Posts Tagged ‘Washington DC

15
Jan
19

1.14.19 … “Hiraeth describes a deep, inborn sense of yearning for a home, a feeling, a place or person that is beyond this plane of existence”

FPC – Charlotte, TMBS, vocabulary, word nerd, hireath, thin places: We began our FPC – Charlotte TMBS with a discussion of hiraeth and thin places.

1.8.19

Breadcoins, Cary Umhau, Washington DC:

I’m so excited by this article about Breadcoin. Cary is a co-founder!


Quentin Wilson, 56, uses a “Breadcoin” to buy breakfast Friday from Naomi Banks at the Mission Muffins food truck. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

Jeffrey Carter, who is homeless, carried two gold-colored coins in his palm as he approached the Mission Muffins cafe trailer in Northwest Washington to exchange them for a breakfast burrito and apple juice.

The quarter-size coins — each worth $2.20 and inscribed with part of the Lord’s Prayer and an image of wheat — were “Breadcoins,” a new form of currency in the District intended for people in need.

Inspired by the popularity of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, Breadcoins have circulated in the District since 2016, but they are still relatively unknown. They are an option for people who worry that giving money to those in need might be used to fuel an addiction.

Source: ‘Breadcoin’ is a new currency in D.C. for people in need – The Washington Post, https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2019/01/11/breadcoin-is-new-currency-dc-people-need/

1.11.19

Kith/kin, UNC-CH, student mental health: For years I have received the DTH daily email. I rarely read it. But today, I clicked on it and there was the daughter of one of my best friends. Nice shout out to e, Eleanor!

Does CAPS' referral system work?

Eleanor Murray, a first-year public policy and global studies major, at the James A. Taylor Building, where Counseling and Psychological Services is located, on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019.  “As someone who did not realize I had mental health issues, it was helpful and resourceful and I felt supported while trying to find a therapist,” Murray says of her experience with CAPS. Murray would recommend CAPS and likes the multiple treatment options offered at CAPS.

Source: Does CAPS’ referral system work? – The Daily Tar Heel, https://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2019/01/caps-short-term-therapy-experiences-0114

1.14.19

Georgetown SC, DeBordieu: One of my favorite places …

From surf and sand to sightseeing and beyond, Myrtle Beach is always a good idea. But, when it’s time for a break from the buzz of the Grand Strand, head less than an hour south to Georgetown, one of six towns that make up the Hammock Coast. Here, you’ll have easy access to a multitude of activities, museums, and dining options. Read on for our affordable guide to the highlights of South Carolina’s third oldest city.

Source: Southern Hospitality Meets Modern Style in Georgetown, South Carolina, 
https://www.shermanstravel.com/advice/easy-southern-escapes-georgetown-south-carolina

1.8.19

Coffee Shops, Third Place, Burney’s Sweets and More, New places: Barb and I enjoying this just opened bakery, as in yesterday. And I will go back!

Barb and I were discussing where to meet. I receive a daily email called Charlotte Agenda which had just this day mentioned this new bakery. I had not realized it was it’s second day until they asked if they could take our picture.

Give Burney’s a try! Bakery known for its fried stuffed croissants now open near Uptown – Charlotte Agenda, https://www.charlotteagenda.com/153909/bakery-known-for-its-fried-stuffed-croissants-now-open-near-uptown/

And I think this could be a great “third place.”

I recently read a book by Ray Oldenburg – The Great Good Place – which suggested another happy place candidate, perhaps the most viable of all. The book is scholarly but accessible, an anthropological / sociological analysis of cafés, coffee shops, bars, and other hangouts. The book introduced to me a new term – third place – that made instant sense.

Third places are where people congregate other than work or home. England has pubs, France has cafés, and Austria has coffee houses. Once upon a time in the United States, common third places included country stores, post offices, barber shops, hair salons, soda shops, and taverns.

As described by Oldenburg, third places share common features. First, they are neutral, meaning that all people can come and go without penalty. If you don’t go to your third place for a few days or weeks, your return is greeted with interest and enthusiasm. Contrast that with work or home, where your eventual return after days of absence would be greeted with a pink slip or divorce papers.

Source: Happy Places: Third Places | Psychology Today, 
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-good-life/200912/happy-places-third-places

cider v cider, I remember the first time …,

I remember discovering alcoholic cider when I traveled to England with my sis in 1978. I liked it!

In the American state of New Hampshire, the state beverage of apple cider is like unfiltered apple juice. Usually, mulled spices are added, turning it into a spiced, piping hot drink. But in the famed cider-growing region of Britain’s West Country, cider is a fermented, alcoholic beverage. Look further across Europe and you’ll find that America’s version of apple cider is the outlier—cidre in France and sidra in Spain are both akin to British hard cider, rather than the American mulled beverage. So, how did Americans end up with such a unique form of apple cider?

People have been making cider for thousands of years. Wild apples, Malus sylvestris, grew naturally in the ancient British Isles. The Romans encouraged apple cultivation for cider, and when Christian monks established monasteries, they also made the beverage. When European settlers traveled to North America, they took cider with them.

Source: Why Cider Means Something Completely Different in America and Europe – Gastro Obscura, https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-is-american-cider-nonalcoholic

1.10.19

Street art, public art, Charlotte NC: And some Charlotte street art … I have a few favorites.

Charlotte’s mural scene is on the rise. Large-scale painting events like Talking Walls Mural Festivaland #nodacanjam help bring local and national artists together to crank out multiple pieces at the same time. And developers and businesses are catching on to the value of investing in public art, as you’ll see in places like South End’s Design Center, as well as at a number of apartment complexes.

The following is a hefty guide to where you can find more than 60 murals around town.

Source: The definitive guide to 60+ Charlotte street murals, mapped – Charlotte Agenda, https://www.charlotteagenda.com/153556/the-definitive-guide-to-60-charlotte-street-murals-mapped/

Neel Reid, Brookwood Hills, Atlanta GA,

Some Neel Reid and Brookwood Hills history for you.

The house is perfectly balanced, and though the facade appears plain at first sight, the bold ornaments draw the eye — the pediment across the front, balanced above a smaller pediment over a wide, ornate doorway topped by a sunken half circle.

These elements tell you the work you are looking at is not by your average architect but by an artist — a poet if you will — a man who brought beauty and precision to everything he touched.

Built in 1922, the house at 14 Palisades Road is the last man standing in a way.

It is one of seven Neel Reid designed just north of Ansley Park, a small settlement of houses designed by one of the South’s preeminent architects before there was a Brookwood Hills, and when Buckhead was several miles north on Peachtree Road.

Source: Brookwood Hills home one of seven originals and the last standing | Opinion | mdjonline.com, https://www.mdjonline.com/neighbor_newspapers/northside_sandy_springs/opinion/brookwood-hills-home-one-of-seven-originals-and-the-last/article_7400e9bc-1495-11e9-9300-cbcd24a794df.html

Longest Shutdown, Peggy Noonan:

I’ll throw in some­thing else I think we agree on. Gov­ern­ing by shut­down is ig­no­rant, cow­ardly and de­struc­tive. It is un­just to the in­no­cent, who are forced to deal with re­duced ser­vices, closed agen­cies and missed pay­checks. It’s dan­ger­ous: Some­thing bad will hap­pen with air se­cu­rity, food in­spec­tion—some­thing. It’s de­mor­al­iz­ing: It makes Amer­ica look in­com­pe­tent in the world, un­sta­ble, like an empty ad­ver­sary and in­ca­pable friend. It harms the de­mo­c­ra­tic spirit be­cause it so vividly tells Amer­i­cans—rubs their faces in it—that they’re pawns in a game as both par­ties pur­sue their self­ish ends.

Source:
End This Stupid Shutdown

1.10.19

Shutdown, Youngstown Steel, SCOTUS, Presidential Powers, US Constitution:

Justice Hugo Black delivered the majority opinion for the Court. Although it was the decision of the majority, it was clear that the Justices were split on a number of issues, as there five concurring opinions entered as well. Justice Black’s decision found for the steel industry, declaring that “[t]he President’s power, if any, to issue the order must stem either from an act of Congress or from the Constitution itself. There is no statute that expressly authorizes the President to take possession of property as he did here. Nor is there any act of Congress…from which such a power can be fairly implied.” The Court also found that, “[i]n the framework of our Constitution, the President’s power to see that the laws are faithfully executed refutes the idea that he is to be a lawmaker.”

Amongst the concurring opinions, and even compared to the majority opinion, Justice Robert Jackson’s still stands out today as the most useful in assessing the extent of executive power. Justice Jackson rejected strict boundaries between Congressional and Presidential power, and instead divided Presidential authority into three categories of legitimacy. First, and most legitimate, were cases in which “[t]he President acts pursuant to an express or implied authorization of Congress.” Second, is when Congress has been silent on the issue. And finally, “[w]hen the President takes measures incompatible with the expressed or implied will of Congress, his power is at its lowest ebb.”

President Truman was shocked by the decision. He immediately ordered the return of the steel mills to their owners, and the workers went on strike right away. The strike lasted more than 50 days. The effect of the Court’s decision limiting Presidential powers, however, has continued to impact executive decision-making throughout our nation’s history.

Source: Youngstown Steel: The Supreme Court stands up to the President – National Constitution Center, https://constitutioncenter.org/blog/youngstown-steel-the-supreme-court-stands-up-to-the-president

1.8.19

Shutdown:

There’s a lot at stake here — much more than just the next craft beer to be discovered and Instagrammed.

What spiritual practices is your congregation taking on in the new year? … such as ….walking a labyrinth … And a shout out to Katie Crowe!

For some, that means a deepening commitment to spiritual practices – to a regular, intentional discipline of taking the time to draw closer to God.

Congregants at First Presbyterian in Conway, Arkansas, learned about various postures for prayer – raising their arms as a passage from Mark’s Gospel was read, to worship God with all their souls.

People both inside and outside of churches are using all sorts of practices – such as centering prayer or walking a labyrinth or using lectio divina to read Scripture. Some have roots in ancient practices of early Christianity. Some involve silence; some seek God’s presence through art or movement.

Some tap into technology – using apps such as Pray as You Go, which draws from Ignatian spirituality and gives folks material to listen to while out for a walk or commuting to work or school.

Practicing a spiritual discipline can be communal work as well.

Quotes: I collect quotes. This is a good place to share a few.

I’m reading the preview chapter of “A Light So Lovely: The Spiritual Legacy of Madeleine L’Engle, Author of A Wrinkle in Time” by Sarah Arthur.

I love the dedication.

“For my young sons, Micah and Sam. May you tesser well.”

https://media.harpercollinschristian.com/files/z/PDF/LightSoLovely_samptxt.pdf

When old age shall this generation waste,

Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe

Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou sayst,

“Beauty is truth, truth beauty,” – that is all

Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.

— Ode on a Grecian Urn”

To be silent does not mean to be inactive; rather it means to breathe in the will of God, to listen attentively and be ready to obey.

– Dietrich Bonhoeffer, “Meditating on the Word”

“Manners are what hold a society together .. that and a reliable postal system. Propriety is concern for other people. When that goes out the window the gates of hell are surely opened and ignorance is king”

– Jane Austen

It is an ongoing temptation to think of ourselves as living under a curse. The loss of a friend, an illness, an accident, a natural disaster, a war, or any failure can make us quickly think that we are no good and are being punished. This temptation to think of our lives as full of curses is even greater when all the media present us day after day with stories about human misery.

Jesus came to bless us, not to curse us. But we must choose to receive that blessing and hand it on to others. Blessings and curses are always placed in front of us. We are free to choose. God says, Choose the blessings!

Source: Henri Nouwen Society | Daily Meditation | Henri Nouwen Society,

https://henrinouwen.org/resources/daily-meditation/

LOL, Art School of Fish:

04
Jul
11

7.4.2011 … Happy 4th … I brought my youngest home from the hospital on the 4th of July … and have shared most with great Charlotte kith family … See ya’ll at the lake!

media, traditions, 4th of July, NPR:  I like this tradition …

Twenty-three years ago, Morning Edition launched what has become an Independence Day tradition: hosts, reporters, newscasters and commentators reading the Declaration of Independence.

It was 235 years ago this Monday that church bells rang out over Philadelphia, as the Continental Congress adopted Thomas Jefferson’s draft of the Declaration of Independence.

via Reading The Declaration Of Independence Aloud : NPR.

yesterday, Facebook posts:  ‎”… Bombs bu[r]sting in air … Love the sound of fireworks even when I don’t see them …”  I read this again this morning (and corrected the typo) and realized how grateful i am that I live in a country where i generally the sound of fireworks is nothing to fear, but brings up a smile and years of happy memories.

I wish I  had written/said that … , family, travel, parenting:  This article so expresses how I felt during the last few weeks leading up to Saturday and Molls’ departure for France.  I smiled today when the director of the Tufts program sent an e-mail that he would be posting photos on a photo sharing site.  They are almost grown … but not quite … so we still get to peek just like at camp for the last 10 years or so … Oh, and I thought of you, CDCU … because I remember your saying several times … I should have written that!

And then — well, she went. Hefting her bags, she grinned a last farewell to her family and walked off toward the uniformed fellow standing at the gate. She looked terribly grown up.

Until that moment, in the weeks leading up to the day of her departure, it was as though she almost physically switched back and forth between the vulnerable child she had been and the confident woman she would someday become.

“I’ve packed Aristotle and Tocqueville for the flight,” she said at one point, with the brisk confidence of a mature traveling intellectual for whom aircraft hold the pleasant prospect of uninterrupted hours of inquiry (though mature traveling intellectuals probably pack mystery novels, or iPods).

via A teenage daughter boards a plane looking like the woman she’ll someday be | Meghan Cox Gurdon | Local | Washington Examiner.

music, 4th of July: YouTube – Beach Boys – 4th of July ‏.

4th of July, Founding Fathers, politics: … “they signed it, pledging ‘their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor.'”  How many of us would do that today?

It sounded preposterous to much of the world on that July 4 in 1776 that somehow a tiny colony long on big ideas and short on such things as an army, money or even much of a government intended to break away from the richest and most powerful nation in the world.

The men who signed that Declaration of Independence knew exactly how long the odds were, and knew they would be hanged if they failed – but they signed it, pledging “their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor.”

John Hancock signed his name large – he wanted the British to make no mistake about who he was.

I thought about that at a recent CBS News Town Hall on the economy when I asked Tom Coburn, a very conservative Republican Senator from Oklahoma, why Congress can’t get anything done anymore. Because, he said:

“We’re more interested in political careers than we are interested in fixing the very real and urgent problems in front of our country. The senate has – this is the lowest level of votes the senate has had in my seven years and the lowest level of votes in 25 years.

“And the reason we’re not voting is people don’t want to take a vote because they might have to defend it.

So rather than come up here and do the job and have the courage and the honor to go out and defend your votes, what we do is we just don’t vote,” Coburn said.

What a contrast to the attitude of the founders who put their lives on the line for what they believed.

Not the usual July 4 message but maybe worth hearing – just to remind us how we used to be.

via Not your grandfather’s Founding Fathers – CBS News.

Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson, The Constitution, history, faith and spirituality:  Another good analysis putting history in perspective …

True history is the enemy of reverence. We do the authors of American independence no favors by embalming them in infallibility, by treating the Constitution like a quasi-biblical revelation instead of the product of contention and cobbled-together compromise that it actually was. Even the collective noun “Founding -Fathers” planes smooth the unreconciled divisiveness of their bitter and acrimonious disputes. History is a book of chastening wisdom to which we ought to be looking to deepen our understanding of the legitimate nature of American government—including its revenue-raising power, an issue that deeply captivated the antagonized minds of that first generation. But unfortunately, there is little evidence of citizens engaging in close, critical reading of The Federalist Papers, of the debates surrounding constitutional ratification, or of the dispute that pitted Hamilton and James Madison against Patrick Henry over what was at stake in Congress’s authority to make laws “necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the…Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States.”

Jefferson wouldn’t have a prayer of winning the Republican nomination, much less the presidency. It wouldn’t be his liaison with the teenage daughter of one of his slaves nor the love children she bore him that would be the stumbling block. Nor would it be Jefferson’s suspicious possession of an English translation of the Quran that might doom him to fail the Newt Gingrich loyalty test. No, it would be the Jesus problem that would do him in. For Thomas Jefferson denied that Jesus was the son of God. Worse, he refused to believe that Jesus ever made any claim that he was. While he was at it, Jefferson also rejected as self-evidently absurd the Trinity, the Virgin Birth, and the Resurrection.

Jefferson was not, as his enemies in the election of 1800 claimed, an atheist. He believed in the Creator whom he invoked in the Declaration of Independence and whom he thought had brought the natural universe into being. By his own lights he thought himself a true Christian, an admirer of the moral teachings of the Nazarene. It had been, he argued, generations of the clergy who had perverted the simple humanity of Jesus the reformer, turned him into a messiah, and invented the myth that he had died to redeem mankind’s sins.

All of which would surely mean that, notwithstanding his passion for minimal government, the Sage of Monticello would have no chance at all beside True Believers like Michele Bachmann. But Jefferson’s rationalist deism is not the idle makeover of liberal wishful thinking. It is incontrovertible historical fact, as is his absolute determination never to admit religion into any institutions of the public realm.

So the philosopher-president whose aversion to overbearing government makes him a Tea Party patriarch was also a man who thought the Immaculate Conception a fable. But then real history is like that—full of knotty contradictions, its cast list of heroes, especially American heroes, majestic in their complicated imperfections.

via The Founding Fathers Were Flawed – Newsweek.

Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence, words/phrases, technology, kudos:  Subjects v. citizens … big difference … thank you, Tom!

“Subjects.”

That’s what Thomas Jefferson first wrote in an early draft of the Declaration of Independence to describe the people of the 13 colonies.

But in a moment when history took a sharp turn, Jefferson sought quite methodically to expunge the word, to wipe it out of existence and write over it. Many words were crossed out and replaced in the draft, but only one was obliterated.

Over the smudge, Jefferson then wrote the word “citizens.”

No longer subjects to the crown, the colonists became something different: a people whose allegiance was to one another, not to a faraway monarch.

“It’s almost like we can see him write ‘subjects’ and then quickly decide that’s not what he wanted to say at all, that he didn’t even want a record of it,” she said. “Really, it sends chills down the spine.”

The library deciphered the hidden “subjects” several months ago, the first major finding attributed to its new high-tech instruments. By studying the document at different wavelengths of light, including infrared and ultraviolet, researchers detected slightly different chemical signatures in the remnant ink of the erased word than in “citizens.” Those differences allowed the team to bring the erased word back to life.

But the task was made more difficult by the way Jefferson sought to match the lines and curves of the underlying smudged letters with the new letters he wrote on top of them. It took research scientist Fenella France weeks to pull out each letter until the full word became apparent.

“It’s quite amazing how he morphed ‘subjects’ into ‘citizens,’ ” she said. “We did the reverse morphing back to ‘subjects.’ ”

via Jefferson changed ‘subjects’ to ‘citizens’ in Declaration of Independence.

4th of July, politics, parenting, LOL:  Democrats beware of letting your children celebrate the 4th!

… new study argues that July 4th celebrations may not be as innocent as they seem – at least from the democratic perspective.

According to the report, published by Harvard University, July 4th-themed festivities (defined by the study as fireworks, parades, political speeches, and barbecues) not only energize primarily Republicans, but also turn children into Republicans and increase GOP voter turnout.

Simply put: “Fourth of July celebrations in the United States shape the nation’s political landscape by forming beliefs and increasing participation, primarily in favor of the Republican Party,” says the report, which was written by Harvard Kennedy School Assistant Professor David Yanagizawa-Drott and Bocconi University Assistant Professor Andreas Madestam.

via Do July 4th festivities make you Republican? – Political Hotsheet – CBS News.

Founding Fathers, The Constitution, politics, US debt limit, Great Recession:  As I mentioned on 7/2, we were discussing this at dinner the other night, and specifically the constitutional provisions applicable. I will find the reference that Bob T. mentioned.  So if you are interested … keep reading.  Again, I feel really old … and dull.

But on one contemporary issue the Founding Fathers did have strong opinions: the national debt. Had they been confronted with the question of whether the federal government should be allowed to default on its debt obligations, they would have spoken with one resounding voice: No! Pay the bills, service the debt. Don’t even think of defaulting or playing dice with global creditors for domestic political gain. End of argument.

The drive to write a new Constitution was fueled by the clear need to empower a national government with a modicum of economic sovereignty.

Proof of that can be found in a legion of quotations and letters, ranging from speeches to the Federalist Papers. James Madison, architect of the nation if there ever was one, described national debts as “moral obligations” in Federalist Paper No. 43. George Washington, who was always measured and diplomatic in public utterances, was unequivocal in his thoughts on public debts: “No pecuniary consideration is more urgent than the regular redemption and discharge of the public debt; on none can delay be more injurious, or an economy of the time more valuable.” And that message was delivered directly to the House of Representatives in 1793, where some members were contemplating various defaults.

The nation’s creators might well have been appalled that our national government accrued so much debt and spent so much on credit, but it is hard to see any of them contending that the way out of that bind is to refuse to pay.

But that is what is being contemplated. The United States has a lot of debt, yes, but we’re not Greece. There is no inability to pay, and no threat from global creditors that credit may be cut off. In time, perhaps, but not now. For those who still look to the Founders for wisdom and guidance, on this celebration of another Independence Day the message is clear: Argue all you want about the proper role of government and levels of debt. Debate and contest, rowdily and angrily. Get down and dirty. But above all, do not sacrifice the nation’s credit on the altar of political expediency and partisan gain.

via What Would the Founding Fathers Say About the National Debt? Don’t Default | Moneyland | TIME.com.

John Adams, Founding Fathers, DC Monuments, history, Washington DC:  Just went to DC … didn’t even think about dear old John.

When President Obama ponders tough decisions at the White House, he may join the cadre of presidents who have sought inspiration in the Truman Balcony’s stunning vista, gazing at the Washington Monument and the Jefferson Memorial, which commemorate our first and third commanders in chief. But there’s a man missing from this presidential panorama.

Where is John Adams, our feisty second president and lifelong American patriot? If George Washington was the sword of the revolution and Thomas Jefferson the pen, why have we neglected the voice of our nation’s independence?

Adams himself predicted this omission. “Monuments will never be erected to me . . . romances will never be written, nor flattering orations spoken, to transmit me to posterity in brilliant colors,” he wrote in 1819, nearly two decades after his single term in office. At his farm in Quincy, Mass., Adams worried that he would be forgotten by history, and for good reason: The temperamental Yankee could never outshine Washington and Jefferson, Virginia’s two-term presidential all-stars — one a brilliant general unanimously chosen to lead the nation, the other the eloquent author of the Declaration of Independence.

“The way the Jefferson Memorial is built, Jefferson is looking right in the center window,” President Bill Clinton told White House guests in 1994. “I go out on the balcony a lot . . . and look at it.”

It’s a shame he couldn’t see Adams, too. Still, as we celebrate July 4 — the anniversary of the declaration’s adoption and of Adams’s death — it’s high time we honored this “passionate sage,” as Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis titled his Adams biography. He is the founding father most unsung in the capital’s memorial landscape.

via Why doesn’t John Adams have a memorial in Washington? – The Washington Post.

17
Jun
11

6.16.2011 … home … great 48 hours in DC … Megabus return was MUCH better …

Washington DC, sights, The Willard, hotels, kith/kin, MegaBus, followup:  OK, the Willard is really nice … and for some history … it was there (at the old Willard) that the last attempt to negotiate a peaceful resolution between the States prior to the Civil War.   After a great night I had breakfast in the Senator’s Dining Room with my cousin, Charlie Harman, who is chief of staff for Saxby Chambliss (R-GA).  It was quite enjoyable to be at the center of power.  I then toured the Capitol, the Library of Congress, the Supreme Court and the American History Museum of the Smithsonian (and yes I did see Julia Child’s kitchen!) …. after all that I took a night tour of the monuments … and then returned to Charlotte on the MegaBus … much better return .. I picked my seat mate and no movies!

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history, generation gap:  To think that some would not understand  where the “gate” term originated.

Newseum

Now that the “Weinergate” scandal has come to a close, let’s remember how the “gate” term originated. Thirty-nine…

via (3) Twitter / Home.

Kyle Johnson, Jr., sports, tennis, high school, Charlotte, kith/kin, kudos:  Kudos, Kyle, Jr.  Can’t wait for #4 in 2012.

Obviously the approach worked as Johnson finished the season with a 24-1 overall record and defended his state title for a second time, beating Western Alamance’s Eric Greene, 7-6, 7-5 on May 14. For his effort, Johnson earned the title of South Charlotte Weekly’s Boys Tennis Player of the Year for the third consecutive time.

Johnson’s third title means he has a chance to be the first male athlete in N.C. public-school history to win a singles title in each of his four seasons if he can repeat his title run again next spring as a senior. But before that record could even became a possibility worth mentioning, Johnson had to take care of business this season.

via Johnson focused on being the state’s best | South Charlotte Weekly.

Davidson College, kudzu, goats, random, LOL:  Goats …. I may have to drive up and see this!

Davidson College is renting 30 goats to solve a kudzu problem at the school’s popular cross country paths.

The goats arrived Monday and will eat the kudzu for about two months.

“Kudzu has taken over. You can see it in the trees,” said Cheryl Searcy with Wells Farm Weed Management.  They are providing the goats.

Kudzu is a weed known for camouflaging anything in its path. College crews cut the kudzu on the school’s walking and jogging trails on Monday.  By Friday, officials say the trails were covered and it has caused people to trip, fall and skin their knees.

The goats ate Monday morning before arriving at Davidson College.  It didn’t matter.  They just kept eating and eating and eating.

The goats will eat 12-18 pounds of kudzu a day.  Their mission is to chomp over five acres of Davidson College kudzu down to size.

“You’re going to be shocked, I’m telling you,” Searcy said.

Davidson College is spending $3,000 to rent the goats

via Local college rents goats to fight kudzu problem | WCNC.com Charlotte.

Southern Food, Chick-fil-a, marketing, LOL:  I was getting PT this morning and the therapists were talking about how much they LOVE Chick-fil-a.  I just laughed when I saw this.

Enjoy some pre-Cow Appreciation Day fun in Washington, D.C. during Running of the Cows!

On July 7th, more than 40 cows will stampede through the streets of Washington, D.C. traveling via open-top bus and converging upon public spaces across the city to give out FREE Chicken Sandwiches, and distribute bovine-themed stickers, headbands, masks and other prizes!

via Washington, D.C. – Running of the Cows.

01
Jun
11

6.1.2011 … remembering the good times …

RIP, William Gresham, obituary: Rest in peace, Moonshot Willie. Prayers for your beautiful daughters, Dean and her sons, your parents, your sisters and their families, Kathy and many, many friends. You are such a part of our family’s OBX memories. You will always be missed and loved. You will never be forgotten.

William enjoyed sitting by the ocean, fishing, golf, and was a huge WWII history buff. He also loved anything having to do with the Civil War and was an active member of the Southport Civil War Round Table.

via John William Gresham Jr. Obituary: View John Gresham’s Obituary by Wilmington Star-News.

 

Apple, changes, iCloud:

Apple said on Tuesday that it would announce new versions of the software that powers its computers and cellphones, as well as a new Internet service that could connect these devices.

The company gave few details about the service, which it calls iCloud, but analysts think it would allow people to gain access to music, photos and videos over the Internet on multiple Apple devices, without needing to sync those devices. An Internet-based version of iTunes with those features has long been expected, and iCloud comes on the heels of deals between Apple and major recording labels that would allow such a service to go forward.

The announcement is to be made next week by Steven P. Jobs, the chief executive, at Apple’s annual developers conference in San Francisco. Mr. Jobs has been on medical leave since January, though he made a surprise appearance in March to introduce a new iPad.

via In Unusual Move, Apple Previews New Software Plans – NYTimes.com.

bees, Davidson:  OK, bees swarming my house would freak me out.

The Alexander home has had other swarms in recent years as well. Mr. Stewart estimated there were 15,000 to 20,000 bees in the wall this time around. Under the watchful eyes of Mr. Stewart and Mr. Flanagan, the beekeepers removed them, and Mr. Cheshire took them to a hive at his Davidson home.

Bees in a bucket after removal from the Concord Road home. The colony is then transferred to a hive, where it will survive if the queen is collected, too. (David Boraks/DavidsonNews.net)

Local bee-removal experts have been busy lately. Mr. Cheshire said he and fellow beekeepers removed a swarm of bees from Davidson’s McConnell neighborhood in April.  The Concord Road removal was in early in May, and about a week later, he and Mr. Goode captured a swarm of bees near some lakeside condos off Jetton Street.

via When bees swarm a home, the experts follow | DavidsonNews.net.

Commencement speeches, Davidson College, spring convocation:  OK, I enjoyed this one … but honestly, who remembers their commencement speaker.  I went to Davidson and we have none … the day is for the graduates.  But we do have a spring convocation and a speaker at that event.  I don’t remember who spoke or what he said.  Sorry.

This is a standard requirement of US commencement speeches, the deployment of didactic little

parable-ish stories. The story [“thing”] turns out to be one of the better, less bullshitty

conventions of the genre, but if you’re worried that I plan to present myself here as the wise,

older fish explaining what water is to you younger fish, please don’t be. I am not the wise old

fish. The point of the fish story is merely that the most obvious, important realities are often the

ones that are hardest to see and talk about. Stated as an English sentence, of course, this is just a

banal platitude, but the fact is that in the day to day trenches of adult existence, banal platitudes

can have a life or death importance, or so I wish to suggest to you on this dry and lovely

morning.

via Dfw Commencement.

blogging, authors, self-promotion, advertising, media:  Although this has no bearing on me, I thought it very interesting.

Nearly all writers launch some sort of blog, Twitter feed, Facebook page and/or Tumblr blog to promote their book online. But most of them have no idea how to get people to actually read these sites.

Over at Splitsider, author and Tumblr blogger Jill Morris (pictured, via) explained How to Become a Published Author in 237 Simple Steps–a useful and funny guide to online promotion.  Below, we’ve highlighted a few tools we never knew existed.

via Tools To Promote Your Author Blog – GalleyCat.

culture, Generation X, Generation Y, Baby Boomers, The Lost Generation, history:  Found this article interesting on multiple levels.  It’s amazing how history repeats itself.  Like the historical link back to the Lost Generation (“the listless generation of young people disillusioned by World War I and memorialized in “The Sun Also Rises.”).

Musical theater dorks like myself will also recall that the 1960 production of “Bye Bye Birdie” had an entire song devoted adults’ frustrations with the slacker youth of their day:

Kids!

I don’t know what’s wrong with these kids today!

Kids!

Who can understand anything they say?

Kids!

They are disobedient, disrespectful oafs!

Noisy, crazy, dirty, lazy, loafers!

And while we’re on the subject:

Kids!

You can talk and talk till your face is blue!

Kids!

But they still just do what they want to do!

Why can’t they be like we were,

Perfect in every way?

What’s the matter with kids today?

Before these whippersnappers came the “Lost Generation,” the listless generation of young people disillusioned by World War I and memorialized in “The Sun Also Rises.” And so on.

When the economy is bad, older Americans are often quick to blame young people when they can’t find jobs. Somehow when the economy is good, however, young people don’t seem to get nearly the same degree of credit for their professional successes.

via The Laziest Generation(s) – NYTimes.com.

fashion, t-shirts, Apple:  25 years of Apple … in t-shirts … I like this one.

Apparel, T-shirt: 25 Years of Mac

Apparel, T-shirt: 25 Years of Mac – FastMac.

WWDC, Apple, Steve Jobs, new products:  WWDC is always more fun when Steve Jobs speaks … can’t wait to find out what is next from Apple.

Apple(APPL) has announced that CEO Steve Jobs, currently on his second medical leave of absence, will headline the company’s Worldwide Developers’ Conference (WWDC) next week, adding a touch of tech glamour to the software-focused event.

In a statement released on Monday before market open, Apple confirmed that Steve Jobs and a team of Apple executives will “kick off” the event at San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Center with a keynote address on Monday, June 6 at 10 a.m. PST.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs will headline next week’s WWDC event.

According to Apple, Jobs and co. will unveil the eighth major release of Mac OS X, dubbed Lion. As widely anticipated, Apple will also take the wraps off iOS 5, the latest version of its mobile operating system, as well as iCloud, its forthcoming cloud services offering.

Apple did not reveal specific details of iCloud, although the service is expected to involve a cloud-based version of iTunes, and, potentially, a streaming media platform for devices running its iOS operating system.

via Article Page | TheStreet.

culture, vulnerability:  I personally hate feeling vulnerable …

Sometimes the toughest part of embracing vulnerability is recognizing vulnerability. There are so many secondary emotions that spring to the surface and grab our focus. I wrote this in my journal this morning as a little reminder to look deeper, be mindful, and practice self-compassion. I don’t want to shut myself off from vulnerability because I don’t want to miss out on what it brings to my life: love, creativity, joy, authenticity, courage, and hope (just to name a few).

It’s always so helpful to be reminded of the many ways that vulnerability shows up in our lives. Leave a comment telling us how you fill in the blanks (on one or both) and three folks will get a copy of The Gifts of Imperfection. I’ll announce the names on Friday.

Vulnerability is __________________.

Vulnerability feels like ___________________.

Have a great week!

via vulnerability is ___________. – my blog – Ordinary Courage.

culture, motivation:  maybe I need to rethink my parenting.

Make no mistake: I’m all for paying people what they’re worth. And I’m opposed to schemes that compensate people the same regardless of their performance.  But whether you’re at a bank in Bogota or a school in Schenectady, relying on “if-then” rewards to encourage great work is like guzzling six cups of coffee and downing three Snickers bars for lunch. It’ll give you a burst of energy – but the effects won’t last. For the long-term, human beings need a very different kind of nourishment.

via Carrots and sticks: Procrastination fix? | Daniel Pink.

technology, tablets:  I have picked my tablet … I’m an iPad user.. Everything You Need to Know About Tablets in 15 Simple Charts – Atlantic Mobile.

protest, flash mob, Jefferson Memorial, court rulings, Washington DC:  Flash mobs are interesting to me … but I want to research the court ruling … “Regardless of your thoughts on the protest or those behind it, there’s little doubt that a collection of over a thousand people could put a real crimp into the “atmosphere of calm, tranquility, and reverence” inside the Jefferson that the Court suggested dancing would compromise.”

2011_0531_jefferson.jpg

Adam Kokesh and several others — a handful of whom were arrested by U.S. Park Police over the weekend during a demonstration in protest of a U.S. Court of Appeals ruling barring dancing inside the Jefferson — have posted a Facebook invitation to a “DANCE PARTY @ TJ’S!!!”, scheduled to take place at noon this Saturday.

“Come dance with us! You don’t have to risk arrest, you can dance on the steps outside in support or join us in civil disobedience in the memorial!” reads the invitation, which also proclaims that “THIS IS NOT A PROTEST! I AM NOT ORGANIZING ANYTHING!” despite being arranged by several individuals. Regardless of your thoughts on the protest or those behind it, there’s little doubt that a collection of over a thousand people could put a real crimp into the “atmosphere of calm, tranquility, and reverence” inside the Jefferson that the Court suggested dancing would compromise.

Based on the video of the arrests and the ensuing media coverage, the U.S. Park Police have launched an “all-encompassing inquiry” into the arrests.

via Over 1,800 RSVP For Next Jefferson Memorial “Dance Party”: DCist.

Afghanistan, US involvement:  Again, interesting perspective expressed here in a no win situation.

We don’t want Karzai telling our soldiers what to do, because they are our soldiers and we don’t trust him, but we don’t want to do things he doesn’t want us to do, because it is his country and we don’t want to be occupiers. There is a fundamental illogic there, enough to make HAL the computer explode—or, perhaps, to persuade us to get out of Afghanistan. Karzai said in his press conference that he was warning us “for the last time” to change our ways. Maybe we should, if not quite in the way he’d like.

via Close Read: What Karzai Wants : The New Yorker.

twitter social networking:

Twitter users who are not household names tend to start by following loved ones, colleagues, favourite writers, etc. Replying to those you do not know personally is no faux pas, whether or not they are extremely well known. And if a popular tweeter retweets you—ie, redistributes the tweet to his followers—that can do wonders to your tally.

What should Babbage’s friend make of all this? She is a writer, filmmaker and former television presenter, yet Twitter makes her strangely shy. Your correspondent’s advice: the only way to go is to take the plunge and start talking, loudly and often. Well, not too often.

via Social networking: Rules of engagement | The Economist.

online self-help, education, technology:  The list of courses is fascinating … Bill Gates is a backer.  I think I may take a few lessons and see what I think.  Anybody tried it?

Watch. Practice. Learn almost anything—for free.

What started out as Sal making a few algebra videos for his cousins has grown to over 2,100 videos and 100 self-paced exercises and assessments covering everything from arithmetic to physics, finance, and history.

via Khan Academy.




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