Posts Tagged ‘Myers Park Baptist Church – Charlotte NC

25
Jun
19

6.25.19 … “Whatever is going on in God is a flow-it’s like a dance. But God is not a dancer-He is the dance itself. That idea might sound novel, but it is about as traditional as you can get. God is the dance itself, and He invites you to be a part of that dance. Are you ready to join in?”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

As a matter of practice, I usually do not take a selection of readings with me to my labyrinth walks. But in the last six weeks, I have found it comforting just to sit a few minutes with a book or an article and read before I walk.

Today I’m finishing “ Moonlight Over Paris” This is by Jennifer Robson, the same author that wrote “The Gown.” As with The Gown, I enjoyed the history and the quality of the writing, but the story itself was very predictable.

I found several quotes in this book interesting…

In Robson’s description of 1925 New York City, “The city felt so new, and not just new compared to London or Paris, but brand-new, so new its paint hadn’t yet dried, and newest of all, to her mind, were the skyscrapers. With the exception of the Eiffel Tower with the spires of the various cathedrals, she was fairly certain she never before seen a structure that rose beyond eight or nine stories – but already they’d driven past dozens of buildings that reached ten, twenty, even thirty stories high.“ (p.307) And I thought to myself that New York City still seems that way compared to any European or North American City.

And page 130 discussed first time painting with oils, something my sister is undertaking for the first time … “She assumed she would have a natural flair for painting in oils. She could not have been more wrong. …”

But early on I saw this in the book, p. 121, … “Most of us spend our whole lives with our heads down, walking in circles. It never occurs to us to want anything more, so we cling to what’s safe. What we know.”

There was lots of debris on my path today. We have had several wicked storms, one Saturday night that cut power at our house for four hours, but a woman in the grocery store yesterday asked me how long she could keep her eggs because she had lost power for 26 hours from that same storm. We again had another wicked storm last night. It is almost like we can’t recover. Today the winds are picking up again in late evening and I wonder if we’ll have another wicked storm.

After I walked, I planned to look over at the the Friendship Garden in the corner. I have noticed this garden in previous years, but never have I noticed the plants so tall above the fence. I truly love this concept of urban gardens and sharing with those who live in the food deserts of the modern city.

Every so often I get off the path. Usually it is that I am thinking of other things. I am not sure what distracted me today… But I was off at a very early juncture. But I corrected myself and was walking on the path again.

It was not too hot, but I am definitely overdressed. I have my uniform on, Khaki pants and a black T-shirt (I own sleeveless, short sleeve, elbow length sleeve and long sleeve ones) and a scarf. Today out of laziness I chose a mid length sleeve. And it is too much.

The natural areas around the labyrinth were littered with debris from the recent storms; the hydrangeas were suffering from the heat; the rosemary had gone wild; and the clover in the grassy areas was equally wild …

As noted before, I still love the corner lighting which is in complete contrast to the strict pattern of the labyrinth. I like the humor.

I have never been a dancer, but for 20 minutes when I walk the labyrinth I experience several things which honestly I never really expected to experience: one is meditation or contemplation, and the other is a sense of dance. The labyrinth path takes me on a very short dance. I was never one to follow a man’s lead, but I can follow the lead of the path. Dance with me?

Which brings me to another thought, which combines several ideas here… That is Richard Rohr’s The Divine Dance. The meditative contemplative walks. that I take on the labyrinth, the dance that I take it as I move through the Labyrinth is for me to dance with God.

“Early Christians who came to be known as the ‘Desert Mothers and Fathers’ applied the Greek verb perichoresis to the mystery of the Trinity. The best translation of this odd-sounding word is dancing. Our word choreography comes from the same root.Although these early Christians gave us some highly conceptualized thinking on the life of the Trinity, the best they could say, again and again, was, Whatever is going on in God is a flow-it’s like a dance. But God is not a dancer-He is the dance itself. That idea might sound novel, but it is about as traditional as you can get. God is the dance itself, and He invites you to be a part of that dance. Are you ready to join in?”

Source: Episode 58 – Mike Morrell- The Divine Dance,

https://crackersandgrapejuice.com/episode-58-mike-morrell-the-divine-dance/

6.25.19

25
Jun
19

6.25.19 … “Whatever is going on in God is a flow-it’s like a dance. But God is not a dancer-He is the dance itself. That idea might sound novel, but it is about as traditional as you can get. God is the dance itself, and He invites you to be a part of that dance. Are you ready to join in?”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

As a matter of practice, I usually do not take a selection of readings with me to my labyrinth walks. But in the last six weeks, I have found it comforting just to sit a few minutes with a book or an article and read before I walk.

Today I’m finishing “ Moonlight Over Paris” This is by Jennifer Robson, the same author that wrote “The Gown.” As with The Gown, I enjoyed the history and the quality of the writing, but the story itself was very predictable.

I found several quotes in this book interesting…

In Robson’s description of 1925 New York City, “The city felt so new, and not just new compared to London or Paris, but brand-new, so new its paint hadn’t yet dried, and newest of all, to her mind, were the skyscrapers. With the exception of the Eiffel Tower with the spires of the various cathedrals, she was fairly certain she never before seen a structure that rose beyond eight or nine stories – but already they’d driven past dozens of buildings that reached ten, twenty, even thirty stories high.“ (p.307) And I thought to myself that New York City still seems that way compared to any European or North American City.

And page 130 discussed first time painting with oils, something my sister is undertaking for the first time … “She assumed she would have a natural flair for painting in oils. She could not have been more wrong. …”

But early on I saw this in the book, p. 121, … “Most of us spend our whole lives with our heads down, walking in circles. It never occurs to us to want anything more, so we cling to what’s safe. What we know.”

There was lots of debris on my path today. We have had several wicked storms, one Saturday night that cut power at our house for four hours, but a woman in the grocery store yesterday asked me how long she could keep her eggs because she had lost power for 26 hours from that same storm. We again had another wicked storm last night. It is almost like we can’t recover. Today the winds are picking up again in late evening and I wonder if we’ll have another wicked storm.

After I walked, I planned to look over at the the Friendship Garden in the corner. I have noticed this garden in previous years, but never have I noticed the plants so tall above the fence. I truly love this concept of urban gardens and sharing with those who live in the food deserts of the modern city.

Every so often I get off the path. Usually it is that I am thinking of other things. I am not sure what distracted me today… But I was off at a very early juncture. But I corrected myself and was walking on the path again.

It was not too hot, but I am definitely overdressed. I have my uniform on, Khaki pants and a black T-shirt (I own sleeveless, short sleeve, elbow length sleeve and long sleeve ones) and a scarf. Today out of laziness I chose a mid length sleeve. And it is too much.

The natural areas around the labyrinth were littered with debris from the recent storms; the hydrangeas were suffering from the heat; the rosemary had gone wild; and the clover in the grassy areas was equally wild …

As noted before, I still love the corner lighting which is in complete contrast to the strict pattern of the labyrinth. I like the humor.

I have never been a dancer, but for 20 minutes when I walk the labyrinth I experience several things which honestly I never really expected to experience: one is meditation or contemplation, and the other is a sense of dance. The labyrinth path takes me on a very short dance. I was never one to follow a man’s lead, but I can follow the lead of the path. Dance with me?

Which brings me to another thought, which combines several ideas here… That is Richard Rohr’s The Divine Dance. The meditative contemplative walks. that I take on the labyrinth, the dance that I take it as I move through the Labyrinth is for me to dance with God.

“Early Christians who came to be known as the ‘Desert Mothers and Fathers’ applied the Greek verb perichoresis to the mystery of the Trinity. The best translation of this odd-sounding word is dancing. Our word choreography comes from the same root.Although these early Christians gave us some highly conceptualized thinking on the life of the Trinity, the best they could say, again and again, was, Whatever is going on in God is a flow-it’s like a dance. But God is not a dancer-He is the dance itself. That idea might sound novel, but it is about as traditional as you can get. God is the dance itself, and He invites you to be a part of that dance. Are you ready to join in?”

Source: Episode 58 – Mike Morrell- The Divine Dance,

https://crackersandgrapejuice.com/episode-58-mike-morrell-the-divine-dance/

6.25.19

15
May
19

5.15.19 … “Not only is the Universe stranger than we think, but it is also stranger than we can think.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

Sometimes I just need labyrinth time with a labyrinth friend. Thank you, Toni!

As we drove to and from MPBC, we talked about multiple intelligences, reading, Jonathan Haidt, technology overload, TMBS, Barbara Brown Taylor’s Holy Envy, and of course labyrinths …

As we approached we noticed children on the labyrinth. One almost 4 year old was riding in circles on the labyrinth.

The day was glorious. The sky was blue with whispy clouds. The weather was cool and the bright green leaves provided almost complete shade to the labyrinth. The birds were chattering. And there was a large colony of tiny ants crawling out from the center Chartres stone.

My reverie was broken by the roar of the chainsaw in the distance.

My thoughts kept focusing on the tall oaks. I wondered how water can travel up from the roots to the trees’ top leaves.

I then I watched a very pregnant mom walk by with two little ones in her stroller, talking on her phone through ear buds. I wondered if she ever allowed herself quiet time.

I heard several planes overhead and noticed their tail in the sky.

And then both Toni and I noticed the honking birds flying above … there were 4 of them flying in what appeared to be synchronized routine … then they cawed, definitely crows.

And here is my quote for today …

“Not only is the Universe stranger than we think, but it is also stranger than we can think… What we observe is not nature itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning… The first gulp from the glass of natural sciences will turn you into an atheist, but at the bottom of the glass God is waiting for you.”

~Werner Heisenberg (father of the uncertainty principle & quantum mechanics)

5.15.19

18
Apr
19

4.18.19 … “Do this in remembrance of me.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (39/40), Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

Today is Maundy Thursday. I never heard the term “Maundy Thursday” until I was dating my husband John in college. He grew up in a traditional Presbyterian Church in Louisville KY, and he knew the term. I grew up in a traditional Presbyterian Church in Atlanta GA and I did not; the term had never been a part of my church vocabulary. Yes, I knew the general story of holy week, but the term “maundy” had never entered my consciousness.

So what does it mean? “Maundy” is an Anglo-French word derived from the Latin “mandatum,” which means “commandment,” and refers to when Jesus, in the Upper Room during the Last Super, said to the disciples: “A new commandment I give you, that you love one another; even as I have loved you, that you also love one another.” (John 13:34). Others say the mandate was the Lord’s Supper: “Do this in remembrance of me.”

I love James Howell’s post today about the group of African Christians who followed him into the “upper room” in Jerusalem last week. They came in joyously singing. Last year James noted in his Maundy Thursday post that Matthew 26:30 tells us that, at the Last Supper on Maundy Thursday, the disciples sang hymns together. I had never thought about the disciples singing the Psalms that evening until I put the two posts together this morning.

So what do I believe Jesus commanded me to do on Maundy Thursday?

1. Love my neighbor

2. Participate in community … take care of each other, wash feet.

3. Eat together and share the food, the bread and the wine, and the experience.

4. Participate in holy communion and “Do this in remembrance of me”

5. Live joyously

Whatever the mandate, let’s do it … with solemnity, joy, sorrow and hope.

I decided on a morning walk today. The sun was streaming, and it was amazing how green everything has become. In the last week to 10 days, all the trees have leafed out and it is glorious.

The lower half of the labyrinth was in shade this morning and the other half in full sun. Although I heard construction and lawn crews working in the distance, they were not on this campus yet. I am sure they will be scurrying about blowing and raking and mowing later today. With all the rain we have had, I was amazed that the pollen had not been washed away. There was lots of pollen and a light coating of yellow on the labyrinth.

As I finished my walk, a light breeze passed by me, over me, through me. It was a spirit moment.

Be still …

4.18.19

And I just saw this …

09
Apr
19

4.9.19 … “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (34/40), Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

I knew beforehand that this walk would be a hurried walk. I had hoped to walk all three painted concrete Chartres labyrinths today created by Tom Schulz in Charlotte, but I will save that adventure for another day.

It was raining as I drove to the labyrinth, but had stopped by the time I had arrived. My mind jumped around as I began my walk. I will be giving the devotion for a group at church later. Easter is late so the flowering trees and bushes will be different … will the dogwoods be gone? Azaleas? Snowballs? The lawn crews were out. I assume their work is more difficult after the downpours we had yesterday. And there are lots of cars in the parking lot …

So I made myself look down and focus on here and now … I tried to slow down, but I found myself cutting corners, something I rarely do. I told myself to focus.

The labyrinth was damp, and there was pollen still on the surface, but not too much. I inhaled deeply and first I smelled the freshly mowed grass and then the rosemary.

“There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray, love, remember; and there is pansies, that’s for thoughts…

There’s fennel for you, and columbines; there’s rue for you, and here’s some for me; we may call it herb of grace o’ Sundays. O, you must wear your rue with a difference. There’s a daisy. I would give you some violets, but they wither’d all when my father died. They say he made a good end,— [Sings.]

“For bonny sweet Robin is all my joy.”

― William Shakespeare, Hamlet

And congrats to UVA, 2019 NCAA basketball champions. I loved it that someone dressed Hugh celebrating.

4.9.19

27
Mar
19

3.27.19 … “ Even if our stories are different, broken, bruised and skinned hearts recognize each other, and when they come together they have the power to heal and create change.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (22/40), Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

I am agitated today and I really don’t know why. It could be the news… The continuous banter about the Mueller Report or the Jussie Smollett case in Chicago or the suicides of two Pakland FL teen survivors and of a Sandy Hook parent …

I thought of the Mary Oliver poem that Parker Palmer posted on social media today:

The Poet Dreams of the Mountain

Sometimes I grow weary of the days, with all their fits and starts.

I want to climb some old gray mountains, slowly, taking

The rest of my lifetime to do it, resting often, sleeping

Under the pines or, above them, on the unclothed rocks.

I want to see how many stars are still in the sky

That we have smothered for years now, a century at least.

I want to look back at everything, forgiving it all,

And peaceful, knowing the last thing there is to know.

All that urgency! Not what the earth is about!

How silent the trees, their poetry being of themselves only.

I want to take slow steps, and think appropriate thoughts.

In ten thousand years, maybe, a piece of the mountain will fall.

-Mary Oliver

And of this from Brene Brown:

Last month, I made my second trip to Newtown to do some work with the Sandy Hook community. Jeremy and Jen started the Avielle Foundation to honor their daughter, Avielle, who was one of the 20 children and six adults murdered in the 2012 school shooting. The Avielle Foundation invited me to be a part of their speaker series on brain health and violence prevention.

Jeremy died of an apparent suicide yesterday. I feel heartbroken and gutted.

But I won’t look away. And, I ask that you continue to look pain in the eye.

We absolutely need to lean into the joy, laughter, beauty, love, and connection in our lives. As much and as often as we can.

And, when called, we need to stand with those in pain. We need to make sure that when we see a heart breaking, we bare our own broken heart and stand together so we know that, even in the midst of struggle, we’re not alone.

Even if our stories are different, broken, bruised and skinned hearts recognize each other, and when they come together they have the power to heal and create change.

So with these melancholy thoughts swirling in my head, I ventured out this afternoon and drove down Memory Lane, i.e. I drove past our first home on Sharon Road, 2247 Sharon Road. As I drove by that house and into Myers Park, I realized what a beautiful place Charlotte is, and I felt my blood pressure begin to go down. The pink and white blooming cherry trees were magnificent today, and there were even a few dogwood trees beginning to bloom.

I pulled up at the labyrinth tucked behind Myers Park Baptist and realized that I had timed my walk very poorly. There were multiple lawn management crew members blowing, trimming and mowing … c’est la vie!

Of course right when I opened my door, one of the men began blowing the labyrinth free of all debris, just for me. I think he tried to hurry and then go as far away as possible to give me some peace. That may be just positive spin on my part.

It looked as if they tried to power wash this labyrinth and instead it has made the painting difficult to see. I imagine it would not be easy on a rainy day. However, I could clearly see the path in today’s sunshine.

I heard emergency sirens in the background, but barely, since the blowers and trimmers and mowers predominated my walk.

And as I walked I clutched my new key, a small thing that I am grateful for… the ignition on our 22-year-old Mercedes that was a gift from john’s mother after his father died went out recently. It was very expensive to repair, but we just could not give the car up yet. It is a link to the past, a sturdy and generally reliable link to the past. When the dealer returned the car to me yesterday, he gave me two new keys including a remote control key. So now, for the first time since I have been driving the car, I have a remote control key and that makes me very happy because I feel much safer.

Other thoughts for today …

Last spring I saw the 2018 “A Wrinkle in Time” 3 times and I never decided my verdict on the film … but I certainly never saw it in this light …

It strikes me that “A Wrinkle in Time” is a Lenten story. Christians give themselves intentional space during Lent to reflect not only on our sin sickness, but also on the hurt we suffer because of the sin sickness of others. Lent is a time to be honest about our fragility, our imperfections and our wounds. Lent reminds us that God’s light conquered sin’s darkness when Jesus was crucified and then rose again. In Jesus’ wounds, we find healing. In our own wounds, we experience the love of God. May our wounds be the places where God’s light can enter in and heal.

Source: Lent: Reckoning with wounds – The Presbyterian Outlook,

https://pres-outlook.org/2018/03/lent-reckoning-with-wounds/

3.27.19

2019 Lenten Lists: Cars I’ve Owned/Loved

1. My mom’s little blue Opel

2. White Sunbird

3. Gray Ford old lady car

4. John’s blue 1964 TR 4A

5. 1986 VW Jetta sedan

6. 1989 Volvo 240 station wagon

7. John’s 1991 Japanese sedan (Honda Accord, maybe?)

8. 1994 Mercury Villager minivan

9. 2000 Volvo V70 wagon*

10. 2004 Volvo V90 SUV*

11. 1997 Mercedes Benz E420*

12. 2000 Volvo V70 wagon – tan interior*

*currently own

15
Mar
19

3.15.19 … who who who who who who …

Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (10/40), Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

It was very warm, 60°ish, when I walked today at 6:30 AM. Because we just began DST last Sunday, it was very dark at this hour.

The birds were just going wild. I don’t know if it’s because I was walking the labyrinth with a flashlight or if they are normally this active this early in the morning. I must admit that I am not usually out at this time of day.

There was a lot of noise in the city this morning. I heard spurts of commuters as they drive along Selwyn Road and nearby Sharon Road. Because this labyrinth is dimly lit, I realized that I was easily distracted if I did not totally focus on the path. As a matter fact, I missed one of the early turns and ended up at the entrance again. That is life.

And as I left, I heard one more chorus of the birds, and then I heard a very loud owl … who who who who who who … (What’s that sound? 7 wildlife calls you might hear in your backyard | MNN – Mother Nature Networkhttps://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/stories/whats-that-sound-7-wildlife-calls-you-might-hear-in-your-backyard)

Immediately afterward, I went to my Friday The Red Boot Way meeting.

Elaine summarized it well, “It was a joyyful and thoughtful The Red Boot Way meeting on transparency, humanity, shame, forgiveness, and how these meetings have empowered me to look at myself and other with compassion and acceptance.”

I talked about the book I’m reading, Lisa Saunders’ “Even at the Grave.” Death is a universal experience, and yet, I have trouble being transparent dealing with death.

That’s all I got!

3.15.19

2019 Lenten Lists: The Red Boot Way Steps

The Red Boot Way Steps

Step One: I am essential to myself, my family, and my community. I matter.

Step Two: I possess the power to positively influence all those with whom I come into contact. I am empowered.

Step Three: I am wonderfully and imperfectly human, with my own story and experiences. I am transparent.

Step Four: I can choose what and whom I allow to influence my mind, body, and personal environment. I am intentional.

Step Five: I approach those I meet with positive intent and likewise assume they come to me with positive intent. I am open.

Step Six: I am more peaceful and centered when I take time every day to be in stillness. I am grounded.

Step Seven: I humbly put aside my own agenda and listen with my whole heart before responding.  I am present.

Step Eight: I approach my life and those in it with wonder and curiosity.  I am curious.

Step Nine: Expressing gratitude is essential to my well-being and the well-being of my community. I am grateful.

Step Ten: When I practice these steps on a regular basis I gain and experience compassion for myself and others. I am compassionate.

Step Eleven: Living my life as outlined in these eleven steps positively impacts my life and the lives of those around me.  I feel a new and joyful responsibility to serve my community. I am engaged.




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 621 other followers

August 2019
S M T W T F S
« Jul    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031