Posts Tagged ‘Travel + Leisure

19
Jul
14

7.19.14 … “you are not a drop in the ocean … you are the entire ocean on a drop.” – Rumi

Rumi, quotes: I really like the quote.  So who is Rumi?

 

viaTwitter / NatureSacred: ‘You are not a drop in the ….

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Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhī (Persian: جلال‌الدین محمد بلخى‎), also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī (جلال‌الدین محمد رومی), Mevlana or Mawlānā (مولانا, meaning Our Master), Mevlevi or Mawlawī (مولوی, meaning My Master), and more popularly in the English-speaking world simply as Rumi (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273), was a 13th-century Persian[1][8] poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic.[9] Rumi’s importance is considered to transcend national and ethnic borders. Iranians, Turks, Afghans, Tajiks, and other Central Asian Muslims as well as the Muslims of South Asia have greatly appreciated his spiritual legacy in the past seven centuries.[10] His poems have been widely translated into many of the world’s languages and transposed into various formats. He has been described as the “most popular poet in America”[11] and the “best selling poet in the US”.[12][13]

Rumi’s works are written in Persian and his Mathnawi remains one of the purest literary glories of Persia,[14] and one of the crowning glories of the Persian language.[15] His original works are widely read today in their original language across the Persian-speaking world (Iran, Tajikistan, Afghanistan and parts of Persian speaking Central Asia and the Caucasus)[16] Translations of his works are very popular, most notably in Turkey, Azerbaijan, the United States and South Asia.[17] His poetry has influenced Persian literature as well as Turkish, Punjabi, Urdu and some other Iranian, Turkic and Indic languages that have been influenced by Persian, e.g. Pashto, Ottoman Turkish, Chagatai and Sindhi.

via Rumi – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Wikipedia edit twitterbot,  Russian State TV, MH17 crash page: interesting …

Over at GlobalVoices, Kevin Rothrock reports that an IP address at VGTRK, the state-run TV and radio network, edited the Russian-language Wikipedia page about aviation accidents to say that Malaysia Air Flight MH17 “was shot down by Ukrainian soldiers.”

The edit seems to have been in response to an earlier edit from an IP address in Kiev that described the plane as being shot down “by terrorists of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic with Buk system missiles, which the terrorists received from the Russian Federation.”

via A Wikipedia edit twitterbot caught the Russian State TV editing the MH17 crash page..

 Elizabeth Warren, age:  The answer may surprise you..

Other voters guesstimated that Warren was around a decade younger than Clinton. She’s actually only 18 months younger, born in 1949, 12 years before the current president of the United States, and four years before the current dynastic hope of the GOP, Jeb Bush.

via This voter guessed how old Elizabeth Warren is. The answer may surprise you..

Bahamas: The view from the ISS:  Magnificient!!

The bright lights to the upper left outline Florida (the long glow is from Miami), and you can trace cities up the east coast of the US. Cuba dominates the lower left (cut off a bit by an ISS solar panel), but the teal and turquoise waters are what draw the eye. The islands right in the middle are the Bahamas, and the bright glow smack dab in the middle of the picture, is (I believe) Nassau — remind me not to go stargazing there! The lights must wash out the sky. But that’s probably not why people go to Nassau in the first place.

Speaking of the sky, note the green arc of light over the Earth’s limb. This is called airglow, and it due to the slow release of energy from sunlight the upper atmosphere stores during the day. It’s actually a fascinating physical process which I’ve described before. In that link I also talk about the brownish-yellow glow beneath it: That’s from glowing sodium in the air, and the source of that sodium may be meteors that have previously burned up in our atmosphere!

Amazing. There’s no such thing as just a pretty picture taken from space — there is always a lot more going on than you might think. And just like any artwork, knowing the story behind the beauty makes it that much more wonderful.

via Bahamas: The view from the ISS..

Social Media Tips for Travel, Travel + Leisure:

Increasing your digital know-how is the key to upgrading your next vacation. To help you reap the benefits, here are seven social media tips for trave

via Social Media Tips for Travel – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

America’s Most Hipster Cities – Epicenter of the American Hipster in 2013, Thrillist, Asheville NC, Boulder CO,  Louisville KY:  Some of my favorite places!!

9) Louisville, KY

Louisville’s all about bourbon, BBQ, and bands that play indie rock. Oh, and beer. It’s home to rockers My Morning Jacket and VHS or Beta (who, ironically, now live in Brooklyn), is the birthplace of Hunter S. Thompson, and actually has restaurants that don’t require staff uniforms (!!!) — so don’t even think about complimenting the waitress on her flair. The city’s best hotel, 21C, is a “boutique-cum-contemporary art museum”.

6) Boulder, CO

More Phish fanatic than Passion Pit aficionado, the local hipster in Boulder’s of the Birk-wearing, green-friendly, outdoor-enthusing variety. Who wants to go slacklining??? No? Wanna toss the disc, then? Come on, man.Every year on April 20th (4/20) at 4:20p, thousands gather on the CU Boulder campus to smoke a bunch of pot. Boulder is home to the famed Naropa Institute, where Allen Ginsberg himself was professor emeritus, spreading beatnik joy/ ennui. If there’s a fine line between hipster and hippie, it merges in Boulder.

4) Asheville, NC

If you’re not one of the Mumford & Sons-inspired buskers jamming on the street, you’re likely taking a long hike in the mountains to “find yourself” or sitting on your front porch in a handmade rocking chair you whittled while watching Girls on your iPad. You could also be drinking a delicious pint of local craft suds, as Asheville’s got a solid beer scene. Farm-to-table eateries are standard, outdoor riverfront bars are the rage, and everyone is apparently an artist.

via America’s Most Hipster Cities – Epicenter of the American Hipster in 2013 – Thrillist.

15 Product Trademarks, Victims Of Genericization, Consumerist: This has always interested me … Jello, Kleenex and in Atlanta, Coke.

Sometimes, we hurt the ones we love. Which is why even if we didn’t mean to be so harsh, many products we use every day have become the victims of trademark genericization, meaning they’ve morphed from a single product identified under a name to an entire product category. And when courts get involved it becomes “genericide,” which sounds even more murderous. Can’t you just imagine Law & Order: Genericized Trademarks? [dun dun]

While some of the 15 products below are truly victims of genericide, having had their trademarks canceled in a court, others simply failed to register as trademarks at all, or in some cases, weren’t renewed or were abandoned for other reasons. Which means now you can have your own escalator company or sell flooring and call it linoleum. Wouldn’t suggest setting up your own heroin company, however.

via 15 Product Trademarks That Have Become Victims Of Genericization – Consumerist.

Rooftop Film Club – Fargo, Handpicked Events, London:  What fun … maybe next year in Charlotte! 🙂

About your visit: As you enter the Queen of Hoxton rooftop you will see the box office is situated to your left where you can collect your tickets, headphones and blankets (if necessary). Please note that blankets are available on a first come, first served basis.

via Rooftop Film Club – Fargo – Handpicked Events.

16
Jun
13

6.16.13 … Museum restaurants … I’ve been to two … One I love, Charlotte’s Halcyon; the other, not so much …

America’s Best Museum Restaurants, Halcyon Mint Museum Charlotte NC, Terzo Piano and Piano Terra The Art Institute of Chicago, Travel + Leisure:

The latest museum restaurants have embraced haute cuisine, artist-themed menus, and farm-to-table freshness. Far from relying on travelers as a captive audience for business or sticking to packaged fast foods, restaurants such as Ray’s and Stark at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art hold their own with the city’s trendiest tables—and inspire both travelers and locals to make advance reservations.

“We attract an international crowd as well as Chicagoans,” points out Tony Mantuano, executive chef of Terzo Piano at the Art Institute of Chicago. “Both groups of diners are always on the lookout for the cutting edge.” At Terzo Piano, that means bold flavors like a pork belly appetizer with brown sugar–aleppo pepper crust, plus a preference for the organic.

The strongest trend we noted among such museum restaurants is a commitment to locally sourced food made from scratch. Bon Appétit Management Company (BAMCO), which operates restaurants at more than a dozen museums and specialty venues, now offers crate-free pork, cage-free eggs, and humane ground beef.

“Museum food used to be an afterthought,” admits Fedele Bauccio, CEO and cofounder of BAMCO. “We’ve worked to extend the reach of the museum into the restaurant. Our chefs like to challenge themselves with special menus that enhance the guests’ experience of an exhibit,” he says, citing an example of highly stylized, black-and-white dishes prepared to complement an exhibit of Herb Ritts’s black-and-white fashion photography.

via America’s Best Museum Restaurants – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

America's Best Museum Restaurants: Halcyon, Mint Museum

Halcyon, Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC

The restaurant’s tagline is “flavors from the earth,” so don’t be surprised if your server shares exactly which farm provided the ingredients for the day’s menu specialties. Halcyon’s design brings the outside in with lovely touches like a chandelier made from twigs and a trickling stone fountain. Adventurous eaters can add crispy pig ears to salads and pasta or enjoy a tour de force spice-lacquered duck breast with truffled cauliflower and turnip purée, smoked and fried cabbage, and glazed beets. halcyonflavors.com

via America’s Best Museum Restaurants – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

Terzo Piano and Piano Terra, The Art Institute of Chicago

Chef Tony Mantuano, whose Spiaggia is one of the country’s best Italian restaurants, is also behind Terzo Piano, a beautifully minimalist dining room flooded with natural light that overlooks the city skyline, Millennium Park, and Lake Michigan. Diners are in for bold (and organic) flavors like a pork belly appetizer with brown sugar–aleppo pepper crust and a crispy chicken breast with butternut squash, pine nuts, and currants. terzopianochicago.com

via America’s Best Museum Restaurants – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

22
Mar
13

3.22.13 … I’m in, So where is Belton, SC? … Locals’ Favorite Restaurants in America …

Locals’ Favorite Restaurants, US, Travel + Leisure:

Belton, South Carolina: “Words can’t explain the religious experience that is eating at Grits & Groceries ($$). It begins with a drive through bucolic Anderson County and ends at an old country store with a tiny farmyard. Grass-fed burgers and pimento-cheese sandwiches top the list.” —Jennifer Norman

via Locals’ Favorite Restaurants in America – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

19
Mar
13

3.19.13 … I like salacious! …

NYC, travel, bus tours, headlines, New York Post Bus Tour, travel, Travel + Leisure:  I like salacious!

The tour, which departs from 57th Street and 7th Avenue at 10AM and 2PM every Thursday (tickets are $49), takes you from the Helmsley Park Lane Hotel on Central Park South, former haunt of “Queen of Mean” hotelier Leona Helmsley to the Marble Collegiate Church, where Donald Trump met his second wife, Marla Maples in 1987. That marriage ended in 1997, but not before giving the Post one of its most famous headlines ever: “The Best Sex I Ever Had!”

via New York Post Bus Tour Brings Back Yesterday’s News – Carry On | Travel + Leisure.

10
Mar
13

3.10.13 … I think I could ponder my calling and being nonjudgmental at The Oyster Box … I wonder if they have a Brightbox …

The Oyster Box Hotel & Spa, Durban SA, bucket list:  I saw this on facebook (Rooms with a View, I think).   I think I will add The Oyster Box to my bucket list …

 

From the moment the Oyster Box opened its doors in 1947 the hotel rapidly became one of Africa’s best loved and most distinguished hotels. The combination of colonial charm, impeccable service, lush tropical gardens and breathtaking seaside setting swiftly gained it a reputation that was legendary the world over.

This iconic landmark has been lovingly refurbished to offer guests a vibrantly contemporary experience, whilst still evoking feelings, memories, and the warm nostalgia of days gone by. Meticulous attention to detail ensures that former guests will be delighted to discover the old glory has not just been retained, but carefully enhanced. All of the warm hospitality and gracious elegance which guests so fondly remember are harmoniously blended with a wealth of modern facilities and contemporary touches to satisfy today’s most discerning of tourist, business person and honeymoon couple.

The Oyster Box, like its famous lighthouse, once again acts as a beacon of exceptional hospitality, luxurious accommodation and personal service unmatched in all Africa and the world at large.

via About Oyster Box Hotel & Spa | Boutique Hotel Durban.

Lenten devotionals, callings,  nonjudgmental life:

Here the word call becomes important.  We are not called to save the world, solve all problems, and help all people.  But we each have our own unique call, in our families, in our work, in our world.  We have to keep asking God to help us see clearly what our call is and to give us the strength to live out that call with trust.  Then we will discover that our faithfulness to a small task is the most healing response to the illnesses of our time.

via Daily Meditation: Our Unique Call.

Towards a Nonjudgmental life

One of the hardest spiritual tasks is to live without prejudices.  Sometimes we aren’t even aware how deeply rooted our prejudices are.  We may think that we relate to people who are different from us in colour, religion, sexual orientation, or lifestyle as equals, but in concrete circumstances our spontaneous thoughts, uncensored words, and knee-jerk reactions often reveal that our prejudices are still there.

Strangers, people different than we are, stir up fear, discomfort, suspicion, and hostility.  They make us lose our sense of security just by being “other.”  Only when we fully claim that God loves us in an unconditional way and look at “those other persons” as equally loved can we begin to discover that the great variety in being human is an expression of the immense richness of God’s heart.  Then the need to prejudge people can gradually disappear.

via Daily Meditation: Towards a Nonjudgmental life.

technology, Brightbox Mobile Charging Services, Travel + Leisure:  What will they think of next …

Hotels have always found ways to draw in the locals—be it with rooftop cocktails or easily accessible bathrooms in the lobbies. Up next? Public charging stations that allow you to plug in your phone for some quick juice on the go courtesy of new company, Brightbox. The devices, shown above, are popping up in Sheraton and Andaz hotels, to name a few.

Of course, there are outlets available in most hotels’ common areas, but Brightbox is a bit different since you don’t need your own power cord and Brightbox lets you lock your phone in a secure box that emits a bright light once your device is fully powered. (Hence the name.) What you do while you wait is up to you. We won’t judge if you just end up back at the bar.

via Tech Thursday: Brightbox Mobile Charging Services – Carry On | Travel + Leisure.

18
Feb
13

2.18.13 … Be Still …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2013 Lenten labyrinth walks, Psalm 46:10, Avondale Presbyterian Church:
As I arrived, I noticed that the  the sun is getting low.  I immediately thought  of my friend who is counting down the days until DST begins.  The chimes were gently ringing …
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I decided to walk the roundabout, or whatever you call it, to the cross.  I walked it first  to see the perspective of the labyrinth from a top. This is an interesting feature to this beautiful Sacred Garden.
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As I approached the labyrinth, I hear an owl … Whoooo …
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As I walk I ponder my favorite Psalm … 46:10.
Blessings!
Darwin: A Graphic Biography, Charles Darwin, Brain Pickings:  I really don’t get “graphic” books.

Charles Darwin — father of evolution, decoder of human emotion, hopeless romantic, occasional grump — was born on this day in 1809. From Smithsonian Books comes Darwin: A Graphic Biography (public library; UK) — a fine addition to outstanding graphic nonfiction, joining other famous graphic biographies of cultural icons like Richard Feynman, Hunter S. Thompson, The Carter Family, and Steve Jobs. Written by journalist Eugene Byrne and illustrated by cartoonist Simon Gurr, the story takes us into the life and times of Darwin — from a curious child on a “beeting” expedition to a patient young man persevering through the ups and downs of battling creationist oppression to a worldwide legend — tracing his intellectual adventures amidst the fascinating scientific world of the 1800s.

via Happy birthday, Darwin! A graphic biography | Brain Pickings.

Civil War sites, lists, travel, Travel + LeisureBest Civil War Sites – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

travel, frequent flier miles, Travel + Leisure.:  Helpful …
Cash, Miles, or Points: The Best Way to Pay for Your Flight

I’d like to fly round-trip from New York City to Martha’s Vineyard. I can pay $300 for a ticket, dip in to my reserve of 50,000 Delta SkyMiles, or use Starwood points. What’s the smartest move?

Pay a service to manage your miles. App and websiteUsingMiles (free, but we like the $29.99-a-year service) keeps track of your accounts and helps determine if it’s better to use cash or miles on a given flight (caveat: frequent fliers on a few airlines, such as Southwest, can’t apply their miles to these services).

via Cash, Miles, or Points: The Best Way to Pay for Your Flight – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

Maker’s Mark, social media, pr mistakes, Quartz:  There seems to be a lot of the “mistakes” lately.

The company had emailed loyal customers on Feb. 9 to say it was lowering its proof to 84, or 42% alcohol, in order to address a supply shortage driven by bourbon’s surging popularity in the United States and certain other markets like Australia, Germany, and Japan. The announcement, first reported by Quartz, spread quickly in social media, rising from a small firestorm to an all-out backlash. The company defended itself in interviews, saying the taste wouldn’t change, but it didn’t help.

via Maker’s Mark learns a painful social media lesson, won’t dilute bourbon – Quartz.

Charlotte, Grier Heights, gunshot detection system, ShotSpotter , Big Brother, CharlotteObserver.com:  Let’s hope it improves the safety of this neighborhood because just publicizing this must be a big negative for real estate values …

Charlotte-Mecklenburg police are installing specialized gunshot detection sensors in the Grier Heights neighborhood as part of their plan to expand the high-tech, crime-fighting tool into troubled communities.

The ShotSpotter system uses a network of microphones activated by gunfire to quickly send officers to potential shooting scenes, even if no one calls 911. Police originally bought the system to cover two square miles in uptown Charlotte as they ramped up security for the Democratic National Convention last year.

Grier Heights is the first of several places outside the center city where police hope to use the technology. The move is part of the department’s plans for enhanced digital surveillance of the city’s streets and residents in the wake of a 2.8 percent increase in overall crime in 2012.

via Grier Heights to get gunshot detection system | CharlotteObserver.com.

Emory University President James Wagner, the “three-fifths compromise” of the U.S. Constitution,  Inside Higher Ed: … the founders of the United States explicitly denied the humanity of black people.

Emory University President James Wagner has infuriated many on his campus and scholars elsewhere by using the president’s letter in the new issue of Emory Magazine to say that the “three-fifths compromise” of the U.S. Constitution was a model for how people who disagree can work together for “a common goal.”

Following an explosion of social media criticism Saturday as word of Wagner’s letter spread, he released an apology. “To those hurt or confused by my clumsiness and insensitivity, please forgive me,” he wrote. (The apology currently appears on top of the original letter on Emory’s website, linked to in the previous paragraph.)

The three-fifths compromise expanded the political clout of the slave states by codifying that black slaves counted for purposes of allocating seats in the House of Representatives as 60 percent of a white person (even though the slave states gave black people 0 percent of the voting or other rights of white people). To many African Americans, the three-fifths compromise is among the more blatant events in which the founders of the United States explicitly denied the humanity of black people.

via Emory president sets off uproar with statements on three-fifths compromise and then apologizes | Inside Higher Ed.

The Essay – an Exercise in Doubt, NYTimes.com:  Worth reading …

I am an essayist, for better or worse. I don’t suppose many young people dream of becoming essayists. Even as nerdy and bookish a child as I was fantasized about entering the lists of fiction and poetry, those more glamorous, noble genres on which Nobels, Pulitzers and National Book Awards are annually bestowed. So if Freud was right in saying that we can be truly happy only when our childhood ambitions are fulfilled, then I must be content to be merely content.

I like the freedom that comes with lowered expectations. In the area of literary nonfiction, memoirs attract much more attention than essay collections, which are published in a modest, quasi-invisible manner, in keeping with anticipated lower sales. But despite periodic warnings of the essay’s demise, the stuff does continue to be published; if anything, the essay has experienced a slight resurgence of late. I wonder if that may be because it is attuned to the current mood, speaks to the present moment. At bottom, we are deeply unsure and divided, and the essay feasts on doubt.

Ever since Michel de Montaigne, the founder of the modern essay, gave as a motto his befuddled “What do I know?” and put forth a vision of humanity as mentally wavering and inconstant, the essay has become a meadow inviting contradiction, paradox, irresolution and self-doubt. The essay’s job is to track consciousness; if you are fully aware of your mind you will find your thoughts doubling back, registering little peeps of ambivalence or disbelief.

via The Essay, an Exercise in Doubt – NYTimes.com.

Facebook, social networks, Facebook frustration, Explore: Well, if it makes you unhappy … don’t bother …

Facebook is supposed to envelope us in the warm embrace of our social network, and scanning friends’ pages is supposed to make us feel loved, supported and important (at least in the lives of those we like). But skimming through photos of friends’ life successes can trigger feelings of envy, misery and loneliness as well, according to researchers from two German universities. The scientists studied 600 people who logged time on the social network and discovered that one in three felt worse after visiting the site—especially if they viewed vacation photos. Facebook frequenters who spent time on the site without posting their own content were also more likely to feel dissatisfied.

[…]

The most common cause of Facebook frustration came from users comparing themselves socially to their peers, while the second most common source of dissatisfaction was “lack of attention” from having fewer comments, likes and general feedback compared to friends.

via Explore – Facebook is supposed to envelope us in the warm….

Twitter:  

As I mentioned before, twitter often starts me researching …

New York Times Arts (@nytimesarts)

2/10/13, 9:28 PM

The Black Keys win best rock performance. Read more about the band’s “El Camino”: nyti.ms/vd8jo0

Rather than repeat the soul-dipped feel of “Brothers” or return to the bluesy slam of their early albums, however, the Black Keys’ follow-up, “El Camino,” out this Tuesday on Nonesuch Records, represents a departure in both style and process. It’s the most urgent and irresistible music they have ever made; the album’s 11 songs are fast, punchy and loaded with hooks, with traces of glitter-rock stomp, girl-group melodies and surf guitar.

As infectious and high energy as “El Camino” sounds, however, Mr. Carney acknowledged that the album also reflects the new sense of pressure on the band after the breakout success of “Brothers,” its sixth album, which has sold roughly 870,000 copies.

via The Black Keys Change Gears With ‘El Camino’ – NYTimes.com.

 A few favorite tweets …
Modern Seinfeld (@SeinfeldToday) 2/16/13, 2:38 PM

Kramer invents a reverse SodaStream to take carbonation out of fizzy drinks. J: “Just leave the bottle open!” K:”You don’t get it, Jerry!”

10
Feb
13

2.10.13 … in this world, but not of this world …

FPC, worship, sermon Transfiguration, epiphany,  labyrinth walks, “Solvitur ambulando” – it is solved by walking, Almetto Howie Alexander Labyrinth:  IMG_5491As I left FPC today (did anyone else notice the tulip trees blooming!), I headed to one of my favorite labyrinths.  I had a heavy heart, despite a very excellent sermon by Kirk Hall about  Transfiguration entitled,  “A Glimpse of Glory.”  I was also quite struck by the affirmation of faith …

We believe Christ gives us and demands of us lives in pilgrimage toward God’s kingdom. Like Christ we may enjoy on our journey all that sustains life and makes it pleasant and beautiful. No more than Christ are we spared the darkness, ambiguity, and threat of life in the world. We are in the world, but not of the world. Our confidence and hope for ourselves and other people do not rest in the powers and achievements of this world, but in the coming and hidden presence of God’s kingdom. Christ calls each of us to a life appropriate to that kingdom: to serve as he has served us; to take up our cross, risking the consequences of faithful discipleship; to walk by faith, not by sight, to hope for what we have not seen. (Declaration of Faith, 9.5) http://www.firstpres-charlotte.org/bulletins/bulletin.pdf

But even my drive was uplifting …

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And the walk was wonderful.  I came away feeling much better …

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I love the quote of Ms. Alexander painted at the “foot” of the labyrinth.

“With patience persistence and prayer, a God-filled spirit can bring a seed to fruit.” – Almetto Howie Alexander 2011

And so this afternoon, I  did a little research on the labyrinth …

.Labyrinth

Activities are often thought of as group-oriented, competitive sports, skill-oriented, performance or even pressure. The labyrinth provides a balancing activity, one which may best be pursued alone, in one’s own time of need, searching, or desire for peace and focus. Experiencing the solace of journey provided by a labyrinth brings peace, healing, and enlightenment — mental health — appropriate for people of any age. The labyrinth itself is a beautiful monument to heritage and history. The spiritual and actual presence of the labyrinth will fulfill the dreams of its founder — a person who spent her life working for her community in education and civil rights — and will offer the benefits and reminders of this continuing journey to the community’s next generations.

via Almetto Howie Alexander Labyrinth: The Labyrinth.

The study, design and installation of labyrinths has become an essential part of my work as an artist. From our research, we believe this may be the first Afro-Centric Labyrinth in the United States. This particular project has all the potential to become a great source of healing and education within the smaller community of Washington Heights as it interacts with the larger community of Charlotte. The unique design pays homage to the nearly lost origins of the labyrinth, and offers each individual the opportunity to metaphorically walk their life’s journey along a pattern that echoes the journey and philosophy of Mrs. Alexander.

— Tom Schulz

via Almetto Howie Alexander Labyrinth: The Labyrinth.

“Solvitur ambulando” – it is solved by walking:  I also did a little research on the term “solvitur ambulando.” I found this very interesting.

Solvitur ambulando (pron.: /ˈsɒlvɪtər ˌæmbjʊˈlændoʊ/)[1] is a Latin term which means:

it is solved by walking

the problem is solved by a practical experiment

Diogenes of Sinope, also known as “Diogenes the Cynic,” is said to have replied to the argument that motion is unreal by standing up and walking away.

The phrase appears early in Lewis Carroll’s “What the Tortoise Said to Achilles”. Achilles uses it to accentuate that he was indeed successful in overtaking Tortoise in their race to empirically test one of Zeno’s paradoxes of motion. This passage also appears in Douglas Hofstadter’s book Gödel, Escher, Bach.

The phrase appears in Dorothy L. Sayers’s “Clouds of Witness”. During the Duke of Denver’s trial before the House of Lords, the Lord High Steward suggests (to laughter) solvitur ambulando to determine whether the decedent crawled or was dragged to a different location, as this was a matter of dispute between the prosecution and the defense.

The phrase is also cited in “Walking” by H.D. Thoreau and in “The Songlines” by Bruce Chatwin in its first meaning.

The phrase is discussed multiple times and at some length in The Tao of Travel by Paul Theroux.

The phrase was the motto of the Royal Air Forces Escaping Society.

via Solvitur ambulando – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Momastery, blog, meme: I loved this graphic and I enjoyed her blog as well.

You’re not screwing it up. Your baby is just completely wicked awesome.

via Momastery.

I’ve been both a “working” and a “stay-at-home” mom so I’ve experienced both sides of the internal and eternal debate moms endure all day, every day. When I worked outside my house, Mommy Guilt rode shotgun with me each morning, chiding me for dropping off my sick boy at day care instead of keeping him home and for rocking him the night before instead of preparing for work. When I got to work each day Mommy Guilt whispered that a good mom would still be at home with her son and when I returned home she’d insist that a better teacher would have stayed at work longer. When I’d visit girlfriends who stayed home, Mommy Guilt would say “See… this lady’s doing it right. Her kids are better off than yours are.” And Mommy Guilt certainly had a lot to say when Chase’s day care provider admitted that he had taken his first steps while I was working. Every night when I finally got Chase to sleep, finished grading papers, and collapsed into the couch, Mommy Guilt would snuggle up next to me and sweetly say “shouldn’t you spend some quality time with your husband instead of checking out?” And finally, before I fell asleep each night, Mommy Guilt would whisper in my ear, “YOU KNOW, THE ONLY WAY YOU’RE GOING TO BE A GOOD MOTHER AND WIFE IS IF YOU QUIT YOUR JOB AND STAY HOME.”

And so now I’m a stay-at-home mom. And the thing is that Mommy Guilt stays home with me.

via Momastery.

Davidson College basketball, Nik Cochran, multitasking, live blogging: Another great day to be a Wildcat (fan)!  Congrats to Nik.  I think it is great that I can multitask and pay attention to a game.  I often put on the live blog, even when I am watching a game.

Cochran Hits 1,000 Career Points; Wildcats Roll to Eighth Straight Win

Nik Cochran became the 44th player in program history to hit the 1,000-point plateau and Davidson shot 53.6 percent in a convincing 87-52 victory over Appalachian State in front of 5,090 fans Saturday evening at Belk Arena.

via Davidson College Athletics.

Davidson College Athletics – Live Blog for Tonight’s Men’s Basketball Game vs. ASU.

Davidson College, Baker Athletic Center, The Davidsonian:  So many things to be done …

“Baker was designed 25 years ago when athletes had one season of intensive practice and play. Now all sports practice year round,” Jim Murphy, Director of Athletics, explains. “This building [Baker] has had an incredible demand put on it. There are students in this building almost around the clock.”

With additional men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball practice courts, as well as a dance center with two studios, office space, and storage, the extra space will alleviate scheduling constraints, reducing the current inconvenience of athletes missing study groups, regular dinner hours, and extracurricular activities.

In addition to benefiting varsity athletes, this extra space will increase student participation in club and intramural sports by 60%, as well as accommodate an expanding academic and extracurricular dance program.

Not all of the additions will be about scheduling, however. Some are merely ways to improve both the athlete and the spectator experience. The renovation will include new locker rooms, team rooms, film rooms, and administrative offices for men’s and women’s basketball. All athletes will appreciate the expanded Basil Boyd Training room, and students, faculty, and staff will benefit from a new cardio/fitness room, as well as a classroom for health and wellness instruction. Baker currently sees 90,000 patrons annually. A new ticket office with internal and external windows and a new game day entrance facing the parking lot will streamline the spectator experience.

The planned Baker renovations are a reflection of Davidson’s impressive expansion over the past quarter century. “Being able to respond so positively to the growth we’ve seen in the student population is the most exciting aspect of this project,” says Murphy.

via $15 M renovation of Baker slated to begin in April – The Davidsonian – Davidson College.

Stonewall Riots, President Obama,  1.21.13 Inauguration Speech, Stonewall Inn, Greenwich Village, Christopher Park, public art, legal history, same-sex marriage, LGBTQ rights, 2013 Legal Festival of Learning, hetero-normative society:  Three weeks ago, if you asked me what I knew about the Stonewall Riots, I would not have been able to tell you anything, and when you told me about them, I would have had to admit that I really do not remember ever learning about the event. Well, President Obama referred to the riots in his 1.21.13 Inauguration Speech, I saw the Stonewall Inn on my 1.28.13 tour of Greenwich Village and the statues dedicated to the riots in Christopher Park (the park facing the Inn), and l learned about them in the context of the legal history of same-sex marriage and LGBTQ rights at the Legal Festival of Learning on 2.9.13 (Same-Sex Relationships: Recent U.S. Developments by Maxine Eichner and Holning S. Lau). Sometimes I am amazed at how un-knowledgeable I am, and wonder if my education will ever be complete. As a lawyer and lover of history, now I at least feel like I can enter into an honest and educated conversation of the topic.”

.

I had not witnessed the use of the acronym LGBTQ ….

When most people see the acronym “LGBTQ” they are fairly certain what the first four letters stand for. “L,” of course, stands for “lesbian;” “G” is for gay; “B” stands for “bisexual” and “T” means “transgender.” But the “Q,” which represents the word “queer,” is harder to define.

So what exactly does it mean to be “queer?”

“Personally, I think ‘queer’ encompasses ALL in the community, whereas ‘gay’ is primarily used for only the homosexual male segment of the community,” says Kate Sherry, the editor of Queer Life News. “However, there some of us who do identify strictly as ‘queer’ instead of ‘lesbian’ or ‘trans,’ etc.”

Originally, the word “queer” meant unusual or strange, and later, it became a derogatory term for someone who is gay. At the end of the 20th century, members of the gay community reclaimed the word and in doing so, recycled the meaning once again, this time with the goal of empowerment.

The “grayness” of the word is part of its power because it breaks down the ability to label and categorize lifestyles that unfairly generate hate and oppression. Activists, people who strongly reject traditional gender or sexual identities, or anyone who feel oppressed by the pressure to conform to the heterosexual lifestyle often use the word.

According to Bill Serpe, the executive director of Senior Action in a Gay Environment (SAGE), “queer” is a catchall word for anyone who is outside the societal norm, not just those who identify themselves as part of the gay community.

“Someone is queer when they have realized that they are not straight, heterosexual or born in the wrong body. Not all people who might fall in this category like being called queer, but would agree that they are living a lifestyle that is different from what is considered the social norm,” says Serpe.

So, can a straight person be queer? Sure. For some, the “Q” stands for “questioning,” which includes people living the straight lifestyle but questioning their sexuality, someone who isn’t sexual at all because they are unsure of their identity or a person who is sexual, but doesn’t fit into any particular box.

“Anyone who feels they don’t or can’t conform to a hetero-normative society are eligible for queer status!” says Sherry.

via OnMilwaukee.com Milwaukee Buzz: What does the “Q” in LGBTQ really mean?.

2013 Northeast Blizzard , Storm Nemo, Nemo memes:  It is amazing th pictures and videos that are coming out of the NE.  Apart of me would love to be there and a part is glad I am looking at tulip tree blossoms! FYI —  10 Things To Know About The Northeast Blizzard. I just love this picture of Beacon Hill from the WSJ …

EASTON, Mass.—A historic blizzard pummeled the Northeast, dumping up to three feet of snow across New England and knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of customers in New England.

via Storm Sweeps Through Northeast U.S. – WSJ.com.

And then there are the Nemo memes. 🙂

The 15 Funniest Blizzard Nemo Memes

The 15 Funniest Blizzard Nemo Memes

Nemo in the Snow | Complex.

Cool Tools, Boing Boing: Just found this  interesting …

We’ve already come up with a lot of ideas for Cool Tools projects, and some are very ambitious. As Kevin said, “Let’s turn Cool Tools into a butterfly, not just a better caterpillar.” That’s a terrific goal to have, and it’s one that can be achieved while staying true to Cool Tools’ original statement of purpose:

Cool tools really work. A cool tool can be any book, gadget, software, video, map, hardware, material, or website that is tried and true. All reviews on this site are written by readers who have actually used the tool and others like it. Items can be either old or new as long as they are wonderful. We only post things we like and ignore the rest.

I love learning about what people make and do, and the tools they use. Do you have a tool you love? Tell us about it at Cool Tools.

via Mark joins Cool Tools – Boing Boing.

Mason-Dixon Knitting.

 English grammar,  NFL,  Tweets, Chris Culliver, Wes Welker, 2d graders: 🙂

A class of 2nd Graders show off their corrections to a number of tweets from top NFL sports stars, including this one by San Francisco 49ers' Chris Culliver.

A group of 2nd graders have corrected  a number of NFL tweets; handing out a lesson in spelling and grammar to a number of top NFL stars.

The second grade students from Elmwood Franklin Elementary in Buffalo, N.Y. were given a challenge by faculty at the school to correct the grammar and spelling mistakes in a number of Twitter postings from top NFL players.

The young children went to work on tweets from Chris Culliver, Wes Welker and Titus D Young Sr. on Friday, correcting errors in grammar the stars had made in the world of Twitter.

In one tweet by Chris Culliver in which the San Francisco 49ers player tweeted, “I pray to God I’m never dieing broke”

Chris Culliver has been in the news a lot this week as the San Francisco 49ers prepare to take on the Baltimore Ravens in New Orleans this Sunday for Super Bowl 47.

However, despite the pressure that must be on Culliver in preparing for the big game, the kids were still unforgiving on his spelling and grammar.

via 2nd Graders Correct NFL Tweets: Chris Culliver, Wes Welker Twitter Accounts Given English Lesson.

blogs, knitting:  I don’t knit, but I liked the blog because of the dialogue between the two writers … Mason-Dixon Knitting.

weddings, destination weddings, Travel + Leisure: When I first started hearing about destination weddings (and I will attend my first this spring), I asked my teenage daughter  if she would ever want a “destination wedding” … the beach where she grew up going, for example.  She looked at me like I was crazy … so I was astounded to read this article  …  “For many couples, I think, it’s the weirder the better.”

“People don’t want their big day to be cookie-cutter,” says Anja Winikka, editor of TheKnot.com, a popular wedding-planning website. “First, the crazy new thing was destination weddings”—which these days represent about 20 percent of ceremonies. “And now, just in the past five years, we’re noticing many more couples seeking unusual settings, from treetops to airplane hangars. For many couples, I think, it’s the weirder the better.”

via Worlds Strangest Places to Get Married – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

twitter, HuffPostHome:  HuffPostHome … I will not trust you again.  This one was really stupid and definitely not  “one of the coolest things … ever seen.”

HuffPost Home 

@HuffPostHome

This laundry trick is one of the coolest things we’ve ever seen huff.to/12BrQFE

12
Jan
13

1.12.13 … all my babies are gone … almost …

Anna Quindlen, “All My Babies are gone now!”, essays:  Great essay: “But the biggest mistake I made is the one that most of us make while doing this. I did not live in the moment enough.” Ditto that sentiment, Anna Quindlen.

All My Babies Are Gone Now

By Anna Quindlen, Newsweek Columnist and Author

Every part of raising children is humbling. Believe me, mistakes were made. They have all been enshrined in the “Remember-When-Mom-Did” Hall of Fame. The outbursts, the temper tantrums, the bad language — mine, not theirs. The times the baby fell off the bed. The times I arrived late for preschool pickup. The nightmare sleepover. The horrible summer camp. The day when the youngest came barreling out of the classroom with a 98 on her geography test, and I responded, “What did you get wrong?” (She insisted I include that here.) The time I ordered food at the McDonald’s drive-through speaker and then drove away without picking it up from the

window. (They all insisted I include that.) I did not allow them to watch the Simpsons for the first two seasons. What was I thinking?

But the biggest mistake I made is the one that most of us make while doing this. I did not live in the moment enough. This is particularly clear now that the moment is gone, captured only in photographs. There is one picture of the three of them, sitting in the grass on a quilt in the shadow of the swing set on a summer day, ages 6, 4 and 1. And I wish I could remember what we ate, and what we talked about, and how they sounded, and how they looked when they slept that night.

via All My Babies are gone now!-a nice reminder to Mom’s everyware. – SheKnows Message Boards.

The British Library, Shakespeare,  Romeo & Juliet,  audio:

The British Library releases the first-ever audio guide to how Shakespeare should really sound. Sampled here, Romeo & Juliet.

via Explore – The British Library releases the first-ever audio….

South Africa, Big 5:

I saw 4 of the 5 … I guess I need to go back. 🙂

Which of the Big 5 game would you be most excited to see on safari?

via Visit South Africa.

1963, 50, tumult:  I am a child of the 60s, but I was only 3 in ’63 … so I do not know where I was when Kennedy was shot … but still this year shaped my life.

“So much happened in the ’60s that every year is almost its own brand … and ’63 has a rightful place,” said Jeremy Varon, a history professor at New York’s New School and co-editor of the journal “The Sixties.”

The decade’s themes resounded, he says. There was “the revolution in race relations,” the divisive Vietnam war, widespread experimentation with drugs, the sexual revolution, a societal turn toward youth.

“All of this was experienced as a crisis,” Varon said. But he added, the period was “also exuberantly fun.”

Ever since, “youth has defined popular taste,” and a favored demographic for marketers remains the age group 18-to-35.

via 1963 at 50: A year’s tumult echoes still.

gadgets, CES, hapifork:  I want the fork!

Hot products of this year’s Consumer Electronics Show meld peculiarity with innovation

Hapifork

Eat too fast with the Hapifork, and you’ll know it. The $99 device lights up and vibrates when you leave fewer than 10 seconds between bites. The aim is to get users to eat more slowly, which the company says improves digestion and prompts you to eat less. Nutritionists we spoke with like the concept, but say the same effect could be achieved, for free, by eating with your nondominant hand. A Hapifork spokesman says the fork’s benefits include the ability to track progress over time

via 10 quirkiest gadgets of CES – Slide Show – MarketWatch.

Tyler Kalinoski,  Davidson College, Davidson Basketball:  Go Cats!   “Like a navy blue blazer…”  LOL

 

Like a navy blue blazer, Kalinoski fits into almost any situation.

He can play any of three guard spots for the Wildcats, who resume Southern Conference play Saturday at Furman, and Kalinoski can do so without negatively affecting Davidson’s on-court dynamic.

The perimeter group, including Kalinoski, has allowed McKillop to mix and match lineups, keeping players fresh without sacrificing productivity. The mix of tough early losses and victories over Vanderbilt and West Virginia has helped the Wildcats as they get into the heart of Southern Conference play, Kalinoski said.

via Tyler Kalinoski does it all for Davidson | CharlotteObserver.com.

YouTube, Samsung, CES 2013. cats: 🙂

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YZRkUYk74g

Samsung Keynote CES 2013 – CATS – YouTube.

firepits, Fire Pit Art, Made in the South Awards, Garden and Gun:  Loved these!  From Fire Pit Art in Lebanon, TN.

Fire Pit Art – Functional Steel Sculpture.

Fire Pit Art – Functional Steel Sculpture.

via Winner: Made in the South Awards | Garden and Gun.

cheese, Made in the South Awards, Garden and Gun:  … And cheese from Elberton, GA!

Winner: Food Category

Nature’s Harmony Farm

Product: Farmstead Cheese

Made in: Elberton, GA

Est.: 2008

via Third Annual Made in the South Awards | Garden and Gun.

Charlotte, uptown living:  I could do this …

<br /> Childress Klein will start construction on its Mint Street project next week.</p> <p>

The development will feature, studio, one- and two-bedroom units ranging from 650 square feet to 1,250 square feet. Most of the apartments will sit atop six levels of structured parking, but those first six floors will have residential units on the front side of the building, Klein says. The seventh floor will contain the amenity center for the complex, including a saltwater pool and clubhouse.

via Childress Klein starting uptown apartment tower – Charlotte Business Journal.

Katie Couric,  Makeup-Free:  If only I looked this good  “without the spackle” … love Katie!

katie couricKatie Couric went makeup-free for the first time ever on her Friday show.

Couric made the move for an episode of “Katie” that examined the beauty industry and its effects on women.

“I’m not the first to go on television without the spackle … but knowing that a lot of other people have done it doesn’t make it easier,” she said on her show.

via Katie Couric Goes Makeup-Free (PHOTOS).

Tahoe, Basecamp Hotel, Travel + Leisure:  I my next life I want to be adventuresome. 🙂

 

Basecamp Hotel

Arc’teryx meets Anthropologie at Lake Tahoe’s newest place to stay, Basecamp Hotel (South Lake Tahoe, Calif. $). Just minutes from both the water and the Heavenly Mountain ski resort, it was designed with high-style adventurers in mind. Its 50 chic, sleepaway-camp-inspired rooms (some with bunk beds) substitute lanterns for lamps and survival guides for Gideon Bibles. Nightly group meals encourage hostel-like mingling—as do the outdoor fire pits, where you’ll find guests sharing s’mores and trading stories about the moguls on Heavenly’s famous Gunbarrel run.

via Tahoe Debut: Basecamp Hotel – Carry On | Travel + Leisure.




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