Posts Tagged ‘winter

06
Jan
14

1.6.14 … A few Epiphanies and a Polar Vortex … Happy Epiphany, BTW … God Bless!

Epiphany:  Every year I love the posts of this FB Page Advent!

January 6th is Epiphany, which means “to show” or “to make known” or even “to reveal”. On this day we as the body of Christ are reminded of our mission to seek to as best we can to be used by God to “reveal” Jesus to the world as Lord and King. With this we end the 12 days of Christmas and celebration of the Christmas Advent season. Next year we will start again. Hope this was a blessing to you. God bless!

via Advent – January 6th is Epiphany, which means “to show” or “to….

… and another good one from James Howell:

Usually I think of the word “Epiphany” in terms of looking up – to a star, a light in God’s immense sky; or perhaps we think of the dawn, the bright sun peering over the horizon, or a light bulb going off in your head.

But perhaps for there to be a real epiphany, a real revelation and discovery in our lives, we need to look down, deep, beneath the surface – like the iceberg, the bulk of the thing hidden, dangerous, very real even if unnoticed. Much of our life is lived on the surface – and sadly our religious life often is limited to some nice, observable acts: I go to church, say a quick prayer, volunteer once in a while, occasionally read my Bible.

But it’s only the tip of the iceberg; the bulk of my life remains untouched, submerged – and I may not even be familiar with the depth of my own life! But it’s down there. God is keenly interested in that submerged, unaddressed life. “Lord, you have searched me and known me” (Psalm 139:1).

Our goals in this series (and in life!)? To grow in emotional health, real compassion for others, to break free from destructive patterns, and be filled with grace; we can embrace weakness, accept the surprising gift of our limitations, learn to resolve conflicts, and forgive.

via Myers Park United Methodist Church | Charlotte Methodist Church, Methodist Churches Charlotte NC – Myers Park UMC.

holiday traditions, winter, paperwhite narcissus, kith/kin:

So if I stage it right, I have blooms from mid December to mid February. I friend who is not on FB gave me paper whites when I was in 8th grade. It has been a favorite winter and Christmas tradition ever since. Thanks, Marty!

Photo: So if I stage it right, I have blooms from mid December to mid February.  I friend who is not on FB gave me paper whites when I was in 8th grade. It has been a favorite winter and Christmas tradition ever since.  Thanks, Marty!

 Polar Vortex:

Meteorologist Eric Holthaus just posted this insane video of him turning boiling water into snow.

Shot in Viroqua, WI, near La Crosse, it was -21°F with a wind chill of -51°F.

via Watch Boiling Water Turn Into Snow – Business Insider.

via ▶ Boiling water vs extreme cold – YouTube.

What is a polar vortex? What distinguishes it?

The polar vortex, as it sounds, is circulation of strong, upper-level winds that normally surround the northern pole in a counterclockwise direction — a polar low-pressure system.  These winds tend to keep the bitter cold air locked in the Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere. It is not a single storm. On occasion, this vortex can become distorted and dip much farther south than you would normally find it, allowing cold air to spill southward.

Photos: Winter weather grips U.S.

How frequently does this polar vortex distortion occur?

The upper-level winds that make up the polar vortex change in intensity from time to time. When those winds decrease significantly, it can allow the vortex to become distorted, and the result is a jet stream that plunges deep into southern latitudes, bringing the cold, dense Arctic air spilling down with it. This oscillation is known as the Arctic Oscillation and it can switch from a positive phase to negative phase a few times per year. This oscillation — namely the negative phase where the polar winds are weaker — tends to lead to major cold air outbreaks in one or more regions of the planet.

via Frigid air from the North Pole: What’s this polar vortex? – CNN.com.

Photo: Be nice to the poor guy.

Definitely … we are just mostly missing the Polar Vortex … on a relative basis …  Sorry.

.Photo: Definitely ... we are just missing the cold front.  Sorry. :)

Emotional Intelligence: Interesting.

Shining a light on this dark side of emotional intelligence is one mission of a research team led by University College London professor Martin Kilduff. According to these experts, emotional intelligence helps people disguise one set of emotions while expressing another for personal gain. Emotionally intelligent people “intentionally shape their emotions to fabricate favorable impressions of themselves,” Professor Kilduff’s team writes. “The strategic disguise of one’s own emotions and the manipulation of others’ emotions for strategic ends are behaviors evident not only on Shakespeare’s stage but also in the offices and corridors where power and influence are traded.”

Thanks to more rigorous research methods, there is growing recognition that emotional intelligence—like any skill—can be used for good or evil. So if we’re going to teach emotional intelligence in schools and develop it at work, we need to consider the values that go along with it and where it’s actually useful. As Professor Kilduff and colleagues put it, it is high time that emotional intelligence is “pried away from its association with desirable moral qualities.”

via The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence – Atlantic Mobile.

wine, Trader Joe’s, Two Buck Chuck,  Thrillist Nation: Potentially useful info? Ok, not really …

Whether you were throwing a dinner for people you felt compelled to not impress, or just hate paying $2.01 and up for literally anything, at some point you’ve likely been in a position to load up a shopping cart with a crapload of Two-Buck Chuck, pray nobody from church sees you, and party down.

Here’s the thing, though: some of it’s actually pretty damn good, and could easily be sold as Nine-to-Eleven-Buck Chuck without anyone being the wiser.

So we brought in two devoted tasters to blindly drink eight different types of Charles Shaw Blend, hit us with detailed notes, and determine 1) which bottles are totally palatable and even enjoyable, and 2) which should be avoided as if they were made by Chuck Woolery, who, it turns out, makes terrible wine.

HOW MANY THEY GOT RIGHT

Sommelier: 4/8

Girlfriend: 3/8

THE FINAL SCORES, FROM BEST TO WORST

Merlot: 8

Chardonnay: 7.5

Shiraz: 7.75

Cabernet Sauvignon: 7.25

Pinot Grigio: 6

Nouveau: 3

Sauvignon Blanc: 2.5

White Zinfandel: Technically 1, but not really even.

via Wines Under 5 Dollars at Trader Joe’s – Cheap Wine – Thrillist Nation.

A Mighty Girl, Jeannette Piccard, NASA: I follow A Mighty Girl on FB.  It is one of my favorite sites!  I would love to be a “mighty girl”!

Following the famous flight, Jeannette Piccard went on to work with NASA, acting as a consultant and speaking publicly about the space program from 1964 to 1970. At age 79, in 1974, she also fulfilled a childhood dream when she became an ordained Episcopal priest as one of the Philadelphia Eleven, a group of eleven women who were ordained as the first female priests in the Episcopal Church.

Piccard’s spirit of adventure is best summed up in this quote to her father, when he asked her why she wanted to fly: “There are many reasons, some of them so deep-seated emotionally as to be very difficult of expression. Possibly the simplest explanation is that we started along this road… and I cannot stop until I have won.”

via (2) A Mighty Girl.

09
Nov
13

11.9.13 … LOL, true confessions, busted …

LOL, winter

Remember : Cold season is starting and cows seek heat on car hoods. do not forget to tap on the hood to give the cow enough time to get off before you drive away! ROTFLMAO

Downton Abbey, Season 4: New Characters Details :  busted … I may be secretly reading the BBS summaries (Downton Abbey Season 4) …

via ▶ MASTERPIECE | Downton Abbey, Season 4: New Characters | PBS – YouTube.

Can’t wait for Downton Abbey Season 4? The cast and creators of the series introduce you to some of the new arrivals — a lord, a valet, an opera star and more! [Downton Abbey, Season 4 premieres Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, 9pm ET on MASTERPIECE on PBS.]

via Downton Abbey, Season 4: New Characters | Downton Abbey | Masterpiece | PBS.

Miniature City Models Around the World, WSJ.com:  OK … true confessions:  I love miniature models.  Last week at the Hoover Dam (10.30.13), I dragged my husband back to the model of the dam during construction.

Thought to be the biggest of mini cityscapes, covering 9,335 square feet, the Panorama of the City of New York was built for the 1964 New York World’s Fair by urban planner Robert Moses —or more specifically, Raymond Lester Associates, a firm specializing in architectural models. Made mostly of wood and plastic, it includes every building in all five boroughs as of 1992, when it was last brought fully up-to-date. (Here, the Twin Towers still stand.) To raise money, the museum is letting people “buy” parcels of real estate in the model, with an apartment going for $50 and city icons running upward of $5,000—a bargain even when adjusted for the literal deflation. New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, queensmuseum.org

What to look for: The tiny plane looping over the city, following a wire to land at LaGuardia Airport and taking off again seconds later.

via Miniature City Models Around the World – WSJ.com.

And here is the Hoover Dam for you …

IMG_8510

16
Feb
13

2.16.13 … a walk on the wild side … spring to winter in 45 minutes …

“Solvitur Ambulando”  – It is solved by walking,  2013 Lenten labyrinth walks, Myers Park Baptist Church, snow, thunder snow, Charlotte, early spring, winter, Why We Broke Up, YA literature: 
I’ve waited all day to walk because I wanted to walk in the snow. But Charlotte’s not going to get snow. But if it does overnight, I can walk tomorrow morning. I hate that about the South, that we wait for winter with anticipation. Other people wait for spring …
So finally at about 4 pm, I drove over to Myers  Park Baptist Church.  I was  amazed at how much spring is already here (yet the homes still have giant hearts on the doors to celebrate Valentine’s).  Yards are  just filled with yellow daffodils. There’s a pink tree in  bloom. The Bradford pears are budding. It is just amazing. However, I am waiting for winter.
Image IMG_5712
Image
I’ve been listening to young adult fiction today, specifically a book called Why We Broke Up. I am amazed at the angst which is always a part of young adult fiction. I wonder if at 53 I am filled with the same angst of 15-year-old.  I think about what I would put in a box if I were 15 and broke up … realizing I probably have such stuff still in a box in my house … I would never have had the guts to deliver that box to my ex …
My  walk was brisk. I notice that the lines marking the seams in the concrete are water stained … collecting as it dries. I feel like it’s trying to dry for the snow.

Image   IMG_5729
IMG_5719   IMG_5720 IMG_5734
I think, “hope I get to come back tomorrow and walk on it  snow-covered ”  My other thought is that I now feel very out of sync when I walk this labyrinth and reach the center. I am out of sync because I now know that the number of petals in the center are not true to Chartres. (But the labyrinth  makes up for it by having a stone inlaid in the  center that was quarried from the same quarry that stones of Chartres were quarried.
IMG_5722 IMG_5736
 IMG_5725 IMG_5726 IMG_5728
 IMG_5739
As I left I noticed that someone has stolen the sign that tells everyone that this is a “sacred place.”  I wonder what would make someone steal that sign. I’ve concluded that it may go in someone’s box  of mementos from a relationship. They stole the side of the labyrinth.
IMG_5741
As I got in the car, I heat ice …and rain and SNOW!
IMG_5746 IMG_5747
I also see lightning and hear thunder … Thunder Snow …
Within 15 minutes Charlotte is covered in snow ….
IMG_5764
IMG_5766
Now I really must go back and walk the labyrinth in the morning … early before anyone else.
fyi … I first experienced thundersnow while I lived in Chicago … I have now experienced it 3 times, the same number that mY kids have experienced …

Thundersnow, also known as a winter thunderstorm or a thunder snowstorm, is an extremely rare[1] kind of thunderstorm with snow falling as the primary precipitation instead of rain. It typically falls in regions of strong upward motion within the cold sector of an extratropical cyclone. Thermodynamically, it is not different from any other type of thunderstorms but the top of the cumulonimbus is usually quite low. As well as snow, graupel, or more rarely hail also commonly falls.

via Thundersnow – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

09
Feb
13

2.9.13 … barking dogs …

barking dogs, for the love of dogs, kith/kin, neighbors:  I was out-of-town and my old pups barked way into the night/ morning.  Sometime I forget their shortcomings because I love them.   I feel really bad …

IMG_5446

Maira Kalman, art, quotes,  Brain Pickings:

Kalman echoes Anaïs Nin and adds to history’s finest definitions of art:

There’s a certain freedom to do whatever I want to do, which I guess is the definition of being an artist.

Complement with Kalman on identity, happiness and existence and the difference between thinking and feeling, then treat yourself to some of her marvelous, unassumingly profound books — you can’t go wrong with The Principles of Uncertainty and Various Illuminations (of a Crazy World).

via Maira Kalman on Art and the Power of Not Thinking | Brain Pickings.

blogs, Jane Austen:  New resource — The Everything Austen Daily.

coffee foam art: 🙂

One of the perks of visiting your local coffee shops!

via The 40 Most Amazing Examples Of Coffee Foam Art.

memes, Marco Polo, childhood:

Poor fellow. To think this is what most will know his name by…

Annie Dillard, winter, memes, Brain Pickings:

This particular excerpt from the essay “Footfalls In A Blue Ridge Winter”, a celebration of winter originally published in the February 1974 issue of — of all places — Sports Illustrated, manages to capture in some 200 words just about everything that’s magical and poetic about life, innocence, curiosity, presence, and even the memes that permeate the Internet, a kind of vision for the currency of the web long before the web as we know it existed.

via Annie Dillard on Winter, Memes, and Living with Wonder | Brain Pickings.

NYT, WSJ, WashPost, NY Post, photography, journalism, Poynter:

 

It’s not unusual for a single image to dominate a news event. But it is unusual for the same photo to be prominently featured on four major newspapers. Reuters photojournalist Brian Snyder captured the front page image (shown below) in Boston on Friday, as the storm was arriving. Only the New York Post uses the name ‘Nemo’ to refer to the blizzard that has dumped several feet of snow in the northeast and left thousands without power. || Related: New York Times, Wall Street Journal drop paywalls for storm coverage | How Wall Street Journal, NPR are using RebelMouse for storm coverage, Fashion Week

via Same photo appears on front pages of NYT, WSJ, WashPost, NY Post | Poynter..

China, architecture, copycats, WSJ.com:

In Beijing, the new Wangjing SOHO complex, a trio of curvy office buildings designed by the internationally acclaimed architect Zaha Hadid, is slowly rising in the smog-filled skyline. Meanwhile, 1,000 miles south, a set of two buildings is going up—and the design looks just like Ms. Hadid’s, say the backers of the Beijing complex.

The other development company has denied copying the design and coined a slogan about its project. “Never meant to copy,” reads a pitch posted on the firm’s official microblog. “Only want to surpass.”

[image]

Robert Harding World Imagery/Corbis

BONJOUR CHINA | An Eiffel Tower looms over a road in Hebei province.

That motto could be the mantra for China’s massive movement in architectural mimicry. To show they are making it big, the Chinese have turned to faking it big.

via In Chinese Buildings, a Copycat Craze – WSJ.com.

Truman Capote, In Cold Blood, Harper Lee, nonfiction narrative, literary genres, WSJ.com:  This entire article is fascinating …

The notes show that when Mr. Capote and his assistant, novelist Harper Lee, traveled to Garden City in the winter of 1960, Mr. Dewey gave them exclusive access to the Clutter files for a week. Mr. Dewey also granted them private interviews with the arrested killers after he had told the media that no such interviews would be granted, according to Charles J. Shields, who studied the Capote archives for his 2006 biography of Miss Lee, “Mockingbird.”

via Capote Classic ‘In Cold Blood’ Tainted by Long-Lost Files – WSJ.com.

Berta Soler, Cuba, dissidents, Ladies In White, freedom to travel:  Change is coming.  i was very moved by this story.

HAVANA — Cuban authorities granted a passport Friday to the leader of a protest group that received the European Union’s top human rights prize in 2005, even as another, lesser-known dissident reported being told she will not be allowed to leave the country.

Berta Soler, the most prominent member of the Ladies in White, picked up her new passport in the morning and said she plans to make a long-delayed trip to Europe to pick up the EU’s Sakharov award, something she has been unable to do until now because she was denied an exit visa.

The 50-year-old exit visa requirement, which was often denied to the likes of doctors, military officers and dissidents, has been abolished under travel reform that took effect Jan. 14.

Soler said she would contact EU officials to schedule a date, and she’s also hoping to visit Spain and attend two April human rights conferences in Panama and Germany.

“I have many invitations to different places,” she told The Associated Press, holding up her new passport.

The Ladies in White formed a decade ago to press for the release of their husbands, 75 dissidents imprisoned in a 2003 crackdown. All 75 have since been freed, and the Ladies have refocused their message on demanding political change, with almost completely new membership. Soler is one of the few original members still active in the group.

via Berta Soler, Leader Of Cuban Dissident Group ‘Ladies In White,’ Receives Passport To Travel.

China, culture, boyfriend rentals, Chinese New Year,  The Wedding Date , Valentine’s Day ,  ABC News:  Reminded me of The Wedding Date … but then thought of the social and family pressure that must exist to cause this to be significant enough of a business that it received US news coverage.

Renting out boyfriends and girlfriends is a new business in China. With the Chinese New Year approaching, the whole country has begun its massive annual migration, with millions of people struggling to get home. For the many young Chinese who work away from their hometowns, this is the one time of year when they can spend a week or two at home with their families. Besides visiting relatives and friends, it’s also the perfect time to show what you have achieved in the past year. For many young people, that means bringing home a potential mate or spouse to introduce to your family.

Gao told ABC News that the market for rental boyfriends is much bigger than rental girlfriends. The pressure to get married weighs heavy on the shoulders of many Chinese women. Even state media refers to single women above age 27 as “leftover women.” The 26th birthday of a daughter rings like an alarm bell for many anxious Chinese parents.

Gao owns two online stores selling flowers through Taobao.com. He has recruited nine young men between the ages of 26 and 32 who he considers suitably masculine to rent out as boyfriends.

via Boyfriend Rentals Boom During Chinese New Year and Valentine’s Day – ABC News.

tea, UK, Earl Grey, British estates, Boston.com: fascinating … but I would have assumed it had never been grown in Britain.  🙂

An estate owned by descendants of the 19th century British aristocrat for whom Earl Grey tea was named is turning history on its head by selling English tea to China. The Tregothnan estate in the southwestern English county of Cornwall started selling tea from its tiny plantation in 2005 and last year produced about 10 tons of tea and infusions. Current owners (and residents) of Tregothnan, Evelyn and Katharine Boscawen think they’ve found a niche to exploit in exporting English tea to China and India. The long history of immersing tea leaves in hot water for a refreshing drink is not lost on the Boscawens. By the Victorian Era, taking tea had become a regular ritual at almost every level of society from elaborate afternoon tea for the rich in country houses to tea and gruel for the working poor as depicted by Charles Dickens.Tregothnan has projected 2013 sales to be $3.14 million, a drop in the proverbial bucket compared to the world’s largest black tea exporter, Kenya, predicting $1.33 billion in sales for 2013.

via Tea Time – The Big Picture – Boston.com.

28
Jan
13

1.28.13 … happy birthday P&P … a day in the big onion …

Jane Austen,  Pride and Prejudice’s 200th Birthday, Janeites:  Happy birthday, P&P!

This week marks an important milestone for anyone who swoons at the very mention of Mr. Darcy. Pride and Prejudice is turning 200, and to celebrate its bicentennial, cartoonist Jen Sorensen drew up an illustrated version of the classic.

via ‘Pride And Prejudice’ Turns 200: A Cartoon Celebration : NPR.

We, Janeites, are a strange people …

Blogs and forums dedicated to Austen and Austen-style fan fiction abound across the internet. The Jane Austen Society of North America (Jasna) boasts 4,500 members and no fewer than 65 branches.

In October 2012, more than 700 Janeites – many attired in bonnets and early 19th Century-style dresses – gathered in Brooklyn, New York for a Jasna event that incorporated three days of lectures, dance workshops, antique exhibitions, a banquet and a ball.

It’s a curious phenomenon when one considers that Austen won little fame in her own lifetime, dying aged 41 in 1817 with only six novels to her name.

While she may be regarded as one of the greatest writers in English literature, it’s difficult to imagine a similar level of fandom emerging around a novelist like, say, Charles Dickens.

For all that her stories can be by turns bleak and waspish, however, it’s the romance of Austen’s world that many Janeites say drew them in.

via BBC News – Janeites: The curious American cult of Jane Austen.

My novels Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict and Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict could have been considered semi-autobiographical had they not involved time travel and body switching. I believe that every lady should have her very own Austen hero and every man his Austen heroine.

When not engaged in new time travel adventures (aka working on the third Austen Addict novel or turning my short story  Intolerable Stupidity into a novel), I can be found on Jane Austen Addict.com (and so can loads of quizzes, games, the Sex and the Austen Girl web series, Austen parody videos, a blog, and lots more time-wasting fun!).

via Jane Austen Addict • About Jane Austen Addict.

NYC, winter, Big Onion Tours, Greenwich Village:  Looking pretty grim on our arrival …

IMG_5092

My tour … with a few photos and comments …

Stroll through one of New York’s most picturesque neighborhoods as we explore the unique and legendary home to artists, writers and radicals.   Our walk has a special emphasis on the history and architecture of the Village. Stops could include: Jefferson Market Courthouse, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, the “hanging elm”, the Stonewall Inn, and sites associated with Stanford White, Aaron Burr, Edith Wharton, John Sloan, Evelyn Nesbit, Jimi Hendrix, and Tom Pain

via Greenwich Village | Big Onion.

IMG_5094 IMG_5095 IMG_5098
IMG_5096 IMG_5100 IMG_5101
1.  Marie’s Crisis … Thomas Paine who wrote Common Sense and The Crisis Papers died here …   That is the “crisis.” And Marie … Gypsy bohemian. 1920s  had a tea room … That is the “Marie.”

To walk downstairs into this old West Village bar is to step out of time a bit. As an amicable regular might tell you, the room first opened in the 1850s as a prostitutes’ den, became a boy bar by the 1890s, and lasted through Prohibition, when it was known as Marie’s (the “Crisis” came from “The Crisis Papers,” by Thomas Paine, who died in the same house). For the past 35 years, it’s plowed through as a piano joint in which neighboring gay men and musical theater performers gather round the keys nightly and sing solo—numbers like “Stranger in Paradise” or “You’re the Top”—to create a mood of both giddiness and longing.

via Marie’s Crisis Cafe – – West Village – New York Magazine Bar Guide.

There’s a lot of history attached to Marie’s Crisis, a West Village bar named after The Crisis Papers by Thomas Paine, who supposedly died in the same house.  The bar had its beginnings as a brothel in the 1850s, speakeasy-ed its way through Prohibition, and finally found its way to the gays, who have been belting out Les Miserables in the basement ever since.

Best NYC Gay Bars For Straight People.

2.  Northern Dispensary 1827 – Served “worthy poor” .. Most famous worthy poor was Edgar Allen Poe. Free clinic until  1980. … Gay HIV aids were patients.  Lawsuit drove into bankruptcy. It’s been closed 15 years.  Deed restrictive  … so no use.

IMG_5103

According to Terry Miller’s “Greenwich Village and How It Got That Way” (Crown, 1990) the dispensary refused treatment to AIDS patients in 1986 and, after trouble with New York City’s Human Rights Commission, closed in 1989. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York arranged with the trustees to take over the building for an AIDS clinic, but now would like to turn it over to the nonprofit organization, BRC Human Services, for conversion into a 15-room single-room-occupancy structure with a community kitchen for homeless people with AIDS.

via Streetscapes/The Northern Dispensary; Plan to House Homeless With AIDS Stirs a Protest – New York Times.

3.  NW Corner Washington Square Park

 Originally Potter’s field … 10000 + buried. Also, dueling and hangings … Hanging Tree see pic of squirrel.  When Lafayette  did victory tour they  hung 22 people in his honor.
IMG_5104 IMG_5105  IMG_5107

A marsh. A cemetery. A parade ground. A gathering spot for avant-garde artists. A battleground for chess enthusiasts. A playground for canines and children. Washington Square Park has served various roles for its community throughout the years, adapting to meet its needs. Well-known for its arch, honoring George Washington, the man for whom the park is named, and its fountain, the arch’s elder by 43 years and a popular meeting spot, Washington Square Park also houses several other monuments and facilities.

via Washington Square Park : NYC Parks.

4. 1830’s townhouses
IMG_5106
5  1850s NYU .. Now unofficial campus quad …

The center of NYU is its Washington Square campus in the heart of Greenwich Village. One of the city’s most creative and energetic communities, the Village is a historic neighborhood that has attracted generations of writers, musicians, artists, and intellectuals. NYU, in keeping with its founder’s vision, is “in and of the city”: the University – which has no walls and no gates – is deeply intertwined with New York City, drawing inspiration from its vitality.

via About NYU.

6. Washington Square arch 1889 to honor 100th Anniversary of George Washington’s of first  inauguration. The first arch was  temporary. Neighborhood wanted permanent. Recreated first on smaller scale.   Some thought this an affront to poor on south side of park.  It was built anyway in 1895.  Sanford White designed the arch.  And then there is the Beanpot Rebellion … John Sloan “ash can school” was a leader.
 IMG_5110 IMG_5111 IMG_5109

The Arch at Washington Square Park was originally built in wood half a block away from its current location for the Centennial of George Washington’s Presidential inauguration in 1889. It was then commissioned in marble and completed in its current location at Fifth Avenue in the early 1890’s. The community came together to raise funds to build the permanent Washington Square Arch which was designed by noted architect Stanford White. The sculptures which adorn the ‘legs’ of the Arch — Washington At War and Washington at Peace, described in this previous blog entry — were not completed until 1916 and 1918.

Stanford White died in 1906 (he was murdered atop the 2nd version of Madison Square Garden, since demolished, a building he also designed) and did not see the two Washington sculptures completed and adorning the Arch.

Judson Memorial Church, another building White designed, can be seen through the Arch – as White intended.

via The Washington Square Arch: Some Additional History.

IMG_5417 IMG_5418 

Around Washington Square: An Illustrated History of Greenwich Village – Luther S. Harris – Google Books.

One snowy night in January 1917, the painters Marcel Duchamp, John Sloan and four friends climbed the arch in Washington Square, built a bonfire in a bean pot and, firing cap pistols in the air, drunkenly proclaimed Greenwich Village, ”a free and independent republic.”

They had come to Greenwich Village along with an unprecedented number of young artists and writers in rebellion against the strictures of 19th-century small-town Protestant culture. Together they helped put an American face on European modernism and almost every contemporary social movement that galvanized the country, then and later: feminism, socialism, gay liberation, Marxism, Freudianism. Not since Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, Emerson and Thoreau made their homes in Concord, has one location harbored so much American artistic energy

via BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Before It Was Hip to Be Hip, There Was Greenwich Village – New York Times.

7. Washington Mews was originally carriage houses for townhouses on the square. Artist John Sloan lived here as did critic Edmund Wilson …

Edmund Wilson (1895-1972) is widely regarded as the preeminent American man of letters of the twentieth century. Over his long career, he wrote for Vanity Fair, helped edit The New Republic, served as chief book critic for The New Yorker, and was a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books. Wilson was the author of more than twenty books, including Axel’s Castle, Patriotic Gore, and a work of fiction, Memoirs of Hecate County.

via Edmund Wilson | The New York Review of Books.

8. Mabel Dodge‘s home on . 5th avenue … Artist and thinkers came to her salon.  Ex Margaret Sanger   … women described as wearing their hair bobbed and wearing  mannish clothes.  Men wore dinner attire or artsy clothes.
IMG_5115

Mabel Dodge’s bohemian salons in the Village

Greenwich Village in the teens was a forward-thinking place, populated by artists and writers, anarchists and free-love practitioners, labor leaders and birth-control proponents. Bringing them together each week in her apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue was 33-year-old Mabel Dodge.

Was she really interested in new ideas, or just a celebrity hound? It’s hard to say; she simply proclaimed that she “wanted to know everybody.”

In New York, now divorced, Mabel decided to gather the city’s “movers and shakers” together during weekly salons, where ideas could be presented and debated.

Mabel’s salons were legendary. Anarchist Emma Goldman talked to poet Edward Arlington Robinson, while Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger chatted up artist Alfred Stieglitz.

Writer John Reed, who later became her lover, also was a regular. She held nights devoted to  ”dangerous characters,” “sex antagonism,” and “evenings of art and unrest.”

The salons came to and end after a few years. Mabel wrote for various publications and put out her memoirs in the 1930s. By then she was living in Taos, New Mexico, with her fourth husband. She died there in 1962.

via Mabel Dodge’s bohemian salons in the Village « Ephemeral New York.

8. CVS before a famous bar old Cedar Tavern.  It was painter’s bar … ex Jackson Polkack

The famous Cedar Tavern was the number one hangout for New York School artists like Pollock, de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko, and Franz Kline, just to name a few.  They gathered here at least every other night to drink, socialize, and discuss art.  In fact, it is often said that it was here that Abstract Expressionism was born and bred.    The tavern changed locations several times, but in 1945 it moved to 24 University Place, where it experienced its heyday.  Pollock and the like were fond of the Cedar for its cheap drinks (15 cents a beer, to be exact) and unpretentious location on then off-the-beaten-track University Place.

via Jackson Pollock’s Old Stomping Grounds.

Also poets’ bar …

The Scottish poet Ruthven Todd introduced Dylan Thomas to the bar, and the great Welsh bard was soon quaffing oceans of ale in the Horse’s back room. Thomas made the place his headquarters on his tumultuous stateside forays, and soon tourists were lining up eight deep at the bar to watch him carouse. Today a plaque on the wall commemorates the November night in 1953 when the poet, still only 39, downed one last shot, staggered outside and collapsed. After falling into a coma at the nearby Chelsea Hotel, he was whisked to St. Vincent’s Hospital where he died.

Thomas’ boozy soirees inevitably attracted other writers. Novelists Norman Mailer and James Baldwin drank at the White Horse. Vance Bourjaily (his The End of My Life was an influential novel of the period) organized a regular Sunday afternoon writer’s klatch. Anais Nin was one of the few notorious women writers who hung out at the Horse. Seymour Krim, the now all-but-forgotten early Village Voice writer whose collected pieces, Views Of A Near-Sighted Cannoneer, helped spawn the “New Journalism” of the late ’60s, hung out there. Village Voice staffers came over from their original offices on nearby Sheridan Square. Delmore’s publisher, James Laughlin of New Directions, kept an apartment for visiting writers nearby.

While Jack Kerouac was living in a dilapidated Westside townhouse with the model Joan Haverty, writing On The Road on a roll of teletype paper, he used to drink so heavily at the White Horse that he was 86’d a number of times. In his book Desolation Angels he describes discovering “Go Home Kerouac” scrawled on a bathroom wall. Like Delmore, Kerouac also put in time at the Marlton Hotel — where he wrote Tristessa, a bittersweet re

via PBS Hollywood Presents: Collected Stories – On Writing – Greenwich Village.

9.  NYU history … Different mission not religious … Main building built with Sing Sing prison labor … Tradesman fought “Protest with rocks ‘.

More than 175 years ago, Albert Gallatin, the distinguished statesman who served as secretary of the treasury under Presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, declared his intention to establish “in this immense and fast-growing city … a system of rational and practical education fitting for all and graciously opened to all.” Founded in 1831, New York University is now one of the largest private universities in the United States. Of the more than 3,000 colleges and universities in America, New York University is one of only 60 member institutions of the distinguished Association of American Universities.

via About NYU.

10. Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire 1911
IMG_5116

The fire spread quickly — so quickly that in a half hour it was over, having consumed all it could in the large, airy lofts on the 8th, 9th and 10th floors of the Asch Building, a half block east of Washington Square Park.

In its wake, the smoldering floors and wet streets were strewn with 146 bodies, all but 23 of them young women.

The Triangle shirtwaist factory fire, as it is commonly recorded in history books, was one of the nation’s landmark disasters, a tragedy that enveloped the city in grief and remorse but eventually inspired important shifts in the nation’s laws, particularly those protecting the rights of workers and the safety of buildings.

The tragedy galvanized Americans, who were shaken by the stories of Jewish and Italian strivers who had been toiling long hours inside an overcrowded factory only to find themselves trapped in a firestorm inside a building’s top floors where exit doors may have been locked. At least 50 workers concluded that the better option was simply to jump.

Triangle was one of the nation’s largest makers of high-collar blouses that were part of the shirtwaist style, a sensible fusion of tailored shirt and skirt. Designed for utility, the style was embraced at the turn of the century by legions of young women who preferred its hiked hemline and unfettered curves to the confining, street-sweeping dresses that had hobbled their mothers and aunts.

via Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire (1911) – The New York Times.

11.  Edward Hopper  painting of the Judson men church est. 1892 baptist.
12 Site of NYU LAW SCHOOL
Papa dare sky boarding house …
Almost free … Famous  …Eugene I Neil

■ 38 Washington Sq. South (SE corner of Macdougal and Fourth Street) is where Eugene O’Neill lived in a boarding house in 1916, when he was having an affair with Louise Bryant (Mrs. John Reed). The earlier building was replaced by the NYU School of Law’s Vanderbilt Hall in 1951.

via New York City: Walking Tour of Greenwich Village.

Resident wrote poem … 42 Washington Sq

42 Washington Square By John Reed

The gas isn’t all that it should be, It flickers – and yet I declare There’s pleasure or near it, for young men of spirit At Forty-Two Washington Square.

In winter the water is frigid, In summer the water is hot; And we’re forming a club for controlling the tub For there’s hardly one bath to the lot.

You shave in unlathering Croton, If there’s water at all, which is rare– But life isn’t bad for a talented lad At Forty-Two Washington Square.

Nobody questions your morals And nobody asks for the rent- And there’s no one to pry if you’re tight, you and I, Or demand how our evenings are spent.

The furniture’s ancient but plenty, The linen is spotless and fair, 0 life is a joy to a broth of a boy, At Forty-Two Washington Square

13 MacDougal  St.  …Marxist … Folk music (Dylan). I. 1950s  Robert Moses … Park district commissioner made his goal to make the city more car friendly and decided to run a highway right through the park …Jane Jacobs gets fight fighting highway, Eleanor Roosevelt, too. And also the Folk Musicians. Moses banned the musicians from park retreat to Judson Church.  Ban lifted 1963 …
14. Eleanor Roosevelt apartment … Moved because she could not have black friends come through front door.
IMG_5117

After F.D.R. died in 1945, Eleanor stopped writing her nationally syndicated column — for four days. She packed her suitcases and left the White House. Eight months later, President Harry Truman asked her to be a delegate to the U.N.’s first session in London. She accepted — and immediately began to cram. “I knew that as the only woman, I’d better be better than anybody else. So I read every paper,” she said later. “And they were very dull sometimes, because State Department papers can be very dull.”

The delegates elected her to chair the committee drafting a Universal Declaration of Human Rights. She worked 18-hour days and traveled the world. She joined the board of the NAACP, and right-wing newspapers dropped her column because of her views on civil rights.

In 1962, Eleanor, 78, died of tuberculosis in her New York City apartment. She’d stopped writing her column just six weeks before. Her last dispatch contemplated the problems of poverty, education and housing. After more than three decades in public life, she still held out hope.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1906802_1906838_1906798,00.html #ixzz2JKkw4itP

The Relentless Mrs. Roosevelt – The Legacy of F.D.R. – TIME.

15. Jefferson Market Courthouse Library … Famous murder trial … Women’s prison on same block now torn down  Angela Davis _____ and incarcerated there
IMG_5123

It follows the chronology of the Jefferson Market Courthouse and library from 1876 to the present. The 1876 structure is actually the oldest building in NYPL (the Schwarzman Building at 42nd and 5th was begun in 1902).  The archive not only covers the history of this building, but provides glimpses into the history of Greenwich Village as well. The papers and photographs that had been stuffed into a filing cabinet are now preserved in 18 acid-free boxes. If anyone wishes to develop their knowledge of Greenwich Village history, they might want to take a look at this unique collection.

There is so much fascinating history just in this site alone!

Jefferson Market began life as a traditional marketplace. A courthouse was erected on the site in 1876. The courthouse received a lot of attention in 1906 when it was used for the Harry K. Thaw / Stanford White murder trial. Later, the women’s house of detention, situated where the garden is now, achieved a certain degree of notoriety.

We have a print of the old market stalls adjacent to the wooden fire tower that perversely burned down; copies of the hand-drawn pen and ink courthouse floor plans; a print of a painting by John Sloan, owned by The Whitney, that shows Jefferson Market in the shadow of the El train that ran up 6th Avenue.

via The Jefferson Market Courthouse/Library Archive: A Sneak Peek with Barbara Knowles-Pinches | The New York Public Library.

16. Stonewall club riot.
IMG_5122

Just after 3 a.m., a police raid of the Stonewall Inn–a gay club located on New York City’s Christopher Street–turns violent as patrons and local sympathizers begin rioting against the police.

Although the police were legally justified in raiding the club, which was serving liquor without a license among other violations, New York’s gay community had grown weary of the police department targeting gay clubs, a majority of which had already been closed. The crowd on the street watched quietly as Stonewall’s employees were arrested, but when three drag queens and a lesbian were forced into the paddy wagon, the crowd began throwing bottles at the police. The officers were forced to take shelter inside the establishment, and two policemen were slightly injured before reinforcements arrived to disperse the mob. The protest, however, spilled over into the neighboring streets, and order was not restored until the deployment of New York’s riot police.

The so-called Stonewall Riot was followed by several days of demonstrations in New York and was the impetus for the formation of the Gay Liberation Front as well as other gay, lesbian, and bisexual civil rights organizations. It is also regarded by many as history’s first major protest on behalf of equal rights for homosexuals.

via The Stonewall Riot — History.com This Day in History — 6/28/1969.

And President Obama even referenced the Stonewall Inn Riots in his Second Inaugural Speech, January 21. 2013

But Obama’s reference was very likely lost on many in the generations that have come of age long after gay men resisted police harassment at the Stonewall Inn gay bar in New York City.

Their five days of riots in the summer of 1969 kindled the nation’s gay-rights movement, which Obama placed in the heart of the nation’s civil rights struggles in Monday’s speech. Obama said:

“We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths — that all of us are created equal — is the star that guides us still, just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great Mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone, to hear a King proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on Earth.”

So, what was Stonewall?

To get the story from someone who was part of the nascent gay-rights effort, and who has written extensively about Stonewall’s role as the galvanizing event of the movement, we turned to Martin Duberman.

via Stonewall? Explaining Obama’s Historic Gay-Rights Reference : It’s All Politics : NPR.

All  in all a very good tour … Thanks, Big Onion!

NYC, dinner, El Quinto Pino : At the recommendation of my tour guide,I tried a tapas restaurant in Chelsa … All by my lonesome … John’s doing the big beef meal at Del Frisco .., tapas for me at El Quinto Pino … Wish me luck … . Tiny little place in Chelsea  … And my blast from the past friend dropped by before we meet tomorrow … Thanks CW … great recommendation!

IMG_5144

IMG_5145 
IMG_5140 IMG_5141
IMG_5142

Tapas

Salmorejo: Gazpacho’s “thicker cousin,” chopped egg, taquitos of Spanish ham • 9

Tortilla de Gambas: Shrimp wafers • 5

Habitas con Jamón: Favas beans, serrano ham • 8 Pinchos Morunos: Marinated Lamb skewer • 8

via El Quinto Pino.

NYC, subway:  Just what i saw today …

IMG_5139 IMG_5138

IMG_5136

IMG_5134

IMG_5133

Paris, bonne anniversaire, la Tour Eiffel:

Jour anniversaire, le 28 janvier 1887 débutait la construction de la Tour Eiffel !

Photo: Un jour, une photo. Aujourd’hui ©Katty Domingos / http://on.fb.me/VrmKtw . Pour proposer à votre tour une photo, rendez-vous sur Paris à l'Oeil Ouvert</p> <p>Jour anniversaire, le 28 janvier 1887 débutait la construction de la Tour Eiffel !

via (1) PARIS.

11
Jan
13

1.11.13 … Say what you will about the south … :)

The South:

Photo: I think the sign says it all.

via WUSY US-101

labyrinth walks:

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking.

Well it is 10:15 AM and it is 65° outside. That is way too warm for January. But it makes for very nice “walking and solving”.

Thoughts…

Wearing summer shoes 😦

Long conversation with fellow Davidson grad Carl McPhail who I had never met. We chatted about Davidson and labyrinths etc.

A very nice walk … — at Myers Park Baptist Church on 1.10.13

UNC-CH, AP classes, college admissions:  More  may not be better … Study finds that more AP classes may not be better – University Gazette.

Sliding Doors, movies I own, quotes: “Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition” … james quoting Monty Python in Sliding Doors (1998) – IMDb.

 pop culture, board games, Monopoly, change:

I am partial to the top hat and the dog …

CS Lewis, quotes:

Photo: "Hardship often prepares an ordinary person for an extraordinary destiny."- CS Lewis<br /><br />  post by team Ziglar www.Ziglar.com

via Zig Ziglar.

Steven Colbert, LOL:  He is just so funny … Watch The Colbert Report: Obama’s Failed Second Term online | Free | Hulu.

President Obama is turning out the way white males wanted him to, and Jack Lew’s sloppy signature will make America’s currency a laughingstock.

via Watch The Colbert Report: Obama’s Failed Second Term online | Free | Hulu.

The Barnes Collection, Phladelphia, bucket list:  On my bucket list … Higher now that I’ve seen this PBS special … About | The Barnes Collection | WHYY.

SouthPark – Charlotte,  Victorias Secret, crime:  50 bras … where did she stuff … stash … them?

 employee reported to police that a woman stole 50 assorted bras off a display table near the front of the store sometime between noon and 2:30 Thursday afternoon.

via Police: Thief snags 50 bras from SouthPark Victorias Secret | CharlotteObserver.com.

Wilmette IL, winter: Family builds coolest house in town.  🙂

For your real estate viewing pleasure: building with second floor patio balcony, architecturally daring circular indoor ramp and stunning central great-room in fashionable east Wilmette.

via Family builds coolest house in town – Wilmette Life.

Davidson College, kudzu, goats:  They’re back!

The cure for kudzu? It may be the common goat. Thirty of the persistent ruminants spent time on campus this summer, the latest weapon in davidson’s eff orts to curtail a 3.5-acre stand of kudzu on the cross-country trails. The initiative—completely sustainable!—was the brainchild of Rebecca mckee ’14, who suggested the college adopt “goatscaping” after seeing it work at her high school. kudzu is notoriously pernicious; introduced in the 19th century as an ornamental plant, it can grow up to a foot per day. But the goats’ eff orts were not for naught—in fact, their chomping was so eff ective that the animals were brought back this fall, to attack the kudzu that has re-sprouted since their departure. The hope is that by munching the weed down to the ground before winter, the goats will get closer to the root of the (kudzu) matter, perhaps eradicating the evil vine for good.

.

via Scene and Herd | davidsonjournal

2013 Academy Award Nominations, movies: I have not seen a single one of these … I now have a list! I’ll let you know what i think.

Best motion picture of the year

“Amour” Nominees to be determined

“Argo” Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck and George Clooney, Producers

“Beasts of the Southern Wild” Dan Janvey, Josh Penn and Michael Gottwald, Producers

“Django Unchained” Stacey Sher, Reginald Hudlin and Pilar Savone, Producers

“Les Misérables” Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward and Cameron Mackintosh, Producers

“Life of Pi” Gil Netter, Ang Lee and David Womark, Producers

“Lincoln” Steven Spielberg and Kathleen Kennedy, Producers

“Silver Linings Playbook” Donna Gigliotti, Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon, Producers

“Zero Dark Thirty” Mark Boal, Kathryn Bigelow and Megan Ellison, Producers

via 2013 Academy Award Nominations Are Announced (Full List) – Speakeasy – WSJ.

Dr. Eben Alexander, Proof of Heaven, bookshelf:  I read Dr, Alexander’s book and really enjoyed and would recommend it.

7. Kathy Maloney- Urich: As a Neurosurgeon, if a person is on life support with no brain activity, not breathing on their own, do you believe they are already in heaven?

Yes, the spirit often has left the body before bodily death. In all of my talks with doctors, nurses and families, I urge them to say and act knowing that the spirit of the beloved is potentially aware and present, no matter what the state of the body. They may still be in transit to heaven at that point, but their spirit/soul is freed up, and well.

via Dr. Eben Alexander Answers Your Questions! – Katie Couric.

09
Jan
13

1.9.13 first walk …

labyrinths, walking, notes from the path:

“Solvitur Ambulando”

– It is solved by walking.

I’m feeling a little guilty since I have not walked since December 31. I think I may have broken a New Year’s resolution.

As I left my house, I was thinking what an ugly day for my first walk. But by the time I reached Avondale Presbyterian Church, the sun was out, and I am so glad I came because it is now a beautiful winter day.

Thoughts as I walked:

Labyrinth keepers have been hard at work on the labyrinth and it is in great shape today. A few weeds are here, but they are part of the labyrinth today.

Chimes are singing softly and they become a part of my walk. As I walk out, i make the decision to pause when the chimes paused, and to pace myself to the chimes as well. I begin thinking what a wonderful site it would be to see classical ballerinas dancing to some Gregorian chants on a labyrinth. It would be really beautiful ballet.

I am tired today. My husband has a new addiction. It is the tv show and related books of Dexter. Dexter is a serial killer. I am wondering why we can all sit there and watch this. It has a transformative effect.

The bright sunshine is blinding. If it were 15° colder it would be a perfect winter day. Unfortunately it is about 70°. Amazing.

Do you like my new boots? Perfect for labyrinth walking in the winter!

Blessings to you!

bicentennials, anniversaries, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, bookshelf:  Just so you know … 19 days ’til the bicentenary of PRIDE AND PREJUDICE! What shall I read this month. 🙂

youtube, LOL:  how to stay positive …

[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qR3rK0kZFkg]

winter, vacations, bucket list:  Oddly, just about every place on this list is already on my bucket list. 🙂

And so,with 2013 just beginning, I got to thinking of my favorite places to spend a winter week

via Where to Spend a Week This Winter – Intelligent Travel.

Gretchen Rubin, Steve Martin,  G. K. Chesterton, quotes, memoirs, bookshelf:

Last week, I read Steve Martin’s memoir of his time learning and doing stand-up comedy, Born Standing Up: A Comic’s Life. I loved it.

It’s a terrific example of one of my favorite kinds of books: someone coming into his or her vocation. I love reading about why people become interested in particular subjects or skills, and how they master them.

Reading Steve Martin’s memoir reminded me of one of my favorite quotations, from G. K. Chesterton: “It is easy to be heavy: hard to be light.” Although Steve Martin’s comedy looks wild and crazy, it’s the product of a tremendous amount of serious thought, rehearsal, and experiment.

via What I Learned About Myself from Steve Martin. « The Happiness Project.

Congress,  polls: colonoscopy?

In a poll released Tuesday, Public Policy Polling found that Americans have a higher opinion of traffic jams (56%-34%), colonoscopies (58%-31%) and cockroaches (45%-43%) than Congress. Ditto for love-‘em or hate-‘em band Nickelback (39%-32%), used-car salesmen (57%-32%), root canals (56%-32%) and NFL replacement refs (56%-29%).

via Poll Finds Congress Ranks Lower Than Colonoscopy – Washington Wire – WSJ.

technology, the future: The Jetsons!

The PAL-V ONE, which looks like a cross between a three-wheeler and a helicopter, uses a rear-mounted propeller to take off and a free-spinning rotor on top for lift. Made by PAL-V in the Netherlands, it needs about 200 meters to take off and costs nearly $300,000. If the price comes down and a reasonable way can be found to keep skyborne vehicles separated, we may at last see a world that is somewhat akin to the one depicted in the futuristic cartoon.

via A Land-Air Hybrid Vehicle: Commute to Work Like The Jetsons [Video]: Scientific American.




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 627 other followers

September 2018
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30