Posts Tagged ‘Thomas Jefferson

31
Jan
14

1.31.14 … The Year of the Horse is upon us …

Chinese New Year/Lunar New Year/Spring Festival ‘Lucky’ red envelopes,  digital, BBC News, China: Happy New Year!

Seen in Chinatown

 via Humans of New York.

The Lunar New Year (also known as the Spring Festival) is one of the most significant of Asian holidays and is a time for feasting, reflection and renewal. Traditionally celebrated over 15 days, the holiday starts with the first lunar new moon of the year and ends on the full moon. Chinese New Year 4712, which begins Jan. 31, will be the Year of the Horse.

via Happy Chinese New Year, Y’all – Atlanta INtown Paper.

kith/kin:  I just realized that one of my children, Jack, is a year of the horse.

Horse people are active and energetic. They got plenty of sex-appeal and know how to dress. Horses love to be in the crowd, maybe that is why they can usually be seen in such occasions like concerts, theaters, meetings, sporting occasions, and of course, parties.

The horse is very quick-witted and is right in there with you before you have had the chance to finish what you are saying: he’s on to the thought in your mind even before you’ve expressed it.

In general, the Horse is gifted. But in truth they are really more cunning than intelligent – and they know that. That is probably why, most of the horse people lack confidence.

Chinese believe that because horses are born to race or travel, all Horse people invariably leave home young.

via Chinese Astrology – Animal Sign: Horse

Technology and red envelopes: I’d take either one.

Chinese people would rather receive bank transfers than traditional red envelopes filled with cash, it’s reported.

More than half of those questioned in a poll would rather money was wired to their accounts than be handed a “lucky” red envelope, Hong Kon’s South China Morning Post reports.

The envelopes – known as “lai see” in Cantonese, and “hongbao” in Mandarin – are usually given during holidays such as Lunar New Year, and at important family gatherings.

The findings come as messaging service WeChat launches a new smartphone app allowing users to swap virtual red envelopes on their phones. Users can now allocate up to 200 yuan (£20) in virtual red envelopes, and have the option to disperse the money at random in the form of a game, Xinhua says.

via BBC News – China: ‘Lucky’ red envelopes go digital.

Voodoo Doughnuts, Denver, Thrillist DEN: Note to sons in CO … Voodoo Doughnuts now in Denver 🙂  My son Edward and I still talk about our visit that a friend said was a “must” for any visitor to Portland! I will admit, NOTHING COMPARES!

Voodoo Doughnuts, the Portland ‘nuttery with a penchant for… interesting names and oddball ingredients, just hit East Colfax with its official grand opening and its full arsenal of pants-stretching treats awaiting your consumption. But lines can be long and pants can only stretch so much, so here are the eight selections you shouldn’t miss if you want to maximize your Voodoo experience.

via Voodoo Doughnuts Denver – Thrillist DEN.

Thomas Jefferson, TJ, quotes:  I totally agree with this one, TJ.

Photo

Looking for a New Old House?,  WSJ.com: I’d like a “new old house.”

“The first words that come out my clients’ mouths are, ‘We’d love to have a real old house. We just can’t find one,’ ” said architect Russell Versaci, who runs a Middleburg, Va.-based practice. “And the second thing they say is, ‘We are so sick of McMansions. We just want to get out and get back to reality.’ ”

via Looking for a New Old House? – WSJ.com.

fun food: Another one for my friends with or who teach small ones.

marijuana v. alcohol, New Yorker cartoons: My thoughts … Since I am not any more concerned about the effects of marijuana than I am for the observed effects of alcohol, I’m all for limiting alcohol.  A cartoon by David Sipress. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/M6FRWb

Photo: A cartoon by David Sipress. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/M6FRWb

Paper, Facebook’s New Answer for Browsing, Mobile Media, Re/code:  interesting, but I tired of Flipboard.  I’ll be interested to see if it improves on Flipboard.

Facebook wants to be a newspaper. And it wants you to be writing some of its best stories.

To that end, the social giant announced on Thursday it will soon launch Paper, a mobile application that entirely re-envisions how Facebook users discover — and create — much of the content flowing through the massive social network.

The stand-alone app is the fruit of a multi-year effort under VP of Product Chris Cox, an attempt to aesthetically and thematically rethink how Facebook presents itself to users. The project — something many insiders never thought would come to fruition — has been a particular challenge for Facebook, which has relied largely on the content distribution power of the News Feed since it was first introduced in 2006.

On the surface, Paper seems like a mere overhaul of the Facebook app’s user interface. Instead of scrolling through a feed like the familiar main Facebook app, browsing through Paper is akin to thumbing through a deck of cards — or sheets of paper, if you will — a drastically different way of browsing mobile content. And just like the Facebook app you already have, all those cards are populated with content such as status updates, photos and other things you normally find floating throughout Facebook.

One big difference: Paper heavily emphasizes the tools you use to post to Facebook. In the composition area, you’re able to see what your status update (or photo, or check-in) will look like after you’ve posted it. In Paper, these “stories” are strikingly different from what you’re used to in your main Facebook app; photos are full-bleed and navigable, videos take up the whole screen. Each word of your status update is aligned with careful, deliberate precision.

In other words, Facebook is paying the same precise attention to detail as Medium, Evan Williams’ buzzy collaborative blogging startup. Even the philosophy of both companies seems to be the same: Present your audience with better tools and a pleasant aesthetic environment, and they’ll naturally start creating better content.

via Meet “Paper,” Facebook’s New Answer for Browsing — And Creating — Mobile Media | Re/code.

21
Aug
11

‎8.21.2011 … “Home of a Senior Hawk” sign is now in the yard … I guess it’s official …

quotes, Thomas Jefferson, debt crisis:  A dear friend reminded me of a quote from a letter penned by Thomas Jefferson:

“To preserve our independence we must let not our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our election between economy and liberty or profusion and servitude.”

Bones, tv: November 3rd .. 😦

If there’s one thing I’ve realized from the huge interest in my recent chats with Hart Hanson and Tamara Taylor, it’s that even though new episodes of Bones won’t be airing on Fox until November 3rd, everyone is missing the show terribly and hungry for any nugget of information about the upcoming seventh season.

via While we wait until November for new #Bones…tell me your favorite episode or moment! Can you pick just one? | Jim Halterman.

04
Jul
11

7.4.2011 … Happy 4th … I brought my youngest home from the hospital on the 4th of July … and have shared most with great Charlotte kith family … See ya’ll at the lake!

media, traditions, 4th of July, NPR:  I like this tradition …

Twenty-three years ago, Morning Edition launched what has become an Independence Day tradition: hosts, reporters, newscasters and commentators reading the Declaration of Independence.

It was 235 years ago this Monday that church bells rang out over Philadelphia, as the Continental Congress adopted Thomas Jefferson’s draft of the Declaration of Independence.

via Reading The Declaration Of Independence Aloud : NPR.

yesterday, Facebook posts:  ‎”… Bombs bu[r]sting in air … Love the sound of fireworks even when I don’t see them …”  I read this again this morning (and corrected the typo) and realized how grateful i am that I live in a country where i generally the sound of fireworks is nothing to fear, but brings up a smile and years of happy memories.

I wish I  had written/said that … , family, travel, parenting:  This article so expresses how I felt during the last few weeks leading up to Saturday and Molls’ departure for France.  I smiled today when the director of the Tufts program sent an e-mail that he would be posting photos on a photo sharing site.  They are almost grown … but not quite … so we still get to peek just like at camp for the last 10 years or so … Oh, and I thought of you, CDCU … because I remember your saying several times … I should have written that!

And then — well, she went. Hefting her bags, she grinned a last farewell to her family and walked off toward the uniformed fellow standing at the gate. She looked terribly grown up.

Until that moment, in the weeks leading up to the day of her departure, it was as though she almost physically switched back and forth between the vulnerable child she had been and the confident woman she would someday become.

“I’ve packed Aristotle and Tocqueville for the flight,” she said at one point, with the brisk confidence of a mature traveling intellectual for whom aircraft hold the pleasant prospect of uninterrupted hours of inquiry (though mature traveling intellectuals probably pack mystery novels, or iPods).

via A teenage daughter boards a plane looking like the woman she’ll someday be | Meghan Cox Gurdon | Local | Washington Examiner.

music, 4th of July: YouTube – Beach Boys – 4th of July ‏.

4th of July, Founding Fathers, politics: … “they signed it, pledging ‘their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor.'”  How many of us would do that today?

It sounded preposterous to much of the world on that July 4 in 1776 that somehow a tiny colony long on big ideas and short on such things as an army, money or even much of a government intended to break away from the richest and most powerful nation in the world.

The men who signed that Declaration of Independence knew exactly how long the odds were, and knew they would be hanged if they failed – but they signed it, pledging “their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor.”

John Hancock signed his name large – he wanted the British to make no mistake about who he was.

I thought about that at a recent CBS News Town Hall on the economy when I asked Tom Coburn, a very conservative Republican Senator from Oklahoma, why Congress can’t get anything done anymore. Because, he said:

“We’re more interested in political careers than we are interested in fixing the very real and urgent problems in front of our country. The senate has – this is the lowest level of votes the senate has had in my seven years and the lowest level of votes in 25 years.

“And the reason we’re not voting is people don’t want to take a vote because they might have to defend it.

So rather than come up here and do the job and have the courage and the honor to go out and defend your votes, what we do is we just don’t vote,” Coburn said.

What a contrast to the attitude of the founders who put their lives on the line for what they believed.

Not the usual July 4 message but maybe worth hearing – just to remind us how we used to be.

via Not your grandfather’s Founding Fathers – CBS News.

Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson, The Constitution, history, faith and spirituality:  Another good analysis putting history in perspective …

True history is the enemy of reverence. We do the authors of American independence no favors by embalming them in infallibility, by treating the Constitution like a quasi-biblical revelation instead of the product of contention and cobbled-together compromise that it actually was. Even the collective noun “Founding -Fathers” planes smooth the unreconciled divisiveness of their bitter and acrimonious disputes. History is a book of chastening wisdom to which we ought to be looking to deepen our understanding of the legitimate nature of American government—including its revenue-raising power, an issue that deeply captivated the antagonized minds of that first generation. But unfortunately, there is little evidence of citizens engaging in close, critical reading of The Federalist Papers, of the debates surrounding constitutional ratification, or of the dispute that pitted Hamilton and James Madison against Patrick Henry over what was at stake in Congress’s authority to make laws “necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the…Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States.”

Jefferson wouldn’t have a prayer of winning the Republican nomination, much less the presidency. It wouldn’t be his liaison with the teenage daughter of one of his slaves nor the love children she bore him that would be the stumbling block. Nor would it be Jefferson’s suspicious possession of an English translation of the Quran that might doom him to fail the Newt Gingrich loyalty test. No, it would be the Jesus problem that would do him in. For Thomas Jefferson denied that Jesus was the son of God. Worse, he refused to believe that Jesus ever made any claim that he was. While he was at it, Jefferson also rejected as self-evidently absurd the Trinity, the Virgin Birth, and the Resurrection.

Jefferson was not, as his enemies in the election of 1800 claimed, an atheist. He believed in the Creator whom he invoked in the Declaration of Independence and whom he thought had brought the natural universe into being. By his own lights he thought himself a true Christian, an admirer of the moral teachings of the Nazarene. It had been, he argued, generations of the clergy who had perverted the simple humanity of Jesus the reformer, turned him into a messiah, and invented the myth that he had died to redeem mankind’s sins.

All of which would surely mean that, notwithstanding his passion for minimal government, the Sage of Monticello would have no chance at all beside True Believers like Michele Bachmann. But Jefferson’s rationalist deism is not the idle makeover of liberal wishful thinking. It is incontrovertible historical fact, as is his absolute determination never to admit religion into any institutions of the public realm.

So the philosopher-president whose aversion to overbearing government makes him a Tea Party patriarch was also a man who thought the Immaculate Conception a fable. But then real history is like that—full of knotty contradictions, its cast list of heroes, especially American heroes, majestic in their complicated imperfections.

via The Founding Fathers Were Flawed – Newsweek.

Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence, words/phrases, technology, kudos:  Subjects v. citizens … big difference … thank you, Tom!

“Subjects.”

That’s what Thomas Jefferson first wrote in an early draft of the Declaration of Independence to describe the people of the 13 colonies.

But in a moment when history took a sharp turn, Jefferson sought quite methodically to expunge the word, to wipe it out of existence and write over it. Many words were crossed out and replaced in the draft, but only one was obliterated.

Over the smudge, Jefferson then wrote the word “citizens.”

No longer subjects to the crown, the colonists became something different: a people whose allegiance was to one another, not to a faraway monarch.

“It’s almost like we can see him write ‘subjects’ and then quickly decide that’s not what he wanted to say at all, that he didn’t even want a record of it,” she said. “Really, it sends chills down the spine.”

The library deciphered the hidden “subjects” several months ago, the first major finding attributed to its new high-tech instruments. By studying the document at different wavelengths of light, including infrared and ultraviolet, researchers detected slightly different chemical signatures in the remnant ink of the erased word than in “citizens.” Those differences allowed the team to bring the erased word back to life.

But the task was made more difficult by the way Jefferson sought to match the lines and curves of the underlying smudged letters with the new letters he wrote on top of them. It took research scientist Fenella France weeks to pull out each letter until the full word became apparent.

“It’s quite amazing how he morphed ‘subjects’ into ‘citizens,’ ” she said. “We did the reverse morphing back to ‘subjects.’ ”

via Jefferson changed ‘subjects’ to ‘citizens’ in Declaration of Independence.

4th of July, politics, parenting, LOL:  Democrats beware of letting your children celebrate the 4th!

… new study argues that July 4th celebrations may not be as innocent as they seem – at least from the democratic perspective.

According to the report, published by Harvard University, July 4th-themed festivities (defined by the study as fireworks, parades, political speeches, and barbecues) not only energize primarily Republicans, but also turn children into Republicans and increase GOP voter turnout.

Simply put: “Fourth of July celebrations in the United States shape the nation’s political landscape by forming beliefs and increasing participation, primarily in favor of the Republican Party,” says the report, which was written by Harvard Kennedy School Assistant Professor David Yanagizawa-Drott and Bocconi University Assistant Professor Andreas Madestam.

via Do July 4th festivities make you Republican? – Political Hotsheet – CBS News.

Founding Fathers, The Constitution, politics, US debt limit, Great Recession:  As I mentioned on 7/2, we were discussing this at dinner the other night, and specifically the constitutional provisions applicable. I will find the reference that Bob T. mentioned.  So if you are interested … keep reading.  Again, I feel really old … and dull.

But on one contemporary issue the Founding Fathers did have strong opinions: the national debt. Had they been confronted with the question of whether the federal government should be allowed to default on its debt obligations, they would have spoken with one resounding voice: No! Pay the bills, service the debt. Don’t even think of defaulting or playing dice with global creditors for domestic political gain. End of argument.

The drive to write a new Constitution was fueled by the clear need to empower a national government with a modicum of economic sovereignty.

Proof of that can be found in a legion of quotations and letters, ranging from speeches to the Federalist Papers. James Madison, architect of the nation if there ever was one, described national debts as “moral obligations” in Federalist Paper No. 43. George Washington, who was always measured and diplomatic in public utterances, was unequivocal in his thoughts on public debts: “No pecuniary consideration is more urgent than the regular redemption and discharge of the public debt; on none can delay be more injurious, or an economy of the time more valuable.” And that message was delivered directly to the House of Representatives in 1793, where some members were contemplating various defaults.

The nation’s creators might well have been appalled that our national government accrued so much debt and spent so much on credit, but it is hard to see any of them contending that the way out of that bind is to refuse to pay.

But that is what is being contemplated. The United States has a lot of debt, yes, but we’re not Greece. There is no inability to pay, and no threat from global creditors that credit may be cut off. In time, perhaps, but not now. For those who still look to the Founders for wisdom and guidance, on this celebration of another Independence Day the message is clear: Argue all you want about the proper role of government and levels of debt. Debate and contest, rowdily and angrily. Get down and dirty. But above all, do not sacrifice the nation’s credit on the altar of political expediency and partisan gain.

via What Would the Founding Fathers Say About the National Debt? Don’t Default | Moneyland | TIME.com.

John Adams, Founding Fathers, DC Monuments, history, Washington DC:  Just went to DC … didn’t even think about dear old John.

When President Obama ponders tough decisions at the White House, he may join the cadre of presidents who have sought inspiration in the Truman Balcony’s stunning vista, gazing at the Washington Monument and the Jefferson Memorial, which commemorate our first and third commanders in chief. But there’s a man missing from this presidential panorama.

Where is John Adams, our feisty second president and lifelong American patriot? If George Washington was the sword of the revolution and Thomas Jefferson the pen, why have we neglected the voice of our nation’s independence?

Adams himself predicted this omission. “Monuments will never be erected to me . . . romances will never be written, nor flattering orations spoken, to transmit me to posterity in brilliant colors,” he wrote in 1819, nearly two decades after his single term in office. At his farm in Quincy, Mass., Adams worried that he would be forgotten by history, and for good reason: The temperamental Yankee could never outshine Washington and Jefferson, Virginia’s two-term presidential all-stars — one a brilliant general unanimously chosen to lead the nation, the other the eloquent author of the Declaration of Independence.

“The way the Jefferson Memorial is built, Jefferson is looking right in the center window,” President Bill Clinton told White House guests in 1994. “I go out on the balcony a lot . . . and look at it.”

It’s a shame he couldn’t see Adams, too. Still, as we celebrate July 4 — the anniversary of the declaration’s adoption and of Adams’s death — it’s high time we honored this “passionate sage,” as Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis titled his Adams biography. He is the founding father most unsung in the capital’s memorial landscape.

via Why doesn’t John Adams have a memorial in Washington? – The Washington Post.




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 618 other followers

May 2020
S M T W T F S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31