Posts Tagged ‘Myers Park Baptist Church – Charlotte NC

03
Apr
20

4.3.20 … “And this is it. This is the life we get here on earth. We get to give away what we receive. We get to believe in each other. We get to forgive and be forgiven. We get to love imperfectly. And we never know what effect it will have for years to come. And all of it … all of it is completely worth it.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (38/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Myers Park Baptist Church – Charlotte NC:

It was beautiful today in Charlotte. I walked around 4 PM and jump from one phone call to the next as I walked. Sometimes it’s OK to let the outside world interfere. I talked with my good friend Allison, and I talked with my daughter Molly.

So, I probably didn’t notice as much as I normally do. No birds, no debris, no noises, no flowers …

“And this is it. This is the life we get here on earth. We get to give away what we receive. We get to believe in each other. We get to forgive and be forgiven. We get to love imperfectly. And we never know what effect it will have for years to come. And all of it … all of it is completely worth it.”

-Accidental Saints: Finding God in All the Wrong People

By Nadia Bolz-Weber

4.3.20

2020 Lenten Lists-

Unpopular Opinion Game!

Name things I DONT like that most people do in no particular order.

1. sweet tea

30
Mar
20

3.30.20 … “Many people seem to think it foolish, even superstitious, to believe that the world could still change for the better. And it is true that in winter it is sometimes so bitingly cold that one is tempted to say, “What do I care if there is a summer; its warmth is no help to me now.” Yes, evil often seems to surpass good by far. But then, in spite of us, and without our permission, there comes at last an end to the bitter frosts. One morning the wind turns, and there is a thaw. And so I still have hope.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (35/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Myers Park Baptist Church – Charlotte NC:

By the time I walked, it was almost 7 PM, and it was much cooler today. I don’t think the high hit 80 today.

On my drive to MPBC, they were significantly fewer cars than at this time normally, but I saw multiple UPS trucks out delivering. I would assume there is a significant increase. There were lots of children out riding bicycles and families walking as has been seen multiple times the last few days.

With all this human activity, my walks are now much more interspersed with human connection even though no one is close to me. I see and hear their voices, their laughter, their footsteps as they run and jog. That is very interesting to me and seems good and healthy. I hope we do learn some lessons from this.

The first thing I noticed when I got out of my car was a woodpecker and then I heard a car backfire.. The labyrinth was a little dirty today. There was pollen, sticks and other debris.

I realized as I approach the center that maybe the reason that the walking in seems to so much quicker than the walking out is that I am dictating and “releasing” … On the way out I am much more focused on the path and what I am going to gain or learn before returning to real time.

I finished up my walk today by walking the perimeter. I have mentioned before that sometimes I walk the perimeter in the beginning when I walk it counterclockwise to shut down chronos time, and then, at the end, I walk clockwise to re-entering chronos time.

Today is Van Gogh’s birthday …

Vincent van Gogh

“Many people seem to think it foolish, even superstitious, to believe that the world could still change for the better. And it is true that in winter it is sometimes so bitingly cold that one is tempted to say, “What do I care if there is a summer; its warmth is no help to me now.” Yes, evil often seems to surpass good by far. But then, in spite of us, and without our permission, there comes at last an end to the bitter frosts. One morning the wind turns, and there is a thaw. And so I still have hope.”

Source: The Letters of Vincent Van Gogh

3.30.20

2020 Lenten Lists-

Some of the Benefits of Walking a Labyrinth:

1. Beneficial in reducing stress.

2. Helps quiet the mind.

3. Opens the heart.

4. Promotes the interaction of the mind, body and spirit.

5. Fosters creativity.

6. It is a walking meditation.

7. Promotes Wellness.

8. Increases self awareness.

9. Spiritual Growth.

10. Labyrinths are a right and left brained activity.

Source: https://www.monroecc.edu/ArchAnnou.nsf/Attachments/17EB75C995AC01BF05257B0100696A15/$FILE/A%20Brief%20History%20of%20Labyrinths.pdf

22
Mar
20

3.22.20 … ““Have patience with everything that remains unsolved in your heart. … live in the question.” ~Rainer Maria Rilke

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (24/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Myers Park Baptist Church- Charlotte NC, kith/kin:

I woke up very early, and I thought to myself, I feel lonely. I’m rarely lonely, but today is my son Edward’s birthday, his 28th. He is in Denver and is pretty much self isolating. He was supposed to be here, but decided it was really not a good idea to fly. So instead, he’s by himself. And I’m not with him. I like to be with my family for birthdays and holidays. So yes, I feel lonely. I hope he is not lonely.

“Have patience with everything that remains unsolved in your heart. … live in the question.”

~Rainer Maria Rilke

Some of the best things about spring in the southeast are the glorious colors, and they come early. I was driving through Foxcroft this morning and the pinks and whites were just gorgeous today.

I decided that I would get up early and go walk before total closings prevent my walks. I don’t think I can argue that they are essential.

I arrived at Myers Park Baptist and a gust of wind nearly yank the door out of my hand. It was 52°, but it felt like it’s about 40° with the wind. This will be a quick walk.

It was very gray. I did hear multiple bird calls. I’m pretty sure one was a robin and another an owl. The rosemary here was beginning to bloom, much l later than that down in Gastonia last week.

When I got in my car this morning it was covered in pollen, and although though it was clear that someone had recently been blowing, the yellow pollen from the area was not be easily removed…

And I liked this Donna Ashworth poem …

Source: History Will Remember When The World Stopped – Ladies – Pass it on, https://ladiespassiton.com/2020/03/18/history-will-remember-when-the-world-stopped/

And today is the 28th birthday of my son Edward. He is kind, so no need for him to be kinder than before…

3.22.20

25
Jun
19

6.25.19 … “Whatever is going on in God is a flow-it’s like a dance. But God is not a dancer-He is the dance itself. That idea might sound novel, but it is about as traditional as you can get. God is the dance itself, and He invites you to be a part of that dance. Are you ready to join in?”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

As a matter of practice, I usually do not take a selection of readings with me to my labyrinth walks. But in the last six weeks, I have found it comforting just to sit a few minutes with a book or an article and read before I walk.

Today I’m finishing “ Moonlight Over Paris” This is by Jennifer Robson, the same author that wrote “The Gown.” As with The Gown, I enjoyed the history and the quality of the writing, but the story itself was very predictable.

I found several quotes in this book interesting…

In Robson’s description of 1925 New York City, “The city felt so new, and not just new compared to London or Paris, but brand-new, so new its paint hadn’t yet dried, and newest of all, to her mind, were the skyscrapers. With the exception of the Eiffel Tower with the spires of the various cathedrals, she was fairly certain she never before seen a structure that rose beyond eight or nine stories – but already they’d driven past dozens of buildings that reached ten, twenty, even thirty stories high.“ (p.307) And I thought to myself that New York City still seems that way compared to any European or North American City.

And page 130 discussed first time painting with oils, something my sister is undertaking for the first time … “She assumed she would have a natural flair for painting in oils. She could not have been more wrong. …”

But early on I saw this in the book, p. 121, … “Most of us spend our whole lives with our heads down, walking in circles. It never occurs to us to want anything more, so we cling to what’s safe. What we know.”

There was lots of debris on my path today. We have had several wicked storms, one Saturday night that cut power at our house for four hours, but a woman in the grocery store yesterday asked me how long she could keep her eggs because she had lost power for 26 hours from that same storm. We again had another wicked storm last night. It is almost like we can’t recover. Today the winds are picking up again in late evening and I wonder if we’ll have another wicked storm.

After I walked, I planned to look over at the the Friendship Garden in the corner. I have noticed this garden in previous years, but never have I noticed the plants so tall above the fence. I truly love this concept of urban gardens and sharing with those who live in the food deserts of the modern city.

Every so often I get off the path. Usually it is that I am thinking of other things. I am not sure what distracted me today… But I was off at a very early juncture. But I corrected myself and was walking on the path again.

It was not too hot, but I am definitely overdressed. I have my uniform on, Khaki pants and a black T-shirt (I own sleeveless, short sleeve, elbow length sleeve and long sleeve ones) and a scarf. Today out of laziness I chose a mid length sleeve. And it is too much.

The natural areas around the labyrinth were littered with debris from the recent storms; the hydrangeas were suffering from the heat; the rosemary had gone wild; and the clover in the grassy areas was equally wild …

As noted before, I still love the corner lighting which is in complete contrast to the strict pattern of the labyrinth. I like the humor.

I have never been a dancer, but for 20 minutes when I walk the labyrinth I experience several things which honestly I never really expected to experience: one is meditation or contemplation, and the other is a sense of dance. The labyrinth path takes me on a very short dance. I was never one to follow a man’s lead, but I can follow the lead of the path. Dance with me?

Which brings me to another thought, which combines several ideas here… That is Richard Rohr’s The Divine Dance. The meditative contemplative walks. that I take on the labyrinth, the dance that I take it as I move through the Labyrinth is for me to dance with God.

“Early Christians who came to be known as the ‘Desert Mothers and Fathers’ applied the Greek verb perichoresis to the mystery of the Trinity. The best translation of this odd-sounding word is dancing. Our word choreography comes from the same root.Although these early Christians gave us some highly conceptualized thinking on the life of the Trinity, the best they could say, again and again, was, Whatever is going on in God is a flow-it’s like a dance. But God is not a dancer-He is the dance itself. That idea might sound novel, but it is about as traditional as you can get. God is the dance itself, and He invites you to be a part of that dance. Are you ready to join in?”

Source: Episode 58 – Mike Morrell- The Divine Dance,

https://crackersandgrapejuice.com/episode-58-mike-morrell-the-divine-dance/

6.25.19

25
Jun
19

6.25.19 … “Whatever is going on in God is a flow-it’s like a dance. But God is not a dancer-He is the dance itself. That idea might sound novel, but it is about as traditional as you can get. God is the dance itself, and He invites you to be a part of that dance. Are you ready to join in?”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

As a matter of practice, I usually do not take a selection of readings with me to my labyrinth walks. But in the last six weeks, I have found it comforting just to sit a few minutes with a book or an article and read before I walk.

Today I’m finishing “ Moonlight Over Paris” This is by Jennifer Robson, the same author that wrote “The Gown.” As with The Gown, I enjoyed the history and the quality of the writing, but the story itself was very predictable.

I found several quotes in this book interesting…

In Robson’s description of 1925 New York City, “The city felt so new, and not just new compared to London or Paris, but brand-new, so new its paint hadn’t yet dried, and newest of all, to her mind, were the skyscrapers. With the exception of the Eiffel Tower with the spires of the various cathedrals, she was fairly certain she never before seen a structure that rose beyond eight or nine stories – but already they’d driven past dozens of buildings that reached ten, twenty, even thirty stories high.“ (p.307) And I thought to myself that New York City still seems that way compared to any European or North American City.

And page 130 discussed first time painting with oils, something my sister is undertaking for the first time … “She assumed she would have a natural flair for painting in oils. She could not have been more wrong. …”

But early on I saw this in the book, p. 121, … “Most of us spend our whole lives with our heads down, walking in circles. It never occurs to us to want anything more, so we cling to what’s safe. What we know.”

There was lots of debris on my path today. We have had several wicked storms, one Saturday night that cut power at our house for four hours, but a woman in the grocery store yesterday asked me how long she could keep her eggs because she had lost power for 26 hours from that same storm. We again had another wicked storm last night. It is almost like we can’t recover. Today the winds are picking up again in late evening and I wonder if we’ll have another wicked storm.

After I walked, I planned to look over at the the Friendship Garden in the corner. I have noticed this garden in previous years, but never have I noticed the plants so tall above the fence. I truly love this concept of urban gardens and sharing with those who live in the food deserts of the modern city.

Every so often I get off the path. Usually it is that I am thinking of other things. I am not sure what distracted me today… But I was off at a very early juncture. But I corrected myself and was walking on the path again.

It was not too hot, but I am definitely overdressed. I have my uniform on, Khaki pants and a black T-shirt (I own sleeveless, short sleeve, elbow length sleeve and long sleeve ones) and a scarf. Today out of laziness I chose a mid length sleeve. And it is too much.

The natural areas around the labyrinth were littered with debris from the recent storms; the hydrangeas were suffering from the heat; the rosemary had gone wild; and the clover in the grassy areas was equally wild …

As noted before, I still love the corner lighting which is in complete contrast to the strict pattern of the labyrinth. I like the humor.

I have never been a dancer, but for 20 minutes when I walk the labyrinth I experience several things which honestly I never really expected to experience: one is meditation or contemplation, and the other is a sense of dance. The labyrinth path takes me on a very short dance. I was never one to follow a man’s lead, but I can follow the lead of the path. Dance with me?

Which brings me to another thought, which combines several ideas here… That is Richard Rohr’s The Divine Dance. The meditative contemplative walks. that I take on the labyrinth, the dance that I take it as I move through the Labyrinth is for me to dance with God.

“Early Christians who came to be known as the ‘Desert Mothers and Fathers’ applied the Greek verb perichoresis to the mystery of the Trinity. The best translation of this odd-sounding word is dancing. Our word choreography comes from the same root.Although these early Christians gave us some highly conceptualized thinking on the life of the Trinity, the best they could say, again and again, was, Whatever is going on in God is a flow-it’s like a dance. But God is not a dancer-He is the dance itself. That idea might sound novel, but it is about as traditional as you can get. God is the dance itself, and He invites you to be a part of that dance. Are you ready to join in?”

Source: Episode 58 – Mike Morrell- The Divine Dance,

https://crackersandgrapejuice.com/episode-58-mike-morrell-the-divine-dance/

6.25.19

15
May
19

5.15.19 … “Not only is the Universe stranger than we think, but it is also stranger than we can think.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

Sometimes I just need labyrinth time with a labyrinth friend. Thank you, Toni!

As we drove to and from MPBC, we talked about multiple intelligences, reading, Jonathan Haidt, technology overload, TMBS, Barbara Brown Taylor’s Holy Envy, and of course labyrinths …

As we approached we noticed children on the labyrinth. One almost 4 year old was riding in circles on the labyrinth.

The day was glorious. The sky was blue with whispy clouds. The weather was cool and the bright green leaves provided almost complete shade to the labyrinth. The birds were chattering. And there was a large colony of tiny ants crawling out from the center Chartres stone.

My reverie was broken by the roar of the chainsaw in the distance.

My thoughts kept focusing on the tall oaks. I wondered how water can travel up from the roots to the trees’ top leaves.

I then I watched a very pregnant mom walk by with two little ones in her stroller, talking on her phone through ear buds. I wondered if she ever allowed herself quiet time.

I heard several planes overhead and noticed their tail in the sky.

And then both Toni and I noticed the honking birds flying above … there were 4 of them flying in what appeared to be synchronized routine … then they cawed, definitely crows.

And here is my quote for today …

“Not only is the Universe stranger than we think, but it is also stranger than we can think… What we observe is not nature itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning… The first gulp from the glass of natural sciences will turn you into an atheist, but at the bottom of the glass God is waiting for you.”

~Werner Heisenberg (father of the uncertainty principle & quantum mechanics)

5.15.19

18
Apr
19

4.18.19 … “Do this in remembrance of me.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (39/40), Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

Today is Maundy Thursday. I never heard the term “Maundy Thursday” until I was dating my husband John in college. He grew up in a traditional Presbyterian Church in Louisville KY, and he knew the term. I grew up in a traditional Presbyterian Church in Atlanta GA and I did not; the term had never been a part of my church vocabulary. Yes, I knew the general story of holy week, but the term “maundy” had never entered my consciousness.

So what does it mean? “Maundy” is an Anglo-French word derived from the Latin “mandatum,” which means “commandment,” and refers to when Jesus, in the Upper Room during the Last Super, said to the disciples: “A new commandment I give you, that you love one another; even as I have loved you, that you also love one another.” (John 13:34). Others say the mandate was the Lord’s Supper: “Do this in remembrance of me.”

I love James Howell’s post today about the group of African Christians who followed him into the “upper room” in Jerusalem last week. They came in joyously singing. Last year James noted in his Maundy Thursday post that Matthew 26:30 tells us that, at the Last Supper on Maundy Thursday, the disciples sang hymns together. I had never thought about the disciples singing the Psalms that evening until I put the two posts together this morning.

So what do I believe Jesus commanded me to do on Maundy Thursday?

1. Love my neighbor

2. Participate in community … take care of each other, wash feet.

3. Eat together and share the food, the bread and the wine, and the experience.

4. Participate in holy communion and “Do this in remembrance of me”

5. Live joyously

Whatever the mandate, let’s do it … with solemnity, joy, sorrow and hope.

I decided on a morning walk today. The sun was streaming, and it was amazing how green everything has become. In the last week to 10 days, all the trees have leafed out and it is glorious.

The lower half of the labyrinth was in shade this morning and the other half in full sun. Although I heard construction and lawn crews working in the distance, they were not on this campus yet. I am sure they will be scurrying about blowing and raking and mowing later today. With all the rain we have had, I was amazed that the pollen had not been washed away. There was lots of pollen and a light coating of yellow on the labyrinth.

As I finished my walk, a light breeze passed by me, over me, through me. It was a spirit moment.

Be still …

4.18.19

And I just saw this …




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