Posts Tagged ‘The New Yorker

02
May
14

5.2.14 … Delicious Trumps, Pretense Stinks, Comfort Feels Good …

Local Three Kitchen & Bar – Atlanta:

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So I first heard of Local Three last week here in Charlotte.  Chef Chris Hall was in Charlotte for Charlotte Food and Wine.  I enjoyed him, so I sought his restaurant out in Atlanta.  My experience was very good.  The Vidalia Onion Soup and the Hoppin John  were both excellent.  But the cost was excessive for lunch.  So although I would recommend the food (it was delicious!), I would not recommend the restaurant unless you are on an expense account.

Creamy Vidalia Onion Soup: Cabot Cheddar, Thyme, Garlic Croutons $4.53/$6.53

Hoppin’ John $4.93

Pimento Cheese Grits $4.93

Carolina Mountain Trout: Anson Mills Rice Grits, “Succotash”, Lobster Saffron Broth $19.93

via Local Three Kitchen & Bar – Atlanta Restaurant.

Their restaurant Local Three represents a shared philosophy on food, drink, hospitality and how to do business. That philosophy is straightforward: People Matter Most, Local Is Priority, Seasonal Makes Sense, Authenticity Rules, Quality Governs, Delicious Trumps, Pretense Stinks, Comfort Feels Good, Appreciation Tastes Better, Prudence Sustains It All.

via Local Three Kitchen & Bar – Atlanta Restaurant.

Daily Meditation by Henri Nouwen, friends:

One friend may offer us affection, another may stimulate our minds, another may strengthen our souls. The more able we are to receive the different gifts our friends have to give us, the more able we will be to offer our own unique but limited gifts. Thus, friendships create a beautiful tapestry of love.

via Daily Meditation: May 2, 2014 | Daily Meditation by Henri Nouwen.

Do or Di, blogs, Westminster classmates:  I have always loved Di’s humor and joie de vie.  It shows in her new blog.  Enjoy!

Do or Di | fixed on the horizon; happily distracted by the present

fixed on the horizon; happily distracted by the present

via Do or Di | fixed on the horizon; happily distracted by the present.

Andy Baio @waxpancake, Kickstarter:

Andy Baio @waxpancake,

Kickstarter turned five today, and the team made a video looking back at its crazy history: youtube.com/watch?v=qcR_UH…

29 Apr

 

On April 28th 2009 at 4:27 pm EST, Kickstarter went live. To celebrate the past five years, we put together this history of Kickstarter.

via ▶ A Brief History of Kickstarter – YouTube.

Freshman Shames Ivy League College with His Personal Story About ‘White Privilege’, Princeton University: Worth reading and thinking about …

My exploration did yield some results. I recognize that it was my parents’ privilege and now my own that there is such a thing as an American dream which is attainable even for a penniless Jewish immigrant.

I am privileged that values like faith and education were passed along to me. My grandparents played an active role in my parents’ education, and some of my earliest memories included learning the Hebrew alphabet with my Dad. It’s been made clear to me that education begins in the home, and the importance of parents’ involvement with their kids’ education—from mathematics to morality—cannot be overstated. It’s not a matter of white or black, male or female or any other division which we seek, but a matter of the values we pass along, the legacy we leave, that perpetuates “privilege.” And there’s nothing wrong with that.

Behind every success, large or small, there is a story, and it isn’t always told by sex or skin color. My appearance certainly doesn’t tell the whole story, and to assume that it does and that I should apologize for it is insulting. While I haven’t done everything for myself up to this point in my life, someone sacrificed themselves so that I can lead a better life. But that is a legacy I am proud of.

I have checked my privilege. And I apologize for nothing.

via Freshman Shames Ivy League College with His Personal Story About ‘White Privilege’.

A friend posted the above  and another mutual friend responded with this.  I have to admit I laughed.

via ▶ Louis CK – Being White – YouTube.

Uploaded on Nov 27, 2008

From his latest stand-up “Chewed Up” – Louis CK tells people why it’s great being a white male. It’s advantages and it’s futuristic disadvantages.

via ▶ Louis CK – Being White – YouTube.

18 Things to Eat, Buy, and Do in Puerto Rico, KieroCoco Coconut Water, food & drink:  I loved Puerto Rico, so I thought I would share this list.

Fresh coconut juice is one of the great, unsung pleasures in life, and I’m not ashamed to say I marched around El Mercado cradling a giant coconut pierced with a frilly cocktail umbrella. At the KieroCoco stand, from whence it came, you select your coconut (rounder ones are juicier; browner ones are sweeter), and then drill into it with the help of a hand-cranked doohickey attached to a mobile cart.

via 18 Things to Eat, Buy, and Do in Puerto Rico

2.4.13 … Becoming Kind … | Dennard’s Clipping Service:  Everyone once a while I notice repeated returns to one post.  With this post, originally it was because of the cone of shame cartoon.  But later, I am not sure what has drawn the interest to this 2.4.13 … Becoming Kind …  I then laughed at myself because a post that is entitled, “Becoming Kind,” leads with a cartoon referenced as “cone of shame.”

New Yorker Cartoons, The New Yorker, cell phones, cone of shame, LOL:  I deserve a cone of shame  …

 Downton Abbey, Dowager, quotes:  The Dowager, she gets all the good quotes!

Albert Schweitzer, quotes, A Mighty Girl:  A Might Girl is one of my favorite source for quotes.

 

“Do something wonderful, people may imitate it.” — Albert Schweitzer

via A Mighty Girl.

just a thought …, Henri Nouwen, Tolstoi, kindness:

Here is the great challenge: All people, whatever their color, religion, or sex, belong to humankind and are called to be kind to one another, treating one another as brothers and sisters. There is hardly a day in our lives in which we are not called to this.

via Daily Meditation: Becoming Kind.

Nothing can make our lives, or the lives of other people, more beautiful than perpetual kindness. – Leo Tolstoy in A Calendar of Wisdom

via Nothing can make our lives, or the lives of other… • literary jukebox.

when bad things happen …, What Gives 365:  From one of my favorite blogs …

I went to church this morning wanting to thank the universe for sparing us … but that assumes, of course, that the universe would have been punishing us had things turned out differently. And therein lies the shame and guilt when bad things happen. The truth is a terrible accident can happen to anyone, at any time, and often there is nobody to blame. But that reality is awfully terrifying to admit; we want our universe to make more sense than that and we want to feel as if our good intentions and conduct will spare us from tragedy.

via Up in smoke. | What Gives 365.

E.B. White, quotes, LOL:

source: Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership..

via 2.4.13 … Becoming Kind … | Dennard’s Clipping Service.

 

11
Apr
14

4.11.14 … collective nouns … an ostentation of peacocks… How great is that! …

trivia: Listening to NPR last weekend … collective nouns … an ostentation of peacocks… How great is that!  I could not find the NPR link, but I found this …

An “exaltation of larks”? Yes! And a “leap of leopards,” a “parliament of owls,” an “ostentation of peacocks,” a “smack of jellyfish,” and a “murder of crows”! For those who have ever wondered if the familiar “pride of lions” and “gaggle of geese” were only the tip of a linguistic iceberg, James Lipton has provided the definitive answer: here are hundreds of equally pithy, and often poetic, terms unearthed by Mr. Lipton in the Books of Venery that were the constant study of anyone who aspired to the title of gentleman in the fifteenth century. When Mr. Lipton’s painstaking research revealed that five hundred years ago the terms of venery had already been turned into the Game of Venery, he embarked on an odyssey that has given us a “slouch of models,” a “shrivel of critics,” an “unction of undertakers,” a “blur of Impressionists,” a “score of bachelors,” and a “pocket of quarterbacks.” This ultimate edition of An Exaltation of Larks is Mr. Lipton’s brilliant answer to the assault on language and literacy in the last decades of the twentieth century. In it you will find more than 1,100 resurrected or newly minted contributions to that most endangered of all species, our language, in a setting of 250 witty, beautiful, and remarkably apt engravings

via Goodreads | An Exaltation of Larks: The Ultimate Edition by James Lipton — Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists.

 

The Dance, March Madness, UK:  In the end, it was  just me, two dogs and a cat pulling for the cats … shhh … Don’t tell the dogs … Dogs won anyway.  next year.

 Dan Clodfelter, Charlotte mayor scandal, It’s a great day to be a Wildcat!: Who you gonna call?

Davidson President Carol Quillen said, “Congratulations to Dan on his election to Mayor of Charlotte. Dan is a remarkable and dedicated leader and has been an incredible asset to the Davidson College community for more than 40 years. We look forward to the great impact Dan will have on the Charlotte region. It’s a great day to be a Wildcat!”

Clodfelter is an attorney with Moore & Van Allen, PLLC, who served on Charlotte City Council 1987-1993. He was a philosophy major at Davidson and earned his law degree from Yale.

At Davidson, Clodfelter was active in student government, and served as SGA President his senior year. He was on the debate team, and served as the student representative on several trustee and faculty committees. He was once featured on national television as one of Ralph Nader’s “Raiders” because of his advocacy for better working conditions in the textile mills of Kannapolis. He graduated cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa as Davidson’s 17th Rhodes Scholar. His hometown of Thomasville, N.C., celebrated the honor with a Daniel G. Clodfelter Day.

Davidson awarded him its Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2007. The citation accompanying the award praised him for a distinguished career in which he brought tenacity and open-mindedness to legal and political tasks; for the high standard of ethics he brought to his twin professions; for the recognition by his peers, and for the distinction he reflects upon Davidson through his achievements.

After two years at Oxford and at Yale, Clodfelter and his wife Elizabeth Bevan returned to North Carolina, where he clerked for U.S. District Court Judge James B. McMillan in Charlotte. He joined Moore & Van Allen in 1978. His practice there emphasizes counseling and litigation involving federal and state antitrust and unfair trade practices, including mergers and acquisitions, and litigation and advice relating to zoning, land use, and planning law.

via Charlotte City Council Selects Dan Clodfelter ’72 as Mayor – Davidson College.

George W. Bush,  painter, The New Yorker: Is he worse than, as good, or better than Churchill?

 

During Friday’s segment on the “Today” show, in which the NBC special correspondent Jenna Bush Hager joined her father, former President George W. Bush, for a tour of an exhibition of his never-before-seen paintings, the two came upon a self-portrait—not the infamous one of Bush in the bathtub, but a more conventional depiction, from the shoulders up.

“You think you got to the soul of you?” Hager asked her father.

“Well, you’re gonna have to ask other people who know me better, like yourself,” the former President said.

In the interview, Bush told his daughter that painting had opened his mind, but perhaps it is too much to think that it would have turned the outward-looking, goal-driven man inward. Some Bush paintings that leaked last year, including ones in the shower and the bathtub, were startling not merely for their unexpected setting (and ex-Presidential skin) but because they, with their primitive experimentation with point of view, suggested a kind of soul-searching. They were quiet and a little sad. The magazine’s art critic, Peter Schjeldahl, wrote, “Someone could run with it into themes of appearance and reality, mysteries of identity, and whatnot. Not me, though.” It turns out he was wise to resist the urge. As Bush tells it, he conceived of those scenes because “I wanted to kind of shock my instructor.”

via George W. Bush Paints the World : The New Yorker.

The Stories Behind 12 Seemingly Obvious Baseball Rules | Mental Floss: 🙂

1. RUNNERS CANNOT RUN THE BASES BACKWARDS [RULE 7.01, 7.02, 7.08(I)]

Considering the purpose of a baserunner is to advance safely to home plate, running the bases in reverse seems nonsensical. However, the silly antics of Germany Schaefer, a journeyman infielder in the early 1900s, forced officials to put this rule in the book.

On August 4, 1911, Schaefer stole second, intending to draw a throw from the catcher to allow his teammate—Clyde Milan, who was on third—to steal home. However, the opposing catcher held the ball, keeping Milan struck at third. Hoping to recreate the play, Schaefer looked to steal again. This time, the only option was to steal first.

On the next pitch, he took off for first, but a double steal still didn’t materialize; the catcher was too surprised to make the throw. The opposing player-manager ran onto the field to argue and amid the chaos Milan finally took off for home plate, where he was thrown out.

This wasn’t the first time Schaefer attempted a double steal by regression, but the 1911 stunt received more publicity. It took until 1920, but the sport’s officials finally passed a rule prohibiting such actions, which remains to this day. Now, if a player runs the bases in reverse

via The Stories Behind 12 Seemingly Obvious Baseball Rules | Mental Floss.

Elite Colleges Turn Away Up to 95%, NYTimes.com:  This is making education very difficult.  Overvaluing a few at the expense of everyone.

Enrollment at American colleges is sliding, but competition for spots at top universities is more cutthroat and anxiety-inducing than ever. In the just-completed admissions season, Stanford University accepted only 5 percent of applicants, a new low among the most prestigious schools, with the odds nearly as bad at its elite rivals.

via Best, Brightest and Rejected: Elite Colleges Turn Away Up to 95% – NYTimes.com.

01
Aug
13

8.1.13 … aspirational places … the south … vacations … food …

Hot U.S. Cities, jobs, culture, Southern and Modest Sized, The Daily Beast, lists:  A few of my favorite places made the list …

Call them aspirational cities, or magnets of opportunity, but the urban areas attracting today’s ambitious citizens are most likely Southern, culturally vibrant, modest sized, long on jobs, and short on traffic, write Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox.

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A city at its best, wrote the philosopher René Descartes, provides “an inventory of the possible.” The city Descartes had in mind was 17th-century Amsterdam, which for him epitomized those cities where people go to change their circumstances and improve their lives. But such aspirational cities have existed throughout American history as well, starting with Boston in the 17th century, Philadelphia in the 18th, New York in the 19th, Chicago in the early 20th, Detroit in the 1920s and 1930s, followed by midcentury Los Angeles, and San Jose in the 1980s.Yes, the great rule of aspirational cities is that they change over time, becoming sometimes less entrepreneurial, more expensive, and demographically stagnant. In the meantime, other cities, often once obscure, suddenly become the new magnets of opportunity.

via Hot U.S. Cities That Offer Both Jobs and Culture Are Mostly Southern and Modest Sized – The Daily Beast.

Washington National Cathedral, Darth Vader, random:  I assumed this was an internet hoax … 🙂

DarthVader

The Star Wars Villain on the Northwest TowerIn the 1980s, while the west towers were under construction, Washington National Cathedral held a decorative sculpture competition for children. Word of the competition was spread nationwide through National Geographic World Magazine. The third-place winner was Christopher Rader, with his drawing of that fearful villain, Darth Vader. The fierce head was sculpted by Jay Hall Carpenter, carved by Patrick J. Plunkett, and placed high upon the northwest tower of the Cathedral.

via Washington National Cathedral : Darth Vader.

recreational mountain climbers, firsts, Moses, Jesus, Elijah, Empedocles,  King Philip V of Macedon, firsts :  Moses, Jesus, Elijah, Empedocles … religiously motivated peak experiences …  King Philip V of Macedon … who?

Moses climbed Mount Sinai to receive the Ten Commandments and ascended Mount Nebo (Jordan) to gaze on the land he would never reach. Jesus took three disciples to a mountaintop to commune with the ghosts of Moses and Elijah. Empedocles, the ancient Greek philosopher, climbed the active volcano Mount Etna on Sicily and leaped into the flaming crater in 430 BC. According to legend, he intended to become an immortal god; the volcano ejected one of his sandals turned to bronze by the heat.

But these religiously motivated peak experiences cannot be described as enjoyable or recreational.

For what may be the earliest summit experience undertaken for pleasure we can look to the ancient Roman historian Livy. King Philip V of Macedon’s mountain climbing expedition was undertaken to admire the spectacular view from Mount Haemus in Thrace, a high peak (ca 7,000 ft) in the Balkan Mountain Range of  Bulgaria.

via Who Were the First Recreational Mountain Climbers?.

Bon Appetit’s August Issue, music playlist, marketing, BA Daily: Bon Appétit, Spotify:  So I think this is interesting marketing  … does it enhance BA or Spotify?

Last month was for grilling and all its excesses; August is for taking a (slightly) healthier turn. Go for simple preparations, fresh produce, the odd indulgence (ice cream sandwiches, anyone?), and a killer soundtrack. This one, ideally.

1. My Kind of Fast Food (p. 16)

Descendents, “I Like Food”

Like the idyllic summer lunch Adam Rapoport describes in his editor’s letter, a perfect meal can still be a quickly assembled one. Ditto a punk anthem.

2. The Chill Zone (p. 25)

EPMD, “You Gots to Chill”

All you need is our recipe, an inexpensive ice cream maker, and 10 minutes. And maybe Erick and Parrish’s advice: “Always calm under pressure, no need to act ill. Listen when I tell you boy, you gots to chill.”

3. One-Dish Wonder Woman (p. 28)

Madonna, “Express Yourself”

Drew Barrymore likes an eclectic soundtrack in the kitchen. The other day, she poured a glass of champagne and blasted Madonna’s “Express Yourself.” Exactly.

4. The Return of the G&T (p. 30)

Merle Haggard, “Misery and Gin”

Country-music great Merle Haggard knew it: Any reason to drink a Gin and Tonic is a fine one.

5. The Foodist (p. 34)

Meklit and Quinn, “This Must Be the Place (Naive Melody)”

Andrew Knowlton’s road-trip mix ends with the Talking Heads classic. Mix things up with Meklit and Quinn’s summery cover.

6. Shop the Crop (p. 46)

The Beets, “Now I Live”

Beets–delicious, dark red, cancer-fighting beets!–deserve a second chance. So do the Beets.

7. A Cooler Cookout (p. 50)

Tullycraft, “DIY Queen”

The best way to enliven that backyard meal? Do-it-yourself condiments.

8. Seattle Shines (p. 58)

Mother Love Bone, “Chloe Dancer/Crown of Thorns”

He probably gets this a lot, but Bar Sajor chef Matthew Dillon isn’t the first person with his name to have a starring role in Seattle. Twenty-two years later, the best thing about the Matt Dillon-starring movie Singles is its grungy soundtrack.

9. A Day at the Beach and Dinner at the Sea (p. 66)

JEFF The Brotherhood, “Mellow Out”

These Nashville garage rockers sing a lot about chilling out. That cold corn soup with lobster salad is a good place to start.

10. Virgin Territory (p. 78)

Holopaw, “We Are the Virgin Snow”

However you like your virgin cocktail in the summer–heavy on juices, hard on bitters–you’ll want it winter-cold.

11. Red Green & Gold (p. 80)

Guy Clark, “Homegrown Tomatoes”

There’s a reason Nashville great Guy Clark liked to introduce “Homegrown Tomatoes” as a love song. (The tomatoes, obviously.)

12. The Vegetable Revolution (p. 88)

R.E.M., “You Are the Everything”

Use a mandoline to cut those veggies paper-thin. Use a mandolin to cut to the heartstrings.

via Bon Appetit’s August Issue, Set to Music: BA Daily: Bon Appétit.

lists, The Best Summer Getaways,  Pawleys Island SC, Summer Destinations | OutsideOnline.com:  One of my favorite places … love the description.  🙂

pawleys island pawley's island south carolina myrtle beach

Thank God for Myrtle Beach. While the crowds pack its rowdy shoreline, the Hammock Coast—just 20 minutes south—remains pristine. Five rivers converge on eclectic villages, cypress swamps, and black-water rivers. Grab a kayak (rentals, $35) and paddle two and a half hours to the 9,200-acre Sandy Island nature preserve, an island that’s home to maritime forests and black bears. Refuel with shrimp and grits at Quigley’s Pint and Plate back on the mainland ($16.50) and set up your beachfront campsite at Huntington Beach State Park (from $17).

via The Best Summer Getaways: Pawleys Island, South Carolina | Summer Destinations | OutsideOnline.com.

Louisville Hot Spots , Garden and Gun:  Something new to try in Louisville KY!

Big Four Pedestrian & Bicycle Bridge

This onetime railroad truss bridge has been updated to create a car-free path across the Ohio River. The ramp to Indiana isn’t expected to be open until October, but you can take in river views with access via the on-ramp at the Louisville waterfront. louisvillewaterfront.com

via Louisville Hot Spots | Garden and Gun.

The Care-Package Wars , summer camp, parenting, Bruce Feiler, NYTimes.com:  Anyone else feel like our generations has really screwed up the parenting thing?

In almost every way, the camps were exactly as I had romanticized them. Except one: care packages are now strictly banned. In camp after camp, directors described how they had outlawed such packages after getting fed up with hypercompetitive parents sending oversize teddy bears and bathtubs of M&M’s.

And they’re not alone. Across the country, sleep-away programs of all sizes are fighting back against overzealous status-mongers.

Not taking this in stride, parents have turned to increasingly elaborate smuggling routines, from hollowing out Harry Potter books to burrowing holes in tennis balls to get their little dumplings a taste of the checkout aisle. We have entered the age of the care-package wars, where strong-willed camps and strong-willed parents battle over control of their children’s loyalty and downtime.

via The Care-Package Wars – NYTimes.com.

interactive map, A Month of Citi Bike, graphics, The New Yorker:  Wow, love this “interactive graphic!”  Can’t wait to ride a Citi Bike.

Here are some highlights from the map:

A commuting pattern first emerged in our data on Tuesday, June 11th, when bikers travelled to a central corridor, which begins in midtown Manhattan and moves south, through the Flatiron District and down to the Financial District. The bikes arrived in this “workplace” area at around 9 A.M., and they remained there until around 7 P.M. The next day, an evening-commute shape materialized, with bikers moving toward certain residential neighborhoods: the East Village, the West Village, and Williamsburg. The pattern fell off somewhat on Thursday, but it returned the following week, and thereafter grew increasingly distinct, with workdays attracting bikes to the center of the city.

Temperatures and precipitation also influence bike use, so the map displays weather information alongside bike movement. For instance, the weaker commuting pattern on Thursday, June 13th, can be attributed, in part, to colder temperatures and over an inch of rain.

It’s possible that the Citi Bike system may be too successful for its own good. As the program becomes a more popular method of commuting, the workday leaves some areas bereft of bikes, making it more difficult for those with reverse or off-hour commutes to participate in the program. Citi Bike crews do redistribute the bikes, but the empty areas on the map show how challenging it is to balance their availability across the stations.

On weekends, the commutes are replaced by patternless, recreational movement, in which bikers meander around the city. The continuous weekend use also results in more over-all activity than Citi Bikes see on weekdays. Greg Estren, who compiles data on Citi Bike, calculated that over the six-week period from June 8th through July 19th, there was ten per cent more station activity on weekends than on weekdays.

July Fourth was a bikers’ holiday. As the night grew dark, Citi Bike members pedalled to the Hudson River to see the fireworks.

via Interactive: A Month of Citi Bike : The New Yorker.

Baja Lobster Roll, recipes, OutsideOnline.com:  I am stuffed right now, but if one of these were placed in front of me, I probably could find room.

lobster lobster roll ditch plains Cincinnati senate senate chicago Little Market American Brasseri

What’s with the abundance of lobsters? It’s the culmination of decades of smart conservation efforts, like strict size limits, that have created one of the most sustainable fisheries in the U.S. “We’ve had a strong plan in place for over 100 years,” says Patrice McCarron, executive director of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association. “In some ways, we’ve been a victim of our own success.” We’ll eat to that.

Want to make your own lobster rolls? Try this delicious recipe from the Little Market American Brasserie:

BAJA LOBSTER ROLL (makes two sandwiches)

Chipotle, cabbage slaw, lemon

CHIPOTLE MAYO

1 piece chipotle pepper in adobo

1 egg yolk

½ tbsp. lemon juice

1/8 cup water

1 cup canola oil

Procedure:

1. In a blender, combine chipotle, egg, lemon juice, and water, blend till smooth

2. Slowly add oil on medium speed

3. Adjust seasoning

SLAW

1/8 of a head Napa cabbage, shredded

1/8 of a head read cabbage, shredded

1 small carrot, julienned

LEMON VINAIGRETTE

2 tbsp. lemon juice

1 tbsp. white wine vinegar

½ shallot, minced

6 tbsp. canola oil

Procedure:

1. Combine first lemon juice, white wine vinegar and shallots

2. Slowly emulsify oil with a blender

3. Adjust seasoning

FOR THE ROLL

2 New England style lobster rolls

½ tsp. chopped tarragon

½ tsp. minced shallot

4 oz. cleaned, chopped, fresh Main lobster meat

¼ cup of the mixed slaw

2 tbsp. chipotle mayo

1 tbsp. honey

2 tbsp. lemon vinaigrette

pinch of salt

Procedure:

1. Butter the cut ends of the roll and griddle till golden brown

2. Mix the slaw with the chipotle mayo, honey and salt

3. Mix the lobster with shallot, tarragon, lemon vinaigrette and salt

4. Slice open the griddle bun, making sure not to slice all the way through

5. Fill with the slaw first and place the lobster mix on top

via How to Make Your Own Baja Lobster Roll | Adventure Travel Guide | OutsideOnline.com.

 

11
Jul
13

7.11.13 … Maira Kalman: “Without cell phones, just walk and observe what’s around you for half an hour. And I am sure—I’m very sure—that asking them to spend half an hour without a cell phone is like asking them to take their clothes off. No cell phones, no cup of coffee—just take a solitary walk.”

Maira Kalman’s Philosopher’s Walk, cover art, The New Yorker, favorites:  Every once in a while I search Maira Kalman because I just love her work.  I found two today …

CVC_TNY_03_18_13_final_465px.jpg

“I’m going to be teaching a short seminar to fourth-year illustration students in Jerusalem,” says Maira Kalman, the artist behind this week’s cover, “Canine Couture.” “I gave them a few pre-assignments: one is to take a half hour walk every day for ten days. Without cell phones, just walk and observe what’s around you for half an hour. And I am sure—I’m very sure—that asking them to spend half an hour without a cell phone is like asking them to take their clothes off. No cell phones, no cup of coffee—just take a solitary walk. If you want to be pretentious about it, Immanuel Kant is famous for taking his walk everyday at 3:30 P.M., so I suggested that time to them. It’s a good time of day; it’s a little bit tired, a little bit sleepy time of day. I’m hoping good things will grow out that.”

See below for a slide show of Kalman’s New Yorker covers, many born out of her solitary walks.

via Cover Story: Maira Kalman’s Philosopher’s Walk : The New Yorker.

Isaac Mizrahi,  Maira Kalman, Home Design Spring 2013, New York Magazine:  Mizrahi and Kalman, interesting neighbors, don’t you think?  … “But if I had to choose one thing that I love, there is nothing. I am very sad to think about having stuff, and not having stuff. There is a sense about wanting to have nothing, and then there is a sense about having everything and not giving anybody anything and keeping it all.”

Maira Kalman’s Dream Place

The artist draws the room of her fantasies—and talks to longtime neighbor and friend Isaac Mizrahi about how her Tel Aviv has influenced her New York.

Do you think that Sara Berman, your mother, understood aesthetics and design principles on the same level as you do?

No, no. I think that she just wanted to have nice things around her. But she also never spoke very much. She was a wonderful mother in amazing ways, but we never had conversations about things. You know, I have no idea what she thought of anything. It was more like, Pass the salt.

Where do you think you got such a sensibility about … objects?

Well, my sister is an artist and an interior designer. She went to high school for art. I went to high school for music. But then it was in the air, it was all around us. And then it was meeting [Maira’s late husband the designer] Tibor and graphic design, so that whole world opened up, kind of from nowhere.

Which object in this apartment do you like the best? Which means the most to you?

I still do have the little lunch bag that my mother made out of a towel and embroidered with my name on it for when I went to kindergarten. And it’s this big. I think she gave me five sandwiches and three apples, it’s huge! But if I had to choose one thing that I love, there is nothing. I am very sad to think about having stuff, and not having stuff. There is a sense about wanting to have nothing, and then there is a sense about having everything and not giving anybody anything and keeping it all. But the things that I have keep changing and go into different rooms. It is always a conflict.

Is it a commitment thing, the fact that you change so much?

In the I regret everything I say mode? [Laughs.] I regret everything I do.

Yes.

I regret everything: nice “up” ending for our talk!

But does it come from a joyous place when you choose things, or does it come from a critical, mean place?

I think it is like starting fresh. Every Monday morning is new hope. And I just like the idea that the set changes. It is a set. That is my home.

via Home Design Spring 2013 – Isaac Mizrahi and Maira Kalman — New York Magazine.

11
Jul
13

7.11.13 … Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Blows a Kiss: “His trial now, as extraordinary as the testimony and the pain in individual lives is likely to be, should be a chance to make sure that our own judicial processes don’t start looking alien to us.” … “It’s our system in motion’’ … “The wheels are now turning.”

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, court, The New Yorker:  Just how is an alleged terrorist/murderer supposed to act ?

The reporters said that he didn’t look at the victims—there were about two dozen present—and only really paid attention to two women, thought to be his relatives. One was holding a baby, who, at times, was the only spectator making noise, and the only one not studying every aspect of Tsarnaev’s demeanor. When Tsarnaev left, he blew the women and baby a kiss.

After Tsarnaev’s arrest, the authorities held off reading him his Miranda rights at first, citing a vague public-safety exception. They waited too long, just as, in retrospect, the restraints the authorities placed on the city during the manhunt—an entire metropolitan area under lockdown—may have been too tight. His trial now, as extraordinary as the testimony and the pain in individual lives is likely to be, should be a chance to make sure that our own judicial processes don’t start looking alien to us. “It’s our system in motion,’’ Boston Police Superintendent-in-Chief Daniel Linskey told reporters after the hearing. “The wheels are now turning.”

via Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Appears in Court, and Blows a Kiss : The New Yorker.

28
Jun
13

6.28.13 … the end of ‘ick’ …

Bert and Ernie,  LGBT rights,  Gay Marriage, The New Yorker, George Takei, DOMA “ick” factor, The Washington Post:  Legally, I get it, and I agree with the Supreme Court’s ruling.  But why do I have misgivings … this New Yorker cover and George Takei’s editorial, together made me realize it’s my problem.  But for the sake of families and society, I need to get over my “ick” factor, my “visceral, negative response to something unfamiliar.”

new-yorker-cover-bert-ernie-gay-marriage-580.jpg

Forty-four years nearly to the day after drag queens stood their ground against a police raid on the Stonewall Inn, sparking rioting in New York City and marking the beginning of America’s gay rights movement, our nation’s highest court at last held that a key section of the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional. Amazingly, since Stonewall, the question of LGBT rights has evolved from whether homosexuals should have any place in our society to whether gay and lesbian couples should be accorded equal marital stature.

Whenever one group discriminates against another — keeping its members out of a club, a public facility or an institution — it often boils down to a visceral, negative response to something unfamiliar. I call this the “ick.” Indeed, the “ick” is often at the base of the politics of exclusion. Just this March, for example, a young woman at an anti-same-sex-marriage rally in Washington was asked to write down, in her own words, why she was there. Her answer: “I can’t see myself being with a woman. Eww.”

These words are outrageous today, but only because we no longer react with disgust at the notion of the races working and sleeping side by side. Because social mores change with each generation, the “ick” is not particularly effective at preventing changes to our institutions. Importantly, same-sex marriage is supported by a strong majority of young people: A recent Field Poll in California showed that 78 percent of voters under 39 favor marriage equality.

Future generations will shake their heads at how narrow, fearful and ignorant we sounded today debating DOMA. Happily, the majority of our justices understood this and did not permit the “ick” to stick.

via George Takei: A defeat for DOMA — and the end of ‘ick’ – The Washington Post.

25
Jun
13

6.25.13 … Edward Snowden/17a: @SnowdenSeat: “I feel empty” …

Edward Snowden, U.S./China relations, US/Russia relations,  WSJ.com, Twitter, @ggreenwald, @17a: SnowdenSeat, journalism, The New Yorker,  NYTimes.com, WSJ.com: So we have a serious news story and the pundits are the only ones who aren’t being made to look like fools.

By contrast, everyone knew where half of the Moscow press corps was: halfway to Havana, on one of the few regular Russian flights that does not serve alcohol. It was the kind of plan that the F.S.B., and the K.G.B. before it, would described as a “special operation.” And somewhere in Moscow, it was clear, someone was laughing.

“When the president is a former spy, from time to time in this country they organize spy games, the Spy Olympic Games, and they have fun,” the novelist Victor Erofeyev said on Monday evening. “We are people from outside, who don’t understand how fun it is to put all the journalists on a plane and send them to Havana. They are having the greatest dinner tonight.”

Almost instantaneously, some anonymous wit opened a fake Twitter account titled “17a: SnowdenSeat,” and remarked, “I feel empty.”

via Empty Seat Deepens a Mystery in Moscow – NYTimes.com.

 …

17A

@SnowdensSeat

Just an ordinary seat on #Aeroflot flight #SU150 from Moscow to Havana.

Up in the air

via Twitter / Search – 17a snowden.

Mea culpa. Having spent almost eighteen years at The New Yorker, I’m arguably just as much a part of the media establishment as David Gregory and his guests. In this case, though, I’m with Snowden—not only for the reasons that Drake enumerated but also because of an old-fashioned and maybe naïve inkling that journalists are meant to stick up for the underdog and irritate the powerful. On its side, the Obama Administration has the courts, the intelligence services, Congress, the diplomatic service, much of the media, and most of the American public. Snowden’s got Greenwald, a woman from Wikileaks, and a dodgy travel document from Ecuador. Which side are you on?

via Demonizing Edward Snowden: Which Side Are You On? : The New Yorker.

Glenn GreenwaldVerified account

‏@ggreenwald

It’s completely irrational to permit one’s views of Snowden’s travel to affect how one views revelations about the NSA.

via Twitter / ggreenwald: It’s completely irrational ….

 …

The White House ripped into Hong Kong and China and issued warnings of unspecified “repercussions” to Russia and Ecuador as U.S. officials sharply dialed up international pressure Monday in a hunt for National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.

The warnings come as U.S. officials intensified talks with counterparts in Moscow and Quito to have Mr. Snowden returned to face charges in the U.S. for stealing and leaking classified documents.

The unusually harsh White House assessment on China represented the strongest U.S. statement to date as the case became a test of American influence with unsympathetic governments.

“We are just not buying that this was a technical decision by a Hong Kong immigration official,” said White House spokesman Jay Carney about Mr. Snowden’s flight from Hong Kong to Moscow on Sunday. “This was a deliberate choice by the government to release a fugitive despite a valid arrest warrant, and that decision unquestionably has a negative impact on the U.S.-China relationship.”

via U.S. Slams China Over Snowden – WSJ.com.

31
May
13

5.31.13 … Marcellus Hall’s ‘Urban Cycles’: “I’ve only been ‘doored’ twice” …

Marcellus Hall’s ‘Urban Cycles’, The New Yorker, Citi Bikes:  “I’ve only been ‘doored’ twice” … wow, I’ve never been “doored.”

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“I’ve only been ‘doored’ twice,” says Marcellus Hall, the artist who penned this week’s cover, “Urban Cycles.” Hall goes on to explain how he’s managed to survive for fifteen years as a cyclist in the city: “I’m very careful. I look into the side mirrors of the parked cars to see if there’s movement inside. I ride only on the left side of the street because there’s less of chance of a passenger getting out than of a driver. Actually, I read it in some cyclist publication that, as a cyclist, you’re allowed to take up a whole lane and sometimes, I even do that—though it’s a risky proposition. I’m not one of those hard-core bike freaks; it’s just a good way for me to get around in the city.”

via Cover Story: Marcellus Hall’s ‘Urban Cycles’ : The New Yorker.

 

10
Apr
13

4.10.13 … a little of this … a little of that …

McCandlish Phillips, obituary, NYT:  This on just struck me as tragic.

He refrained from smoking, drinking, cursing and gambling, each of which had been refined to a high, exuberant art in the Times newsroom — the last of these to such a degree that at midcentury the newspaper employed two bookmakers-in-residence, nominally on the payroll as news clerks.

Over the years, Mr. Phillips was asked whether he felt responsible for Mr. Burros’s suicide. He felt “a vague sense of sadness,” he said, but no guilt.

His stance — the view from the prospect where his faith and his journalism converged — was encapsulated in a remark he made to Mr. Gelb.

On the afternoon of Oct. 31, 1965, Mr. Gelb phoned Mr. Phillips to tell him, very gently, that Mr. Burros had shot himself.

“What I think we’ve seen here, Arthur,” Mr. Phillips replied, “is the God of Israel acting in judgment.”

via McCandlish Phillips, Times Reporter, Dies at 85 – NYTimes.com.

 Chicago, the Bloomingdale, public spaces, NYC,  High Line:  Add to the list!

When it’s finished, the trail will connect the ‘L’ train’s Blue Line, which runs from downtown to O’Hare International Airport, to two Metra commuter rail lines, and link green, expansive Humboldt Park to points east. As designed by the New York- and Cambridge, Mass.-based firm Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, five anchor parks will provide green space and access. The trail itself will include a concrete bike path, a softer jogging and walking path and an array of flora-heavy areas with benches and art installations.

Matthew Urbanski, a partner at MVVA and one of the lead designers, explained his firm’s approach to the project as “a creative editing of the structure, removing pieces where it expedites connection.” The local response has generally been positive. “It could be Chicago’s next great public space,” wrote Blair Kamin, architecture critic at the Chicago Tribune.

The evolution of the Bloomingdale has been a more public affair than that of the High Line, which was largely devised and shaped by a small group of supporters and their backers. Because it’s meant to link neighborhoods, and lacked private capital, the former sought, and found, broad community engagement.

via Forefront Excerpt: A Chicago Park Learns from New York’s High Line – Next City.

Sri Srinivasan, US Supreme Court, The New Yorker:  The nerd lawyer in me loves this stuff!

sri-srinivasan-toobin-580.jpeg

The next Supreme Court confirmation hearing begins on Wednesday afternoon, April 10th. Technically, Sri Srinivasan is just a candidate for the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, but few are misled. The stakes in this nomination are clear: if Srinivasan passes this test and wins confirmation, he’ll be on the Supreme Court before President Obama’s term ends.

The real issue with a potential Srinivasan nomination would be political. Ginsburg is the justice most likely to retire in the next two years. Would Obama select a woman to take her place? Tom Goldstein, the proprietor of the indispensable SCOTUSblog, thinks the President will feel compelled to keep three women on the court. He points to Kamala Harris, the attorney general of California, as the most likely choice. (It’s now well known that the President already finds Harris an, er, attractive office holder.) Another possibility is Jacqueline Nguyen, a Vietnamese immigrant who now serves on the Ninth Circuit. But there hasn’t been an active politician like Harris named to the Court since Earl Warren in 1953, and Nguyen is little-known outside California. (If the President does go for a politician, I think the more likely possibility is Amy Klobuchar, the senior Senator from Minnesota.) I am less sure than Goldstein that Obama will nominate a woman to replace Ginsburg. There is no female candidate as obvious as Sotomayor was in 2009, and Srinivasan would, as the first Indian-American on the court, be a history-making choice.

Plus, if Srinivasan runs the confirmation gauntlet now, it will be difficult for Republicans to argue that he’s unconfirmable just months later. His credentials would surely appeal to Obama, who has a fondness for technocrats, and his thin paper trail would make him difficult to attack. Which is why it looks very much like this hearing isn’t just a test for Srinivasan—it’s a dress rehearsal.

via Sri Srinivasan, the Supreme Court Nominee-in-Waiting : The New Yorker.

06
Apr
13

4.6.13 … Lincoln … Two Thumbs UP … I would like to be a cultural thinker … :)

Lincoln, movies, history: I knew I was going to see it, but waited  ’til it was out on DVD.  I wanted to watch it multiple times.  I friend’s son was in it … still looking for the dead soldier in the battlefield and his big shot as an escort (and his friend as a dancing extra at the ball). I thought the acting was very good, Lincoln especially.  Some  were still too much of themselves, or were they?

What really interested me was how little I knew about the history.  I now have a research project.  Where do I begin?

So from that standpoint alone, raising interest in history, I give Lincoln 2 thumbs up.  RIP, Roger Ebert.

There is an earlier shot, when it could have ended, of President Lincoln walking away from the camera after his amendment has been passed. The rest belongs to history.

via Lincoln :: rogerebert.com :: Reviews.

Steven Spielberg,  Lincoln, The New Yorker:

I now think that I initially reacted to “Lincoln” the way that so many Radical Republicans reacted to Lincoln himself: I was demanding perfection, and pouting when perfection wasn’t forthcoming. But compromise is inevitable—in life, in politics, in movies. That’s one of the movie’s messages, and one of its meta-messages, too. On second viewing, I put aside the nitpicking. I realized that the very narrowness of my complaints was backhanded evidence of the enormous amount that the film gets right. And, indeed, virtually every point that the story and script of “Lincoln” makes is grounded in historical fact, even if the conventions and limitations of a theatrical film, especially one that eschews narrations and “crawls,” sometimes require awkward or contorted “exposition.” If some of the dialogue “sounds written” rather than spoken, that is because so much of it is drawn directly from letters, memoirs, and speeches. (Also, sometimes fact is stranger than fiction: for example, the scene with Tad that I describe above in item eleven turns out to be mostly true, although the theatre manager’s behavior was less callous, because his announcement came after the rumor had already spread throughout the theatre.)

There is no doubt about the integrity and seriousness of purpose of Spielberg and his screenwriter, Tony Kushner. They took on an immense, probably insuperable challenge. If they did not fully meet my hopes and expectations (nor, I suspect, their own), they succeeded in making a very fine film, one that has no equal, no parallel that I know of, in the entire movie canon. “Lincoln” will be watched for many decades to come. It will be a standard resource in high school and college curricula, a wedge to lure students into deeper inquiry. As for me, I’m looking forward to seeing “Lincoln” a third time when the DVD comes out. And maybe a fourth.

via What Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln Got Wrong, and What It Got Right : The New Yorker.

Roger Ebert, RIP, film criticism: cultural thinkers…

No one will be able to recreate Ebert’s unique path into so many people’s lives. But curious and teachable cultural thinkers are already charting new ones.

via What Will Roger Ebert’s Death Mean For The Future Of Film Criticism.

Roger Ebert, TEDTalk, TIME.com:  Worth watching …

The late Roger Ebert was always candid about his battle with thyroid cancer and the toll it took on his body. As his cancer progressed, Ebert lost his ability to speak and the once-voluble film critic was forced to grapple with the loneliness and the loss of identity he experienced over relinquishing his voice, but not his ability to communicate. Turning to social media and the internet, Ebert continued to assess movies with his trademark directness and wit, even chronicling his experience as a cancer patient in his blog, Roger Ebert’s Journal.

In a gripping TED2011 talk, Ebert spoke with the help of a computer voice, two close friends and his wife Chaz, about how the Internet and digital revolution gave him his voice back.

via WATCH: Roger Ebert’s TED Talk On Losing, and Regaining, His Voice | TIME.com.

 




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