confident people happier than anxious ones.

That personality, along with intelligence, is at least partly heritable is becoming increasingly clear; so, presumably, the tendency to be happy or miserable is, to some extent, passed on through DNA. To try to establish just what that extent is, a group of scientists from University College, London; Harvard Medical School; the University of California, San Diego; and the University of Zurich examined over 1,000 pairs of twins from a huge study on the health of American adolescents. In “Genes, Economics and Happiness”, a working paper from the University of Zurich’s Institute for Empirical Research in Economics, they conclude that about a third of the variation in people’s happiness is heritable. That is along the lines of, though a little lower than, previous estimates on the subject.

via The genetics of happiness: Transporter of delight | The Economist.

War on Drugs, drugs, cities:  very interesting piece!

Just as New York and Chicago were the fiercest resisters of Prohibition, big cities are today home to the most vibrant drug markets. As the upper classes began fleeing America’s great cities in the 1930s and taking with them much of the wealth, drugs filled the void, while at the same time deepening exacerbating the urban crisis. The word “brownstone” became a slang term for heroin, perhaps best immortalized in Guns N’ Roses’ 1987 song “Mr. Brownstone,” but also evident in the Velvet Underground’s 1967 song “I’m Waiting for the Man,” where Lou Reed sings about going up to Harlem to meet his dealer, “Up to a brownstone, up three flights of stairs / Everybody’s pinned you, but nobody cares.” The drug trade fueled enormous amounts of crime, further dragging down cities’ reputations and driving out those who could afford to leave.

As with alcohol in the 1920s, when Prohibition was foisted on cities by small towns, today’s anti-drug policies are most popular among white suburban and rural conservatives. Urban voters, who bear the brunt of the damage of America’s misguided drug policies, are more liberal and likely to favor reforms like marijuana legalization and needle exchanges, but just like their predecessors who opposed Prohibition, they are forced to acquiesce to the federal war on drugs. We can even see the same pattern in ultra-liberal Netherlands, where the national government wants to restrict the sale of cannabis to foreigners, against the wishes of Amsterdam (although Rotterdam has not been so tolerant).

It’s no coincidence that Vancouver is both North America’s leader in urbanism and hard drug policy, having fought the Canadian federal government to win the latter distinction. It’s bred “Vancouverism,” a distinct architectural and urbanist genre, and was also the first city on the continent to open a legal supervised injection center, where heroin and cocaine users can shoot up in the presence of medical professionals, safe from the threat of overdose and arrest.

But the old “poor druggy cities, rich clean suburbs” paradigm is eroding. The suburbs are beginning to see poverty, and rural areas have recently given birth to two bonafide drug trends, OxyContin and methamphetamine. ”Brownstone” is starting to make people think more Park Slope Coop and less dimebags of dope, and attitudes towards drugs are inching in a more liberal direction. Marijuana legalization seems to be on the horizon in California and the West, and hard drug users are at least hearing more rhetoric about being treated less punitively. It remains to be seen how far both urbanism and drug reform will go, but as the two issues dissociate from each other, we may begin to see more rational dialog on both cities and drugs.

via The War on Drugs Is a War on Cities – Forbes.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Susan G. Komen Foundation, “pinking”, prayers, kith/kin:  What should i buy this year? As some of you know I buy something pink that I use everyday for a friend who has experienced breast cancer that year.  I make a point to remember them in a prayer when I use the item.

shop for a cure

Think pink! Shop our favorite fashion, beauty and home finds that donate to Breast Cancer research—and show off your support.

Think pink! Shop our favorite fashion, beauty and home finds that donate to Breast Cancer research—and show off your support.

via Breast Cancer Awareness Month – Susan G. Komen Foundation – Jennifer Aniston – Celebrity – InStyle.

Ameriprise Financial, aggrieved employees: “If you work for the dog food makers, they are probably going to serve you some dog food.”

As for Ameriprise’s 401(k) plan for its employees, there may well be areas where it has broken the rules. But it is hard to have a ton of sympathy for aggrieved employees in one important respect. If you work for the dog food makers, they are probably going to serve you some dog food. And some of it may not be your favorite variety.

via Turning a Lens on Ameriprise Financial – NYTimes.com.




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