Posts Tagged ‘Westminster

18
Aug
19

8.18.19 … Atlanta’s current population at the Darlington … 6,885,071

Driving Mama Lindsey …

So the brother is at the beach and I decided to take on Sunday with my mom. Nails, maybe? She vetoed that. But since I had already moved toward our favorite nail spot on Roswell near Mt. Paran, I drove across Mt. Paran to Northside, thinking and talking about families who have lived in that part of town. The Wayts lived there for a bit, and the Blacks forever, and the Everetts on Cave.

At Northside, I turned south and then decided to drive through Westminster. I went in the front gate and out the back. To be honest, the place has changed a great deal and is only barely recognizable as the place where I attended. I guess that’s what happens when you rarely visit.

Once on West Wesley we headed east and then at the last minute I drove down Bohler to Peachtree Battle. I don’t often drive along this stretch Peachtree Battle so I enjoyed this stretch along the creek and between Northside and Habersham. Once we crossed Northside, mom and I reminisced about my E. Rivers elementary friends who lived on PB or nearby … the Burdetts, the Smiths, the Sharps and family friends the Georges. And my favorite house, one I have never been in, which has lots of angles in the roof … it looks like a cottage. Then back by E. Rivers and south on Peachtree.

After crossing over the right, we swing into the shopping center that looks like Buckingham Palace where Aunt Jane’s shop was. So many memories.

Then to Brookwood Hills. Today we enter at Huntington and share stories about our friends on this street … the Wards, the Ingrams, the Fergusons… and the back by 139 …

On Peachtree we head north to Buckhead … checking out the current population … 6,885,071 …

My mom actually lived at the Darlington for a short period before she married. She roomed with a girl she had met at the boarding house behind First Presbyterian. Catherine Smith was her name, one of the few people mom lost track with fairly early in life.

And then back home … Andrews to W Paces to Valley to Habersham to Old Ivy to Wieuca to Peachtree …

8.18.19

14
Aug
11

‎8.14.2011 … getting organized … and caught up on my “service” …

Olmsted, environmentalist:  I have a friend driving the BRP for the first time.  I wonder if he knows that Olmsted played a role by preserving the Pisgah Nation Forest.

Best known for crafting urban spaces – New York’s Central Park, Boston’s Emerald Necklace – Olmsted was also deeply involved in saving wild places.

Helping preserve Yosemite is one of his greatest accomplishments. Beginning in 1864 – at a time when only a few hundred non-Native Americans had ever set foot in the valley – Olmsted made a series of visits. He was awestruck by the epic scenery, but also recognized how easily the place could be spoiled.

In 1865, Schuyler Colfax, speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, embarked on a cross-country journey with a visit to Yosemite slated as the highlight. Speaker Colfax was accompanied by a number of journalists. As it happens, Olmsted saw a mention in a paper about Colfax’s planned Yosemite visit. He arranged to meet up with the party to act as a guide. Olmsted also drafted an 8,000-word treatise about Yosemite.

In 1906, Yosemite became a national park, thanks to the tireless efforts of naturalist John Muir. But Olmsted gets credit for being one of the first people to call for the valley’s preservation. Olmsted, the pioneering environmentalist, also helped preserve Niagara Falls and the vast Pisgah forest in North Carolina.

via Olmsted, The Environmentalist.

pop-ups, H&M, WaterAid:  Still haven’t visited a really creative pop-up!

H&M has already appeared on our virtual pages once before for its innovative partnership with fashion blogger Elin Kling, but recently we found cause to cover the Swedish clothing retailer again. The topic this time? A pop-up store H&M recently ran in the Netherlands to benefit global charity WaterAid.

H&M has been collaborating with WaterAid since 2002, including an initiative every summer whereby the retailer sells an exclusive bikini or — this year — a whole beachwear collection dedicated to the effort, with 10 percent of proceeds donated toward providing safe water and sanitation to developing countries. This year, however, H&M took its support a step further by opening a pop-up beach store for two days in The Hague’s popular Scheveningen seaside resort. A variety of essentials for men, women and kids from H&M’s “Beachwear in Shades of Blue” line were available at the shipping container-style shop on the beach, and a full 25 percent of the sales proceeds went directly to WaterAid, according to a report on the Superfuture blog.

There’s no shortage of seasonal opportunities for pop-up retail, and H&M’s charitable focus makes the deal even sweeter. Other retailers around the globe: how can you make the most of summer to demonstrate your own corporate generosity?

via Pop-up beach store benefits global water charity | Springwise.

Statue of Livberty, NYC, LIFE:  I am really enjoying the LIFE photo galleries. American Classic: Lady Liberty – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

Constitution, States Rights: 

I know states’ rights advocates revere the 10th Amendment. But when the word “states” appears in the Constitution, it typically is part of a compound word, “United States,” or refers to how the states and their people will be represented in the national government. We learned it in elementary school: The Constitution replaced the Articles of Confederation to create a stronger federal government, not a weak confederate government. Perry’s view was rejected in 1787 and again in 1865.

We praise our Founders annually for revolting against royal rule and for creating an exceptionally durable system of self-government. We can wreck that system if we forget our Founders’ purpose of creating a representative form of national authority robust enough to secure the public good. It is still perfectly capable of doing that. But if we pretend we are living in Boston in 1773, we will draw all the wrong conclusions and make some remarkably foolish choices.

via What our Declaration really said – The Washington Post.

Toulouse-Lautrec, Jane Avril, Moulin Rouge, Paris, muses:  I really learned a great deal on my Paris Walks tour of Montmartre … and so enjoyed this article yesterday in the WSJ.

[lautrec]

After the Moulin Rouge hired Avril in 1889, Lautrec painted her constantly. Some of his angular and unconventional depictions were used on posters to promote her performances.The Avril posters “made Lautrec famous as well,” Ms. Ireson says. “They were advertising the performance, but they were also advertising the artist himself.”

Unlike many artist-muse relationships, theirs is not thought to have escalated into romance, though that might have been to Lautrec’s chagrin. He was known to be positively giddy whenever she was around. His late biographer, Thadée Natanson, who knew both Lautrec and Avril, once described the artist as something of an “amorous alcoholic” in her presence.

via Jane Avril and Toulouse-Lautrec at the Courtauld – WSJ.com.

politics, millennials:  Thanks, Joni, for this great article.  I am not sure I want to turn over power to the Harry potter Generation … but I do have great hope in our children.

 

She continues, “We respond not as traditional issue-driven constituencies, but look for the nuances that reflect our own complex life experiences. We accept as fact that since people are different, not everyone will or should make the same choice when faced with an important life decision. Strident political alternatives come across as unrealistic and out of touch.”

Another young professional in Washington says she and her friends also shy away from absolutist thinking. “Women shouldn’t wait until the third trimester to have an abortion,” she says emphatically, “but should we have a law banning it? No. Should every medical provider be obligated to perform abortions? Also, no.”

In 2007 William A. Galston, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, asked 20-somethings what they considered the top qualities necessary to be an adult. Four out of five rated becoming less self-oriented, and developing greater consideration for others, among the top four of 16 possible answers.

Will they be as generous in the future if the economy continues to decline? Will the level-headed among them become inspired to run for public office and, once there, offer fresh ideas on how to govern in a collaborative manner? We must hope so.

via End political gridlock: Put a Millennial in charge – CNN.com.

2012 Presidential Election, Michelle Bachmann, Francis Schaeffer, “How Should We Then Live?,” Westminster:  Wow … this story scares me.  One interesting note – at my high school, we were requred to watch the Schaeffer series referenced for a senior Christian ethics class.  I have re-read the book in recently years beause the 5 part series has haunted my take on ethics … I plan to re-read it again.

The transformation of Michele Bachmann from Tea Party insurgent and cable-news Pasionaria to serious Republican contender in the 2012 Presidential race was nearly complete by late June, when she boarded a Dassault Falcon 900, in Dulles, Virginia, and headed toward the caucus grounds of Iowa. The leased, fourteen-seat corporate jet was to serve as Bachmann’s campaign hub for the next few days, and, before the plane took off, her press secretary, Alice Stewart, announced to the six travelling chroniclers that there was one important rule. “I know everything is on the record these days,” Stewart said, “but please just don’t broadcast images of her in her casual clothes.”

Later that year, they experienced a second life-altering event: they watched a series of films by the evangelist and theologian Francis Schaeffer called “How Should We Then Live?”

Schaeffer, who ran a mission in the Swiss Alps known as L’Abri (“the shelter”), opposed liberal trends in theology. One of the most influential evangelical thinkers of the nineteen-seventies and early eighties, he has been credited with getting a generation of Christians involved in politics. Schaeffer’s film series consists of ten episodes tracing the influence of Christianity on Western art and culture, from ancient Rome to Roe v. Wade. In the films, Schaeffer—who has a white goatee and is dressed in a shearling coat and mountain climber’s knickers—condemns the influence of the Italian Renaissance, the Enlightenment, Darwin, secular humanism, and postmodernism. He repeatedly reminds viewers of the “inerrancy” of the Bible and the necessity of a Biblical world view. “There is only one real solution, and that’s right back where the early church was,” Schaeffer tells his audience. “The early church believed that only the Bible was the final authority. What these people really believed and what gave them their whole strength was in the truth of the Bible as the absolute infallible word of God.”

The first five installments of the series are something of an art-history and philosophy course. The iconic image from the early episodes is Schaeffer standing on a raised platform next to Michelangelo’s “David” and explaining why, for all its beauty, Renaissance art represented a dangerous turn away from a God-centered world and toward a blasphemous, human-centered world. But the film shifts in the second half. In the sixth episode, a mysterious man in a fake mustache drives around in a white van and furtively pours chemicals into a city’s water supply, while Schaeffer speculates about the possibility that the U.S. government is controlling its citizens by means of psychotropic drugs. The final two episodes of the series deal with abortion and the perils of genetic engineering.

Schaeffer died in 1984. I asked his son Frank, who directed the movies—and who has since left the evangelical movement and become a novelist—about the change in tone. He told me that it all had to do with Roe v. Wade, which was decided by the Supreme Court while the film was being made. “Those first episodes are what Francis Schaeffer is doing while he was sitting in Switzerland having nice discussions with people who came through to find Jesus and talk about culture and art,” he said. But then the Roe decision came, and “it wasn’t a theory anymore. Now ‘they’ are killing babies. Then everything started getting unhinged. It wasn’t just that we disagreed with the Supreme Court; it’s that they’re evil. It isn’t just that the federal government may be taking too much power; now they are abusing it. We had been warning that humanism followed to its logical conclusion without Biblical absolutes is going to go into terrible places, and, look, it’s happening right before our very eyes. Once that happens, everything becomes a kind of holy war, and if not an actual conspiracy then conspiracy-like.”

Francis Schaeffer instructed his followers and students at L’Abri that the Bible was not just a book but “the total truth.” He was a major contributor to the school of thought now known as Dominionism, which relies on Genesis 1:26, where man is urged to “have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.” Sara Diamond, who has written several books about evangelical movements in America, has succinctly defined the philosophy that resulted from Schaeffer’s interpretation: “Christians, and Christians alone, are Biblically mandated to occupy all secular institutions until Christ returns.”

In 1981, three years before he died, Schaeffer published “A Christian Manifesto,” a guide for Christian activism, in which he argues for the violent overthrow of the government if Roe v. Wade isn’t reversed. In his movie, Schaeffer warned that America’s descent into tyranny would not look like Hitler’s or Stalin’s; it would probably be guided stealthily, by “a manipulative, authoritarian élite.”

Today, one of the leading proponents of Schaeffer’s version of Dominionism is Nancy Pearcey, a former student of his and a prominent creationist. Her 2004 book, “Total Truth: Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity,” teaches readers how to implement Schaeffer’s idea that a Biblical world view should suffuse every aspect of one’s life. She tells her readers to be extremely cautious with ideas from non-Christians. There may “be occasions when Christians are mistaken on some point while nonbelievers get it right,” she writes in “Total Truth.” “Nevertheless, the overall systems of thought constructed by nonbelievers will be false—for if the system is not built on Biblical truth, then it will be built on some other ultimate principle. Even individual truths will be seen through the distorting lens of a false world view.”

via The Transformation of Michele Bachmann : The New Yorker.

slutwalks, society, culture:  In theory, the “sluts” are right … but tell that to the woman or adolescent who is raped and it could have been avoided.

Jarvis, along with crowds of protesters, had taken to the streets to march in what was dubbed a SlutWalk. The march, organized by Jarvis and Sonya Barnett, was spurred by the comments of Toronto constable Michael Sanguinetti, who told a group of students in a safety class that women “should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized.” In response to the constable’s remark — and the implication that women’s actions, not the actions of rapists, lead to sexual assault — SlutWalk was born.

via Will SlutWalks Change the Meaning of the Word ‘Slut’? – TIME.

Sandra Day O’connor, iCivics:  SDO’C is one of myheroes.  I continue tpo be impressed with her commitment to our society.

Mario and Luigi save princesses. Lara Croft raids tombs. And then there’s Chuck Freepress, a computer-game constitutional lawyer—created by retired Supreme Court justice Sandra Day O’Connor—who scores courtroom victories and boasts a heroic knowledge of the First Amendment.

O’Connor’s unlikely venture into the videogame world may not have produced a Resident Evil–level blockbuster, but so far it has hooked kids in 12,000 classrooms across the U.S. on a selection of civics-themed games—now played more than 2 million times. The goal: revive the teaching of civics in American schools to help prepare the next generation of kids to participate as citizens in a democracy.

As O’Connor points out, America’s public schools were founded in part to prepare kids for citizenship, not just college and career. “That was the theory, and schools followed it until recently,” she told NEWSWEEK. “Now our schools aren’t supporting it anymore. And I think that’s dangerous.”

Indeed, fewer than half of Americans can list all three branches of government, yet three in four can name all of the Three Stooges. High-school seniors today know less about the country than their peers did five years ago, according to the 2010 National Assessment of Educational Progress’s civics report card. And only 29 states require high-school students to take a civics or government course.

via Sandra Day O’Connor on Her American Civics Videogame – Newsweek.

Less than half of the public can name a single Supreme Court justice. But more than 80 percent of Americans know Michael Jackson sang “Beat It” and “Billie Jean.”

Thankfully, the Internet can be leveraged to update civics education in the digital age. At its best, the web is much more than just a source of information—it can be a powerful platform for students to exchange and debate ideas about what’s going on in their communities. And it is a vital vehicle for organizing political activities and finding government assistance.

A number of organizations are leading the way to producing the next generation of civics instruction. iCivics, founded by Justice O’Connor, offers web-based education projects and an array of interactive games and activities that students can use in class or at home. Students can assume the role of a Supreme Court justice and help decide a school dress-code case. Or they might learn how a new immigrant becomes a U.S. citizen by guiding them through the naturalization process. iCivics also provides outlets for students to engage in real-world civics efforts and support community projects founded by their peers from across the country.

Students continue to need opportunities to learn and experience civics in their offline communities as well. When Education Secretary Arne Duncan was CEO of the Chicago Public Schools, he worked closely with the Mikva Challenge, which seeks to move beyond your grandmother’s civics to what it calls “action civics.”

via iCivics: Sandra Day O’Connor and Arne Duncan on Civics Education Online – The Daily Beast.

Grove Park Inn, culture, pets:  I guess the Grove Park is going after the European jet set … or the European jet set wannabees. 🙂

The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa announced last week it’s opening its doors to four-legged guests, with a new section of pet-friendly rooms and even doggie room service with dishes like Meat Woof and Chicken Pup Pie.

Rooms open to pets have been set aside in the inn’s Vanderbilt Wing, and there’s a pet walking area nearby. Meanwhile, the resort says it has a variety of trails and walking routes for exercising.

via Grove Park Inn opens doors to 4-legged guests  | Pets.

wine, Rosé, food – drink:  i enjoyed Rosé in Paris and my guide Donna Morris (Best Friend in Paris France – great guide if you need one) explained to me that this is what the French drink in summer.  I felt great being in the know … and the WSJ agrees.

Rosé has long been the summer beverage of choice for fashionable diners in Cannes and Saint-Tropez, but Americans have yet to fully embrace it.

One of the reasons for the dubious reputation of rosé may be that many drinkers remember the sweet blush wines and so-called White Zinfandels which were so popular in the 1970s and ’80s. Remember Sutter Home White Zinfandel? Technically it was a rosé and it was kind of sickly sweet, unlike the pink wines of southern France.

Nearby on the North Fork of Long Island, Paula and Michael Croteaux operate Croteaux Vineyards, which may be the only vineyard in the U.S. devoted entirely to rosé, creating some six different cuvées from different clones of Merlot. The Manhattan refugees bought their 18th-century farm in Southold, N.Y., in the early 1990s. “We’d have people coming by our place and saying, ‘I feel like I’m in Provence,’ ” Mr. Croteaux says. “And when we thought about planting vines, rosé seemed like a great fit based on the lifestyle out here on the east end.”

Fortunately, you don’t have to travel to the Hamptons or Provence to experience the incomparable pleasure of a cold rosé on a hot summer day.

via Rosé Wines for Summer | Jay McInerney on Wine – WSJ.com.

21
Jul
11

‎7.21.2011 … On the 6:41 train to Poughkeepsie, actually Garrison and Ossining, to spend the morning with Jeanne, Anne and Mrs. S, then fellow Davidsonian Kim … Then back to the big apple for museum hopping … And have I mentioned it’s HOT!

NYC, Garrison, Boscobel, Metropolitan Museum, Westminster, Davidson College, kith/kin: Day 2 was a train adventure to Garrison to see Jeanne, Anne and their mom at Anne’s home in Garrison … on to Boscobel with Davidson friend Kim … and finally to the Metropolitan Museum with John where I hoped to see the Romare Bearden’s “The Block” (1971), but unfortunately it is being readied for a larger showing.  Overall, a great day.  If you want to see some photos here is a link.

Boscobel, the elegant Federal period house museum set on lovely landscaped grounds with breathtaking views of the Hudson River, has been welcoming visitors to explore its man-made and natural beauty for over half a century. The fact that it remains a gleaming jewel in the Hudson River Valley’s crown is to the credit of its many stewards during that time span: its dedicated boards, its accommodating staffs, and earliest principal benefactors, Benjamin West Frazier and Lila Acheson Wallace.

Boscobel (Italian for “beautiful woods”) is situated in scenic Garrison, NY, on a bluff above the east bank, overlooking the United States Military Academy at West Point.

The mansion house, which originally stood fifteen miles down river, was completed in 1808 for the States Dyckman family and is widely regarded as one of the finest examples of Federal architecture in the country.

via Boscobel Home Page.

constitutional issues, separation of church and state, Davidson College:  I am interested in the outcome here …

It has been four months since the N.C. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case challenging the powers of Davidson College’s campus police, and college officials are awaiting a ruling that could have a big effect on campus security.

It’s not clear when the court might issue a ruling, but a spokeswoman for the state Supreme Court said opinions are handed down on designated “opinion days.” The next one is Aug. 26. If it doesn’t come then, it could be October before there’s any news.

“We hope that the decision will be made in the next several months,” college spokeswoman Stacey Schmeidel said Wednesday.

The court heard oral arguments March 15 in the case, known as State vs. Yencer. In a 2006 incident, Davidson campus police stopped driver Julie Anne Yencer on a road near campus. At first, she pleaded guilty to driving while intoxicated and reckless driving. But in 2008, she appealed and challenged the authority of the campus police department.

Ms. Yencer’s lawyer has argued that the state of North Carolina improperly granted state authority to the campus police because of Davidson’s religious affiliation, with the Presbyterian Church (USA).

via College still waiting for ruling in police powers case | DavidsonNews.net.

Bones, The Finder, tv:  OK, so The Finder is a Bones spin-off.  I did not like the Finder episode, but I wish them luck.

Mercedes Masohn (Chuck) has landed the female lead oposite Geoff Stults and Michael Clarke Duncan in The Finder, the upcoming Bones spinoff series, which is slated to launch on Fox in January. She will play Deputy US Marshall Isabel Zambada, a focused, nuclear-powered cop on the rise – who is a brilliant politician using a career in law enforcement to climb to the top of the heap in life. Also cast in the new series 16-year-old newcomer Maddie Hasson as Willa, a second generation criminal who helps Walter (Stults) and Leo (Duncan) in their investigations.

via Fox’s ‘Bones’ Spinoff Casts Female Leads – Deadline.com.

Julia Child:  Bon Appetit!

French Cooking in the U.S.A.

The chefs had to tackle Julia Child inspired cuisine. Now you decide if they made dishes worth a Julie Powell blog.

via Roccos Dinner Party Season 1 – French Cooking in the U.S.A. – Photo Gallery – Bravo TV Official Site.

29
May
11

5.29-30.2011 … Happy Memorial Day Weekend … staycation for me …

Memorial Day, holidays, staycations, Atlanta, favorites:  Well, I am  having a Charlotte staycation which, by the way, is not on the list.  But oddly just about every other favorite US city is on it … Atlanta, Chicago, San Francisco, Chicago …  I will have to make do with Charlotte.

A staycation here could include a visit to Oakland Cemetery followed by a cold beer on a rooftop patio, shopping on the Westside followed by cheap eats, chilling with Coca Cola, hanging in the Botanical Gardens, or (heaven forbid) working up a sweat on the Silver Comet Trail. Our local Atlantan’s staycation plans showed her that she could stay in Atlanta but feel like she was a million miles away… without spending a million dollars to get there!

via Six Great Cities, Six Great Staycations – weather.com.

Robert McDuffie, people, Macon GA, Westminster: Saw that the GA Music Hall of Fame is closing down.  On its website is this advertisement for an exhibit on Macon GA artists.  I think the violinist in the picture is Macon native Bobby McDuffie , Camille’s husband.  Small world.

Georgia Music Hall of Fame.

bookshelf, lists:  Well, I have heard of very few of these … the list came recommended to me.  I’ll give you my list tomorrow …. Books for the Beach.

essays, love:  I liked David Mark Simpson entry “What is Carved in Stone,”  a runner-up in the Modern Love college essay contest.  Enjoy!

Every day for the next two weeks, we scraped our way up the cliffs of our two-bar plateau. It may not have been the same as carving a petroglyph, but the three-hour journey required a kind of resoluteness. It was exhausting and dangerous. And it left ample time to ponder if the climb was worth making.

via Modern Love – What Is Carved in Stone – NYTimes.com.

Facebook, twitter, social network, addictions:  I fail the test … and my children will tell you that.  Maybe I will set myself free this summer …

Q: Do you ever feel the urge to pull out your smartphone while someone else is making a point in a conversation?

Q: Have you ever realized that you were texting or checking your e-mail while your child was telling you about her day at school?

Q: Have you ever felt that something hasn’t really happened until you post it on Facebook?

Q: Does a flashing red light on your BlackBerry make your heart flutter?

Q: Are you spending time with your spouse or significant other without talking to each other because you’re each immersed in a different device?

If you answered yes to at least a couple of these questions, you’re among the millions of Americans being overrun by technology.

via The Digital Diet: How to break free of your smartphone and other gadgets – The Washington Post.

food, vegetarian food, lists, kith/kin:  We have a family friend who is vegetarian so I always keep a box of veggie burgers on hand.  After several years, I have grown to like them myself.  Our favorite brand, Morningstar, is not even on the list.  What do they know? Taste Test: 10 Veggie Burgers for Grilling – KitchenDaily.

Davidson IB, Davidson, CMS,  magnet schools, education, Charlotte:  I still do not understand how CMS could shut down what is considered one of the best magnet schools in the country … amazing.

They bonded over shovels.

It was a Friday in March, a day off for students. Parents and kids from two middle schools, Davidson IB and J.M. Alexander, met on the Alexander campus. They were partners in an arranged marriage. Davidson was closing at the end of the school year. Alexander would take Davidson’s students and faculty. Nobody was thrilled about it.

Back in the fall, when the school board made the decision, the feelings were bare and raw. Davidson families blasted the board for killing off one of the best magnet schools in America. Alexander families got mad at the idea that their school didn’t measure up. Board member Rhonda Lennon said Davidson parents seemed unwilling to send their kids to school with poor black students. Davidson parents threatened to walk away from CMS.

Now, a few months afterward, everyone had calmed down. But the relationships still needed tending. The principals of both schools thought sprucing up the Alexander campus might be the way to spruce up the mood.

via Starting with a clean slate – together | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

news, for the love of money:  She buried him in the flower garden to collect his social security, and no one noticed for 15 years!!!

When police found the body of Ruth Huber Bostic last year in the living room of her southeast Raleigh home, her neighbors noted that they hadn’t seen her husband, David Ellis Bostic, in a while.

As in a decade or more.

via Flower bed hid man’s grave | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

commencement speeches, kith/kin, lists:  OK, they failed to mentioned my brothers’s speech at E. Rivers Elementary School … 2011’s Best Commencement Speeches – Galleries – The Daily Beast.

Picasso, muses, art:  Be honest, have you ever heard of an artist’s muse who was happy?

 

 

At Picasso’s death in 1973, an abstract sculpture of Marie-Therese holding a lantern was placed over his grave:

“Why do you think he wanted that sculpture on his grave?” Mason asked.

“I think he saw Marie-Therese as his real wife,’ Richardson said. “And she was the one person of all the women in his life who’d given him the most love, the most understanding.”

Fifty years after their first meeting, Marie-Therese took her own life.

For the muse, there was no living without the artist.

via Picasso and his mistress, his muse – CBS Sunday Morning – CBS News.

2012 Presidential Election, Mitt Romney:  Interesting analysis of Mitt and this “early” campaign speech.

THE principal themes of Mitt Romney’s speech here in Des Moines earlier this afternoon were that America’s economy remains a wreck because Barack Obama’s a rank amateur whose woeful inexperience, ignorance of the requirements of a robust economy, and faintly un-American taste for the public-policy fashions in Europe, has created a climate of economic uncertainty that has retarded recovery. Speaking before a small crowd beneath antique airplanes suspended in the atrium of the State of Iowa Historical Museum, an effortfully cheerful Mr Romney assayed an early version of a stump speech I imagine will become a staple of his campaign for the Republican nomination, once it “officially” begins some time next week in New Hampshire.

via Mitt Romney in Iowa: All-pro, all-American | The Economist.

Niagara Falls, travel bucket list:  Well, I love these articles… 36 hours in ______ … and Niagara Falls is on my list.  36 Hours in Niagara Falls – NYTimes.com.

14
Apr
11

‎4.14.2011 Jack’s birthday eve … boy do I remember that night like it was yesterday! …

movies, writing:  Enjoyed this on writing a screenplay.

While crafting a screenplay, it helps to visit The Script Lab for Five Plot Point Breakdowns of popular movies–a useful tool for exploring the structure of your favorite films.

Here’s more about the site: “[T]he five major plot points are the building blocks behind sequence construction: Inciting Incident, Lock In, Midpoint, Main Culmination, and Third Act Twist. Each analysis of selected features breaks the film down to the essential 5 major plot points, time code of when each plot point occurs included.”

To help all the aspiring screenwriters, comic book writers, and playwrights participating in the Script Frenzy writing marathon, we will feature a new script writing tool or tip every day this month. Read all the advice at this link.

via Explore Five Plot Point Breakdowns: Script Frenzy Tip #14 – GalleyCat.

Ben Haverty, Westminster, Atlanta, kudos:  Nice article about Westminster classmate Ben Haverty.  kudos, Ben! RETAIL: Furniture dealer stands on own legs: Ben Haverty left Atlanta-based family chain five years ago. No-frills, discount stores grew during recession.

politics, budget crisis, Any Rand:  My ears perk up when I hear “Ayn Rand.”  Do you think most Tea Partyers have heard of Ayn Rand?

In fact, the two streams—the furious Tea Party rebels and Ryan the earnest budget geek—both spring from the same source. And it is to that source that you must look if you want to understand what Ryan is really after, and what makes these activists so angry.

The Tea Party began early in 2009 after an improvised rant by Rick Santelli, a CNBC commentator who called for an uprising to protest the Obama administration’s subsidizing the “losers’ mortgages.” Video of his diatribe rocketed around the country, and protesters quickly adopted both his call for a tea party and his general abhorrence of government that took from the virtuous and the successful and gave to the poor, the uninsured, the bankrupt—in short, the losers. It sounded harsh, Santelli quickly conceded, but “at the end of the day I’m an Ayn Rander.”

Ayn Rand, of course, was a kind of politicized L. Ron Hubbard—a novelist-philosopher who inspired a cult of acolytes who deem her the greatest human being who ever lived. The enduring heart of Rand’s totalistic philosophy was Marxism flipped upside down. Rand viewed the capitalists, not the workers, as the producers of all wealth, and the workers, not the capitalists, as useless parasites.

via War on the Weak – Newsweek.

youth, colleges, culture, parenting, US  Naval Academy, synthetic marijuana:  There are too things out there to trip up our kids.

The U.S. Naval Academy has expelled another midshipman in an ongoing investigation into the use or possession of synthetic marijuana.

Cmdr. Joe Carpenter said Wednesday that a male student was expelled last week. The expulsion brings to 13 the number of midshipmen who have been expelled as a result of the investigation, which began last fall.

Synthetic marijuana is sold in drug paraphernalia shops and on the Internet. The products contain organic leaves coated with chemicals that provide a marijuana-like high when smoked.

It is banned by the Defense Department and the Navy.

The academy has been working to raise awareness about synthetic marijuana. The superintendent and commandant have addressed the issue at school-wide forums.

via Academy expels 13th midshipman in synthetic marijuana investigation – baltimoresun.com.

politics, budget crisis:  Need to fact check … but it always helps me to have it laid out like this.Comparing Republican and Obama Budget Plans – Graphic – NYTimes.com.

movies, dvd release, Harry Potter:  I love Harry Potter … reminds me of Jack … and all my kids’ childhoods  ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1’ and Other Blu-ray Releases – Speakeasy – WSJ.

iPad apps, marketing:  hmmm …just not sure why this “branding” will make me want to buy it.

Moleskine’s app–currently pending Apple’s approval and due out released later this week–is your standard digital note-taking space beckoning you to fill it with musings and rumination. But wait, how’s that different from Apple’s Notes app or something like Evernote? Why would you devote precious screen real estate to Moleskine’s nascent angle on the touchscreen world?

For starters, you’ll be able to abandon Apple’s harsh yellow pages for Moleskine’s easygoing cream-colored writing space. And you can join the ranks of the notebook’s historic lovers, Vincent Van Gogh and Pablo Picasso – proudly touted by the company in each journal they sell – who used their Moleskines as a sketchbook and doodle pad.

The app also allows you to draw freehand, so whether you’re on an iPhone or iPad, you can use it just as you would pen and paper (hey, you never know when your next masterpiece will come to mind).

via Moleskine Goes Digital with First iPhone App – Techland – TIME.com.

photography, photo journalism, Libya:  Enjoyed this article and photo journalists perspective.

  Hellis, Libya

These images were shot all over eastern Libya, including Benghazi. I feel lucky to have been able to see a different perspective. For 42 years, Libya has been closed off to journalists. It was, and still is, a relatively authoritarian state. The image of Libya in my head was totally different from reality — both in terms of the landscape and the people. The front line, and people in scarves firing AK-47s into the air — that’s just one part of it. I wanted to show the people who are at stake.

You would walk down a street and, yes, there would be a guy with an AK-47. But there would be 10 or 20 other civilians, unarmed, queuing for gas. Resistance takes on many forms. Guns and fighting are one. But a different form of resistance I saw was people organizing, making food, housing each other, healing each other. They weren’t fighting with guns; they were fighting by creating social services, by talking to the media, by trying to represent themselves. They were trying to create a new society. I think people should be able to see that.

I don’t know what will happen next in Libya. But I’m glad I have at least a historical moment. It’s a snapshot of a country that almost was, or still may be.

via Photographs of Libya’s Quiet Moments – NYTimes.com.

16
Mar
11

3.16.2011 …. Just a normal day … kinda nice …

bookshelf, kith/kin, Westminster, Atlanta: Childhood friend Elizabeth Goldsmith Musser has a new book coming out in June … set in Atlanta in the 1930s … can’t wait.  Click on the link and you can read a few pages …

The Sweetest Thing

Coming in June, 2011

via The Sweetest Thing.

Civil War, history:  This has always bothered me … interesting article.

The Jeffersons, going back to the patriarch, embodied all the contradictions of Upper South slaveholders. The author of the Declaration of Independence was also a founding father of procrastination on slavery. At times Jefferson seemed a determined proponent of abolition. He termed slavery an “assemblage of horrors.” He called “nothing … more certainly written in the book of fate than that these people are to be freed.” Otherwise, he feared that “his people” would free themselves in a slave revolt. He thus winced that “if something is not done, and done soon, we shall be the murderers of our own children.”

But he found emancipating slaves without removing freedmen from the country even more frightening than risking black insurrectionists. In his climactic proposal to effect safe emancipation, presented in 1824, Jefferson suggested a constitutional amendment authorizing the use of profits from federal land sales to free slaves born in the future — and then deport them. But he never urged this plan of delayed emancipation publicly, and he privately shuddered that “we have the wolf by the ears, and we can neither hold him, or safely let him go.”

via What Would Thomas Jefferson Do About Secession? – NYTimes.com.

Japan Earthquake/Tsunami, pets: How they survived …

When the tsunami warnings sounded after the massive earthquake that struck Japan on Friday, Masaki Kikuchi sprinted upstairs to grab his sleeping 12-year-old daughter before racing away to escape the rushing waters.

In the backyard tied to a small shed, Mr. Kikuchi left behind two dogs: Towa, a two-year-old Sheltie and Melody, a one-year-old Golden Retriever. Mr. Kikuchi assumed the giant tsunami that flattened his neighbors’ homes and whisked away their cars probably killed Towa and Melody too.

When he finally got to the house, sidestepping a car that had shifted to block the entrance to the driveway, he could hear the barking.

“I was happy to see them because I had felt badly about leaving them behind,” said Mr. Kikuchi. He gave them water, food and brought them inside after cleaning them up.

via Two Dogs Defy the Wave – WSJ.com.

social media, twitter, advertising: Separating your business life and personal life can be very tricky …

SOCIAL media like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have been embraced by Madison Avenue as effective new ways to reach consumers. But what happens when behavior on social media is deemed antisocial?

Two large marketers, Aflac and the Chrysler Group, are struggling to answer that uncomfortable question in the wake of incidents that took place within days of each other. The incidents, involving remarks on Twitter that were judged to be tasteless, inappropriate and insensitive, point out some inherent risks of social media.

One challenge is the “amplified effect” of social media, said Ian Schafer, chief executive at Deep Focus, a digital agency in New York, citing how, on Twitter, “you put something out and it can be retweeted thousands of times.”

“It’s an age when anybody can communicate to an audience,” he added. “It didn’t used to be that way.”

The relative newness of that phenomenon, said George E. Belch, a marketing professor at San Diego State University, means “there are people in your company who forget when they post on a blog, on Twitter, on a Facebook page, that it’s out there — and it’s out there at warp speed.”

via Aflac and Chrysler, Turning to Social Media, Hit Trouble – NYTimes.com.

changes, technology:  Funny. I still like to get a person’s card … just something tangible about it, real, not virtual ….

SXSW attracts distinct, and diverse, tribes. With some, my card is indeed a stamp of authenticity. In others, a mark of a time passed. When I’ve met journalists or designers, the business card is still the default. Some cards are plain; others speak to their holders’ personalities through odd trim sizes, quirky color schemes, or clever word play. But in the startup circles I’ve come across, the business card is the badge of the outsider. I had a lovely conversation with two young entrepreneurs from New York and when it was time to part ways, I used that old line: “Here, let me give you my card.” They both paused, looking unsure about whether or not I was serious. Then I saw the understanding wash over them. I was speaking a forgotten language. A business card. How precious. One kindly accepted it anyway. The other craned his neck to copy my email address into his Hashable account and instantly sent me his virtual business card instead. With that small paper rectangle, I’d outed myself as a square.

via The Business Card Is Dead, Long Live the Business Card – Susy Jackson – Our Editors – Harvard Business Review.

18
Nov
10

11.18.2010 … beautiful day in Carolina …

Christmas, business, advertising, change:  This was one of my favorite things about Christmas … going downtown to see the Christmas windows.  We took our kids in Chicago and they loved it too … very magical.  Most kids will never have that experience.  Some change I do not like.

Many department stores are competing to add high-tech special effects to their holiday displays this season. Saks, Neiman Marcus and Bloomingdale’s are among the big stores deploying computer-assisted animation, projection shows and interactive features to amp up the drama. The goal is to grab the attention of consumers accustomed to the fast pace, interactivity and sophisticated effects of smartphones and videogames.

Retailers’ holiday window decorations date back to the late 19th century, when stores began using large plate-glass windows to showcase their wares, according to William L. Bird Jr., author of the 2007 book “Holidays on Display.” Christmas-themed sets were powered by spring mechanisms, steam and eventually electrical power. Department stores’ downtown displays became free entertainment destinations that families took annual pilgrimages to see.

via Designing Holiday Windows 2.0 – WSJ.com.

Davidson basketball: Let the games begin … I hope to hear “Sweet Caroline ,” soon.

Let the Games Begin! Day 1 of the fourth annual Honda Puerto Rico Tip-Off is finally here. Davidson and West Virginia will get the party started at 12:30, followed by Nebraska vs. Vanderbilt at 2:30 p.m. Both games are on ESPNU

via Puerto Rico Tip-Off.

politics, business: interesting …

Still, the omission – let’s call it a “No-bama” — does seem to be a curious lapse considering that Buffett supported Obama in the 2008 elections and after. When people criticized Obama for not moving quickly enough to revive the economy, Buffett publicly called for patience on financial recovery. On the eve of the presidential election, Obama penned his own thank-you letter of sorts, saying he was “proud” to have the support of Buffett and other business leaders. Is this relationship unequal?

The mid-term election “shellacking” delivered to Obama and the Democrats – his words – was at least in part owed to opponents’ efforts to badge the financial bailouts as an Obama intervention, whether that was a fair characterization or not. So in this case, is Obama getting zero credit for the government’s financial rescue and all of the blame?

via Is Warren Buffett’s ‘Thank You’ to America a Dis to Obama? – Deal Journal – WSJ.

special needs, gLee: gLee effect … I like this story … watch the video clip!

The Sparkle Effect was created by cheerleading coaches in Iowa. The idea is to allow those with special needs the opportunity to cheer side-by-side with their peers. Some young ladies are showing us how it works here in the Twin Cities.

via The Sparkle Effect at Anoka High School.

high school, football, Westminster: I like this story, too.

Hardin is spending his senior season serving as the school’s first-ever “student assistant coach” after having his playing career abruptly end last year because of a severe concussion.

“This is my way of staying connected to football, the sport I’ve loved so much for as long as I can remember,” Hardin said. “It has been awful not being able to play. It changed the direction of everything in my life. So I’m very thankful to the coaches for allowing to me to still be a part of the program.”

via Westminster football standout switches to coaching after concussion No. 7 | Prep Zone: High School Sports.

Davidson, kudos:  Kudos to Professor Shaw.  I would love to nominate several professors from classes that I took over 28 years ago … I am still talking about quite a few Davidson classes … the Emergence of Professions, Urban Development, History of Economic Thought … to name a few.

He was nominated without his knowledge by Alex Pitsinos, a 2010 Davidson graduate in economics who took Shaw’s course as a sophomore. It was his first political science course at Davidson, and made a big impression. Pitsinos said, “I had a lot of great courses at Davidson, but none other affected me and my friends to the point that we were still talking about them in our senior year.”

“Foundations of Liberalism” examines the different interpretations of the liberal tradition-from John Locke in the seventeenth century to John Rawls in the twentieth. Shaw begins by explaining that all current American political movements are “liberal” in the sense of sharing a fundamental commitment to the core liberal values of individual rights, political democracy, toleration and economic liberty.

via Liberal? Conservative? Award Recognizes Professor Shaw’s Course for Its Unbiased Examination of Both

Kruger, South Africa, places:  I loved where we stayed … but this looks pretty cool.

With the black mamba tutorial over, a Land Rover delivers me to the base of an ancient Leadwood tree, home of the only treehouse at the Lion Sands Private Game Reserve. It’s dead and bone dry, its scraggly branches curl against a darkening sky like the fingers of a fairy-tale witch. Thirty feet up, a two-tiered platform abuts the tree—bed and dining table on top, chemical flush toilet below. The large bed is shrouded in mosquito netting and a small dining table is set for dinner. An insulated cooler stores the evening meal, morning breakfast and your choice of wine or beer. At the foot of the bed are extra blankets to ward off the night cold and a two-way radio to call for help.

The family-owned property dates back four generations to Guy Aubrey Chalkley, a Virginian gold miner turned stockbroker who bought it in 1933. Mr. Chalkley had arrived in South Africa in search of gold and to hunt big game, but his descendants say he became an early conservationist.

Today, Lion Sands shares a porous river border with Kruger National Park, one of Africa’s biggest game reserves. The Big Five—lion, leopard, elephant, rhino and buffalo—are in abundance, as are wildebeest, wild dogs and warthogs. Tawny Eagles hunt from the sky while packs of hyena skulk for prey through thorny underbrush.

via A Treehouse Night at the Lion Sands Private Game Reserve in South Africa – WSJ.com.

gardening, locavore:  I will gladly barter my yard for produce. 🙂

But James Lucal in Seattle has them all beat. He not only brings home the local produce, he got a local to grow it for him directly outside his home. And yet he spent almost nothing for this luxury, and lifted not so much as a trowel to make it happen.

Welcome to “urban sharecropping,” the hippest, most hardcore new way to eat local. In the latest twist in the farm-to-table movement, homeowners who lack free time or gardening skills are teaming up with would-be farmers who lack backyards. Around the country, a new crop of match-makers are helping the two groups find each other and make arrangements that enable both sides to share resources and grow their own food.

via The Rise of the Lazy Locavore – WSJ.com.

gift ideas, food – Southern, books, me: I love cookbooks (especially Southern cookbooks), but I hate to cook.   Cookbooks with a Southern Twist.

gift ideas: I like this one … Holiday CD to benefit Atlanta Humane Society | Atlanta INtown Paper.

food, kith/kin, my dad:  My dad’s hamburgers are still my favorite … “Lindsey Burgers”  They contained both fat and butter …

Most of the chefs make a big deal about the kind of meat served at their restaurants. Mr. Lagasse blends ground chuck, short rib and brisket; others promote their Angus, Kobe or grass-fed beef. Some beef experts say the main secret behind tasty celebrity-chef burgers is simple: They pile on the fat, whether from beef patties with 30% fat content or from patties basted in butter. That alone may make their burgers delicious at a time when supermarket ground beef may contain as little as 8% fat.

via Burger Chains of Bobby Flay, Emeril Lagasse, Hubert Keller, Marcus Samuelsson and Other Celebrity Chefs – WSJ.com.

water resource management, NC, SC:

“Today is a beautiful day, a gorgeous day for a settlement concept to be proposed to you,” S.C. Deputy Attorney General Bob Cook told the bi-state commission. “I’m here to tell you today that the settlement concept is not only a better result, but it’s a fair resolution for both states.”

The deal is built from a compact that a 70-member stakeholder group from both states previously crafted and signed in August 2006. That pact, called the Comprehensive Relicensing Agreement, is required for the renewal of Charlotte-based Duke Energy Corp.’s (NYSE:DUK) 50-year federal license to use the Catawba to generate electricity. The renewal is still pending before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

The new settlement deal places strict drought protocols on any entity that pulls water from one of Duke Energy’s reservoirs along the river.

via Settlement reached in N.C.-S.C. water war | Charlotte Business Journal.

Bones, tv: My other favorite show …‘Bones’ exclusive: A proposal in February! (Plus, scoop on the Brennan-centric and sniper episodes) | EW.com.

31
Oct
10

‎10.31.2010 … Happy Halloween … fed my soul at worship … fed by body at Amelie’s …

Halloween, holidays, google doodle :  Happy Halloween!  Gotta love the Scooby Doo Halloween doodle!

travel, restaurants, places, Boulder: A few more suggestions … my boys went to Pizzeria Basta and absolutely loved it.  Next time …

Boulder has won just about every shiny happy lifestyle award a city can: Healthiest, Most Educated, Most Bicycle-Friendly—the list goes on. And this year, it can add one more: Bon Appétit’s Foodiest Town in America.

… I have more questions to ask him, but I have to stop and walk. Finally, a pint of Left Hand Brewing Company lager and a few pizzas (one with house-made sausage and mozzarella and another with seasonal local potatoes and goat cheese) from Pizzeria Basta come to the rescue.

via America’s Foodiest Town 2010: Boulder, Colorado.

Davidson, kudos:  Dr. Murphy gave a very inspiring talk at Davidson’s convocation yesterday.

A Davidson College alumnus who organized a medical mission to Haiti following the Jan. 12 earthquake will speak at the college’s fall convocation Oct. 30.

Dr. Greg Murphy, a 1985 graduate who now works as an urologist and general surgeon in Greenville, N.C., has conducted short-term medical missions in developing countries for 20 years. But Murphy said he never seen such a dire situation as Haiti, and two weeks after the quake, he and 15 other medical personnel he recruited began seeing patients at St. Damien Hospital in Port-au-Prince.

via Physician who served in Haiti speaking at Davidson convocation | Huntersville Herald.

technology, the Cloud: Coming next …

Moving beyond mere Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), the company is positioning Windows Azure as a Platform-as-a-Service offering: a comprehensive set of development tools, services, and management systems to allow developers to concentrate on creating available, scalable applications.

Over the next 12-18 months, a raft of new functionality will be rolled out to Windows Azure customers. These features will both make it easier to move existing applications into the cloud, and enhance the services available to cloud-hosted applications.

The company believes that putting applications into the cloud will often be a multistage process. Initially, the applications will run unmodified, which will remove patching and maintenance burdens, but not take advantage of any cloud-specific functionality.

Over time, the applications will be updated and modified to start to take advantage of some of the additional capabilities that the Windows Azure platform has to offer.

Microsoft is building Windows Azure into an extremely complete cloud platform. Windows Azure currently takes quite a high-level approach to cloud services: applications have limited access to the underlying operating system, and software that requires Administrator installation isn’t usable.

via Future of Windows Azure — platform is the service – CNN.com.

food, restaurants, Charlotte: Amelie’s Bakery was very good!  Charlotte NC :: Amelie’s French Bakery :: Amelie’s French Bakery and Cafe.

tv, movies, James Bond: ‎… Bond Weekend on TNT … What more could a girl want … (followup — so far I have only watched 2)

facebook, internet, religion, things past, Westminster:  Friday I asked Westminster friends on FB if they remember reading/watching Francis Schaeffer’s How then Should We Live in Christian Ethics senior year?  The answers varied … from we had senior ethics? … to  memories of other books we read , memories of the teachers (cute Mr. Trotter, Mrs. Eastham) and papers written … No one else remembers watching the videos … Do you remember them?  YouTube – How Should We Then Live 10#1.

lists:  I like lists … but I can see why Ebert doesn’t.  Why Roger Ebert Loathes Top 10 Film Lists – WSJ.com.

history, literature: Bill Wood referenced Girolamo Savonarola and the 15th century “bonfire of the vanities.”  I really hate it when I have completely missed a literary reference.

Girolamo Savonarola (21 September 1452, Ferrara, Emilia-Romagna – 23 May 1498, Florence) was an Italian Dominican priest and leader of Florence from 1494 until his execution in 1498. He was known for his book burning, destruction of what he considered immoral art, and hostility to the Renaissance. He vehemently preached against the moral corruption of much of the clergy at the time, and his main opponent was Rodrigo Borgia, who was Pope Alexander VI from 1492, through Savonarola’s death, to 1503.

via Girolamo Savonarola.

After Charles VIII of France invaded Florence in 1494, the ruling Medici were overthrown and Savonarola emerged as the new leader of the city, combining in himself the role of secular leader and priest. He set up a republic in Florence. Characterizing it as a “Christian and religious Republic,” one of its first acts was to make sodomy, previously punishable by fine, into a capital offence. Homosexuality had previously been tolerated in the city, and many homosexuals from the elite now chose to leave Florence. His chief enemies were the Duke of Milan and Pope Alexander VI, who issued numerous restraints against him, all of which were ignored.

Painting of Savonarola’s execution in the Piazza della Signoria.

In 1497, he and his followers carried out the Bonfire of the Vanities. They sent boys from door to door collecting items associated with moral laxity: mirrors, cosmetics, lewd pictures, pagan books, immoral sculptures (which he wanted to be transformed into statues of the saints and modest depictions of biblical scenes), gaming tables, chess pieces, lutes and other musical instruments, fine dresses, women’s hats, and the works of immoral and ancient poets, and burnt them all in a large pile in the Piazza della Signoria of Florence.[2] Many fine Florentine Renaissance artworks were lost in Savonarola’s notorious bonfires — including paintings by Sandro Botticelli, which he is alleged to have thrown into the fires himself.[3]

Florence soon became tired of Savonarola because of the city’s continual political and economic miseries partially derived from Savonarola’s opposition to trading and making money. When a Franciscan preacher challenged him to a trial by fire in the city centre and he declined, his following began to dissipate.

During his Ascension Day sermon on May 4, 1497, bands of youths rioted, and the riot became a revolt: dancing and singing taverns reopened, and men again dared to gamble publicly.

via Girolamo Savonarola – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

As a metaphor, Tom Wolfe used the 15th century event and ritual as the title for his 1987 novel The Bonfire of the Vanities and its film adaptation.

via Bonfire of the Vanities – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

education, literature, film/lit:  Sometimes it is the really odd classes that stay with a preson their whole life.

Students in the course write essays and blog about such movies as 28 Days Later and Night of the Living Dead and books such as the Jane Austen send-up, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Seth Grahame-Smith.

“The course looks at what fears about society and ideology are expressed in zombie fiction,” Rivers says, “such as becoming part of a society where the individual ceases to exist, or what zombies, who persuade us to become them by consuming us, have to say about persuasion and identification.”

One student, Rohit Mukherjee (NHS’12), wrote about how in movies and books, zombies kill people just because they are different.

“At our core, we possess the same force of destruction as the zombie masses,” Mukherjee wrote. “No virus led the Hutu masses to hack their Tutsi neighbors to death … their rage was intrinsic.”

via Georgetown University: Students Attack Tough Subjects Through Zombies.

museums, NYC:  I would like to see this museum one day …

McKim Building Reopening

The Morgan’s landmark 1906 building by McKim, Mead and White closed in early June for the first extensive restoration of its interior spaces in more than one hundred years. The building will reopen to the public on Saturday, October 30 with a full slate of special activities and we invite you to join us to mark the occasion.

The afternoon’s festivities will begin with a welcome and talk about the McKim building project and the Morgan collections by director William M. Griswold. Throughout the day, musicians, including the New-Trad Octet, a New Orleans-style band exploring the roots of early American music, will perform. Docents will be on hand to provide visitors with historical insight into the Morgan’s architecture. All events are included with admission to the Morgan.

via The Morgan Library & Museum – Public Programs – McKim Building Reopening.

24
Sep
10

9.24.2010 … happy birthday, special kith niece Carson! … Fall is here, but no fall in temperature … only my hairdresser knows for sure :)

birthdays:  happy birthday, special daughter Carson!

icons, food – Southern, Atlanta:

What’ll Ya Have!

Varsity Chili Now Available Online

15 oz Can

http://secure.thevarsity.com:80/shop/dept.asp?dept_id=1337

Will also be available in all of our locations by Friday 24th.

via Facebook | The Varsity.

media, history, baseball, random: It amazes me what has not been saved …

Crosby, who was a part-owner of the Pirates, evidently was also extremely superstitious and could not bear to watch the deciding game of the series for fear of jinxing a Pittsburgh win. The fear was so great he “escaped” to Paris and listened to the game on the radio.But in order to see the game later and lacking the future technology of home videotape and DVRs, Crosby hired a film crew to record the NBC broadcast, featuring announcers Mel Allen and Bob Prince, off a TV screen.

via 1960 Series Game Found in Bing Crosbys Wine Cellar – Sports Blog – CBS News.

writing, education, media, Davidson:  The internet allows us to look back, be in the present and look to the future.  I love this new site.

Commonplaces is dedicated to publishing writing produced in any courses across the College taken by Davidson students in their first year. We invite writers to submit work produced during the 2010-2011 academic year to be considered for publication in the 2011 issue. We seek academic and intellectual writing of any length that demonstrates a commitment to understanding and its expression, and encourage submissions from the full range of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities

via Common Places » Vol. 1 / Fall 2010.

education, Westminster, Atlanta:

The Westminster Schools Thirty nine Westminster Seniors, in a class of 198 students, have recently been named National Merit Semi-finalists in the 56th annual National Merit Scholarship Program. The prestigious group will now compete for finalist status through the demonstration of an outstanding academic record, and earn SAT scores that confirm their earlier qualifying test performance (based on PSAT scores from October, 2009).

via Facebook | The Westminster Schools.

iPad:  I am not there yet …

There were only two things I wanted to do but couldn’t because I had an iPad rather than a laptop. In one case, where a Word document contained a lot of revision comments, I couldn’t get any of the productivity apps on my tablet to display these. In another, I couldn’t help a colleague test Apple’s new Ping social network, because, ironically, you can only set up a Ping account on a regular computer.

via Personal Technology: An iPad in Paris – WSJ.com.

politics, people:  Not everyone in the US agrees about Jimmy Carter’s place in history … but in South Africa we did not meet one person who did not revere Nelson Mandela.

Jimmy Carter says he’s “superior” to other U.S. ex-presidents. But on the world stage, he’s got some tough competition.

After decades leading South Africa’s anti-apartheid struggle and a historic presidency, “Madiba” was already a global icon. But in the years since his retirement, Mandela has established himself as the African continent’s foremost elder statesman as well. He has founded the Nelson Mandela Foundation to promote conflict resolution, theNelson Mandela Institute to promote education and rural development in South Africa, and theNelson Mandela Children’s Fund to promote the rights of young people. In 2007, Mandela brought together a group of gracefully aging world leaders including Jimmy Carter, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan to form The Elders, a group that speaks out on human rights issues from Burma to Sudan.

via The League of Extraordinary Ex-Presidents – By Joshua E. Keating | Foreign Policy.




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 618 other followers

November 2020
S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930