Posts Tagged ‘Wall Street Journal

29
Sep
11

9.29.2011 … the Molls overnighted at Davidson … :)

Davidson College, admissions process, kith/kin: There is value in sending a prospect on an overnight. 🙂

Davidson College – Distinctions.

road trip, music playlist, lists:  What’s on you road trip playlist?

And here’s a final playlist:

1. The Rise and Fall of Intelligent Design by Rodney Crowell

2. The Poet Game , sung by Ani DiFranco (written by Greg Brown, an American treasure who deserves more attention than he gets)

3. Sweet is the Melody by Iris DeMent (who, last I heard, was living with Greg Brown)

4. Talkin’ ‘Bout Women, Obviously by Buddy Guy

5. Leonard by Merle Haggard

via Road Trip Day 19: Road Trip Interruptus | Swampland | TIME.com.

TimesCast, media,  video, NYT: Just discovered this daily video broadcast … why am I paying for cable?

President Obama faces a changing electoral landscape; the Op-Ed columnist Nicholas D. Kristof on Bahrain’s latest crackdown; and Islamists prepare for elections in Egypt and Tunisia.

via TimesCast | September 29, 2011 – Video Library – The New York Times.

Google Wallet:  From Katherine (Boehret WSJ’s The Digital Solution – AllThingsD): “Ironic: Citi sent me a paper letter confirming I was using Google Wallet for paper-free payments”  🙂

Would you rather leave home without your wallet and be penniless all day, or leave your phone at home and be out of touch all day? Many people would rather be penniless. If only phones could be used to pay for things, it would be easier to leave a wallet behind.

Enter Google Wallet, the search engine’s answer to this problem. This mobile app uses a chip in the phone so it can be waved in front of payment stations to buy things. Users set it up by registering a credit card to the phone or loading a Google Prepaid Card with a credit card. A four-digit password enables payment transactions. Google Wallet is rolling out this week to Sprint’s already available, $50 (after $50 mail-in rebate and with a two-year contract) Nexus S 4G phones by way of an Android operating-system software update.

via Katie Reviews Google Wallet – Katherine Boehret – The Digital Solution – AllThingsD.

South Africa, Honeymoon Murder Case:  This murder occurred shortly after I returned from SA last year and it sent chills down my spine.  SA had made great strides in connection with its public image regarding such random acts of violence in connection with ists hosting of the World Cup.  In one fell swoop this brought it right back to where it started … and to know here that it was a hit job by the groom.  Very sad.

British Home Secretary Theresa May approved the extradition of a British businessman to return to South Africa to stand trial for his wife’s murder on their honeymoon last year.

Shrien Dewani, 31, is accused of hiring hit men to kill his 28-year-old bride, Anni Dewani, who was shot and killed last November when the couple’s taxi was hijacked in the Gugulethu township in South Africa, the BBC reports. Dewani, who denies involvement in the murder, was released unharmed during the hijacking, but his bride’s body was later found in the abandoned car.

via British Government Approves Extradition in South Africa Honeymoon Murder Case – TIME NewsFeed.

zombies, tv, AMC , “Walking Dead”:    “Walking Dead” themed talk show… Well, since we haven’t watched  “Walking Dead”, yet, i don’t think I need to watch a   “Walking Dead” themed talk show!

Coming soon to your TV: A zombie talk show.

Let’s Talk Zombies: AMC to Air ‘Walking Dead’-Themed Talk Show – TIME NewsFeed.

Wall Street Journal, advertisements,  commercials:  I don’t think I have ever seen a WSJ ad … I wonder how many people called 1-800-xxx-xxxx … agents are standing by … Actually it is an interesting add … what do you think?

By animating a series of still photographs, and without using a single word of dialogue, The Wall Street Journal moves beyond its traditional business focus to become a vibrant “Everything Journal” in a :30 brand image spot entitled, “Live in the Know,” from agency McGarry Bowen (NYC) and production/design company The Wilderness.

In aggressively moving beyond its traditional black-and-white, business-only format, The Wall Street Journal’s agency asked The Wilderness to produce a spot that embraces its newly expanded editorial focus and use of four-color art throughout, exclusively using still images. Using the masthead the concept was to create a new visual language to present the newspaper as the The ‘Blank’ Street Journal, in which the reader fills in his favorite ‘blank’ subject matter.

via The Wall Street Journal : Live in the Know | scaryideas.com.

moods, Twitter, biological rhythms: When I read this i immediately thought of biorhythms and mood rings from the 70’s. 🙂

However grumpy people are when they wake up, and whether they stumble to their feet in Madrid, Mexico City or Minnetonka, Minn., they tend to brighten by breakfast time and feel their moods taper gradually to a low in the late afternoon, before rallying again near bedtime, a large-scale study of posts on the social media site Twitter found.

Drawing on messages posted by more than two million people in 84 countries, researchers discovered that the emotional tone of people’s messages followed a similar pattern not only through the day but also through the week and the changing seasons. The new analysis suggests that our moods are driven in part by a shared underlying biological rhythm that transcends culture and environment.

via Moods on Twitter Follow Biological Rhythms, Study Finds – NYTimes.com.

slavery, economic analysis, cartography, “Cotton Kingdom”:  Article blended history and economics … very enjoyable.

Te role of maps in visualizing United States Census results is actually a practice that originated 150 years ago, in the crisis between North and South.

An earlier post in this series described the efforts of the Coast Survey to map the distribution of slavery across the South in the summer of 1861. At about the same time, another pathbreaking effort was underway to “measure” the productivity of Southern slavery. The map is not well known, but its creator was none other than Frederick Law Olmsted, the designer of New York’s Central Park and one of the pioneers of American landscape architecture.

Olmsted was already an accomplished journalist when he met Henry Raymond, the editor of the newly established New-York Daily Times (later The New York Times) in the early 1850s. After just five minutes of conversation, Raymond was so impressed that he made Olmsted a special correspondent, and sent him to observe and write about Southern life. For the next several years Olmsted sent back voluminous reports — published in three volumes — of disorder, poverty, inefficiency, backwardness and chaos. We might dismiss these as hopelessly biased Northern observations, yet these accounts gained a wide audience, and challenged the contemporary picture of the cotton south as an economic powerhouse.

Olmsted and Goodloe identified slave labor as the single most damaging influence on the southern economy: it was inefficient, absorbed capital away from reinvestment, and required substantial overhead. Worst of all, the price of slaves drove cotton production — rather than the other way around — and was immune to competition from free labor. Such a system could never generate real prosperity. Even Olmsted’s title, “The Cotton Kingdom,” turned the South Carolina politician James Henry Hammond’s famous phrase — “Cotton is King” — on its head. Instead of a place of wealth and economic superiority, Olmsted found a closed society imprisoned by the crop, unable to advance, diversify or feed its own people. This was entirely an economic — rather than a moral or humanitarian — case against slavery, for the authors were tailoring their case for a British public concerned about their cotton supply.

Olmsted and Goodloe weren’t the first to say that slavery was a doomed system, but they were the first to use cartography to make their case, first to the British, and then to their fellow Americans.

via Mapping the Cotton Kingdom – NYTimes.com.

stereotypes, Christian denominations, LOL:

denomination-interpretation-chart.jpg 1,280×1,280 pixels

Deep Springs College: My friend Bob T. told me about this college … impressive results … but who are the kids that go there … obviously they can get in elite colleges anyway … interesting.

Deep Springs College, a small and storied institution of higher learning set on a cattle ranch in California, is going co-ed.

Founded in 1917, Deep Springs is a highly selective two-year college unlike any other: it enrolls just 26 students, all men, for a two-year regimen of study and toil. Most graduates go on to equally selective four-year colleges. By “equally selective,” I mean Yale.

The college sits on a cattle ranch and alfalfa farm in California’s High Desert and operates “on the belief that manual labor and political deliberation are integral parts of a comprehensive liberal arts education,” according to the web site.

Deep Springs is an ambitious place, intended as a training ground for leaders. Founder L.L. Nunn put it thus: “Great leaders in all ages have sought the desert and heard its voice.”

The admission rate ranges from 6 percent to 15 percent a year. Students who manage to get in attend on a full scholarship worth about $50,000 a year. Over the past 10 years, according to the web site, 16 percent of students went on to Harvard, 13 percent to the University of Chicago, 7 percent to Yale and 7 percent to Brown.

It is probably safe to assume that two years at Deep Springs is, for many lads, a first taste of honest toil.

via A cattle-ranch college for future Yalies goes co-ed – College, Inc. – The Washington Post.

compact SLR cameras, photography:  Perfection?   A toy I would like to have …

 

The Nikon 1 is bigger than the Pentax Q — what isn’t? — but strikes a better balance in the complex price/size/features/sensor size equation.

 

It’s available in two models: the J1, intended for the general user (available in white, black, silver, red or pink for $650 with a 3X zoom lens); and the V1, intended for advanced hobbyists (black, $900 with 3X lens). The V1 adds an electronic eyepiece viewfinder and a few more perks.

 

The headline here is speed. These cameras are tricked out with enough computing power to launch a rocket. They can perform stunts like taking 10 shots a second, refocusing all the way, or 60 shots a second without refocusing.

 

They focus faster than any camera Nikon has ever made. They easily create slow-motion video, containing as many as 1,200 frames a second, although at a tiny frame size.

 

Get this: You can even snap a full-resolution still photo while you’re recording video, without leaving a blink or a gap in the movie. Nikon believes, as do I, that that’s a first in the history of consumer cameras, and it’s unbelievably useful.

 

The sensor inside is a new design. At 0.62 inch, it’s much bigger than a pocket camera’s, but not as big as the sensor in a Micro Four Thirds camera (0.89 inch), let alone a real S.L.R. (1.2 inches or larger).

 

The photos are generally very good, but you can easily tell they didn’t come from an S.L.R. For example, the Nikon 1 too easily “blows out” the brightest parts of the scene, and muddies up the darkest parts.

 

That would still present an irresistible tradeoff if it weren’t for a couple of truly idiotic design elements. First, the mode dial has only four positions — Auto, Movie, Best Shot and Motion Snapshot — and two of them are wasted.

 

The Best Shot mode takes 20 photos in one second, then throws away all but what it considers the best five, based on focus, blur and so on. The Motion Snapshot mode captures a one-second slow-motion movie and adds cheesy music to it.

 

But dedicating two of the mode dial’s precious four positions to these rarely used gimmicks is a criminal splurge. Meanwhile, if you want to adjust the shutter speed or aperture, you have to dive deeply into the labyrinth of on-screen menus. Bring bread crumbs.

 

And another thing. There’s a dedicated movie start/stop button, but it doesn’t work except in Movie mode! What’s the point of a Movie button if you have to change modes to use it?

 

Three lenses are already available for the Nikon 1 — an f/2.8 nonzooming pancake lens, the 3X zoom (the film equivalent of a 27-71 mm lens) and a telephoto lens (81-297 mm equivalent). There’s also an enormous 10X zoom intended for video.

 

The Nikon 1’s 1080p videos are spectacular in general (it smoothly refocuses and re-exposes while filming); but when you add the 10X lens and its smooth “power zoom” button, your Nikon 1 becomes an actual camcorder.

 

Nikon will also offer an adapter that lets you use any existing F-mount Nikon lens with your camera. It might look a little silly on such a tiny body, but it’ll work.

 

Both the Pentax Q and the Nikon 1 are important experiments. Both demonstrate that the camera industry has, at last, given up the meaningless race to cram more megapixels onto a sensor — and moved into more important pursuits, like better photos and smaller cameras.

 

Unfortunately, both cameras are also flawed in their own special ways. Yes, the world’s camera engineers have finally brought us the pocket S.L.R. But perfection continues to elude them.

 

via 2 Compact Cameras Move Closer to Perfection – David Pogue – NYTimes.com.

mea culpa, science: Another interesting piece … the science behind saying you’re sorry.  The piece did not mention Tiger … but his mea culpa was a major fail.

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings’ recent effort to address customer anger follows an all-too-familiar script. A public figure or institution commits an offense, and then offers an apology to fix it.

Yet as we see over and over again, our reactions to even the most direct and explicit mea culpas can differ markedly from one incident to another.

For instance, before his more recent infidelity troubles, Arnold Schwarzenegger was accused of sexually harassing several women during his 2003 gubernatorial campaign. He apologized and subsequently won that election. In contrast, former U.S. Representative Anthony Weiner apologized in June 2011 for his involvement in a sexting scandal. He was heckled, called a “pervert,” and soon resigned from office.

What makes one apology succeed and another fail? A growing body of research is trying to understand this very question. The psychology behind saying you’re sorry is proliferating rapidly, and there are still many questions to answer. However, it already offers some important lessons that help explain why some acts of contrition work—while others don’t.

Apologies are a double-edged sword. By signaling repentance and an effort to repair the problem, they’re beneficial. But they’re also harmful because they confirm that blame is actually deserved. When making an apology, then, the benefits should outweigh the cost. There is little harm in offering an apology if it’s already obvious that you are guilty. But there’s also little benefit if you fail to make it clear that the offense won’t recur.

Many people assume that if you make the apology more direct, sincere and explicit, people will think you won’t do it again. And they may be partly correct. However, research has shown that a host of other factors often exert far more drastic effects on an apology’s reception than how sincere people think it is.

Here’s just one example, based on research my colleagues and I have done. It turns out that an apology’s effectiveness depends largely on whether the offense is thought to be intentional or a mistake. People are often willing to discount a poor decision if it’s the result of a mistake; they believe its causes will be corrected. But if it’s thought to be intentional, people tend to place little faith in the idea that the flaw will be corrected. This is important because many offenses can be construed either way, and would-be apologizers often fail to account for people’s perception before they respond.

via The science behind saying you’re sorry – The Washington Post.

college admissions, college crisis, internet solutions: A Match.com for Higher Ed?  Lots of good insight in this piece.

Newspapers and magazines like to pick on excitable parents over-prepping their children for college. This would be a wonderful problem for the rest of the country to have.

It’s an article of faith among the striving classes that college admissions has become a Thunderdome-style tournament from which a chosen few emerge to enjoy lives of guaranteed privilege. Media outlets make a lot money stoking the flames of anxiety among the college-bound. A devoted New York Times reader could be forgiven for thinking the typical American teenager spends his or her seventeenth year doing nothing but studying for AP tests and fretting about impressing the personal-essay readers at Swarthmore and Brown.

In truth, the college admissions frenzy is limited to a relative handful of privileged students, as I wrote in a story for the Washington Monthly’s annual college issue. This is a problem. As a nation, we need far more students to be caught up in the college admissions market–but in a completely different way.

Unfortunately, the closest, cheapest college is often a bad choice. In 2009, more than 320 four-year colleges and universities reported six-year graduation rates below 30 percent. At community colleges, the average three-year graduation rate is 16 percent. While much ink is spilled denouncing terrible K-12 schools, pundits and politicians seem less willing to admit that a not-insignificant number of public colleges also suffer from the same problems of incompetence, mediocrity, and inadequate funding. Add the more recent phenomenon of some (although by no means all) for-profit colleges loading up students with debt by selling overpriced online degrees, and it’s clear that all students need help choosing the right college, not just the privileged few.

Indeed, the stakes are arguably much higher for a first-generation student picking among open-access institutions of wildly varying quality than for a wealthy suburban kid whose worst-case scenario is an expensive private school. Without a better-functioning higher market, we’ll continue to lose ground to foreign competitors that have eclipsed America in producing college graduates in recent years.

The existing admissions system is also remarkably archaic. To a large extent, it still involves students submitting pieces of paper (or electronic copies of pieces of paper) containing information about grades, test scores, high-school profiles, essays, and personal recommendations. Colleges then apply a few crude filters, like a minimum SAT threshold or whether the student’s parents are rich, and consider the remaining applicants via a “holistic” process of decision-by-committee. Because the information isn’t stored in a database, it’s hard to perform post hoc analyses to see if the “yea” and “nay” decisions were good ones. The fact that most students drop out of or transfer from the first college they choose suggests that many are not.

Traditional students will probably be least affected by all of this. Harvard will always be Harvard. But for everyone else, a vigorous, technology-driven higher education marketplace can’t come soon enough.

via Our Best Weapon Against the College Crisis: A Match.com for Higher Ed – Kevin Carey – Business – The Atlantic.

mass transit, Charlotte, Red Line (Charlotte-to-Mooresville mass transit line), CATS, Charlotte NC, innovative funding: John and I always said we would move back to Davidson if they built the Red Line!  The funding would be based on a dual usage line —  both passenger and freight rail service.

According to the blog, a Red Line Task Force subcommittee has come up with an idea that state transportation official Paul Morris says is unique — use the Charlotte-to-Mooresville line for both passenger and freight rail service. The plan also calls for CATS to join with the towns of Huntersville, Cornelius and Davidson to tax revenues from new development along the line.

via New idea for North transit line? | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

MLB, wild card, Braves, quotes: he must not be a Braves fan. 🙂 “What that was, quite simply, was the best day of regular-season baseball the game has ever seen.”

(STEVE NESIUS – REUTERS) At one point Wednesday night, the final night of the baseball calendar, there were four games being contested to decide the two wild cards, and in three of them the situations were as follows: In Baltimore, a 3-2 game in the seventh inning; in St. Petersburg, Fla., a 7-7 game in the 10th; in Atlanta, a 3-3 game in the 12th.

I am tasked with looking forward today (I think the matchups are Yankees-Tigers and Rangers-Rays in the AL, and Phillies-Cardinals and Brewers-Diamondbacks in the NL). I have a playoff preview to write, and predictions to get wrong. But it is impossible not to spend a few hours looking back first.

via Wild-card race: Baseball’s greatest regular-season finish – Baseball Insider – The Washington Post.

Apple, iPod, kith/kin, RIP:  My boys still have their original iPods … what a great product.  RIP, iPod.

Apple makes the most sought after gadgets on the planet, but they may be about to pull the plug on one that helped get the revolution rolling.

Classic is just another way to say outdated.

Rumor has it that the iPod Classic (and iPod Shuffle) may be discontinued.

Apple sells millions of iPods, but the Classic and Shuffle don’t have touchscreens, which are the interface of the present and future.

CNET’s Crave gadget blog notes there’s no mention of iPod news in the upcoming Oct. 4 Apple press conference, where details of the iPhone 5 will be announced.

The iPod first appeared 10 years ago … a long time in tech circles … and Apple would rather folks buy an iPhone (or iTouch) than an iPod, which contributed a mere 8 percent of the company’s revenue.

Crave has a great Steve Jobs quote: ”Just get rid of the crappy stuff and focus on the good stuff.”

The iPod Classic can hold 120 gigabytes of music … which I think is really good, but probably not enough to keep it from going the way of the Walkman.

via Apple to pull plug on iPod? | News To Me with George Mathis.

Civil War, refugee box,  General  Sherman, evacuation of Atlanta, history:  Interesting that your valuables could be put in one box …

Before Sherman ordered the evacuation of Atlanta, thousands of civilians living outside the city had begun to refugee South. As the Union army approached in June 1864, the Archibald Smith family fled from their home in Roswell, GA. They packed their belongings in this box, painted their address across the top, and made their way to Valdosta, GA, to stay with relatives. They would not return to Roswell until 1866. Today their home is museum and is open to the public.

via Atlanta History Center, Civil War Refugee Box.




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