Posts Tagged ‘Teach for America

02
Nov
11

11.1.2011… Nomaste and happy 18th birthday to Sarah (daughter of RA and Tim) and Scottie (son of Melanie)! … Rabbit, rabbit … never heard of this superstition …

11.1.11: 🙂

Women’s Quest

Welcome to this amazing day of oneness — 11/1/11 — this day will never happen again. Take it in and enjoy being one with every one – Namaste!

via Welcome to this….

superstitions, rabbit…rabbit: No wonder my friend with a British mum knew of this one!

“Rabbit rabbit” is a common British superstition. The most common modern version states that a person should say “rabbit, rabbit, white rabbit”, “rabbit, rabbit, rabbit”, “rabbits, rabbits, rabbits”,[1] “rabbit, rabbit” or simply “white rabbits” upon waking on the first day of each new month, and on doing so will receive good luck for the duration of that month. In the United States, the tradition is especially common in Nantucket, Cape Cod other towns within Massachusetts and throughout Vermont, notably in Middlebury and Chester.

[edit]Origins and history

The exact origin of the superstition is unknown, though it has appeared in print at least as early as 1922:

“Why,” the man in the brown hat laughed at him, “I thought everybody knew ’Rabbit, rabbit, rabbit.’ If you say ‘Rabbit, rabbit, rabbit’—three times, just like that—first thing in the morning on the first of the month, even before you say your prayers, you’ll get a present before the end of the month.”[2]

However, some reports place its origins even earlier, into the 1800s. Today it has spread to most of the English-speaking countries of the world, although, like all folklore, determining its exact area of distribution is difficult. This superstition is related to the broader belief in the rabbit or hare being a “lucky” animal, as exhibited in the practice of carrying a rabbit’s foot for luck. Some have also believed it represents jumping into the future and moving ahead with life and happiness.[citation needed]

via Rabbit rabbit – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

architecture, Louisville, real estate market: I was just telling someone that Louisville is more midwestern than southern in architecture … classic southern here!

Kentucky Greek Revival

11/01/11

Price: $2,950,000

Location: Louisville, United States

Type of Home: Detached Home

This house near Cherokee Park in Louisville, Ky., includes a Tuscan-inspired courtyard, as well as a sunroom and a wine room. The current owner designed the interiors, adding a mix of French, English, Chinese, Japanese and contemporary furniture. –Sushil Cheema

Dorothy Cherry says she and her late husband, Wendell Cherry, bought this Greek Revival home in Louisville, Ky., 33 years ago, just a month before they married. ‘I called it my honeymoon cottage,’ Ms. Cherry says. Mr. Cherry, the co-founder of hospital operator Humana, Inc., passed away in 1991 at the age of 55. Photo: John Nation

via Kentucky Greek Revival — Photos, House of the Day – WSJ.com.

Northeastern University (Boston),  regional campus, Charlotte:  Johnson & Wales made sense to me … but why would Northeastern University open a “regional campus” in Charlotte.

Northeastern University of Boston is officially laying down stakes in Charlotte today smack in the middle of the city at Trade and Tryon streets.

It is the venerable private school’s first venture outside Massachusetts, and likely won’t be its last — with campuses planned elsewhere, including in Seattle within a year.

In Charlotte, Northeastern will offer a doctorate in education and eight master’s-level programs tied largely to the region’s financial center. Those offerings will include masters of science degrees in finance, taxation, project management, sports leadership, leadership, education and health informatics.

The school is leasing 14,000 square feet of space in the 20-story 101 Independence Building at Trade and Tryon, including administrative offices on the ground floor near the entrance.

N.C. Lt. Gov. Walter Dalton and local officials plan to hold a ribbon-cutting this morning for the new uptown Charlotte campus.

via Northeastern University is opening regional campus today | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

‘History of the World in 100 Objects’, British Museum:   I loved following this when they were released daily … might be a good coffee table book.

IT was a project so audacious that it took 100 curators four years to complete it. The goal: to tell the history of the world through 100 objects culled from the British Museum’s sprawling collections. The result of endless scholarly debates was unveiled, object by chronological object, on a BBC Radio 4 program in early 2010, narrated by Neil MacGregor, director of the museum. Millions of listeners tuned in to hear his colorful stories — so many listeners that the BBC, together with the British Museum, published a hit book of the series, “A History of the World in 100 Objects,” which is being published in the United States on Monday.

via ‘History of the World in 100 Objects,’ From British Museum – NYTimes.com.

Teach for America, college football, Alabama, Coach Saban: “But in spite of this, the Board of Education plans to hire 110 Teach for America teachers over the next three years and put them in schools in poor neighborhoods.  These are recent college graduates, most of whom got degrees in something other than education and will receive a five-week crash course in how to teach before being sent off to work in the city’s most challenging schools.”

But in spite of this, the Board of Education plans to hire 110 Teach for America teachers over the next three years and put them in schools in poor neighborhoods.  These are recent college graduates, most of whom got degrees in something other than education and will receive a five-week crash course in how to teach before being sent off to work in the city’s most challenging schools.”

Anyone who pays attention to education knows that the most persistently poor-performing schools are those in impoverished neighborhoods.  For example, there are nine schools in the Huntsville system where more than 90 percent of students receive free-reduced lunches.  According to an analysis by the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama, none of these schools have reading and math scores where all grades (three through eight) are equal to or above state average.

By comparison, of the five schools where all grades are above state average, free-reduced lunches range from 4 to 25 percent.

But in spite of this, the Board of Education plans to hire 110 Teach for America teachers over the next three years and put them in schools in poor neighborhoods.  These are recent college graduates, most of whom got degrees in something other than education and will receive a five-week crash course in how to teach before being sent off to work in the city’s most challenging schools.

I don’t believe this is the way Coach Saban thinks.

But this rather convoluted logic is not the only concern raised by hiring Teach for America teachers.

Earlier this year the Board of Education released a substantial number of employees, citing continuing budget concerns as the reason.  Yet in addition to paying the salaries of the TFA teachers, the board will also pay an additional $5,000 per teacher to the TFA organization.

Teachers across the state have just had their pay reduced by the Legislature; Gov. Robert Bentley announced a few days ago that the state’s education budget will be $108 million less next year than in the current year, money for classroom supplies have been slashed to the bone and educators are being asked every day to do more with less.

Yet the Huntsville City Board of Education is considering signing a contract for $550,000 with Teach for America.

What am I missing?

via If football coaches used Teach for America logic – The Answer Sheet – The Washington Post.

clocks, time:  I like the art of this one …

Clock for an Acrobat – new clock by Pentagram’s Daniel Weil explores parallels in the way time moves in space and an acrobat’s moves along a wire. Related, 7 ways to understand time.Clock for an Acrobat – new clock by Pentagram’s Daniel Weil explores parallels in the way time moves in space and an acrobat’s moves along a wire.

via curiosity counts – Clock for an Acrobat – new clock by Pentagram’s….

Justice Clarence Thomas, Establishment Clause:  This is a mess … don’t usually agree with Thomas.

Justice Clarence Thomas on Monday said that the U.S. Supreme Courts establishment-clause jurisprudence is “in shambles.”Citing divergent lower-court opinions on the display of crosses, the Ten Commandments, and other religious messages in courthouses, city halls, and public schools, Thomas said “our jurisprudence has confounded the lower courts and rendered the constitutionality of displays of religious imagery on government property anyones guess.””Even if the court does not share my view that the establishment clause restrains only the federal government, and that, even if incorporated [i.e., applied to the states], the clause only prohibits actual legal coercion, the court should be deeply troubled by what its establishment clause jurisprudence has wrought,” Thomas said in a lone dissent from the courts denial of certiorari in Utah Highway Patrol Association v. American Atheists Inc. Case No. 10-1276.The Supreme Court on Oct. 31 refused to hear the case involving white crosses placed on or near spots where members of the Utah Highway Patrol were killed while on duty. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, in Denver, ruled last year that although the crosses were placed by a private group, their location predominantly on public property conveyed a message that the state of Utah endorsed Christianity.In his 19-page dissent, Thomas referred to a number of school cases that, in his view, reflect confusion or inconsistent application by lower courts of the Supreme Courts rulings under the First Amendments prohibition against government establishment of religion.

via Thomas: Establishment Clause Jurisprudence In Shambles – The School Law Blog – Education Week.

Tricia Rose Burt, fertility challenge:  Interesting …

New Story is Featured National Podcast on The StoryCollider

Vignette from new show Be Fruitful and Multiply begins airing Oct. 31

Just days after completing a successful run of I Will Be Good  at the FringeNYC Encore series, I was asked to perform at The StoryCollider  in Brooklyn. An audience favorite, the story was selected for their national podcast. Tune in here!

At The StoryCollider, all the stories told are about science, some by experts and some by everyday folks. My story  is based on my husband’s and my experience with fertility treatments several years ago. It’s both poignant and funny (well, as funny as invasive medical procedures can be) and is part of my upcoming show, Be Fruitful and Multiply (working title), currently in development. As always, I’d love your feedback — email me  or post your thoughts on my Facebook page.

via New story podcast nationwide!.

 …

The fertility challenge

A 40-year old artist struggles with fertility treatments.

via Tricia Rose Burt: The fertility challenge.

 …

“I’m mostly terrified of two things: One, having a baby and all of the freedom I’ll lose, and two, not having a baby, and all the joy that I will miss.”

via Tricia Rose Burt: The fertility challenge.

You Are Not So Smart: A Field Guide to the Psychology of Our Stupidity, book: Probably need this “field guide.”

We spend most of our lives going around believing we are rational, logical beings who make carefully weighted decisions based on objective facts in stable circumstances. Of course, as both a growing body of research and our own retrospective experience demonstrate, this couldn’t be further from the truth. For the past three years, David McRaney’s cheekily titled yet infinitely intelligent You Are Not So Smart has been one of my favorite smart blogs, tirelessly debunking the many ways in which our minds play tricks on us and the false interpretations we have of those trickeries. This month, YANSS joins my favorite blog-turned-book success stories with You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You’re Deluding Yourself — an illuminating and just the right magnitude of uncomfortable almanac of some of the most prevalent and enduring lies we tell ourselves.

The original trailer for the book deals with something the psychology of which we’ve previously explored — procrastination

via You Are Not So Smart: A Field Guide to the Psychology of Our Stupidity | Brain Pickings.

19
Feb
11

2.19.2010 … continuing the tour of mid-atlantic colleges … our tour guides all seem happy :)

education, Teach for America, USA: Very interesting analysis … ET has met some TFA teachers and noted that they feel unprepared.  Several teach math with absolutely no background in math … or teaching.

According to the petition,

“few TFA teachers remain in the classroom beyond TFA’s two-year requirement, depriving our children of experienced educators. These are bold injustices in a perpetually unfair education system that denies our children the critical resources they deserve and need to reach their full potential. The status quo educational inequity that assigns well-prepared teachers to middle class and wealthy white children and inadequately prepared teachers to our children must end.”

Undeniably, part of what’s kept Teach For America going over the past 20 years is the ability to cultivate achievement-oriented individuals who are committed to keeping student achievement front and center. Improving its training is surely going to be a part of how the organization prioritizes its students in the 21st century. But if Teach For America stepped up and took the lead in the national conversation about race, class, and education—if it used its considerable influence to challenge how school districts decide which teachers get funneled to certain schools—now that would be something spectacular.

via Teach For America’s Model: Does It Need to Change? – Education – GOOD.

college, drugs, parenting:  One negative of decriminalizing or social acceptance of “a little pot” is that the risk-takers move up the risk ladder.

Thanks to recent high profile narcotics busts at the universities of Georgetown, Columbia, and Cornell, word is out that students at elite private schools aren’t just smoking a little pot. They’re using (and dealing) hard drugs like heroin—and they’re getting arrested for it.

via Breaking: Ivy League College Students Use Hard Drugs – Education – GOOD.

economics, world markets:  Coffee is the second most important legally traded commodity.

While you might think of coffee as merely a good caffeinated drink, the seeds of the Coffea plant represent the second most important legally traded commodity, following oil, in terms of dollar value, writes Mark Pendergast in Uncommon Grounds. Consequently, these beans mean a lot to some 25 million farmers in developing countries.

via Map: Where Are the World’s Coffee Drinkers? – Food – GOOD.

culture, multiculturalism, globalization, parenting:  I really enjoyed this analysis and agree it is very difficult to raise children open to multiculturalism in our culture.

U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron just reignited the debate on “multiculturalism,” joining ranks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Sarkozy by declaring their multicultural policies a “failure.” As a U.S. passport carrying, multilingual, daughter of immigrants, and as a mother of aspiring global citizens, such a defeat felt like a kick in the gut. In my travels speaking to diverse audiences on gaining a global perspective and the tools contained in my book, Growing Up Global: Raising Children to Be At Home in the World, I’ve seen quite the opposite: individuals of varied backgrounds coming together to raise beautiful families, make friends across cultural and ideological lines, and take tangible steps toward building a better world for their children.

Upon closer review, David Cameron’s justification for the failure of multiculturalism seemed reasonable: “Under the doctrine of state multiculturalism, we have encouraged different cultures to live separate lives, apart from each other and apart from the mainstream.” Speaking specifically of radical Muslim youth, Cameron argued this resulted in marginalization, rootlessness, and “behaving in ways that run completely counter to our values.”

Like most words that end in “-ism,” the policy of multiculturalism divided people rather than it building connections among them. Unity and diversity became mutually exclusive. This resulted in too many immigrants not gaining opportunities to move into better neighborhoods, attend those schools, or marry outside their confined groups. That version of “multiculturalism” resulted in ghettoization, produced a violently radicalized youth, and served as a excuse for racism; that version of “multiculturalism” is a failure.

via How to Save Multiculturalism – Education – GOOD.

politics, stereotypes:  Also interesting … as well as the comments.

I find Mr Sumner’s typology quite congenial probably because I have Mr Sumner’s politics, more or less, and his way of carving up the ideological space places us where we see ourselves: as “pragmatic libertarians” leaning a bit more toward “progressive idealism” than “dogmatic libertarianism”. That said, there is something troubling about the lack of parallelism in Mr Sumner’s scheme. While conservatism and progressivism both have “idealistic” and “corrupt” variants, libertarianism is only “dogmatic” and “pragmatic”. I think the ideological influence but electoral insignificance of libertarianism goes some way toward justifying its different treatment. But I wouldn’t want to leave out the possibility of conservatism and progressivism that is pragmatic in the sense of pursuing conservative and progressive values through practical, empirically-tested means, and not in the “corrupt” sense of catering to the electoral interests of a partisan faction.

via Picturing politics: Sumner’s wheel of ideology | The Economist.

history, China, bookshelf:  In 2007, my family visited the Chengde Mountain Resort.  As I walked through this summer palace with our guide, he read to me many of the signs that were not translated into English and I was struck by how many times he read the word “humiliation”.  I commented the other day that  it would be like walking through a US historical site and repeatedly commenting on our humiliation. This book review puts perspective on why the Chinese did this (and possibly why the signs were not translated into English and others glorifying China’s dynastic history were translated).

AS NUMEROUS museums across China testify, the country dwells on its past in order to justify the present. A common theme is that of the “national humiliation” China says it suffered from the mid-19th century until the Communist Party came to power in 1949. To help prove that the party created a “new China” and has the right to rule it, schoolchildren are made to tramp around exhibits showing how foreigners scrambled to dismember China, how they poisoned it with opium, bullied (and sometimes butchered) its people and looted its treasures.

As far as it goes, this outline of what happened is true enough, though opium was commonly used by the Chinese elite before the British started peddling their own produce from India. But the party forbids exploration of anything that might blur this picture. One taboo area is what Chinese nationalists at the time saw as the foreign nature of the last imperial dynasty, the Qing, which collapsed in 1911. Sun Yat-sen, the revolutionary who helped topple it, held the ethnic Manchus who controlled the dynasty in more contempt than the Westerners who had forcibly set up colonial enclaves, the Russians who had carved off part of Manchuria, or the Japanese who had taken Taiwan after a war in 1895. To keep the story simple, the party prefers to view the Manchus as Chinese.

In his history of the foreign scramble for China, Robert Bickers of Bristol University looks mainly at the story of west European and, to a lesser extent, American interaction with the country. The Japanese and Russian strands of this hugely complex tale of an evolving nation-state are picked out in less detail. The anglophone actors take centre stage—rightly, perhaps, at first, given the pioneering role played by the British in China’s history of humiliation. Mr Bickers takes 1832 as his starting point, the year when British ships sailed north from the Canton delta, carrying pamphlets, textiles and opium.

via 19th-century China: Clashing with the foreign devils | The Economist.

Middle East Unrest:  good country by country summary …

Unrest has spread across the Middle East and North Africa. Here’s a look at what has happened — and what is happening — in various countries:

via Unrest in the Middle East and North Africa — country by country – CNN.com.

history, GWTW, Atlanta, kith/kin:  Every time a new picture or footage is found I search for a 12-year-old boy in a boy scout uniform “holding the ropes” for Clark Gable and shaking his hand.  🙂

The color film is a rarity for its time, shot in 1939 during the three-day celebration surrounding the release of the movie Gone with the Wind.

“It was made on 16mm Kodachrome film. And some of that film is of pretty lasting quality,” said Paul Crater of the Atlanta History Center.

The Atlanta History Center uploaded the film to YouTube a few weeks ago. It features the Loew’s Grand Theatre — which was destroyed by fire in 1978. The Georgia Pacific tower stands in its place now. Shot by a furniture store executive with a taste for expensive cameras, it’s an archival piece that stayed mostly under wraps for 70 years.

via New / Old Footage Unearthed of 1939 Atlanta GWTW Premiere – 11Alive.com | WXIA | Atlanta, GA.

12
Feb
11

2.12.2011 … home :) … Learned a lot at the Festival of Legal Learning …

faith and spirituality: Thou shalt not kill … thinking positively, thou shalt create.

Words, words, words. Our society is full of words: on billboards, on television screens, in newspapers and books. Words whispered, shouted, and sung. Words that move, dance, and change in size and color. Words that say, “Taste me, smell me, eat me, drink me, sleep with me,” but most of all, “buy me.” With so many words around us, we quickly say: “Well, they’re just words.” Thus, words have lost much of their power.

Still, the word has the power to create. When God speaks, God creates. When God says, “Let there be light” (Genesis 1:3), light is. God speaks light. For God, speaking and creating are the same. It is this creative power of the word we need to reclaim. What we say is very important. When we say, “I love you,” and say it from the heart, we can give another person new life, new hope, new courage. When we say, “I hate you,” we can destroy another person. Let’s watch our words.

via February 11, 2011 – Words That Create.

The Economy, economics, oil:

All of which is to say, the world doesn’t need to experience declines in potential oil production to see a rise in oil prices. All it needs is for oil producers to see that such limits loom and begin betting on the near-certainty of rising prices. Of course, different countries will face different liquidity constraints; some leaders may find themselves producing full out in order to sustain their socialist paradise, particularly when prices temporarily dip thanks to recession. But at those times, other countries with fiscal room to spare should cut back their production further—to buy more, essentially, when prices are low in order to sell more when prices are high.

Just something to keep an eye on if and as prices for petroleum rise.

via Oil prices: Dwindling reserves | The Economist.

unemployment, South Africa: >1/3 of the workforce is jobless.

President Jacob Zuma made tackling staggering unemployment the government’s top priority on Thursday. He announced $2.7 billion in tax breaks to encourage investment in manufacturing, and an additional $1.25 billion for job-creation undertakings, without offering specifics. The unemployment rate fell to 24 percent from 25.3 percent in the final quarter of 2010. When those who have given up looking for work are included, more than a third of the potential work force is jobless.

via South Africa – President Announces New Spending on Jobs – NYTimes.com.

internet, Groupons:  good question … do I need that?

Or, even when consumers pause to consider the value of the product or service offered, they might be so excited that they fail to ask a more basic question: Do I need, or even want, this thing at any price? These steps are especially likely to be skipped when the pressure is on and the deal will be disappearing within hours. If you’ve seen any of these sites, you know that right next to the deal’s price, there’s always a clock that’s ticking—showing consumers just how little time they have to pull the trigger or risk missing out forever.

via Before Buying a Hot Daily Deal from the Likes of Groupon, Think About This – It’s Your Money – TIME.com.

lists, social media:  Good ideas to help you learn to use the tools that are out there. 15 resources to accelerate your social media learning | Alexandra Samuel.

children’s literature, Pooh, NYC, libraries:  I love Pooh, always have, always will.

Winnie the Pooh has finally found a new home in midtown…and I don’t think he pays rent.

Pooh and his friends recently moved into the main branch of the New York Public Library from their old home at the Donnell Library Center on West 53rd St.

via From The Hundred Acre Wood To Midtown « Scouting NY.

community service, Teach for America, Princeton Senior Thesis, Wendy Kopp:

In 1989, when Wendy Kopp proposed the idea in her senior thesis at Princeton of quickly training outstanding college graduates to teach in high-poverty schools for at least two years, her adviser told her she was “quite evidently deranged.” The comment has become legend since Kopp, unfazed, went on to launch Teach For America after she graduated, and on Saturday more than 10,000 of the nonprofit’s alumni will gather in Washington to celebrate its 20th anniversary.

via Teach for America: 5 Myths That Persist 20 Years On – TIME.

random, movies, YouTube, life lessons: YouTube – Reel Wisdom: Lessons from 40 Films in 7 Minutes.




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