Posts Tagged ‘Swan House

19
Apr
14

4.19.14 … The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb … and the Pope likes Homeless Jesus …

The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb, Hans Holbein the Younger, Holy Saturday: Saw this image today, Hans Holbein the Younger between 1520–22.  I can only say, it struck me off guard.

 

550px-The_Body_of_the_Dead_Christ_in_the_Tomb,_and_a_detail,_by_Hans_Holbein_the_YoungerThe Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb is an oil and tempera on limewood painting created by the German artist and printmaker Hans Holbein the Younger between 1520–22. The work shows a life-size, grotesque depiction of the stretched and unnaturally thin body of Jesus Christ lying in his tomb. Holbein shows the dead Son of God after he has suffered the fate of an ordinary human.

The painting is especially notable for its dramatic dimensions (30.5 cm x 200 cm),[1] and the fact that Christ’s face, hands and feet, as well as the wounds in his torso, are depicted as realistic dead flesh in the early stages of putrefaction. His body is shown as long and emaciated while eyes and mouth are left open.[2]

via The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

 Philomena, RedBox:  I got lucky! The movie has so many themes consistent with Holy Week, forgiveness, marginalized people, role of the Church, atonement, confession, tragedy … and what if he was obese? 

via ▶ Philomena – Size of Portions – The Weinstein Company – YouTube.

Philomena: “Now we’re getting closer, all these years wondering if Anthony was in trouble or prison or goodness knows where. But as long as I didn’t know I could always turn myself he was happy somewhere and that he was doing all right.”

Martin: “Don’t upset yourself.”

Philomena: “What if he was obese?”

Martin: “Obese?”

Philomena: “I watched this documentary that says a lot of Americans are huge. What if that happened to him?”

Martin: “What on earth makes you think he’d be obese?”

Philomena: “Because of the size of the portions!”

As they learn more about Anthony and draw closer, Philomena wonders about his lifestyle and health. A documentary about obese Americans has her wondering if Anthony is obese, among other things.

via Philomena Movie Quotes.

 

Oh my goodness, it’s the best movie I’ve seen in the last five years.  It’s a rather somber movie, although positively holy. I’d go for something more lighthearted for an exhausted Wildcat.

Loved it!

A must see

One of the best talks about forgiveness

Excellent story. Worth watching.

Philomena seems to have broad appeal: men women, protestant, jew, young, old (or at least middle aged) …

The most wrenching scene in the film is when she spots her young son being taken away from the convent by the American couple who adopt him, almost as an afterthought, to be a companion to the young girl they had originally come to claim. (Plot spoilers abound in this article.)

Throughout the film, Mr. Hess remains something of an enigma to the audience, which is why his real-life story may seem so tantalizing to viewers. Yes, there are those artfully staged flashbacks, but Mr. Hess is always “a little out of reach” to quote Mr. Coogan, who plays the journalist who helps Philomena track him down and who was a co-writer of the screenplay.

This was apparently intentional. If you are going to make a movie based on a true story, and if that story centers on a woman’s search to find the son she was forced to give up for adoption, it makes a certain amount of sense not to flesh him out too much.

“We didn’t want to become overly involved in the life of Anthony Lee or Michael Hess,” Mr. Coogan said. “What appealed to me was the search for the son and the tragedy of not being able to see him grow up. That’s how Philomena experienced it; it was just out of reach, just beyond her.”

via Behind ‘Philomena,’ the True Story of Michael Hess – NYTimes.com.

60 MINUTES CLASSICS

THE MAGDALEN LAUNDRIES

The movie “Philomena,” which opens this week and stars Judi Dench, tells the true story of an unwed, pregnant Irish girl who is sent off to a convent, where her baby is given up for adoption against her will. Years later, as an elderly woman, Philomena tries to find her son.

The convent where Philomena was sent was a “Magdalen Laundry,” one of many convents across Ireland where thousands of girls – pregnant out of wedlock or otherwise deemed morally wayward – were placed by the church or their families. At the laundries, the girls endured harsh, unpaid labor to make restitution for their sins.

Steve Kroft reported on the Magdalen Laundries in 1999, only two years after the last one had closed and when the full story of the laundries was coming to light. “The women had been virtual prisoners,” Steve reported. “Confined behind convent walls for perceived sins of the flesh, condemned to a life of servitude.”

Earlier this year, the Irish government released a report on the laundries. The report acknowledged, for the first time, that the state was directly involved in the laundries, having sent as many as one quarter of the women to these institutions — most of them in their twenties, but at least one as young as age 9.

“The chronicle of the Magdalen Laundries was for many years characterised primarily by secrecy, silence and shame,” the report says. “The psychological impact on these girls was undoubtedly traumatic and lasting.”

via “Philomena” and Ireland’s Magdalen Laundries – CBS News.

And a friend put me on to this … beautiful!

emmylou harris – magdalene laundries

Electoral College, kith/kin: A long time ago on a family vacation, my brother and sister discussed the pros and cons of the electoral college (yes, really). It was a very heated discussion (yes, really). So I always click on news items discussing it and its alternatives. Somehow my childhood never leaves me.

I think, like most colleges, the cost of the EC has become outrageous!

It was the statewide and/or nationwide debate topic when I was in high school. I’m well versed on both sides. Would welcome the opportunity to referee.

Maybe you are the cause of the lifelong debate in our house!! I had to interest in the matter at the time. I really think the Great Electoral College Debate began on a Jekyll beach trip.

I used to ask my dad to explain the Electoral College to me when we were driving on trips and he seemed sleepy. He would get all fired up and it would wake him back up.

Why does that not surprise me about V. Stuart!

Pros/cons of the Electoral College was one of the national debate topics when I was in high school – I never thought I was very convincing when I had to support it.  We also debated unilateral intervention in Vietnam, abortion rights, and the role of the military- industrial complex. I loved debate!

Deadliest Everest Avalanche, adventure travel, Sherpas: This link is a Sype interview with Diana Williams, the wife of a Davidson friend , who is just down from Everest Base Camp. You never think that you might know someone who is at such a phenomenal place. Prayers for the Sherpas who lost their lives and the families and the adventurers who are up there.

[http://bcove.me/4brrdauw]

VIDEO: Deadly Everest Avalanche.

On April 17, at about 6:30 a.m. local time, an avalanche swept down off the west shoulder of Everest and killed 16 climbers. To anybody who’s familiar with Everest climbing, it should come as no surprise that all of the men were Sherpa porters. Sherpas are Everest’s workforce—the literal backbone of the climbing industry there. The men who were struck were either carrying 80-pound loads to Camps 1 and 2, or they were on their way back to Base Camp. Without the hard work of the Sherpa porters, it would be largely impossible for Americans and Europeans with slightly above-average physiology, and well-above-average disposable income, to scale the world’s tallest mountain.

Increasingly, the pinnacle of adventure tourism—the summit of Everest—comes at too steep a cost. In the August 2013 issue, I wrote a story titled “Disposable Man,” about the routinization of Sherpa deaths on Everest. Today’s avalanche was the worst accident in the history of the mountain. Add to this the April 2 death of Sherpa Mingma Tenzing, who was working for the Peak Freaks expedition, as well as at least a dozen serious injuries from the avalanche, and 2014 stands out as the bloodiest year in Everest history— all before most teams have even set foot on the mountain.

Yes, something needs to be done.

via The Value of a Sherpa Life | Mountaineering | OutsideOnline.com.

Homeless Jesus statue,  Timothy Schmalz, audience with an admiring Pope Francis, Toronto Star: The Pope likes Homeless Jesus; no surprise there.  Maybe St. Albans/Davidson should ask him to drop by and see it installed.

 

For two years, it was the sculpture nobody would take: a life-sized Jesus sleeping on a park bench with his bare feet, wounded from his crucifixion, poking out from under a blanket.

But now Jesus the Homeless and its Canadian sculptor have a new fan in the Vatican: Pope Francis.

Timothy Schmalz brought the original wooden model of his sculpture to St. Peter’s Square last Wednesday to present to the leader of the Roman Catholic Church. After his weekly general audience, the Pope prayed over the statue and blessed it, Schmalz said.

“It is very, very amazing for a sculptor to have that,” he said. “After, the Vatican officials introduced me to Pope Francis and he said he thought Jesus the Homeless was a beautiful sculpture. So needless to say, I’m very excited about that.”

The model is going to stay in one of the Vatican houses, he said, and he is working to find an outdoor location near St. Peter’s for the full-sized bronze version.

via Homeless Jesus statue gets audience with an admiring Pope Francis | Toronto Star.

clear quartz, follow-up:  I’m trying to figure out what to do with my quartz.  Infuse me with optimism … I like that! 🙂

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Crystal Properties – Clear Quartz

Color: Clear with a glassy look.

Associations:

Associated Crystals: Diamond, white sapphire and white topaz.

Candle Color: Gold.

Chakra: Crown.

Element: Fire.

Flowers & Plants: Golden chrysanthemum, marigold and sunflower.

Herbs – Incenses – Oils: Bay, frankincense, orange and rosemary.

Planet: Sun.

Zodiac: Leo.

Metaphysical Properties & Uses:

Animals: Use clear quartz with old animals to help give them an energy and health boost.

Children: All children should be give a piece of clear quartz to be kept throughout life. It will gradually increase in power and act as their own personal talisman.

Environment: Clear quartz will send environmental healing energy to anywhere it is needed on the planet.

Finance & Prosperity: –

Health & Healing: Clear quartz is almost certainly the most versatile healing crystal there is. It can be used for any cleansing, energizing or healing.

Home: Clear quartz will help your family to live together in harmony. It will also help instill a sense of optimism and purpose when times are difficult.

Love: –

Protection: Clear quartz is protective against negative energy and will transmute it to positive energy.

Psychic: Clear quartz will amplify any healing or psychic power. It is also suitable for channeling angels and spirit guides, and can be used for aura work.

It Is The Stone Of: –

Ritual: –

Work: Clear quartz will infuse everyone with a sense of optimism, even those who are by nature pessimistic.

Other: –

See Our Clear Quartz

via Clear Quartz – Properties – Associations – Uses.

biological clock, reset: I have never been a big camper, but I am definitely in need a of a reset!

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Inflatable Child Seat Concept, Volvo Cars, YouTube:  Pretty cool.

via Inflatable Child Seat Concept – Volvo Cars – YouTube.

selfie, travel photos:

“The selfie is a new type of travel photo,” explains Dr. Lev Manovich, a professor at CUNY’s Graduate Center and the project coordinator of Selfiecity, an academic investigation into the where and why of the phenomenon. Portraits may have always been integral to travel photography, but the emergence of the two-camera mobile phone means people no longer need a friend or trustworthy stranger to take one.

“Since the face occupies a larger part of the images, these self-portraits may function differently from earlier travel photos,” Manovich continues. “They do not document the travel scene—rather they announce, ‘I was here.’”

And this year, with World Cup mania taking over Brazil, Universal Orlando opening a new section of its Harry Potter mini-park, and Coachella celebrating 15 years of wrecking the minds and bodies (and fashion sense) of music fans, there’s plenty to announce. If Kobe Bryant can have a selfie-off in a Turkish Airlines commercial and Ellen can break Twitter records at the Oscars, then you can surely make your friends and family jealous for months. And if you do it in the Philippines, home to the Selfiest City in the World, you’ll be in good company; Manhattan and Miami trail just behind.

So grab your favorite mobile camera—be it a Canon, iPhone, or GoPro—and get snapping. This year, you don’t want to spare a minute of #FOMO. We’ve even included a few hashtags for you to use along the way.

via 25 Selfies You Have to Take This Year – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

Swan House, Atlanta History Center, Flyworx.co productions, YouTube: New perspective!

via ▶ Swan House – Atlanta History Center – Flyworx.co productions – YouTube.

What I Learned Watching 150 Hours of TED Talks, Carmine Gallo, Harvard Business Review:

What makes for a great presentation — the kind that compels people’s attention and calls them to action?  TED talks have certainly set a benchmark in recent years: HBR even asked Chris Anderson, the group’s founder, to offer lessons drawn from the three decades he’s run TED’s signature events in an article published last summer.

But experience and intuition are one thing; data and analysis are another. What could one learn by watching the most successful TED talks in recent years (150 hours’ worth), talking to many of the speakers, then running the findings by neuroscientists who study persuasion?  I did just that, and here’s what I learned:

Use emotion. Bryan Stevenson’s TED talk, “We need to talk about an injustice”, received the longest standing ovation in the event’s history. A civil rights attorney who successfully argued and won the Supreme Court case Miller v. Alabama, which prohibits mandatory life sentences without parole for juveniles convicted of murder, this is a man who knows how to persuade people.

I divided the content of his talk into Aristotle’s three areas of persuasion. Only 10 percent fell under “ethos” (establishing credibility for the speaker); 25 percent fell into the “logos” category (data, statistics) and a full 65 percent was categorized as “pathos” (emotion, storytelling). In his 18-minute talk, Stevenson told three stories to support his argument. The first was about his grandmother, and when I asked him why he started with it, his answer was simple: “Because everyone has a grandmother.” The story was his way of making an immediate connection with the audience.

Stories that trigger emotion are the ones that best inform, illuminate, inspire, and move people to action. Most everyday workplace conversations are heavy on data and light on stories, yet you need the latter to reinforce your argument. So start incorporating more anecdotes – from your own experience or those about other people, stories and brands (both successes and failures) – into your pitches and presentations.

Be novel. We all like to see and hear something new. One guideline that TED gives its speakers is to avoid “trotting out the usual shtick.” In other words, deliver information that is unique, surprising, or unexpected—novel.

In his 2009 TED presentation on the impact of malaria in African countries, Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates shocked his audience when he opened a jar of mosquitoes in the middle of his talk. “Malaria, of course, is transmitted by mosquitoes,” he said. “I brought some here so you can experience this. I’ll let these roam around the auditorium. There’s no reason why only poor people should have the experience.” He reassured his audience that the mosquitoes were not infected – but not until the stunt had grabbed their attention and drawn them into the conversation.

As neuroscientist Dr. A.K. Pradeep confirms, our brains can’t ignore novelty. “They are trained to look for something brilliant and new, something that stands out.” Pradeep should know. He’s a pioneer in the area of neuromarketing, studying advertisements, packaging, and design for major brands launching new products.

In the workplace your listener (boss, colleague, sales prospect) is asking him or herself one question: “Is this person teaching me something I don’t know?” So introduce material that’s unexpected, surprising or offers a new and novel solution to an old problem.

Emphasize the visual. Robert Ballard’s 2008 TED talk on his discovery of the Titanic, two and a half miles beneath the surface of the Atlantic, contained 57 slides with no words. He showed pictures, images, and animation of life beneath the sea, without one word of text, and the audience loved it. Why did you deliver an entire presentation in pictures? “Because I’m storytelling; not lecturing,” Ballard told me.

Research shows that most of us learn better when information is presented in pictures and text instead of text alone. When ideas are delivered verbally—without pictures—the listener retains about 10% of the content. Add a picture and retention soars to 65%.

For your next PowerPoint presentation, abandon the text blocks and bullet points in favor of more visually intriguing design elements. Show pictures, animations, and images that reinforce your theme. Help people remember your message.

via What I Learned Watching 150 Hours of TED Talks – Carmine Gallo – Harvard Business Review.

Japan, travel:

Japan: What facts about Japan do foreigners not believe until they come to Japan?

In light of all the comments and feedback I’ve been getting, the one thing about Japan that foreigners do not believe, even if they do come to Japan for a visit, is probably this: It’s a mass of contradictions and hard to pigeonhole; your snap judgement may just be wrong. This may be why you are reading this and why Japan interests you. I addressed this in greater depth in the first half of my answer here: Makiko Itoh’s answer to Japan: What are some of Japan’s best kept secrets?

via (1) Home – Quora.

Divinity Candy Recipe, Garden and Gun, kith/kin: I saw this today as an Easter treat.  It was more a Christmas confection from my memory, but that memory is a good one.

My mother made wonderful divinity, but I also remember the divinity fails if you tried to make it on a rainy day and it would refuse to set.

I like divinity every now and then, but if I’m going to mess with making meringue I’d rather make a Pavlova or just meringues.

I’m going to have to check on Pavlova … that’s a new one for me.

It’s a large – pie sized – meringue. Usually has fresh fruit w/sauce over it.

 

holidays can be particularly tough for homesick Southerners. Her old-fashioned Divinities make a great addition to the Easter table, wherever you are. Meringue clouds studded with hunks of pecan, they’re bound to trigger a few sweet memories, especially among Southerners of a certain age. Feel free to personalize them with your own add-ins—she recommends peanuts, chocolate, or candied fruit.

via Divinity Candy Recipe | Garden and Gun.

J.P. Craven, Davidson College alum, Boston Marathon after trauma, http://www.wsoctv.com:

A group from Davidson College will fly to Boston this weekend to cheer on graduate and baseball alumnus J.P. Craven. Craven was at the finish line waiting for his father to cross when the first blast went off at last year’s marathon.

Craven will be running in the race for a cause.

As Craven gets ready to take on the Boston marathon, he’s going with the support of his former baseball team, classmates and teachers at Davidson.

It’s just some of the support he’s relied on since the bombings. The first explosion knocked him to the ground.

“I realized I was bleeding and realized I had to get out of there, which is when I started running,” Craven said.

Craven found help at a Boston Medical Center tent nearby. A piece of shrapnel had hit him in the head and ear, and another piece was lodged in his nose. He asked medics to call his parents, and his dad, who hadn’t finished the race yet, ran straight there.

via Davidson College alum returns to Boston Marathon after trauma | www.wsoctv.com.

Boobypack,  A Fanny Pack For Your Rack, kickstarter campaigns:  The things you learn from daughters.  One of her friends is interning for tho startup.  🙂

About Boobypack- The one and only fannypack for your rack | Boobypack | A Fanny Pack For Your Rack.

24
Nov
13

11.24.13 … bests …

great inventions, bests, lists,  TIME.com, Kickstarter, Cronuts:  Kickstarter brought several to market.  Cronuts, really?

What makes an invention great? Sometimes it solves a problem you didn’t think could be solved. Skyscrapers can’t turn invisible. Pens can’t write in midair. Paraplegics can’t walk. Except now they can. And sometimes an invention solves a problem you didn’t know you had. Maybe you didn’t realize you needed to eat a doughnut and a croissant at the same time, or resurrect an extinct frog, or turn your entire body into a living password. Now you do. Want a list of the best things that were invented in 2013? Now you have one. Just keep reading.

via What Makes an Invention Great? | The 25 Best Inventions of the Year 2013 | TIME.com.

In 2013 a new fusion food joined the ranks of the ice cream cake and the turducken. The cronut—made of croissant-style pastry that’s fried like a doughnut, filled with cream and topped with glaze—transfixed foodies when New York City chef Dominique Ansel started selling it in May. His recipe inspired imitations around the world, and customers proved willing to wait hours for a taste; scalpers were even hawking the $5 treats for up to $40.

via The 25 Best Inventions of the Year 2013 | TIME.com.

The 3Doodler is a new kind of pen that doodles in three dimensions instead of two. Essentially it works like a 3-D printer, melting and cooling colored plastic to create rigid, freestanding structures in any shape imaginable (sort of like a hot-glue gun but better). Invented by Maxwell Bogue, Peter Dilworth and Daniel Cowen at the Boston-based toy company WobbleWorks, the 3Doodler raised over $2 million on Kickstarter (they were shooting for $30,000) and can be preordered online for $99.

via The 3Doodler | The 25 Best Inventions of the Year 2013 | TIME.com.

An Olympic-size pool designed to float in the less-than-crystal-clear East River, the Plus Pool kills two birds with one stone: it cleans the river water and gives New Yorkers a place to swim. Its unique filtration system scrubs the water as it floats through it, while its distinctive plus-sign shape isolates different wings for different activities. Designed by Dong-Ping Wong, Archie Lee Coates IV and Jeffrey Franklin, the pool could make it possible for New Yorkers to dive into clean river water for the first time in 100 years. So far the $15 million project has been funded by Kickstarter, but the team is still raising money to get the pool up and floating by the summer of 2016.

via The Plus Pool | The 25 Best Inventions of the Year 2013 | TIME.com.

Best Tweets, lists, Twitter:  Too much Ryan Gosling and I not sure why Huffpost needs to make a list of best posts by women …

What Women Said On Twitter This Week.

@saraschaefer1

Sara Schaefer

I hope my children live one day to see the first female Santa

via Best Tweets: What Women Said On Twitter This Week.

 

 

Atlanta History Center, Swan House, Hunger Games:

The Atlanta History Center’s Capitol Tour experience offers visitors an opportunity to pay tribute to Atlanta’s burgeoning film industry as well as Swan House’s new chapter in cinematic history. http://ow.ly/qTwHr

Love unites all, whether created or uncreated. The heart of God, the heart of all creation, and our own hearts become one in love. That’s what all the great mystics have been trying to tell us through the ages. Benedict, Francis, Hildegard of Bingen, Hadewijch of Brabant, Meister Eckhart, Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Dag Hammarskjöld, Thomas Merton, and many others, all in their own ways and their own languages, have witnessed to the unifying power of the divine love.

The Swan House at the Atlanta History Center was one of many Georgia set locations used during the filming of the movie The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

via Atlanta History Center – Located on 33 acres of history in Buckhead, Atlanta.

via Daily Meditation: November 16, 2013 | Daily Meditation by Henri Nouwen.

Just so you know … H&M opens at Northlake Mall | CharlotteObserver.com.

 39 Democrats, Fix Obamacare, Washington Wire – WSJ:

The 39 House Democrats who voted to reinstate sales of insurance policies canceled under the Affordable Care Act had this in common: Most are being targeted by the House Republican campaign arm for their position on the health law.

The National Republican Congressional Committee has gone into overdrive, tailoring news releases around about dozens of Democrats like Reps. Ron Barber (D., Ariz.) and Patrick Murphy (D., Fla.), who are thought to be vulnerable in the 2014 elections. Friday’s vote showed the pressure appears to be working.

“I would imagine that there would be more and more attacks coming for months on end,” Mr. Murphy, a freshman, told reporters shortly before voting in favor of the Republican-led bill.

The 39 Democrats were four more than the 35 who voted for a GOP bill in July to delay the laws’ mandate on businesses – the previous high water mark in Republicans’ efforts to win Democratic support for rolling back the health care law. The 39 Democrats also tracked closely with the roughly 40 Democrats facing pressure from the NRCC.

via Why 39 Democrats Voted for GOP Bill to Fix Obamacare – Washington Wire – WSJ.

George W. Bush:  This is an old one.  But, personally and politically, I think this was a mistake.

There will be two notable absences at Wednesday’s commemoration to mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington: George H.W. and George W. Bush.

Both former presidents were invited to participate in Wednesday’s celebration, which will feature speeches from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial by President Obama as well as former presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter. But both Bushes are dealing with health issues and decided it best to skip the event.

“He’s doing fine, but he’s not able to get up to Washington this week,” said Freddy Ford, a spokesman for George W. Bush, who is still recuperating after undergoing surgery this month for an arterial blockage.

Ford stressed that the younger Bush’s recovery is going well, and that Bush even managed to stop by the Southern Methodist University’s football practice on Tuesday

via Bushes unable to attend March on Washington ceremony.

05
Jul
13

7.5.13 … Atlanta’s best … one of those perfect Atlanta days …

I had one of those perfect Atlanta days … First,  a ride with my mom: Ansley Park, Brookwood Hills, the Cathedral’s labyrinth, lunch in front of the gates of the Swan House, then dinner at new Atlanta restaurant … Saltyard.  I highly recommend it!

The Cathedral of St. Phillips , labyrinth walks: This labyrinth fits right into my Atlanta drives with my mom.  7/2 was a great day … birds, squirrels, flowers, clouds …

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Atlanta, Swan House, YouTube:  At the Swan House, there is a new historical marker.  And in the bottom corner is one of those scannable codes linking to a YouTube, and a really fun YouTube  short on the Swan House.  Old technology meets new … Love it … and my mom did, too.

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Swan House – Atlanta History Center – YouTube.

Saltyard, Small Plates,  Atlanta GA: Just a few weeks ago, I saw a review of Saltyard … definitely worth it!  6.17.13 … Saltyard … on my list …   We enjoyed gruyere gougeres w/ smoked salt whipped butter, cerviche, greendale farm “mille fleur” (GA) w/ green tomato relish, housemade summer smoked sausage w/ quick kraut, pan roasted ga trout w/ fingerlings, buttered english peas, tarragon nage, roasted mushrooms, roasted brussel sprouts …

Saltyard offers a carefully edited selection of seasonal dishes, which are sure to impress even the most distinguished palettes.

Saltyard – Small Plates & Uniquely Social Dining Experience – Atlanta GA .

 

06
Feb
13

2.6.13 … I would like to have style … 45 and goofy in Atlanta …

Coco Chanel, quotes, fashion:  

Media

via Fashion fades Coco Chanel wall decal vinyl sticker – Polyvore.

adult play, Spacious:  I personally think this is very funny … What do you think, O Spacious One , Cary Umhau?

Over the more than two decades that 10 middle-aged friends from Spokane, Wash., have been locked in a game of Tag, there have been years when almost nothing happened.

But already this week, ‘It’ has changed hands twice.

The game is live only in February so it resumed late last week. Mike Konesky was ‘It’ heading into this year’s action and he made his move on Sunday.

via In Epic Game of Tag, There’s a New ‘It’ – The Juggle – WSJ.

Civil War Sesquicentennial Commemoration,  Library of Congress, Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust, events:

Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust to Commemorate the Civil War Sesquicentennial at the Library of Congress

An estimated 620,000 Union and Confederate soldiers lost their lives in the Civil War. These deaths permanently transformed the character of American society.

Drew Gilpin Faust, 28th President of Harvard University and Lincoln Professor of History in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences, will join Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Ric Burns in exploring this theme on Wednesday, Feb. 27, at noon in the Coolidge Auditorium, located on the ground floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First Street, S.E., Washington, D.C.

This event is free and open to the public; no tickets are required.

The event is presented in conjunction with the Library of Congress exhibition “The Civil War in America,” which commemorates the 150th anniversary of the war and runs through June 1, 2013.

As part of the presentation, Burns will feature clips from his PBS documentary “Death and the Civil War,” which was based upon Faust’s book “This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War” (2008), winner of the Bancroft Prize in 2009 and a finalist for both a National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize. Faust will sign copies of her books immediately following the presentation. Also participating in the presentation will be Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

via Harvard University President to Commemorate the Civil War | News Releases – Library of Congress.

Georges Seurat, Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, followup, FB, Theartblab.com:  I have funny friends … Follow up to  yesterday’s post.

…the monkey was the answer to a Jeopardy question.

Ferris Bueller likes it too!

Is that Beyonce with the umbrella? it looks like she has a little bedunkadunk in the trunk. He is also a favorite artist of mine.

language,  Indian English, retroflex, The Economist:  I actually have wondered about this.

A FRIEND recently asked me what gives Indian English its unique sound. With 22 constitutionally recognised languages in India, and hundreds more spoken, how is it that many Indians’ English accents sound fairly similar? Part of the answer has to do with a set of sounds used across the country: retroflex consonants.

Indian retroflexes are fun to produce. Curl your tongue back and strike your palate, and you’re in position to articulate one. English distinguishes voiced and unvoiced consonants (the difference between [d] and [t], based on whether the larynx vibrates). Many Indian languages further distinguish consonants by whether a puff of air comes out or not (aspirated or unaspirated). So the retroflex consonants in, for example, Hindi, include ʈ (unvoiced unaspirated), ʈh (unvoiced aspirated), ɖ (voiced unaspirated), and ɖh (voiced aspirated). Most Indian languages also include two more retroflex consonants, ɳ and ʂ. It’s common for Indian English-speakers to substitute retroflex ʈ and ɖ where Western English-speakers use [t] and [d], which Indian languages don’t have. This substitution is part of Indian English’s special sound.

via Language in India: The humble retroflex | The Economist.

African elephants,  Serengeti National Park, ecology, BBC Nature: Having seen theses beasts in South Africa, they are truly sensitive beasts …

Wild African elephants prefer to live in safer, protected areas and become stressed when they leave them.

Scientists have found African elephants living outside Serengeti National Park are more stressed than those within the protected area.

More elephants also choose to live inside the park, suggesting they “know” which areas are safer to live in, and actively avoid humans.

Details are published in the African Journal of Ecology.

Serengeti National Park helps protect animals from threats such as illegal hunting and habitat disturbance.

via BBC Nature – African elephants prefer Serengeti National Park.

New Year’s Resolutions, Starbucks, Atlanta, Brookhaven – the historic neighborhood: I can only have lattes on weekends and they must be skinny. Exception: I can have one if I walk there … 45 and goofy in ATL this morning.Great morning walk to nearby Starbucks and then through my second favorite Atlanta neighborhood, Brookhaven – the historic neighborhood, not the new DeKalb County city.  Oh, And i meant 45 and foggy … Thank you, autocorrect.

real-time advertising,  2013 Super Bowl ads, 2013 Super Bowl blackout, follow-up:  Very interesting …

Sunday’s power outage provided the perfect surprise for brands to pounce on creatively. Tide shrewdly tweeted, “We can’t get your #blackout. But we can get your stains out.” In a dig at their luxury car rival, Audi tweeted, “Sending some LEDs to the @MBUSA Superdome right now…” At Mondelēz International, our Oreo brand team and their agency partners sat together in a war room and came up with this gem, which has since been re-tweeted more than 15,000 times:

This was a big, albeit unplanned moment, but the beauty of real-time content is that there’s always something interesting happening in the world, and always an audience who cares about it. The ubiquity of digital technology and mobile devices enables people at far corners of the globe to share moments together, regardless of where they’re located, their economic status, or how old they are. By focusing content development around these shared cultural moments, marketers can transcend the demographics-driven targeting that has for so long defined the industry, reaching more people in a more relevant way.

We saw firsthand the power of tapping into big cultural moments when we celebrated Oreo’s 100th birthday in 2012. We produced 100 consecutive “Daily Twists,” spotlighting global cultural developments, as they happened, through an Oreo lens. Covering everything from LGBT Pride Month to the Mars Rover landing, we were able to join the global conversation with fresh content, and this timeliness nearly tripled the level of consumer engagement compared to the three months prior to the campaign.

via The Power of Real-Time Advertising – B. Bonin Bough – Harvard Business Review.

Atlanta, labyrinth walking, Solvitur Ambulando – It is solved by walking, Lenbrook, kith/kin, The Cathedral of St. Philips, Swan House, Buckhead, Driving Mamma Lindsey, The State Botanical Garden of Georgia, Dr. Wilf Nicholls:  

So excited I will soon have a new outdoor labyrinth to walk in Atlanta!!   Found this via google from December …

.Photo: Great progress on the outdoor labyrinth!

A fun lunch at the Lenbrook Grill where i caught up with Katherine and her mom, uncle and cousin. She says hello to you, Catherine and Cary.

After lunch, mom and I took a drive. First stop … St. Philip’s where I walked their recently completed labyrinth.

A few notes from my walk … It’s an absolute perfect winter day in Atlanta. It must be 60° and the sky is clear blue.  I have gone over to the Cathedral of St. Philip  and walked their newly completed 11-curcuit labyrinth. There’s something special about walking the labyrinth for the first time. And there is also something special about walking a labyrinth that you know you will walk many times more.

When you know you’re going to walk it many times, you become very observant of the seasons and the plantings and the landscape around you.

This one is by far the most beautiful one that I have walked in the midst of skyscrapers. That is interesting to me because i grew up here, and when i grew up here, there were no skyscrapers.

Again it was an absolutely beautiful walk on an absolutely beautiful day. And I walked barefoot!!

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Then we did our usual riding and telling stories … Driving Mamma Lindsey! We drove by the former home my cousins, the Mauldins, and those of Lillian, Catherine, Roline, Bryna, Lethea and Gregor.

And the gates were open to the Swan House.

And now I am back at Lenbrook listening to the director of The State Botanical Garden of Georgia, Dr. Wilf Nicholls. Current topic is rethinking landscape in light of the seasonal drought … Dr. Nicholls was a very good speaker … even though he doesn’t wear pants … he wears trousers (his joke not mine) … New botanical garden director gets ‘acclimatized’ | Online Athens.

A native of London, Nicholls spent the first 22 years of his career as a horticulturist in Vancouver, British Columbia, a temperate Pacific climate that, despite its northern latitude, is only a single zone cooler than our own. Nonetheless, the torrid temperatures that greeted him upon hisarrival in Athens in early September came as something of a shock. “Ninety-five degrees is just stunning!” he says, “But I’ll get acclimatized, I had to get acclimatized from Vancouver to Newfoundland.”

via New botanical garden director gets ‘acclimatized’ | Online Athens.

And a final birthday celebration with my mom and siblings and one in-law!

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Julie Andrews, ‘Sound of Music’ Remake,  Speakeasy: Hmmmm … Why?

Speakeasy asked Andrews what she thought of NBC’s recently-announced plans to redo “The Sound of Music” with country singer Carrie Underwood in the lead role that Andrews helped make famous. We also asked Andrews if she planned to play a part in the remake.

“No, I don’t think I will,” Andrews replied. “Listen—how long ago was it out? 50 something years ago? … So, 48 years, probably time that a remake is allowed. Why not? ‘Cinderella’ has been done, ‘Mary Poppins’ has been put on stage in the theater. It’s all part of the process of those wonderful properties going out and reaching another audience. No, I won’t be in it, but I do endorse everything. I mean why not?”

via Julie Andrews Sounds Off on That ‘Sound of Music’ Remake – Speakeasy – WSJ.

Downton Abbey, Facebook, LOL:

via Downton Abbey Facebook Recap Season 3 Episode 3 | Happy Place.

Lenbrook, kith/kin:  They have cushions in Fine Dining, too … Helps the residents get up easier. 🙂

Monopoly, pop culture, RIP:  A cat?!? RIP, iron …

via A cat?!? RIP, iron ….

Monopoly fans voted in an online contest to add a new cat token to the property-trading game, replacing the iron, toy maker Hasbro Inc. said Wednesday.

Monopoly fans voted in an online contest to add a new cat token to the property-trading game, replacing the iron. George Stahl has details on Markets Hub.

The results were announced after the shoe, wheelbarrow and iron were neck and neck in the final hours of voting that sparked passionate efforts by fans to save their favorite tokens and businesses eager to capitalize on publicity surrounding pieces that represent their products.

via Cat Added to Monopoly’s Token Lineup – WSJ.com.

05
May
11

5.5.2011 … cinco de mayo … and the testing begins …

parenting, empty nesters, women’s issues, me:

As far as I can tell, my own generation of mothers doesn’t really do the empty nest thing, no matter how large the hole left behind and no matter how pressing the grief. Unlike our mothers, we generally don’t go back to school to finally launch careers or, like our grandmothers, embrace the newly won status of matron and then grandmother. Unlike past generations, today’s middle-agers typically started their careers before marriage and motherhood. As for our wardrobe choices, my own concession to aging mainly involves wearing low-heeled shoes, but otherwise, like practically every woman I know, I continue to dress like I did in my student days. You know the uniform: jeans and a T-shirt or blouse, with clogs or sneakers or sandals.

There are other reasons we don’t stop to realize that we’re fretting over our empty nests. With the endless options for instant communications, we’re able to check in with the kids, or vice versa, on an embarrassingly regular basis. When my eldest went off to college four years ago, a friend of mine who was a year ahead of me in the kid-launching game reassured me. Don’t worry, he said: His wife and their college-age son “text at least once a day.” Another friend, whose eldest is studying abroad, told me that she regularly talks to him. “I can Skype daily without any big buildup or pressure that this is the big, expensive, long-distance call,” she said. “It’s easy to communicate, and it doesn’t cost anything.”

via Women on the Verge of an Empty Nest – Ideas Market – WSJ.

Swan House, Atlanta, places, kith/kin:  My father’s close friend grew up in the Swan House.  I can’t look at a picture of the house without smiling …. great stories …

Swan House.

education, public education, Atlanta:  A new high school for Buckhead ….

Atlanta Public Schools finalized this week the purchase of a 56-acre site in northwest Atlanta for the city’s new Buckhead-area high school. Final cost of the purchase totaled $55.3 million.

The site, at the former IBM complex on Northside Parkway, will replace North Atlanta High School on Northside Drive. The new school is scheduled to open in August 2013. The North Atlanta campus will then be converted into a second middle school in Buckhead, relieving an overcrowded Sutton Middle School on Powers Ferry Road near Chastain Park.

via APS finalizes land deal for new Buckhead high school  | ajc.com.

science, Albert Einstein, kudos: … Scientists affirmed “his theory of relativity after studying the most perfect spheres ever made as they orbit around the Earth.”

The longest experiment in space physics began with three men in a university swimming pool arguing about Einstein. It ended Wednesday, after 52 years and $750 million, with scientists affirming his theory of relativity after studying the most perfect spheres ever made as they orbit around the Earth.

Called Gravity Probe B, the exotic experiment measured how the revolving mass of Earth imperceptibly twists the fabric of space in a test of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. By one finding, the distortion amounts to 1.1 inches off true across the 24,900-mile circumference of Earth.

via Researchers Spent $750 million—and 52 Years—Affirming Theory of Relativity – WSJ.com.

food/drink, beer, George Washington: 🙂

We cannot tell a lie: Even George Washington needed to take the edge off sometimes.

The founding father and first president of the republic was a man of the people when it came to his drink of preference. His “Notebook as a Virginia Colonel,” dated from 1757, includes a handwritten recipe for “small beer.”

George Washington’s recipe for “small beer”. For a larger version, scroll to the end of this post.

That recipe, along with many of Washington’s other papers, is part of the New York Public Library’s collection. This month, the library is partnering with Shmaltz Brewing Company to recreate a modern version of the porter, to celebrate the centennial of its Stephen A. Schwarzman building.

Just 15 gallons will be brewed and offered for tasting. Local brewers Peter Taylor and Josh Knowlton have taken the liberty of tweaking the recipe, which the NYPL has dubbed “Fortitude’s Founding Father Brew.”

The brewers made batches of the beer, one with molasses — which Washington used — and one without, substituting malted barley for the fermentable sugar.

“Back then, they didn’t really have quite the same understanding of brewing science that we do now,” said Josh Knowlton.

Of Washington’s beer, “it’s pretty light, pretty dry, medium-bodied but roasty,” Knowlton said. “We used some roasted malts in there so it’s definitely got some of a roasted, chocolaty, little bit of a coffee flavor.”

via New York Public Library’s Tasty Treasure: George Washington’s Beer – Metropolis – WSJ.

news, Charlotte, Uptown power outage:  John and I have lived and worked in Charlotte for almost 30 years … power outage with no weather cause.

Duke Energy has restored power after an outage in uptown Charlotte that impacted a portion of Bank of America Plaza.A number of employees told the Observer that the power went out around midday at the Bank of America Plaza building.Duke Energy reported about 230 power outages in Mecklenburg County, most of them near Center City.The company also said more than 100 customers near the intersection of Trade and Tryon streets were without power.Duke Energys website showed that power was restored to the area by 4:30 p.m. Officials have not yet said what caused the outage.

via Power restored in uptown Charlotte | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

food:  Yuck …

What is often in shredded cheese besides cheese?

Powdered cellulose: minuscule pieces of wood pulp or other plant fibers that coat the cheese and keep it from clumping by blocking out moisture.

Cellulose can improve the texture of packaged food products, including bottled chocolate milk shakes.

One of an array of factory-made additives, cellulose is increasingly used by the processed-food industry, producers say. Food-product makers use it to thicken or stabilize foods, replace fat and boost fiber content, and cut the need for ingredients like oil or flour, which are getting more expensive.

Cellulose products, gums and fibers allow food manufactures to offer white bread with high dietary fiber content, low-fat ice cream that still feels creamy on the tongue, and allow cooks to sprinkle cheese over their dinner without taking time to shred.

via Packaged-Food Producers Increasingly Turn to Cellulose – WSJ.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, War on Terror, man’s best friend:  Didn’t realize they used dogs in this capacity.

While many Americans are anxious to meet and commend the team of Navy SEALs who raided the compound in Abottabad, Pakistan, and killed Usama bin Laden, one team member would be happy just to receive a doggie treat.

Among the commandos was a heroic canine – a bomb-sniffing dog who was attached to a team member as the SEALs were lowered from a Black Hawk helicopter into bin Laden’s hideout, The Sun reports.

The four-legged soldier has not yet been identified, but some speculate the breed was either a Belgian Malinois or German shepherd, a breed used frequently in raids in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The dogs are well-protected in these dangerous situations, armed with ballistic body armor, protective gear to shield against bullets and shrapnel, and infrared night-sight cameras that provide crucial feedback to troops and warn of potential ambushes, The Sun reports.

There are currently 600 dogs serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, Ensign Brynn Olsen of U.S. Central Command told the New York Times. In 2008, Gen. David Petraeus, current U.S. commander in charge of Afghanistan and soon to be CIA director, called for an increase in the number of dogs used by the military.

via Military Dog Used in Bin Laden Compound Raid – FoxNews.com.

 Osama bin Laden’s death, War on Terror:  Actually I am tired of this …

Steve King was the first member of Congress to float the inevitable question. “Wonder what President Obama thinks of waterboarding now?” the Iowa Republican tweeted shortly after Obama announced the death of the world’s most infamous terrorist. In the days since, even as they maintain the tacit truce that bans partisan potshots in the wake of bin Laden’s killing, Capitol Hill Republicans have advanced the idea that Bush-era “enhanced-interrogation techniques” were responsible for the tip that led intelligence officials to Osama bin Laden’s Abbottabad compound.

At least two members of the Senate Intelligence Committee have made this claim. “The information that eventually led us to this compound was the direct result of enhanced interrogations; one can conclude if we had not used enhanced interrogations, we would not have come to yesterday’s action,” North Carolina Senator Richard Burr told CNBC Tuesday.

via Republicans Split Over Waterboarding’s Role in bin Laden’s Death | Swampland.

 Osama bin Laden’s death, War on Terror:  Why didn’t they suspect?

ABBOTTABAD, Pakistan – When a woman involved in a polio vaccine drive turned up at Osama bin Laden’s hideaway, she remarked to the men behind the high walls about the expensive SUVs parked inside. The men took the vaccine, apparently to administer to the 23 children at the compound, and told her to go away.

The terror chief and his family kept well hidden behind thick walls in this northwestern hill town they shared with thousands of Pakistani soldiers. But glimpses of their life are emerging — along with deep skepticism that authorities didn’t know they were there.

Although the house is large, it was unclear how three dozen people could have lived there with any degree of comfort.

via Bin Laden’s neighbors noticed unusual things – CBS News.

food, North Carolina:  North Carolina … sweet potatoes???

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The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More




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