Archive for March, 2020

31
Mar
20

3.31.20 … “There is no group to join here, no need to sign on the dotted line, only a generous moment of recognition that the Inner and the Outer are one and the same. Our inner meaning and Christ’s outer meaning, if you will. They mirror one another: Human anthropology matches a divine theology. How is that for one Great Ecosystem? If one’s theology (view of God) does not significantly change one’s anthropology (view of humanity), it is largely what we call a “head trip.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (36/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, finger labyrinth walk -Charlotte NC:

Today was an out of sorts day. The weather turned cool and wet, and I just did not want to go out.

I attended my TMBS class via Zoom. We discussed Richard Rohr’s The Universal Christ. That book and the discussions take everything out of me, at least for a while after we are done. It was both intellectually and spiritually challenging to me. And today we discussed resurrection. It was an amazing discussion. I plan to reread this week’s chapters with the conversation in mind.

“It will really help you, Christian or not, if you can begin to see Jesus—and Christ—as coming out of Reality, naming it, giving it a face, not appearing to Reality from another world. There is no group to join here, no need to sign on the dotted line, only a generous moment of recognition that the Inner and the Outer are one and the same. Our inner meaning and Christ’s outer meaning, if you will. They mirror one another: Human anthropology matches a divine theology. How is that for one Great Ecosystem? If one’s theology (view of God) does not significantly change one’s anthropology (view of humanity), it is largely what we call a “head trip.”

Resurrection is also grace taken to its logical and full conclusion. If reality begins in grace, it of course must continue “grace upon grace” (John 1: 16b) and “from this fullness we have all received” (1: 16a). In such a field, we now might have the courage to join Jesus in imagining that “I and the Father are one” (John 10: 30) too. That is what I mean by theology changing anthropology. If death and resurrection are just about Jesus, and not about history, the world will continue to lose interest in our story line.”

— The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe by Richard Rohr

https://a.co/1jxpdVJ

The coronavirus news is getting very scary. I have a friend who has been hospitalized for a week with it and I am worried. And I just found out that my son has an acquaintance who has died, a 30-year-old young man.

So I ran some errands and I came home and I found my collection of finger labyrinths. And I thought about the people that have given me certain ones or the places where I purchased the others.. And then I thought about my friends who have walked with me.

Each of you is special.

I’ve been going through my book collection, and I think about each book, to keep or give away, and if to keep, where. I love books …

“I’m sit­ting here star­ing at my old friends on the shelves,” said Prof. Baron, whose re­search shows there are lots of rea­sons peo­ple still feel at­tached to the printed-and-bound word. “Books are part of your per­sonal his­tory. They’re me­men­tos from trips you took. They’re part of who you were. I am look­ing at my Gothic dic­tio­nary, from a class I took when I was in grad­u­ate school. Do I ever use this dic­tio­nary? No. But just look­ing at the spine re­minds me of the time when I was a stu­dent and learn­ing ex­otic things,” she said.

Why Books Are Comforting in the Era of Coronavirus – WSJ,

https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-books-are-comforting-in-the-era-of-coronavirus-11584646866

Books are comforting …

3.31.20

Today’s list …

My book categories:

1. Jane Austen library

2. Spiritual library

3. TMBS

4. Books about labyrinths

5. Dog books

6. Travel books

7. Coffee table books

8. Books read in high school and college

9. Academic textbooks

10. Books by friends

11. Signed books

12. Reference

13. Self help

14. History

15. Sociology

16. Cozy mysteries

17. Books about Davidson or by Davidson alums

30
Mar
20

3.30.20 … “Many people seem to think it foolish, even superstitious, to believe that the world could still change for the better. And it is true that in winter it is sometimes so bitingly cold that one is tempted to say, “What do I care if there is a summer; its warmth is no help to me now.” Yes, evil often seems to surpass good by far. But then, in spite of us, and without our permission, there comes at last an end to the bitter frosts. One morning the wind turns, and there is a thaw. And so I still have hope.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (35/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Myers Park Baptist Church – Charlotte NC:

By the time I walked, it was almost 7 PM, and it was much cooler today. I don’t think the high hit 80 today.

On my drive to MPBC, they were significantly fewer cars than at this time normally, but I saw multiple UPS trucks out delivering. I would assume there is a significant increase. There were lots of children out riding bicycles and families walking as has been seen multiple times the last few days.

With all this human activity, my walks are now much more interspersed with human connection even though no one is close to me. I see and hear their voices, their laughter, their footsteps as they run and jog. That is very interesting to me and seems good and healthy. I hope we do learn some lessons from this.

The first thing I noticed when I got out of my car was a woodpecker and then I heard a car backfire.. The labyrinth was a little dirty today. There was pollen, sticks and other debris.

I realized as I approach the center that maybe the reason that the walking in seems to so much quicker than the walking out is that I am dictating and “releasing” … On the way out I am much more focused on the path and what I am going to gain or learn before returning to real time.

I finished up my walk today by walking the perimeter. I have mentioned before that sometimes I walk the perimeter in the beginning when I walk it counterclockwise to shut down chronos time, and then, at the end, I walk clockwise to re-entering chronos time.

Today is Van Gogh’s birthday …

Vincent van Gogh

“Many people seem to think it foolish, even superstitious, to believe that the world could still change for the better. And it is true that in winter it is sometimes so bitingly cold that one is tempted to say, “What do I care if there is a summer; its warmth is no help to me now.” Yes, evil often seems to surpass good by far. But then, in spite of us, and without our permission, there comes at last an end to the bitter frosts. One morning the wind turns, and there is a thaw. And so I still have hope.”

Source: The Letters of Vincent Van Gogh

3.30.20

2020 Lenten Lists-

Some of the Benefits of Walking a Labyrinth:

1. Beneficial in reducing stress.

2. Helps quiet the mind.

3. Opens the heart.

4. Promotes the interaction of the mind, body and spirit.

5. Fosters creativity.

6. It is a walking meditation.

7. Promotes Wellness.

8. Increases self awareness.

9. Spiritual Growth.

10. Labyrinths are a right and left brained activity.

Source: https://www.monroecc.edu/ArchAnnou.nsf/Attachments/17EB75C995AC01BF05257B0100696A15/$FILE/A%20Brief%20History%20of%20Labyrinths.pdf

29
Mar
20

3.29.20 … “When we are grounded in our bodies, we are stabilized and can receive information more accurately. Much like fine-tuning a radio, if we are attuned to our bodies, the static in the incoming messages and impulses is reduced.”- Lauren Artress

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (34/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Avondale Presbyterian Church – Charlotte NC:

It was 4:30 PM, and I had had other plans for the day, but I made a change of plans. I walked Avondale. When I arrived, there was another couple visiting/walking. So I waited.

While I waited, I walked up to the cross on the hill. During the winter, I can see downtown from the top of the hill. But today, with the trees now with leaves, I couldn’t see anything.

I noticed the wisteria… I never noticed all the wisteria in Charlotte before… it’s everywhere. On the other side of the barrier bushes of the garden is a big bamboo field. It strikes me as curious. I never have had much experience with bamboo, except that my grandmother knew where some grew in South Georgia, and we would go and cut some for our fishing poles. I have not thought about that in a long time.

It’s funny that I almost never see anyone at the labyrinths when I walk, but both yesterday and today I have found people. Maybe the labyrinths are good source of recreation or entertainment or prayer or meditation during a quarantine.

The dogwoods have come out much more fully since I was here just a few days ago. And there was yellow pollen covering everything. I guess we need another rain to clear it out.

I heard an airplane that was so loud that it overwhelmed the raucous chimes. That was interesting.

After I finished walking up to the cross, I walked by the columbarium on my way to the labyrinth. I loved it that someone took the time to put flowers into the space between the niche covers. I’ve never seen that done, and it was done in two places. Also I thank the people who left the pansies in the large pot for all to enjoy.

Something to ponder …

“When we are grounded in our bodies, we are stabilized and can receive information more accurately. Much like fine-tuning a radio, if we are attuned to our bodies, the static in the incoming messages and impulses is reduced.”- Lauren Artress

3.29.20

2020 Lenten Lists

Favorite Movies to Watch Again and Again

1. Pride and Prejudice

2. Persuasion

3. Sound of Music

4. When Harry Met Sally

5. Notting Hill

6. Pretty Woman

7. Sweet Home Alabama

8. Possession

9. Sliding Doors

10. …

28
Mar
20

3.28.20 … “Be alert as you watch a dog at play or at rest. Let the animal teach you to feel at home in the now, to celebrate life by being completely present. You just watch the tail … with some dogs you just look at them – just a little look is enough – and their tail goes …’Life is good! Life is good!’ And they are not telling themselves a story of why life is good. It’s a direct realization.” ~Eckhart Tolle

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (33/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Wedgewood Church-Charlotte NC:

So I still feel like I’m doing something wrong when I go out and walk a labyrinth. Today I decided to head over to Wedgewood Church, and as I pulled up, another car pulled up. It was the couple’s first time walking, and I told them that I would wait for them to walk and that it took 20 or so minutes. The couple was very very gracious and told me about the new chime garden. I’ve never walked around the church, so I decided I would spend my time walking around the church and seeing the chime garden.

As soon as I walked to the back, I heard the chimes. But before I walked toward the singing chimes, I noticed the peace pole, the little birdbath, st. Francis and the flamingo walking path stone.

This is the crunch crunch crunch labyrinth, and I laughed as I walked down the path to the new chime garden because they have used all white pebbles to make the path, so it was also a crunch crunch crunch garden.

The chime tower was gorgeous, very similar to the one at Avondale. And today the chimes were ringing wildly…

This was a beautifully done garden. Can’t quite figure out the totem pole, but it is a nice feature. I’m not sure what’s going in the covered shed area. There were also two wind sculptures and a single bell for ringing. There was wisteria hanging around which makes for a very beautiful spring garden and the azaleas were a nice bonus. I read recently that wisteria has a beautiful smell, so I had to smell it. And then I picked some. I carried my wisteria in my hand and I kept smelling it.

And then I returned to the labyrinth. The couple was still there; they had finished their walk and I told him about other labyrinths in Charlotte. They were looking for something to do during the quarantine.. It is a nice thing to do.

We talked about the chime garden, wisteria and labyrinths. The woman who walked before me said it smelled like lavender. I’m trying to decide if I think it smells like lavender. I’m not a big smell person, but it did have a pleasant smell.

I tried to explain in very general terms the history and use of the labyrinth. I really am going to have to write out my three minute elevator speech and memorize it. Because I always forget things like what are the three Rs of walking …

It was really hot today, and I have not adjusted to changing my wardrobe in March. But it was 88° here today. The record was 90° in 1907. So a long sleeve T-shirt and a black vest was totally inappropriate…

Walking in versus walking out… Almost always it seems to take longer to walk out, and it’s the exact same path that I am returning on. Maybe because I am waiting for an epiphany of some sort. I never know … but it’s a wrinkle in time for me.

And here are a few things I’ve enjoyed this week:

Prayer for those who are alone

God, we pray for those who have touched

computer keys or phone touchscreen

(or both) thousands of times,

since they last touched human skin —

for both extroverts, who are fatigued,

unable to generate any energy,

and introverts, charged up

with nowhere to share renewed compassion.

We pray for those who decided to skip deodorant,

and now have not washed their hair

for days and days and days,

and for people who never, ever thought

they would not be satisfied with dog’s devotion

or the sufferance of the cat.

We pray for those who have signed up

for free Gratefulness.org courses,

My Fitness routines,

binged some fabulous new shows,

play online scrabble with friends,

and who know that a single phone call

can be an offertory-worthy gift,

and those who feel like they don’t care.

We pray for those with newly cleaned closets,

and those with dirty underwear

underfoot … everywhere

because no one is going to see it.

We know you are with everyone who is alone,

and pray they feel it at least once a day,

and we pray for the ones

whom lonely is damaging —

that they may have

human attention, maybe ours. amen

Source: Prayer for those who are alone | Gifts in Open Hands,

https://giftsinopenhands.wordpress.com/2020/03/25/prayer-for-those-who-are-alone/

“Be alert as you watch a dog at play or at rest. Let the animal teach you to feel at home in the now, to celebrate life by being completely present. You just watch the tail … with some dogs you just look at them – just a little look is enough – and their tail goes …’Life is good! Life is good!’ And they are not telling themselves a story of why life is good. It’s a direct realization.”

~Eckhart Tolle

3.28.20

Today’s list_

3 Rs of labyrinth walking: Releasing, Receiving and Returning/or Reflection.

1. Before you walk, pause and take a few moments to quiet your mind and become aware of your breath. Allow yourself to find the walking pace your body wants to go. Do what feels natural.

2. Releasing- As you enter the labyrinth, you follow the path to the center and try to develop a relaxed, calm state that releases concerns and quiets the mind. This is the time to open the heart and quiet the mind.

3. Receiving- Upon reaching the center of the labyrinth, on this labyrinth it is called the center rose. The rose symbolizes beauty, love and enlightenment. Each petal symbolizes the aspects of creation; mineral, vegetable, animal, human, the spirit world and the mystery of the unknown. The center of the rose is place of rest. This is a place for meditation and or prayer. This is a time of openness and peacefulness; you experience or receive what the moment offers you. Stay here as long as you feel the need.

4. Returning/Reflection- You choose when to leave the center, following the same path. This is a time to review and consider the healing forces at work and how they may apply to your life.

27
Mar
20

3.27.20 … “Numbers aren’t just for counting, nor are they just symbolic. They are the actual essence of everything that exists.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (32/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, St. Stephen United Methodist Church – Charlotte NC:

This Labyrinth was a little wet again today. It was overcast and 60° degrees, but we are expecting a high if the sun comes out in the low 80s.

The birds were chirping, lawn maintenance equipment was going, including the high powered leaf blowers flowers, etc., a truck was backing up … There was a constant din of noise interspersed with a few chirping birds.

Today was the second day of the stay at home order. Since I had a doctor’s appointment, a permitted activity, I went out and drove myself to a labyrinth on the way home. I also filled up my car, washed my car (I guess those are essential activities as well) before I will returned to my house after pick up some new prescriptions.

I’m beginning to like this labyrinth because of its privacy … each one is unique.

I researched sacred geometry, again.

“Alex Champion’s Definition

Sacred geometry is the contemplation and utilization of the archetypal geometric patterns of Nature for the purposes of spiritual communion and healing.

Robert Ferré’s Definition

“Sacred geometry is the act of studying the divine act of creation and then using that knowledge to create in the same way. By studying nature, we find that the basic building blocks of creation are geometric. Since a divine hand is responsible for originating the numbers and proportions of the manifest universe, that geometry is sacred. Studying sacred geometry leads us to truth and self-understanding. All societies use sacred geometry to construct their temples, sacred places, and art. Chartres Cathedral, for example. And its labyrinth. Numbers aren’t just for counting, nor are they just symbolic. They are the actual essence of everything that exists.”

The Labyrinth Society: The Labyrinth Society: Sacred Geometry and Labyrinths

https://www.labyrinthsociety.org/sacred-geometry

3.27.20

2020 Lenten Lists

Calendar of Virtual Field Trips for Families

See calendar pics

26
Mar
20

3.26.20 … ““The descending way is a way that is concealed in each person’s heart. But because it is so seldom walked on, it’s often overgrown with weeds. Slowly but surely we have to clear the weeds, open the way, and set out on it unafraid.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (31/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Sardis Baptist Church – Charlotte NC:

I didn’t walk yesterday which was the last day that I could walk without feeling guilty. I’m gonna look at the stay at home order, but this is definitely a wellness activity for me, and it’s definitely includes social distancing since I am almost always completely by myself…

I headed out early, 7:30 AM, and it was cold, 48°.

Wow, the stay at home emergency alert just went off as I walked. It’s a strange and scary world.

But today, I’m gonna do this walk and if I have to walk to them going forward, then I will …

Sardis Baptist is the closest one, about 2 miles away. I do plan to find my finger Labyrinths as well.

Still, I hope I can find a way to come every day and find some peace.

Labyrinths are blessings to me and definitely part of my wellness plan.

Other thoughts for today …

“The descending way is a way that is concealed in each person’s heart. But because it is so seldom walked on, it’s often overgrown with weeds. Slowly but surely we have to clear the weeds, open the way, and set out on it unafraid.”

Source: Henri Nouwen Society | The Descending Way of Jesus – Henri Nouwen Society, https://henrinouwen.org/meditation/the-descending-way-of-jesus/

“There is a twilight zone in our own hearts that we ourselves cannot see. Even when we know quite a lot about ourselves – our gifts and weaknesses, our ambitions and aspirations, our motives and drives – large parts of ourselves remain in the shadow of consciousness.

This is a very good thing. We always will remain partially hidden to ourselves. Other people, especially those who love us, can often see our twilight zones better than we ourselves can. The way we are seen and understood by others is different from the way we see and understand ourselves. We will never fully know the significance of our presence in the lives of our friends. That’s a grace, a grace that calls us not only to humility but also to a deep trust in those who love us. It is in the twilight zones of our hearts where true friendships are born. “

Source: Henri Nouwen Society | Friendship in the Twilight Zones of Our Heart – Henri Nouwen Society, http://henrinouwen.org/meditation/friendship-twilight-zones-heart/

3.26.20

25
Mar
20

3.25.20 … “ in working one’s way through the labyrinth of one’s present circumstances that one comes to realize one’s purpose and a final meaning for existence.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (30/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, researching labyrinths, virtual labyrinth walk @ home-Charlotte NC:

Today is Gloria Steinem’s birthday. She is 86. “[Feminism is] the belief in the full social, economic, political equality of males and females. And that’s it…It has been demonized as if it meant ‘man-hating’ or I don’t know what, but actually, it just simply means shared humanity, equality.” –Gloria Steinem. I used to dislike the word”feminism,” but fully support the concept. I think I need to walk and ponder this,

I didn’t walk today, but I did do a great deal of pondering. I have allowed opinions to separate me from people I love and respect. And sometimes it is merely vocabulary that I allow to create barriers. So I enjoyed this take on labyrinths today:

This is certainly evident in the mandalas of Tantric literature from India and, most notably, in the Rigveda (c. 1500 BCE) in which the various books progress along the same lines as a labyrinth where one travels a spiritual path alone to eventually merge one’s inner journey with the outer world. Carl Jung (1875-1961 CE) saw the labyrinth as a symbol of this reconciliation between the inner self and the external world. Scholar Mary Addenbrooke writes:

[Jung] describes the effect of being “gloriously, triumphantly drunk. There was no longer any inside or outside, no longer an ‘I’ and the ‘others’, No. 1 and No. 2 were no more (he is referring to his sense of having two dissimilar personalities within him); “caution and timidity were gone and the earth and sky, the universe and everything in it that creeps and flies, revolves, rises, or falls, had all become one.” (1)

Jung discusses the journey through the labyrinth in his Stages of Life:

When we must deal with problems, we instinctively resist trying the way that leads through obscurity and darkness. We wish to hear only of unequivocal results, and completely forget that these results can only be brought about when we have ventured into and emerged again from the darkness. But to penetrate the darkness we must summon all the powers of enlightenment that consciousness can offer… The serious problems in life are never fully solved. If ever they should appear to be so it is a sure sign that something has been lost. The meaning and purpose of a problem seem to lie not in its solution but in our working at it incessantly. This alone preserves us from stultification and petrifaction. (11)

The people of the ancient world seem to have understood this concept long before Jung articulated it so eloquently. The labyrinth, finally, is the journey of the self to wholeness. Although the ancient Egyptians or Greeks may not have phrased it this way, their architecture and myths point to the same conclusions Jung and other later psychologists have come to: that it is in working one’s way through the labyrinth of one’s present circumstances that one comes to realize one’s purpose and a final meaning for existence.

Mark, Joshua J. “Labyrinth.” Ancient History Encyclopedia. Ancient History Encyclopedia, 16 Apr 2018. Web. 24 Mar 2020.

And today is Albert’s adoption anniversary … we think he is about 8.

Preserve me from stultification and petrifaction …

3.24.20

2020 Lenten Lists

Vocabulary for today

1. Feminism

2. stultification

3. petrifaction

24
Mar
20

3.24.20

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (26/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Sardis Baptist Church- Charlotte NC:

It was one of those days that the path was difficult to see because it had been raining. Since the last time I was here, which was just a few days ago, a plethora of weeds has sprung up between the pavers.

I can’t sit at the center today because it is wet with water.

The temperature is about 50° but because it is so damp, it feels a little cooler.

A shelter in place order was issued today effective Thursday morning at 8 AM. This is what it says…

My mother has been restricted for 10 days at her assisted living facility in Atlanta. They are not allowed to leave their apartments; all meals are brought to them… I have been trying to call, but not frequently enough. I will ramp up my phone calls. Maybe two or even three times per day.

Lots of thoughts from my Tuesday morning Bible class today. But I love when people introduce me to new ideas or writers or hymns. Today I listened to Ann read “Hymn of Promise” …

In the bulb there is a flower;
In the seed, an apple tree;
In cocoons, a hidden promise: butterflies will soon be free!
In the cold and snow of winter
There’s a spring that waits to be,
Unrevealed until its season,
Something God alone can see.
There’s a song in every silence,
Seeking word and melody;
There’s a dawn in every darkness, bringing hope to you and me.
From the past will come the future; what it holds, a mystery,
Unrevealed until its season,
Something God alone can see.
In our end is our beginning;
In our time, infinity;
In our doubt there is believing;
In our life, eternity,
In our death, a resurrection;
At the last, a victory,
Unrevealed until its season,
Something God alone can see.

I don’t know if my walks will be permitted when the shelter in place order goes in effect, but I figure I can route myself by one on the way to the grocery store. It will count as exercise.

Today my birds were singing and the wisteria caught my attention.

And I loved these …

“The Peace of Wild Things” – Wendell Berry

  • Listen
  • When despair for the world grows in me
  • and I wake in the night at the least sound
  • in fear of what my life and my children’s lives may be,
  • I go and lie down where the wood drake
  • rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
  • I come into the peace of wild things
  • who do not tax their lives with forethought
  • of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
  • And I feel above me the day-blind stars
  • waiting with their light. For a time
  • I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.
  • And from Pope Francis:

    “Tonight before falling asleep
    think about when we will return to the street.
    When we hug again,
    when all the shopping together will seem like a party.
    Let’s think about when the coffees will return to the bar,
    the small talk, the photos close to each other.
    We think about when it will be all a memory
    but normalcy will seem an unexpected and beautiful gift.
    We will love everything that has so far seemed futile to us.
    Every second will be precious.
    Swims at the sea, the sun until late,
    sunsets, toasts, laughter.
    We will go back to laughing together.
    Strength and courage.
    See you soon! “

    Source: A Message from Pope Francis :“Tonight before falling asleep” – Catholic Living / Spirituality – Catholic Answers Forums, https://forums.catholic.com/t/a-message-from-pope-francis-tonight-before-falling-asleep/597160

    When we hug again,

    3.24.20

    2020 Lenten Lists-

      Things I’ve googled today:
      Wisteria
      hymn of Promise
      Butterflies in Death in the Family
      Ted Dennard
      Wendell Berry
    23
    Mar
    20

    3.23.20 … “That—butterfly has got more of God in him than Jackson will ever see for the rest of eternity”

    “Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (25/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Avondale Presbyterian Church- Charlotte NC:

    The first thing I noticed when I get out of my car was a pile of chopped wood. Why would a church have a stockpile of chopped wood?

    .

    Wow, the birds are really singing today. And just yesterday I was thinking to myself that I hadn’t seen any dogwoods beginning to bloom, and here today at Avondale they are most definitely beginning to bloom.

    I love the sound of rushing water in the fountain.

    There was only a slight breeze, so the chimes were quiet. It was cold , 48°, wet and overcast… Make that a slight drizzle…

    The green of my yard clogs matched the green of the boundaries.

    Well, the birds were really singing. I even spied a few. They were watching me, and I them.

    The red leaf trees were fully leafed out. I’m going to have to look at my pictures from a few weeks ago to see what they looked like then.

    There were constant chirpings of the birds. Oh, and I could see in the distance the large oak trees were beginning to leaf out.

    ——-

    And today I finally discovered the story that introduced me to the spiritual metaphor of butterflies. I knew it as soon as I touched the book …

    “If anything ever makes me believe in God… Or life after death, “his uncle said.

    “It’ll be what happened this afternoon..”

    “There were a lot of clouds… But they were a blowing fast, so there was a lot of sunshine too. Right when they began to lower your father into the ground, into his grave, a cloud came over and there was a shadow just iron, and a perfectly magnificent butterfly settled on the — coffin, just rested there, right over the breast, and stayed there, just barely making his wings breathe, like a heart.“

    “ he stayed there all the way down,… He never stirred, except just to move his wings that way, until it graded against the bottom like a — rowboat. And just when it did the sun came out just dazzling bright and he flew up out of that that — hole in the ground, straight up into the sky, so high I couldn’t even see him anymore.“

    … “If there are any such things as miracles… then that’s surely miraculous.”

    Miraculous.Magnificent.

    “That—butterfly has got more of God in him than Jackson will ever see for the rest of eternity”

    Agee, James. A Death in the Family. New York, Bantam Books, 1972.

    And there’s a family story that involves my sister, my grandparents, my cousin Judy, a funeral and a butterfly. And I have been trying to remember where I first encountered a butterfly at a funeral. It was important to me, and now I have found it.

    3.23.20

    22
    Mar
    20

    3.22.20 … ““Have patience with everything that remains unsolved in your heart. … live in the question.” ~Rainer Maria Rilke

    “Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (24/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Myers Park Baptist Church- Charlotte NC, kith/kin:

    I woke up very early, and I thought to myself, I feel lonely. I’m rarely lonely, but today is my son Edward’s birthday, his 28th. He is in Denver and is pretty much self isolating. He was supposed to be here, but decided it was really not a good idea to fly. So instead, he’s by himself. And I’m not with him. I like to be with my family for birthdays and holidays. So yes, I feel lonely. I hope he is not lonely.

    “Have patience with everything that remains unsolved in your heart. … live in the question.”

    ~Rainer Maria Rilke

    Some of the best things about spring in the southeast are the glorious colors, and they come early. I was driving through Foxcroft this morning and the pinks and whites were just gorgeous today.

    I decided that I would get up early and go walk before total closings prevent my walks. I don’t think I can argue that they are essential.

    I arrived at Myers Park Baptist and a gust of wind nearly yank the door out of my hand. It was 52°, but it felt like it’s about 40° with the wind. This will be a quick walk.

    It was very gray. I did hear multiple bird calls. I’m pretty sure one was a robin and another an owl. The rosemary here was beginning to bloom, much l later than that down in Gastonia last week.

    When I got in my car this morning it was covered in pollen, and although though it was clear that someone had recently been blowing, the yellow pollen from the area was not be easily removed…

    And I liked this Donna Ashworth poem …

    Source: History Will Remember When The World Stopped – Ladies – Pass it on, https://ladiespassiton.com/2020/03/18/history-will-remember-when-the-world-stopped/

    And today is the 28th birthday of my son Edward. He is kind, so no need for him to be kinder than before…

    3.22.20




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