Posts Tagged ‘quotes

23
Nov
19

11.23.19 … “Light exists as well as shadow. Creation has not only a positive but also a negative side. It belongs to the essence of creaturely nature, and is indeed a mark of its perfection, that it has in fact this negative side. In creation there is not only a Yes but also a No; not only a height but also an abyss; not only clarity but also obscurity; not only growth but also decay; not only opulence but also indigence; not only beauty but also ashes; not only beginning but also end.

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, The Cathedral of St. Philip-Atlanta GA:

I had a day of errand running in Atlanta today. I headed out from Marietta about noon. First, I got my nails done. While I was in the nail salon, it poured. I’m pretty in pink …

Second, I visited the local Dollar Tree. There I purchased some glass vases and small pebbles for my Christmas paperwhite narcissus flowers which are my first Christmas decoration, my Christmas Eve table decoration and my favorite gift.

Third, I delivered a package to a friend to her mother-in-law‘s house. To get to her house I had to cross the River at Lovett and then back in the neighborhood to the left. This is an area of Atlanta that I have rarely ventured and so I was interested again at the topography, which I love, and, since the brig late afternoon sun was peaking out from the clouds, the drive was magical enhanced with the beautiful very end of fall color, deep reds and bright yellows.

Next, I headed for a labyrinth. The labyrinth at St. Philip’s is my most frequented labyrinth when I’m in Atlanta. And getting to it takes me through one of the most beautiful neighborhoods in the US in my opinion. So I always get the pleasure of driving past old haunts and homes of old friends and family. As I drove to the Cathedral, it became overcast again, but luckily was not raining.

When I got to the labyrinth, since I had Albert, I pulled out my cast-iron iron which I have re-purposed as a dog anchor. It comes in very handy when I am walking labyrinths. Ive tried walking “with” Albert, but that is a major fail. As I walked, Albert looked at me quizzically and tried to drag the anchor around a bit. But then he just patiently watched.

Next up was checking the ginkgo trees at E Rivers Elementary School. I definitely missed it this year. However, the light was coming in and out of the clouds and for a brief moment it highlighted the bed of yellow leaves at their bases.

After leaving there, I headed toward my mom’s. I took the back way (Habersham, Old Ivy, Wieuca to Peachtree), and it was now a perfect late fall afternoon. The leaves played with the afternoon sunlight. And as I rounded a corner and saw the beautiful yellows and reds, I smiled, and as soon as I smiled, the sun went back behind the clouds. Some days are like that.

At Lenbrook, I went up the freight elevator with Albert. He doesn’t like steps, and he really doesn’t like elevators. I had to drag him on elevator. But the visit with my mom and Albert was the highlight of my day … really. .She said, “We got lucky when we got Albert!” WE … I chuckled. Albert is the only dog in my extended family currently. My mom truly views him as her dog, too.

So all in all a great day …

And now a quote … “Light exists as well as shadow. Creation has not only a positive but also a negative side. It belongs to the essence of creaturely nature, and is indeed a mark of its perfection, that it has in fact this negative side. In creation there is not only a Yes but also a No; not only a height but also an abyss; not only clarity but also obscurity; not only growth but also decay; not only opulence but also indigence; not only beauty but also ashes; not only beginning but also end. In the existence of man there are hours, days and years both bright and dark, success and failure, laughter and tears, youth and age, gain and loss, birth and sooner or later its inevitably corollary, death. In all this, creation praises its Creator and Lord even on its shadowy side. For all we can tell, may not His creatures praise Him more mightily in humility than in exaltation, in need than in plenty, in fear than in joy? May not we ourselves praise Him more purely on bad days than on good, more surely in sorrow than in rejoicing, more truly in adversity than in progress? If there may be praise of God from the abyss, night and misfortune… how surprised we shall be, and how ashamed of so much unnecessary disquiet and discontent, once we are brought to realize that all creation both as light and shadow, including our own share in it, was laid on Jesus Christ, and that even though we did not see it, while we were shaking our heads that things were not very different, it sang the praise of God just as it was, and was therefore right and perfect.” – Karl Barth

And here’s round one of my paperwhite plantings …

Blessings, Safe Travels and Happy Thanksgiving!

11.23.19

12
Jul
19

7.12.19 … “And this is precisely the secret held by all those who go by foot: life is prolonged when you walk. Walking expands time rather than collapses it.” -Erling Kagge

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Labyrinth Walks, The Cathedral of St. Philip-Atlanta GA:

I have a lot going on right now. I have been in Atlanta helping my mom deal with some major dental issues. I never thought about it, but there is a useful life for teeth. And for my mom, 92 seems to be the number. It is not fun to deal with serious dental health issues at 92.

My sister had an appointment at Piedmont so I drove with her and decided I could use my time free time as quiet time … Iced coffee from Starbucks, labyrinth walk, and, if time permits, a visit to Richards Five and Dime.

I have secured my coffee, and a blueberry muffin, and I’m now sitting in the very hot sun, 89°, at The Cathedral. There is a magnolia tree in the distance that still has a few blooms on it, but most in this garden, are well past any blooms.

My thoughts wander to my three adult children and what they are doing. Jack is in Alaska and the temperature in Alaska has been breaking records. It was hotter in Anchorage AK last week than in Atlanta GA today. It hit the 90s for the first time in recorded history and in the lower 90s for three days in a row in McCarthy AK. And there are over 400 forest fires; so bad that Jack says the normally pristine air is hazy from the fires.

My son Edward is in Colorado and dealing with the ups and downs of relocation, finding a job, and how sometimes the world just doesn’t play into your hand. But, he is surrounded by good friends and has found a beautiful place to live, so I am hopeful that he will find a spot where he enjoys this period of his life.

And Molly, my daughter, is in Brooklyn. Last month she traveled to Ecuador and now she will work super hard and then have mini vacations to attend the weddings of two close friends in August and September. I think this wedding season will be different than when I was her age because each wedding, as a general rule, is unique. No longer does a bride go home to her childhood church and get married surrounded by her family and friends of childhood with a couple of additions from college, etc. instead, the couple often choose a venue that is special to them, a beach resort or a mountain venue or even a local park or venue near where the couple currently lives. It’s a different world.

Before I walk I took stock of my surroundings. As I mentioned, it was hot. And the birds were the most significant activity in the garden today. I enjoyed watching them fly from tree to tree and singing to each other.

I love this cartoon forwarded to me by a good Episcopalian friend. I wish I knew the cartoonist so I could give him/her credit.

I found this quote the other day…

“And this is precisely the secret held by all those who go by foot: life is prolonged when you walk. Walking expands time rather than collapses it.”

-Erling Kagge’s Walking: One Step at a Time (translated by Becky L. Crook, Pantheon)

I certainly believe that my walking expands time, rather than collapses it. I’m hoping my life is prolonged by my walks.

And I enjoyed Hamilton’s score today:

🎶Look around, look around at how lucky you are … to be alive right now … 🎶

And as for the goats … you’ll have to ask my brother.

7.12.19

and I found this …

27
Mar
19

3.27.19 … “ Even if our stories are different, broken, bruised and skinned hearts recognize each other, and when they come together they have the power to heal and create change.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (22/40), Myers Park Baptist Church-Charlotte NC:

I am agitated today and I really don’t know why. It could be the news… The continuous banter about the Mueller Report or the Jussie Smollett case in Chicago or the suicides of two Pakland FL teen survivors and of a Sandy Hook parent …

I thought of the Mary Oliver poem that Parker Palmer posted on social media today:

The Poet Dreams of the Mountain

Sometimes I grow weary of the days, with all their fits and starts.

I want to climb some old gray mountains, slowly, taking

The rest of my lifetime to do it, resting often, sleeping

Under the pines or, above them, on the unclothed rocks.

I want to see how many stars are still in the sky

That we have smothered for years now, a century at least.

I want to look back at everything, forgiving it all,

And peaceful, knowing the last thing there is to know.

All that urgency! Not what the earth is about!

How silent the trees, their poetry being of themselves only.

I want to take slow steps, and think appropriate thoughts.

In ten thousand years, maybe, a piece of the mountain will fall.

-Mary Oliver

And of this from Brene Brown:

Last month, I made my second trip to Newtown to do some work with the Sandy Hook community. Jeremy and Jen started the Avielle Foundation to honor their daughter, Avielle, who was one of the 20 children and six adults murdered in the 2012 school shooting. The Avielle Foundation invited me to be a part of their speaker series on brain health and violence prevention.

Jeremy died of an apparent suicide yesterday. I feel heartbroken and gutted.

But I won’t look away. And, I ask that you continue to look pain in the eye.

We absolutely need to lean into the joy, laughter, beauty, love, and connection in our lives. As much and as often as we can.

And, when called, we need to stand with those in pain. We need to make sure that when we see a heart breaking, we bare our own broken heart and stand together so we know that, even in the midst of struggle, we’re not alone.

Even if our stories are different, broken, bruised and skinned hearts recognize each other, and when they come together they have the power to heal and create change.

So with these melancholy thoughts swirling in my head, I ventured out this afternoon and drove down Memory Lane, i.e. I drove past our first home on Sharon Road, 2247 Sharon Road. As I drove by that house and into Myers Park, I realized what a beautiful place Charlotte is, and I felt my blood pressure begin to go down. The pink and white blooming cherry trees were magnificent today, and there were even a few dogwood trees beginning to bloom.

I pulled up at the labyrinth tucked behind Myers Park Baptist and realized that I had timed my walk very poorly. There were multiple lawn management crew members blowing, trimming and mowing … c’est la vie!

Of course right when I opened my door, one of the men began blowing the labyrinth free of all debris, just for me. I think he tried to hurry and then go as far away as possible to give me some peace. That may be just positive spin on my part.

It looked as if they tried to power wash this labyrinth and instead it has made the painting difficult to see. I imagine it would not be easy on a rainy day. However, I could clearly see the path in today’s sunshine.

I heard emergency sirens in the background, but barely, since the blowers and trimmers and mowers predominated my walk.

And as I walked I clutched my new key, a small thing that I am grateful for… the ignition on our 22-year-old Mercedes that was a gift from john’s mother after his father died went out recently. It was very expensive to repair, but we just could not give the car up yet. It is a link to the past, a sturdy and generally reliable link to the past. When the dealer returned the car to me yesterday, he gave me two new keys including a remote control key. So now, for the first time since I have been driving the car, I have a remote control key and that makes me very happy because I feel much safer.

Other thoughts for today …

Last spring I saw the 2018 “A Wrinkle in Time” 3 times and I never decided my verdict on the film … but I certainly never saw it in this light …

It strikes me that “A Wrinkle in Time” is a Lenten story. Christians give themselves intentional space during Lent to reflect not only on our sin sickness, but also on the hurt we suffer because of the sin sickness of others. Lent is a time to be honest about our fragility, our imperfections and our wounds. Lent reminds us that God’s light conquered sin’s darkness when Jesus was crucified and then rose again. In Jesus’ wounds, we find healing. In our own wounds, we experience the love of God. May our wounds be the places where God’s light can enter in and heal.

Source: Lent: Reckoning with wounds – The Presbyterian Outlook,

https://pres-outlook.org/2018/03/lent-reckoning-with-wounds/

3.27.19

2019 Lenten Lists: Cars I’ve Owned/Loved

1. My mom’s little blue Opel

2. White Sunbird

3. Gray Ford old lady car

4. John’s blue 1964 TR 4A

5. 1986 VW Jetta sedan

6. 1989 Volvo 240 station wagon

7. John’s 1991 Japanese sedan (Honda Accord, maybe?)

8. 1994 Mercury Villager minivan

9. 2000 Volvo V70 wagon*

10. 2004 Volvo V90 SUV*

11. 1997 Mercedes Benz E420*

12. 2000 Volvo V70 wagon – tan interior*

*currently own

07
Mar
19

3.7.19 … bar bet traditions … let others choose what i give up … So if I let you choose what I should give up, what would you choose? … probably not popsicles, pumpkin seeds and meatballs …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, List making, St. John’s Episcopal Church – Charlotte NC, 2019 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (2/40), Lenten Lists, Fr. James Martin:

My friend Toni asked me to help fold and put up the loaner Chartres canvas labyrinth and the church’s new 5 circuit children’s labyrinth. So I arrived early and got in my walk before the agreed upon time. It was set up beautifully with small tea candles around the circumference. It was perfectly quiet.

“Be still and know that I am God.”

Fr. James Martin, giving things up: I really enjoy Fr. James Martin. And I love it that his Jewish college roomate Rob has chosen what he gives up for Lent. And it all began with a bar bet! This year Rob has deemed that he give up Popsicles, pumpkin seeds and meatballs.

Since then, for over 20 years my friend Rob has phoned me every Ash Wednesday to assign me a Lenten sacrifice. The sacrifices have grown easier over the years since Rob is running out of things for me to give up. For a few years he favored spices. One Lent I was suppose to avoid anything with oregano. It sounded easy until it dawned on me that pizza was out of the question for six weeks. Having another person choose your sacrifice adds an extra dimension to Lent. Since my penance is not within my control, it feels a little more spiritual. As with far more serious struggles in life, like an illness or the loss of a job, things outside our control are the most difficult to deal with. They are, in traditional Christian theology, crosses that eventually need to be accepted, much as Jesus finally accepted his cross.

Source: Priest Lets Friend Choose His Sacrifice for Lent : NPR, 
https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5238122

So if I let you choose what I should give up, what would you choose?

An interesting thought, don’t you think?

Lenten Lists:

Daily emails and notifications

1. Henri Nouwen Society

2. Daily OM

3. Audible Daily Deal

4. Gifts in OpenHands

5. Morning Brew

6. Daily Report

7. Charlotte Five

8. Time: The Brief

9. TheSkimm

10. DTH at a glance

11. ThrillList

12. Next Vacay

13. Gretchen Rubin Moment of Happiness

14. The Charlotte Observer: Daily Headlines

15. Medium Daily Digest

16. Recode Daily

17. TPG

18. NYT: Morning

19. WSJ

20. Atlas Obscura

21. Flipboard Politics Rundown

Wow … I need to tidy up what I let into my life every day.

3.7.19

And I look back on my day and what I thought about … a little of this and a little of that …

Walking: Great article!

“Gros discusses the centrality of walking in the lives of Nietzsche, Rimbaud, Kant, Rousseau, and Thoreau. Likewise, Rebecca Solnit has profiled the essential walks of literary figures such as William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, and Gary Snyder in her book Wanderlust, which argues for the necessity of walking in our own age, when doing so is almost entirely unnecessary most of the time. As great walkers of the past and present have made abundantly clear—anecdotally at least—we observe a significant link between walking and creative thinking.”

Source: How Walking Fosters Creativity: Stanford Researchers Confirm What Philosophers and Writers Have Always Known | Open Culture, http://www.openculture.com/2015/07/how-walking-fosters-creativity.html

Quotes, Mrs. Who, “A Wrinkle in Time”: I’ve grown fond of quotes, but can’t remember one long enough to express myself in quotes.

The three of them approach the haunted house and don’t find Mrs. Whatsit, but instead a friend of hers, Mrs. Who, inside. Mrs. Who is a plump, cheerful little woman with enormous glasses, sewing away at the stolen sheets to make them into ghosts for the haunted house. Mrs. Who often expresses herself by quoting great authors, frequently in different languages. When Charles asks Mrs. Who if she knows Calvin, she says, “He wasn’t my idea, Charlsie, but I think he’s a good one.” Mrs. Who then mentions that Mr. Murry needs their help, though it’s not yet time, and tells them all to go home to dinner.

Blockbuster, Bend OR, end of an era: so how many Friday and Saturday nights did I spend picking out a movie at Blockbuster?

The last Blockbuster in Australia will close its doors this month, which means there will only be one Blockbuster left in the entire world….Bend, OR …

Source: The last chapter of Blockbuster’s story | MNN – Mother Nature Network, https://www.mnn.com/money/sustainable-business-practices/stories/believe-it-or-not-you-can-still-rent-movies-at

25
Jan
19

1.25.19 … “If you are mindful, or fully present in the here and now, anxiety disappears and a sense of timelessness takes hold, allowing your highest qualities, such as kindness and compassion, to emerge.”

Thich Nhat Hanh, Mindfulness, Vietnam: Another non-Westerner who has influenced my life in recent years.

Nhat Hanh taught that you don’t have to spend years on a mountaintop to benefit from Buddhist wisdom. Instead, he says, just become aware of your breath, and through that come into the present moment, where everyday activities can take on a joyful, miraculous quality. If you are mindful, or fully present in the here and now, anxiety disappears and a sense of timelessness takes hold, allowing your highest qualities, such as kindness and compassion, to emerge.

This was highly appealing to Westerners seeking spirituality but not the trappings of religion. Burned-out executives and recovering alcoholics flocked to retreats in the French countryside to listen to Nhat Hanh. An entire mindfulness movement sprang up in the wake of this dharma superstar. Among his students was the American doctor Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction course that is now offered at hospitals and medical centers worldwide. Today, the mindfulness that Nhat Hanh did so much to propagate is a $1.1 billion industry in the U.S., with revenues flowing from 2,450 meditation centers and thousands of books, apps and online courses. One survey found that 35% of employers have incorporated mindfulness into the workplace.

Source: Thich Nhat Hanh, Father of Mindfulness, Awaits the End | Time, http://time.com/5511729/monk-mindfulness-art-of-dying/

Rumi, quotes: I truly love Rumi quotes. So why had I never heard of him until a few years ago. He’s only been around for 700+ years

The inspiration you seek is already within you.

Be silent and listen.

~ Rumi

Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī, also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhī, Mevlânâ/Mawlānā, Mevlevî/Mawlawī, and more popularly simply as Rumi, was a 13th-century Persian poet, jurist, Islamic scholar, theologian, and Sufi mystic originally from Greater Khorasan. Wikipedia
Born: September 30, 1207
Died: December 17, 1273, Konya, Turkey

stuff that doesn’t matter:

“As is usually the case with viral stuff that doesn’t actually matter but that we pretend matters anyway in order to give ourselves some semblance of control, identity, and distraction in this exponentially disastrous world, the arrow question has kindled fierce arguments between folks who believe their way of drawing X’s is THE ONLY CORRECT WAY and EVERYONE ELSE CAN GO TO HELL.”

Source: Twitter Is Divided Over The Right Way To Draw An ‘X’, https://hub.bloomjoy.com/ruin-my-week/right-way-to-draw-an-x/

LOL;

1.24.19

Cultural Rorschach test, Covington Catholic viral video, viral video:

I’ve been slow to opine on the Covington Catholic viral video. I reposted two days later this post by Fr. James Martin, SJ whom I respect.

And I hope that the students are ready to apologize as well.

Until then, dialogue is essential. Among Covington High School administrators. Between the students and indigenous peoples. Or simply between that group of students and Mr. Phillips.

In disagreement, dialogue is essential, as is what Pope Francis calls a “culture of encounter.” For example, a service trip for the students to a Native American reservation–as a learning opportunity.

Another essential lesson, which transcends whatever happened in Washington this weekend: an understanding of the appalling treatment that Native Americans have endured in our country. That lesson needs to be learned regardless of what you think of Covington High School.

This Teachable Moment can offer us, if we are open, lessons about dialogue, encounter and reconciliation during this coming week, which is, believe it or not, Catholic Schools Week.

Source: https://www.facebook.com/46899546495/posts/10155810610636496/

And then I saw this. Did you pass or fail? I waited … and I’m not sure why. So I barely passed.

The story is a Rorschach test—tell me how you first reacted, and I can probably tell where you live, who you voted for in 2016, and your general take on a list of other issues—but it shouldn’t be. Take away the video and tell me why millions of people care so much about an obnoxious group of high-school students protesting legalized abortion and a small circle of American Indians protesting centuries of mistreatment who were briefly locked in a tense standoff. Take away Twitter and Facebook and explain why total strangers care so much about people they don’t know in a confrontation they didn’t witness. Why are we all so primed for outrage, and what if the thousands of words and countless hours spent on this had been directed toward something consequential?

Source: Julie Irwin Zimmerman: I Failed the Covington Catholic Test – The Atlantic, 
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/01/julie-irwin-zimmerman-i-failed-covington-catholic-test/580897/

And I loved having a conversation about cultural Rorschach testswith Davidson friend A. Hall

Yes, it is. Fascinating. We’ve had some vivid reminders that what we perceive as reality is based on the lenses with which we view it. And those lenses can change depending on the information we put in or on our lived experience. It can feel like vertigo to know that people have a completely different perception of reality – but it looks like understanding that is a challenge we should take up.

Ditto what she said!

At the same time, I regret commenting on another friend’s post, because my comment only gave friends a g”otcha, you’re a racist moment.” I wanted a discussion of cultural Rorschach tests and lenses and respect, and instead, I felt that the commenter was saying, “gotcha.”

The Great Comma, Epiphany moment, liturgical Christian traditions,Apostles Creed, Niceness Creed: The Great Comma! So, I guess I worship in one of the liturgical Christian traditions, and I participate in proclaiming the Great Comma. An Epiphany Moment for me.

 . . Born of the Virgin Mary,
suffered under Pontius Pilate, . . .

—The Apostles’ Creed

If you worship in one of the liturgical Christian traditions, you probably know the opening words of the Apostles’ Creed by heart:

I believe in God, the Father Almighty, creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried; he descended into hell; . . .

But have you ever noticed the huge leap the creed makes between “born of the Virgin Mary” and “suffered under Pontius Pilate”? A single comma connects the two statements, and falling into that yawning gap, as if it were a mere detail, is everything Jesus said and did between his birth and his death! Called the “Great Comma,” the gap certainly invites some serious questions. Did all the things Jesus said and did in those years not count for much? Were they nothing to “believe” in? Was it only his birth and death that mattered? Does the gap in some way explain Christianity’s often dismal record of imitating Jesus’ life and teaching?

There are other glaring oversights. The Apostles’ Creed does not once mention love, service, hope, the “least of the brothers and sisters,” or even forgiveness—anything that is remotely actionable. The earliest formal declaration of Christian belief is a vision and philosophy statement with no mission statement, as it were. Twice we are reminded that God is almighty, yet nowhere do we hear mention that God is also all-suffering or all-vulnerable (although it does declare that Jesus “suffered . . . , died, and was buried”). With its emphasis on theory and theology, but no emphasis on praxis (i.e., practice), the creed set Christianity on a course we are still following today.

The Apostles’ Creed, along with the later Nicene Creed, is an important document of theological summary and history, but when the crowd at my parish mumbles hurriedly through its recitation each Sunday, I’m struck by how little usefulness—or even interest—the creed seems to bring as a guide for people’s daily, practical behavior. I hope I am wrong, but I doubt it.

Both creeds reveal historic Christian assumptions about who God is and what God is doing. They reaffirm a static and unchanging universe and a God who is quite remote from almost everything we care about each day. Furthermore, they don’t show much interest in the realities of Jesus’ own human life—or ours. Instead, they portray what religious systems tend to want: a God who looks strong and stable and in control. No “turn the other cheek” Jesus, no hint of a simple Christ-like lifestyle is found here.

https://email.cac.org/t/ViewEmail/d/EA7137F1585CAE9E2540EF23F30FEDED/1DC1AEAE5E535C1F0B3A73003FEB3522

1.23

Peripatetic Posse, kith/kin, wasabis, safety in numbers: My friend reposted one of my favorite of her blog posts. I’m not the letter writer.

My friend Dennard Lindsey Teague reminded me of an article I wrote several years ago in tribute to my group of Davidson College Alumni women from the Davidson College Class of 1982. They are my “peripatetic posse.”

In honor of Dennard’s upcoming birthday (and our particular friendship going back to first grade), I wanted to post this again in celebration of her, of MY friendships, and in celebration of ALL women’s friendships.

And yet fifteen years after graduation we came back together for a reunion, setting in motion a powerful force, the original “us” reconvened and buttressed.

Now we see each other yearly, as many of us as can get there, with the “there” moving between vacation homes, rented camps, and urban hotels. We have a system for choosing location and time, and it begins anew each spring so we can gather in the fall. We pool resources to be sure all can come.

On the appointed weekend, from the time the last one arrives on Thursday or Friday until the first one leaves on Sunday, we sit in a circle with a single purpose: listening to what has happened in each other’s lives throughout the last year. Listening to hear, not listening to solve or fix. Just listening. We take breaks only for meal preparation, pouring coffee or wine, a long walk or hike each day, and a little sleep.

There’s power in our honesty and in our safety. There are opportunities for us to see both sides of an issue through each other as we skip the “How could someone think that?” in favour of the “Oh, I can see why you feel the way you do.” Maybe one woman has parenting challenges that help another imagine that her own mother did all she could; a rant on health-care annoyances is met with a doctor’s own perspective on her disappointment in her changing profession. Yet we don’t go out of our way to stir up the subjects on which we would disagree (and there are probably several). It’s not a place to be right; it’s a place to be loved.

Source: My Peripatetic Posse: Safety in Numbers | Comment Magazine, https://www.cardus.ca/comment/article/my-peripatetic-posse-safety-in-numbers

Corolla, OBX: many years at OBX, many memories of the horses …

Carolla Beach … What a way to start the day! This is our idea of traffic

Lunar eclipse, wolf moon: I was so excited, but I slept through the entire event: I’m glad some people were up,and shared their photos!

The Evolution of Lin-Manuel Miranda: The Evolution of Lin-Manuel Miranda is just fun to watch!

https://youtu.be/u-gte9G2urU, The Evolution of Lin-Manuel Miranda,

1.21.18 … We cannot be held responsible for bibliomania!

Baltimore MD, Lee’s Oyster and Pint, The Helmand (Afghan), Gnocco, Pitango Coffee, The Book Thing – Baltimore MD:

So far, lunch at Lee’s Oyster and Pint, great Afghan meal at The Helmand last night with Averie and Suzanne, brunch today at gnocco, now coffee at Pitango … endless opportunities for good food, good drink and good company in Baltimore. And then The Book Thing. We cannot be held responsible for bibliomania!

We cannot be held responsible for bibliomania!

15
Jan
19

1.14.19 … “Hiraeth describes a deep, inborn sense of yearning for a home, a feeling, a place or person that is beyond this plane of existence”

FPC – Charlotte, TMBS, vocabulary, word nerd, hireath, thin places: We began our FPC – Charlotte TMBS with a discussion of hiraeth and thin places.

1.8.19

Breadcoins, Cary Umhau, Washington DC:

I’m so excited by this article about Breadcoin. Cary is a co-founder!


Quentin Wilson, 56, uses a “Breadcoin” to buy breakfast Friday from Naomi Banks at the Mission Muffins food truck. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

Jeffrey Carter, who is homeless, carried two gold-colored coins in his palm as he approached the Mission Muffins cafe trailer in Northwest Washington to exchange them for a breakfast burrito and apple juice.

The quarter-size coins — each worth $2.20 and inscribed with part of the Lord’s Prayer and an image of wheat — were “Breadcoins,” a new form of currency in the District intended for people in need.

Inspired by the popularity of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, Breadcoins have circulated in the District since 2016, but they are still relatively unknown. They are an option for people who worry that giving money to those in need might be used to fuel an addiction.

Source: ‘Breadcoin’ is a new currency in D.C. for people in need – The Washington Post, https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2019/01/11/breadcoin-is-new-currency-dc-people-need/

1.11.19

Kith/kin, UNC-CH, student mental health: For years I have received the DTH daily email. I rarely read it. But today, I clicked on it and there was the daughter of one of my best friends. Nice shout out to e, Eleanor!

Does CAPS' referral system work?

Eleanor Murray, a first-year public policy and global studies major, at the James A. Taylor Building, where Counseling and Psychological Services is located, on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019.  “As someone who did not realize I had mental health issues, it was helpful and resourceful and I felt supported while trying to find a therapist,” Murray says of her experience with CAPS. Murray would recommend CAPS and likes the multiple treatment options offered at CAPS.

Source: Does CAPS’ referral system work? – The Daily Tar Heel, https://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2019/01/caps-short-term-therapy-experiences-0114

1.14.19

Georgetown SC, DeBordieu: One of my favorite places …

From surf and sand to sightseeing and beyond, Myrtle Beach is always a good idea. But, when it’s time for a break from the buzz of the Grand Strand, head less than an hour south to Georgetown, one of six towns that make up the Hammock Coast. Here, you’ll have easy access to a multitude of activities, museums, and dining options. Read on for our affordable guide to the highlights of South Carolina’s third oldest city.

Source: Southern Hospitality Meets Modern Style in Georgetown, South Carolina, 
https://www.shermanstravel.com/advice/easy-southern-escapes-georgetown-south-carolina

1.8.19

Coffee Shops, Third Place, Burney’s Sweets and More, New places: Barb and I enjoying this just opened bakery, as in yesterday. And I will go back!

Barb and I were discussing where to meet. I receive a daily email called Charlotte Agenda which had just this day mentioned this new bakery. I had not realized it was it’s second day until they asked if they could take our picture.

Give Burney’s a try! Bakery known for its fried stuffed croissants now open near Uptown – Charlotte Agenda, https://www.charlotteagenda.com/153909/bakery-known-for-its-fried-stuffed-croissants-now-open-near-uptown/

And I think this could be a great “third place.”

I recently read a book by Ray Oldenburg – The Great Good Place – which suggested another happy place candidate, perhaps the most viable of all. The book is scholarly but accessible, an anthropological / sociological analysis of cafés, coffee shops, bars, and other hangouts. The book introduced to me a new term – third place – that made instant sense.

Third places are where people congregate other than work or home. England has pubs, France has cafés, and Austria has coffee houses. Once upon a time in the United States, common third places included country stores, post offices, barber shops, hair salons, soda shops, and taverns.

As described by Oldenburg, third places share common features. First, they are neutral, meaning that all people can come and go without penalty. If you don’t go to your third place for a few days or weeks, your return is greeted with interest and enthusiasm. Contrast that with work or home, where your eventual return after days of absence would be greeted with a pink slip or divorce papers.

Source: Happy Places: Third Places | Psychology Today, 
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-good-life/200912/happy-places-third-places

cider v cider, I remember the first time …,

I remember discovering alcoholic cider when I traveled to England with my sis in 1978. I liked it!

In the American state of New Hampshire, the state beverage of apple cider is like unfiltered apple juice. Usually, mulled spices are added, turning it into a spiced, piping hot drink. But in the famed cider-growing region of Britain’s West Country, cider is a fermented, alcoholic beverage. Look further across Europe and you’ll find that America’s version of apple cider is the outlier—cidre in France and sidra in Spain are both akin to British hard cider, rather than the American mulled beverage. So, how did Americans end up with such a unique form of apple cider?

People have been making cider for thousands of years. Wild apples, Malus sylvestris, grew naturally in the ancient British Isles. The Romans encouraged apple cultivation for cider, and when Christian monks established monasteries, they also made the beverage. When European settlers traveled to North America, they took cider with them.

Source: Why Cider Means Something Completely Different in America and Europe – Gastro Obscura, https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-is-american-cider-nonalcoholic

1.10.19

Street art, public art, Charlotte NC: And some Charlotte street art … I have a few favorites.

Charlotte’s mural scene is on the rise. Large-scale painting events like Talking Walls Mural Festivaland #nodacanjam help bring local and national artists together to crank out multiple pieces at the same time. And developers and businesses are catching on to the value of investing in public art, as you’ll see in places like South End’s Design Center, as well as at a number of apartment complexes.

The following is a hefty guide to where you can find more than 60 murals around town.

Source: The definitive guide to 60+ Charlotte street murals, mapped – Charlotte Agenda, https://www.charlotteagenda.com/153556/the-definitive-guide-to-60-charlotte-street-murals-mapped/

Neel Reid, Brookwood Hills, Atlanta GA,

Some Neel Reid and Brookwood Hills history for you.

The house is perfectly balanced, and though the facade appears plain at first sight, the bold ornaments draw the eye — the pediment across the front, balanced above a smaller pediment over a wide, ornate doorway topped by a sunken half circle.

These elements tell you the work you are looking at is not by your average architect but by an artist — a poet if you will — a man who brought beauty and precision to everything he touched.

Built in 1922, the house at 14 Palisades Road is the last man standing in a way.

It is one of seven Neel Reid designed just north of Ansley Park, a small settlement of houses designed by one of the South’s preeminent architects before there was a Brookwood Hills, and when Buckhead was several miles north on Peachtree Road.

Source: Brookwood Hills home one of seven originals and the last standing | Opinion | mdjonline.com, https://www.mdjonline.com/neighbor_newspapers/northside_sandy_springs/opinion/brookwood-hills-home-one-of-seven-originals-and-the-last/article_7400e9bc-1495-11e9-9300-cbcd24a794df.html

Longest Shutdown, Peggy Noonan:

I’ll throw in some­thing else I think we agree on. Gov­ern­ing by shut­down is ig­no­rant, cow­ardly and de­struc­tive. It is un­just to the in­no­cent, who are forced to deal with re­duced ser­vices, closed agen­cies and missed pay­checks. It’s dan­ger­ous: Some­thing bad will hap­pen with air se­cu­rity, food in­spec­tion—some­thing. It’s de­mor­al­iz­ing: It makes Amer­ica look in­com­pe­tent in the world, un­sta­ble, like an empty ad­ver­sary and in­ca­pable friend. It harms the de­mo­c­ra­tic spirit be­cause it so vividly tells Amer­i­cans—rubs their faces in it—that they’re pawns in a game as both par­ties pur­sue their self­ish ends.

Source:
End This Stupid Shutdown

1.10.19

Shutdown, Youngstown Steel, SCOTUS, Presidential Powers, US Constitution:

Justice Hugo Black delivered the majority opinion for the Court. Although it was the decision of the majority, it was clear that the Justices were split on a number of issues, as there five concurring opinions entered as well. Justice Black’s decision found for the steel industry, declaring that “[t]he President’s power, if any, to issue the order must stem either from an act of Congress or from the Constitution itself. There is no statute that expressly authorizes the President to take possession of property as he did here. Nor is there any act of Congress…from which such a power can be fairly implied.” The Court also found that, “[i]n the framework of our Constitution, the President’s power to see that the laws are faithfully executed refutes the idea that he is to be a lawmaker.”

Amongst the concurring opinions, and even compared to the majority opinion, Justice Robert Jackson’s still stands out today as the most useful in assessing the extent of executive power. Justice Jackson rejected strict boundaries between Congressional and Presidential power, and instead divided Presidential authority into three categories of legitimacy. First, and most legitimate, were cases in which “[t]he President acts pursuant to an express or implied authorization of Congress.” Second, is when Congress has been silent on the issue. And finally, “[w]hen the President takes measures incompatible with the expressed or implied will of Congress, his power is at its lowest ebb.”

President Truman was shocked by the decision. He immediately ordered the return of the steel mills to their owners, and the workers went on strike right away. The strike lasted more than 50 days. The effect of the Court’s decision limiting Presidential powers, however, has continued to impact executive decision-making throughout our nation’s history.

Source: Youngstown Steel: The Supreme Court stands up to the President – National Constitution Center, https://constitutioncenter.org/blog/youngstown-steel-the-supreme-court-stands-up-to-the-president

1.8.19

Shutdown:

There’s a lot at stake here — much more than just the next craft beer to be discovered and Instagrammed.

What spiritual practices is your congregation taking on in the new year? … such as ….walking a labyrinth … And a shout out to Katie Crowe!

For some, that means a deepening commitment to spiritual practices – to a regular, intentional discipline of taking the time to draw closer to God.

Congregants at First Presbyterian in Conway, Arkansas, learned about various postures for prayer – raising their arms as a passage from Mark’s Gospel was read, to worship God with all their souls.

People both inside and outside of churches are using all sorts of practices – such as centering prayer or walking a labyrinth or using lectio divina to read Scripture. Some have roots in ancient practices of early Christianity. Some involve silence; some seek God’s presence through art or movement.

Some tap into technology – using apps such as Pray as You Go, which draws from Ignatian spirituality and gives folks material to listen to while out for a walk or commuting to work or school.

Practicing a spiritual discipline can be communal work as well.

Quotes: I collect quotes. This is a good place to share a few.

I’m reading the preview chapter of “A Light So Lovely: The Spiritual Legacy of Madeleine L’Engle, Author of A Wrinkle in Time” by Sarah Arthur.

I love the dedication.

“For my young sons, Micah and Sam. May you tesser well.”

https://media.harpercollinschristian.com/files/z/PDF/LightSoLovely_samptxt.pdf

When old age shall this generation waste,

Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe

Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou sayst,

“Beauty is truth, truth beauty,” – that is all

Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.

— Ode on a Grecian Urn”

To be silent does not mean to be inactive; rather it means to breathe in the will of God, to listen attentively and be ready to obey.

– Dietrich Bonhoeffer, “Meditating on the Word”

“Manners are what hold a society together .. that and a reliable postal system. Propriety is concern for other people. When that goes out the window the gates of hell are surely opened and ignorance is king”

– Jane Austen

It is an ongoing temptation to think of ourselves as living under a curse. The loss of a friend, an illness, an accident, a natural disaster, a war, or any failure can make us quickly think that we are no good and are being punished. This temptation to think of our lives as full of curses is even greater when all the media present us day after day with stories about human misery.

Jesus came to bless us, not to curse us. But we must choose to receive that blessing and hand it on to others. Blessings and curses are always placed in front of us. We are free to choose. God says, Choose the blessings!

Source: Henri Nouwen Society | Daily Meditation | Henri Nouwen Society,

https://henrinouwen.org/resources/daily-meditation/

LOL, Art School of Fish:

15
Dec
18

12.15.18 … It was a joke … happy pilgrims? …

Camino de Santiago, Pilgrim’s Mass:

It was a joke. The idea came during the Christmas Eve mass. We bought half a kilo of Mary Jane and dropped it inside the censer. We are sure that people have left the Cathedral happier than ever.

Source: Two Altar Boys Were Arrested For Putting Weed In The Censer-Burner
https://internationalhighlife.com/two-altar-boys-arrested-putting-weed-censer-

Creative Mornings CLT: I attended my first Creative Mornings CLT and it was inspiring!

Incredibly inspiring and engrossing presentation by Dr. Stephanie Cooper-Lewter, director of the Leading on Opportunity Task Force, at today’s Creative Morning CLT. Plus the usual fun, music and creative inspiration. #CLTisCreative

Charlotte 250:

But the story is more interesting than that. The way that Charlotte came into being was unusual for the time and illustrates the spirit and vision that have so often been a part of Charlotte and of Mecklenburg County.

About 1750, European settlers began to come down from Pennsylvania into the western part of the Royal Colony of North Carolina. Within a dozen years these settlers formed a new county and called it Mecklenburg after the birthplace of their Queen Charlotte Sophia, who had come to England from Mecklenburg Strelitz, Germany. Seven men were appointed to purchase land and build a courthouse, then levy a tax to repay themselves. But there were not enough people in the new county to pay the expense, so they waited. For four years.

Then, in January 1767, they did something extraordinary.

Instead of just constructing an inexpensive courthouse on cheap land, three of the commissioners put up their own money and bought some of the best land in the county. It was 360 acres on the main road on a high hill and cost £90, a fortune at the time. There they built a courthouse raised up on pillars with market space below. Around it they laid out a town and began to sell lots.

The General Assembly met on Nov. 7, 1768, and five days later Thomas Polk introduced a bill to officially establish the Town of Charlotte. The bill passed both houses of the legislature on Nov. 23. Colonial Governor William Tryon signed it into law on Dec. 3.

Source: Charlotte began on a big gamble – and a loss | Charlotte Observer, 
https://www.charlotteobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article214058394.html
SCOTUS:
“Sotomayor often interrupts a lawyer by saying “I’m sorry,” even though her tone suggests she isn’t actually sorry, the AP story reports. And Gorsuch often tells a lawyer  he needs help understanding something, although “he’s often saying he’s not buying what the lawyer is selling,” the story concludes.

AP did a count for its story, published on Monday. Sotomayor said she is sorry 98 times last term and 30 times so far this term. And Gorsuch used various forms of “help me out” 25 times last term and 10 times this term.”

Lonnie Holley:

I spent 10 minutes in March of 2016 talking one on one with Lonnie Holley. It was a memorable conversation about true art, triggered by a discussion of the beauty of the brass water pipes behind us.

Congratulations on your recognition as a musician by the New Yorker!

Lonnie Holley, “MITH”

“Lonnie Holley was born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama, in the pre-civil-rights-era South. For decades, he was perhaps best known for his trenchant and transfixing sculptures, which were often assembled from found objects. Then, in 2012, he began formally releasing music. His work is rooted in experimental and noise traditions, but it also contains an excess of love and imagination.”

The Ten Best Albums of 2018, https://www.newyorker.com/culture/2018-in-review/the-ten-best-albums-of-2018

National Film Registry:

“The movies chosen are instead meant to reflect American culture as compositions of consequence.”

Source: Latest Entries to the National Film Registry Admit More Diverse Styles, Stories : NPR, 
https://www.npr.org/2018/12/12/675384976/jurassic-park-the-shining-and-23-other-movies-added-to-national-film-registry
Obituary, Ruby Clay, E. Rivers Elementary School – Atlanta GA:
RIP, Mrs. Clay, my wonderful amazing third grade teacher. I had planned to reach out to her and tell her thank you for all she did for me as a third grader.
“Ruby loved education and having an impact on the lives of children.  She especially loved reading and the impact it could have in children’s lives. She taught for over 30 years as a classroom teacher and a reading specialist.”
Source: Obituary for Ruby H. Clay | Donaldson Funeral Home, P. A. (Laurel), https://www.donaldsonlaurel.com/notices/Ruby-Clay



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