Posts Tagged ‘quotes

16
Feb
16

2.16.16 … “tonight’s episode was devoted to bringing out the puppy in everyone” …

Image-1“Solvitur  Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2016 Labyrinth Walks (Walk 7/40), Pewter Finger Labyrinth @ Home – Charlotte: No one said I had to walk a full size labyrinth.  Let your fingers do the walking …

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 ‘Downton Abbey’ Season 6/Episode 7: Crash and Burn, The New York Times:  Send in the puppies!

 

Send in the puppies! Oh, I know, Abbots, there was only one flesh-and-blood pooch on view: an aww-inspiring yellow lab who will henceforth bear the name Tiaa in the hope that no terrorist group lays claim to it. (As any imbecile could tell you, Tiaa was the wife of Amenhotep II.) But I couldn’t escape the feeling that tonight’s episode was devoted to bringing out the puppy in everyone.

Source: ‘Downton Abbey’ Season 6, Episode 7: Crash and Burn – The New York Times

 

Sharon UMC – Charlotte church,  “Holy Land”, Story | WJZY

A Charlotte church is trying to turn its land into apartments, restaurants, and even a hotel, but theyre not actually going anywhere. The congregation plans to stay put on the land and let all that development go up around them.The City of Charlotte’s City Council had a public hearing Monday night to re-zone Sharon United Methodist Churchs seven-acre property in the SouthPark area and turn it into “mixed-use development.”

The building would be torn down, and a new church would be built, so that the congregation can make way for all the other new neighbors. Senior Pastor Kyle Thompson said, “We’re not here to be a fortress walled off from the community. We’re here to be in and among people trying to share the love of God with them.”

Charlotte church redeveloping “Holy Land”Thompson said the concept of turning church property into “mixed-use development” is the first of its kind in the Southeast and perhaps the United States.Thompson said, “Things have just built up around us, and we find ourselves in a different community, and so we’re trying to adjust to that.”

Source: Charlotte church redeveloping “Holy Land” – Story | WJZY

Daily Overview,   Hoover Dam: This is one of my favorite websites and I loved today’s post … Hoover Dam!

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Daily Overview Page

Hoover Dam is a 726-foot high, 1,244-foot wide concrete arch-gravity dam located on the Colorado River at the border of Arizona and Nevada. Constructed between 1931 and 1936 during the Great Depression, a workforce of approximately 20,000 poured a total of 4.36 million cubic yards of concrete to complete the structure. That is enough concrete to pave a two-lane highway from San Francisco to New York City. 36°0′56″N 114°44′16″W

Source: Daily Overview – Hoover Dam is a 726-foot high, 1,244-foot wide…

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, RBG, quotes: Another favorite from the internet today … K12744144_548123298702883_3535158997842440966_n

 

Krispy Kreme, Betty Crocker, Krispy Kreme Cake Mix with Original Doughnut Glaze:  Really!

 

Source: Krispy Kreme Cake Mix with Original Doughnut Glaze – Betty Crocker

 

 

02
Mar
15

3.2.15 … “Think and wonder. Wonder and think.” – Dr. Seuss … happy birthday, Dr. Seuss …

Dr. Seuss, quotes: Happy birthday, Dr. Seuss …

 

Seuss

 

ISIS, Islamic “Reformation”, Religion Dispatches: Very interesting in light of the recent Atlantic which it references …

But while reformation may signal modernity – and this is important in the context of any discussion about the Islamic State – it doesn’t always signal progress, liberalism, or democracy. It’s often presented as a given that the existence of modern democracy, capitalism, and science grow purely out of the reformation, but John Calvin was not Thomas Jefferson (arguably Thomas Jefferson wasn’t even Thomas Jefferson). It’s a reductionist understanding of history, and it becomes dangerous when misapplied to current events.

Our educations have tended to gloss over the brutal violence of the sixteenth and seventeenth-centuries that was perpetrated by both Catholics and Protestants. Millions of Europeans were killed on a scale unimaginable during the medieval era (even though our common parlance has us believe that that the Middle Ages were a particularly brutal period). From the French wars of religion, to the English civil wars, to the Thirty Years’ War (where possibly 30% of German civilians perished) the arrival of modernity signaled terror and horror in many corners.

How we use words like “medieval,” “reformation,” and “modern” must be exact if we’re to make any sense out of what the Islamic State is, and how we are to defeat it. Graeme Wood’s controversial Atlantic cover essay “What ISIS Really Wants” has opened discussion in the press about what language we use to describe the Islamic State. It may be politically expedient to deny that the Islamic State is Islamic (and of course the majority of the world’s Muslims find it reprehensible) but it’s also to commit the “No True Scotsmen Fallacy.”

Where Wood’s analysis falters is when he claims that there is a “dishonest campaign to deny the Islamic State’s medieval religious nature.” The fact is that when other pundits declare a need for an Islamic reformation that is exactly what the Islamic State is delivering. Far from medieval they’re eminently modern, they are simply an example of the worst grotesqueries that modernity has to offer.

And they’re not early modern as my previous historical examples have it, they’re as modern as we are. They may wish to return to their own fantasy version of an ancient past (and Wood even notes that ISIS recruitment videos utilize scenes of medieval warfare skillfully edited from contemporary movies) but no group, liberal or reactionary, can escape their own time period. To designate them as “medieval” is to merely engage in an outmoded school of historical critique that has more to do with our own constructed pasts and our own prejudices than it does reality.

The modern world has never been devoid of religion and the presence of religion does not mean we are in the medieval. We are not fighting a medieval army for the simple reason that it is not the middle ages. It is to buy into that old “war of civilizations” idea that eliminates complex historical contingencies in favor of a narrative every bit as mythic as what the Islamic State believes about itself. Indeed it is a formidable and evil army, but it is a modern army. The Islamic State, as Haroon Moghul notes in Salon, was born out of the catastrophic US invasion of Iraq. From the debris of that incredible mistake they have taken the technology of modernity and the rhetoric of the Hollywood action film to claim they’re building a caliphate.

via ISIS is the Islamic “Reformation” | Religion Dispatches.

 $2 dollar bill:  I love the idea of getting a stash of $2 bills for tips.

Legends, Myths and Factoids

Several legends have arisen around the $2 dollar bill over time:

The scene of the Declaration of Independence that appears on the bill’s reverse is not a perfect duplicate of the John Trumbull painting. Five figures were removed to make the image fit the bill

In 2004, President Jefferson’s estate and home Monticello had an admission price of $13. As a results most people required $2 dollars in change. The staff at Monticello would hand out $2 dollar bills featuring President Jefferson’s portrait as change for admission to his estate.

A two-dollar bill is often used as a tracer by small stores to track robberies. A store clerk can keep a two-dollar bill at the bottom of their one-dollar bill slot in the cash drawer with its serial number recorded in case of robbery.

In 2005 Stuart Woods wrote a novel called “Two Dollar Bill.” One of the major characters made it a point to always tip with two-dollar bills.

The two-dollar bill has a long association with horseracing and was popular at racetracks for placing a two-dollar bet.

Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple Computing, buys two dollars by the sheet from the Treasury Department. He then has them bound into a booklet and the bills act as “tear off” pages.

via $2 Bill History – The $2 Dollar Bill – America’s Rarest US Currency.

Significance of Red Doors in a Church: I commented in a labyrinth about the red doors, “As for the red doors … I see them usually at Episcopal and Lutheran churches.”  One friend, an Episcopalian did not know the symbolism.   I found this:

According to Dr. Richard C Hoefler, dean of Christ Chapel at Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary, “Christians have entered into worship, into the presence of God, through the blood of Christ.” It is also said that a red door in the Lutheran Church harkens back to the time of Martin Luther, who posted his 95 Theses on the red doors of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany—the crimson color symbolizes the church as part of the Reformation. (Pastor Kuhlman, can you confirm?)

On the website St. David’s Episcopal Church  in Laurinburg, NC it explains: “Red Front Doors. The red doors symbolize the blood of Christ, which is our entry into salvation. They also remind us of the blood of the martyrs, the seeds of the church.”

Historically a church has been a place of sanctuary, a place where a soldier could not pursue an enemy, much like when one takes refuge in  Christ the enemy, the devil and evil,  cannot pursue and destroy you. Thank you Bonnie for bringing this little known history to my attention.

By the way, this door is at St. Francis Assisi in South Windsor Connecticut.

I am now on a quest for other Red Doors around the country, here is one in Nebraska City at an Episcopal Church

via Significance of Red Doors in a Church.

The Tree of Contemplative Practices | On Being, labyrinth walks:

via The Tree of Contemplative Practices | On Being.

19
Jul
14

7.19.14 … “you are not a drop in the ocean … you are the entire ocean on a drop.” – Rumi

Rumi, quotes: I really like the quote.  So who is Rumi?

 

viaTwitter / NatureSacred: ‘You are not a drop in the ….

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Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhī (Persian: جلال‌الدین محمد بلخى‎), also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī (جلال‌الدین محمد رومی), Mevlana or Mawlānā (مولانا, meaning Our Master), Mevlevi or Mawlawī (مولوی, meaning My Master), and more popularly in the English-speaking world simply as Rumi (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273), was a 13th-century Persian[1][8] poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic.[9] Rumi’s importance is considered to transcend national and ethnic borders. Iranians, Turks, Afghans, Tajiks, and other Central Asian Muslims as well as the Muslims of South Asia have greatly appreciated his spiritual legacy in the past seven centuries.[10] His poems have been widely translated into many of the world’s languages and transposed into various formats. He has been described as the “most popular poet in America”[11] and the “best selling poet in the US”.[12][13]

Rumi’s works are written in Persian and his Mathnawi remains one of the purest literary glories of Persia,[14] and one of the crowning glories of the Persian language.[15] His original works are widely read today in their original language across the Persian-speaking world (Iran, Tajikistan, Afghanistan and parts of Persian speaking Central Asia and the Caucasus)[16] Translations of his works are very popular, most notably in Turkey, Azerbaijan, the United States and South Asia.[17] His poetry has influenced Persian literature as well as Turkish, Punjabi, Urdu and some other Iranian, Turkic and Indic languages that have been influenced by Persian, e.g. Pashto, Ottoman Turkish, Chagatai and Sindhi.

via Rumi – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Wikipedia edit twitterbot,  Russian State TV, MH17 crash page: interesting …

Over at GlobalVoices, Kevin Rothrock reports that an IP address at VGTRK, the state-run TV and radio network, edited the Russian-language Wikipedia page about aviation accidents to say that Malaysia Air Flight MH17 “was shot down by Ukrainian soldiers.”

The edit seems to have been in response to an earlier edit from an IP address in Kiev that described the plane as being shot down “by terrorists of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic with Buk system missiles, which the terrorists received from the Russian Federation.”

via A Wikipedia edit twitterbot caught the Russian State TV editing the MH17 crash page..

 Elizabeth Warren, age:  The answer may surprise you..

Other voters guesstimated that Warren was around a decade younger than Clinton. She’s actually only 18 months younger, born in 1949, 12 years before the current president of the United States, and four years before the current dynastic hope of the GOP, Jeb Bush.

via This voter guessed how old Elizabeth Warren is. The answer may surprise you..

Bahamas: The view from the ISS:  Magnificient!!

The bright lights to the upper left outline Florida (the long glow is from Miami), and you can trace cities up the east coast of the US. Cuba dominates the lower left (cut off a bit by an ISS solar panel), but the teal and turquoise waters are what draw the eye. The islands right in the middle are the Bahamas, and the bright glow smack dab in the middle of the picture, is (I believe) Nassau — remind me not to go stargazing there! The lights must wash out the sky. But that’s probably not why people go to Nassau in the first place.

Speaking of the sky, note the green arc of light over the Earth’s limb. This is called airglow, and it due to the slow release of energy from sunlight the upper atmosphere stores during the day. It’s actually a fascinating physical process which I’ve described before. In that link I also talk about the brownish-yellow glow beneath it: That’s from glowing sodium in the air, and the source of that sodium may be meteors that have previously burned up in our atmosphere!

Amazing. There’s no such thing as just a pretty picture taken from space — there is always a lot more going on than you might think. And just like any artwork, knowing the story behind the beauty makes it that much more wonderful.

via Bahamas: The view from the ISS..

Social Media Tips for Travel, Travel + Leisure:

Increasing your digital know-how is the key to upgrading your next vacation. To help you reap the benefits, here are seven social media tips for trave

via Social Media Tips for Travel – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

America’s Most Hipster Cities – Epicenter of the American Hipster in 2013, Thrillist, Asheville NC, Boulder CO,  Louisville KY:  Some of my favorite places!!

9) Louisville, KY

Louisville’s all about bourbon, BBQ, and bands that play indie rock. Oh, and beer. It’s home to rockers My Morning Jacket and VHS or Beta (who, ironically, now live in Brooklyn), is the birthplace of Hunter S. Thompson, and actually has restaurants that don’t require staff uniforms (!!!) — so don’t even think about complimenting the waitress on her flair. The city’s best hotel, 21C, is a “boutique-cum-contemporary art museum”.

6) Boulder, CO

More Phish fanatic than Passion Pit aficionado, the local hipster in Boulder’s of the Birk-wearing, green-friendly, outdoor-enthusing variety. Who wants to go slacklining??? No? Wanna toss the disc, then? Come on, man.Every year on April 20th (4/20) at 4:20p, thousands gather on the CU Boulder campus to smoke a bunch of pot. Boulder is home to the famed Naropa Institute, where Allen Ginsberg himself was professor emeritus, spreading beatnik joy/ ennui. If there’s a fine line between hipster and hippie, it merges in Boulder.

4) Asheville, NC

If you’re not one of the Mumford & Sons-inspired buskers jamming on the street, you’re likely taking a long hike in the mountains to “find yourself” or sitting on your front porch in a handmade rocking chair you whittled while watching Girls on your iPad. You could also be drinking a delicious pint of local craft suds, as Asheville’s got a solid beer scene. Farm-to-table eateries are standard, outdoor riverfront bars are the rage, and everyone is apparently an artist.

via America’s Most Hipster Cities – Epicenter of the American Hipster in 2013 – Thrillist.

15 Product Trademarks, Victims Of Genericization, Consumerist: This has always interested me … Jello, Kleenex and in Atlanta, Coke.

Sometimes, we hurt the ones we love. Which is why even if we didn’t mean to be so harsh, many products we use every day have become the victims of trademark genericization, meaning they’ve morphed from a single product identified under a name to an entire product category. And when courts get involved it becomes “genericide,” which sounds even more murderous. Can’t you just imagine Law & Order: Genericized Trademarks? [dun dun]

While some of the 15 products below are truly victims of genericide, having had their trademarks canceled in a court, others simply failed to register as trademarks at all, or in some cases, weren’t renewed or were abandoned for other reasons. Which means now you can have your own escalator company or sell flooring and call it linoleum. Wouldn’t suggest setting up your own heroin company, however.

via 15 Product Trademarks That Have Become Victims Of Genericization – Consumerist.

Rooftop Film Club – Fargo, Handpicked Events, London:  What fun … maybe next year in Charlotte! 🙂

About your visit: As you enter the Queen of Hoxton rooftop you will see the box office is situated to your left where you can collect your tickets, headphones and blankets (if necessary). Please note that blankets are available on a first come, first served basis.

via Rooftop Film Club – Fargo – Handpicked Events.

08
Jul
14

7.8.14 … canned soup …

Progresso “Artisan” Creamy Potato Soup with Sausage and Kale, canned soup, artisan: Progresso “Artisan” Creamy Potato Soup with Sausage and Kale was very good … But doesn’t soup hermetically sealed in box go against the definition of “artisan?” Obviously if you follow my conversations, you know of my discussion of the use/misuse of this word.

 Crumbs cupcake empire:

When news broke last night that the Crumbs cupcake empire crumbled, outlets were quick to declare (yet again) the end of the cupcake trend as we know it. While the shuttering of a major chain is certainly noteworthy, this isn’t actually the end of a era—we still have Magnolia, Sprinkles, and countless other sugar-laden chain bakeries. There are still Sex and City tour buses and bachelorette parties, not to mention people who just generally enjoy the taste of cupcakes (not that there’s anything wrong with that). Even Robicelli’s, a Brooklyn bakery that happens to bake quite excellent cupcakes, admits that cupcakes are still a hot-ticket item:

Here’s my theory: Crumbs closed because it made awful cupcakes (and some questionable financial decisions). Despite its attempts at vaguely innovative flavors like Oreo, Crumbs did not produce a good product. Maybe the rest of the population finally wised up to that fact—down with mediocrity! If you want to eat a cupcake, great. But it should at least be a palatable one.

What’s more, this may be evidence of an overall trend: Americans are developing a sense of taste (at last). Other bland, mass-market food categories are down as well. Domestic light beer sales will hit a 10-year low in 2015, reports Bloomberg Businessweek. Why the plummet? Because people are veering toward craft beer, imports, and cider. Translation: People want to drink things that taste good.

The frozen food industry is hurting as well, according to both National Journal and the Wall Street Journal. ”Within this foodie culture the last few years, I think there has been a change in how some people define healthy foods,” Rob McCutcheon, president of ConAgra’s consumer frozen-food division, told the WSJ. “There is definitely a push toward products that are more real, higher quality, more homemade and closer to the source.”

Even the salad dressing industry is feeling the pain of consumer discernment; sales for premium salad dressing are growing at two to three times the rate of regular dressing, the WSJ reported last year. (Bonus: It’s really easy to make your own.)

No one even wants cereal anymore either! Why? Because cereal—whether ultra-sugary or ultra-healthy—can’t quite live up to the morning hero du jour: yogurt!

Does this mean the artisanal food revolution has succeeded? Have we home cooks won the war? Will parents be rolling out kouign amann for their kids’ birthday parties? Will shoyu ramen replace the Quarter Pounder?

Maybe not quite yet. Though casual chains such as Olive Garden and Applebee’s are struggling to stay relevant, TGI Friday’s actually just launched a new “endless appetizer” special: a neverending deluge of mozzarella sticks, potato skins, and more—for only $10. So you know what? Forget what I just said about people caring more about quality than quantity (and price). This is America. Cupcakes may crumble, craft beer may bubble up, but we will always have our fried cheese. Only, perhaps a little more now than before, it may be burrata.

via Crumbs Is Closing—Are Americans Developing a Palate?.

Bonaparte, Joseph Bonaparte, US, history:

Mental Floss ‏@mental_floss 1m

Napoleons older brother Joseph Bonaparte lived for many years in New Jersey.

via 3 Twitter.

 AS a former king, he entertained on a lavish scale. In exile, he surrounded himself with European artwork. He was oldest brother to the conqueror of Europe, but he far preferred gardening to warfare.

Beginning in 1816, Joseph Bonaparte, the brother of Napoleon, was a New Jersey resident. Once king of Spain and Naples, Bonaparte made his home in exile at Point Breeze, a promontory overlooking the junction of the Crosswicks and Thornton Creeks with the Delaware River.

In the last two years, students from Monmouth University in West Long Branch, led by Richard F. Veit, an associate professor of anthropology, have worked to unearth the foundations of Joseph Bonaparte’s first house, which was destroyed by fire in 1820. In two six-week summer digs this year and last, some 125 students recovered more than 14,000 artifacts, mostly remnants of china, marble and glass.

“Uncovering the foundation cornerstone was hands down the most exciting find we made,” Sean McHugh, a graduate student from Brick, said about finding a portion of the mansion. “It helps orient the whole site.”

Monmouth University’s find was showcased at a recent open house at Point Breeze, hosted by the Divine Word Missionaries, whose seminary now sits on the property. “The university’s undertaking of archaeology here has helped bring the hidden pages of history back to life,” said Pierre Villmont, France’s ambassador to the United States, who attended the event.

Little remains on the property original to Bonaparte’s time. The former estate is honeycombed with underground tunnels, which were used to bring in supplies and also offered a quick escape route if enemies came to call. A brick archway now teetering in the woods may have once supported a carriageway to Bonaparte’s house, according to Keri Sansevere, a Monmouth student from Middletown.

While Joseph Bonaparte’s time in New Jersey may be obscure to some, residents of Bordentown City are well acquainted with his story. Mayor John W. Collom III talked of exploring the underground tunnels as a teenager. Kathleen Pierce, who would have been a close neighbor of M. Bonaparte, said a local repairman once asked her, “And what Bonaparte artifact do you own?”

Bonaparte, who escaped to America from France after his brother’s defeat in 1815, purchased Point Breeze in 1816. He quickly set about enlarging the existing house and acquiring more land, eventually owning more than 1,800 acres in the Bordentown area.

His first mansion burned on Jan. 4, 1820. Bonaparte was away but arrived in time to see the roof collapse, Dr. Veit said.

But his Bordentown neighbors rushed to the property when they saw the flames, and rescued most of his artwork, furniture, silver and other valuables. Bonaparte later publicly praised their efforts in a letter written to local newspapers.

He then built a second, grander mansion, set farther back from the river. This residence was judged by many visitors to be the “second-finest house in America,” after the White House, according to Patricia Tyson Stroud, author of “The Man Who Had Been King,” which was used in Dr. Veit’s course work for the dig.

When he was king of Spain, Bonaparte loved wine and dinner parties — his nickname was “Joey Bottles” — and Monmouth students unearthed generous evidence of this in the hundreds of broken wine bottles recovered at the site. Bonaparte also loved to garden, and Dr. Veit said his estate was a forerunner to Central Park — with an artificial lake and marble statues — that Bonaparte often opened to the public.

In 1839, Bonaparte left New Jersey for Europe, where he died in 1844. His second home was bought by Henry Beckett, the son of a former British consul, who promptly razed it to build another mansion. He was dubbed “Beckett the Destroyer” by local residents.

via History – Unearthing the Home of That Other Bonaparte, the One Who Lived in New Jersey – NYTimes.com.

Why Every City Needs a Labyrinth – CityLab, maze v. labyrinth: Not really a labyrinth, but very cool!

 

I’m the kind of person who probably couldn’t find his way out of a paper bag, so it was with some hesitation that I stepped into the BIG Maze. This is a project at D.C.’s National Building Museum, a summer folly designed by the always-entertaining Danish architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group, a plywood playground where kids will snap selfies all season long. For a person with a sense of direction like mine, though, it couldn’t be worse if a Minotaur were lurking in the middle.

The labyrinth swallowed me. Though the structure is dwarfed by the cavernous museum itself, this maze is no slouch, spanning more than 3,000 square feet. In a word, it’s big: The maple-wood walls rise 18 feet high, and each side is is 57 feet long. Welp, I thought, as I assessed my inventory: If I was going to have to live in a maze for the holiday weekend, at least I had a Perrier.

via Why Every City Needs a Labyrinth – CityLab.

quotes:

As Edward de Bono would say, “Creativity involves breaking out of established patterns in order to look at things in a different way.”

via CATHERINE WILMER | CACHE Worldwide.

MegaBus: I’m on the MegaBus with Steph Curry’s mother-in-law. She is one of the most down to earth women I have met in a long time … And one very proud grandmother. She paid a dollar for her trip.

 

02
May
14

5.2.14 … Delicious Trumps, Pretense Stinks, Comfort Feels Good …

Local Three Kitchen & Bar – Atlanta:

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So I first heard of Local Three last week here in Charlotte.  Chef Chris Hall was in Charlotte for Charlotte Food and Wine.  I enjoyed him, so I sought his restaurant out in Atlanta.  My experience was very good.  The Vidalia Onion Soup and the Hoppin John  were both excellent.  But the cost was excessive for lunch.  So although I would recommend the food (it was delicious!), I would not recommend the restaurant unless you are on an expense account.

Creamy Vidalia Onion Soup: Cabot Cheddar, Thyme, Garlic Croutons $4.53/$6.53

Hoppin’ John $4.93

Pimento Cheese Grits $4.93

Carolina Mountain Trout: Anson Mills Rice Grits, “Succotash”, Lobster Saffron Broth $19.93

via Local Three Kitchen & Bar – Atlanta Restaurant.

Their restaurant Local Three represents a shared philosophy on food, drink, hospitality and how to do business. That philosophy is straightforward: People Matter Most, Local Is Priority, Seasonal Makes Sense, Authenticity Rules, Quality Governs, Delicious Trumps, Pretense Stinks, Comfort Feels Good, Appreciation Tastes Better, Prudence Sustains It All.

via Local Three Kitchen & Bar – Atlanta Restaurant.

Daily Meditation by Henri Nouwen, friends:

One friend may offer us affection, another may stimulate our minds, another may strengthen our souls. The more able we are to receive the different gifts our friends have to give us, the more able we will be to offer our own unique but limited gifts. Thus, friendships create a beautiful tapestry of love.

via Daily Meditation: May 2, 2014 | Daily Meditation by Henri Nouwen.

Do or Di, blogs, Westminster classmates:  I have always loved Di’s humor and joie de vie.  It shows in her new blog.  Enjoy!

Do or Di | fixed on the horizon; happily distracted by the present

fixed on the horizon; happily distracted by the present

via Do or Di | fixed on the horizon; happily distracted by the present.

Andy Baio @waxpancake, Kickstarter:

Andy Baio @waxpancake,

Kickstarter turned five today, and the team made a video looking back at its crazy history: youtube.com/watch?v=qcR_UH…

29 Apr

 

On April 28th 2009 at 4:27 pm EST, Kickstarter went live. To celebrate the past five years, we put together this history of Kickstarter.

via ▶ A Brief History of Kickstarter – YouTube.

Freshman Shames Ivy League College with His Personal Story About ‘White Privilege’, Princeton University: Worth reading and thinking about …

My exploration did yield some results. I recognize that it was my parents’ privilege and now my own that there is such a thing as an American dream which is attainable even for a penniless Jewish immigrant.

I am privileged that values like faith and education were passed along to me. My grandparents played an active role in my parents’ education, and some of my earliest memories included learning the Hebrew alphabet with my Dad. It’s been made clear to me that education begins in the home, and the importance of parents’ involvement with their kids’ education—from mathematics to morality—cannot be overstated. It’s not a matter of white or black, male or female or any other division which we seek, but a matter of the values we pass along, the legacy we leave, that perpetuates “privilege.” And there’s nothing wrong with that.

Behind every success, large or small, there is a story, and it isn’t always told by sex or skin color. My appearance certainly doesn’t tell the whole story, and to assume that it does and that I should apologize for it is insulting. While I haven’t done everything for myself up to this point in my life, someone sacrificed themselves so that I can lead a better life. But that is a legacy I am proud of.

I have checked my privilege. And I apologize for nothing.

via Freshman Shames Ivy League College with His Personal Story About ‘White Privilege’.

A friend posted the above  and another mutual friend responded with this.  I have to admit I laughed.

via ▶ Louis CK – Being White – YouTube.

Uploaded on Nov 27, 2008

From his latest stand-up “Chewed Up” – Louis CK tells people why it’s great being a white male. It’s advantages and it’s futuristic disadvantages.

via ▶ Louis CK – Being White – YouTube.

18 Things to Eat, Buy, and Do in Puerto Rico, KieroCoco Coconut Water, food & drink:  I loved Puerto Rico, so I thought I would share this list.

Fresh coconut juice is one of the great, unsung pleasures in life, and I’m not ashamed to say I marched around El Mercado cradling a giant coconut pierced with a frilly cocktail umbrella. At the KieroCoco stand, from whence it came, you select your coconut (rounder ones are juicier; browner ones are sweeter), and then drill into it with the help of a hand-cranked doohickey attached to a mobile cart.

via 18 Things to Eat, Buy, and Do in Puerto Rico

2.4.13 … Becoming Kind … | Dennard’s Clipping Service:  Everyone once a while I notice repeated returns to one post.  With this post, originally it was because of the cone of shame cartoon.  But later, I am not sure what has drawn the interest to this 2.4.13 … Becoming Kind …  I then laughed at myself because a post that is entitled, “Becoming Kind,” leads with a cartoon referenced as “cone of shame.”

New Yorker Cartoons, The New Yorker, cell phones, cone of shame, LOL:  I deserve a cone of shame  …

 Downton Abbey, Dowager, quotes:  The Dowager, she gets all the good quotes!

Albert Schweitzer, quotes, A Mighty Girl:  A Might Girl is one of my favorite source for quotes.

 

“Do something wonderful, people may imitate it.” — Albert Schweitzer

via A Mighty Girl.

just a thought …, Henri Nouwen, Tolstoi, kindness:

Here is the great challenge: All people, whatever their color, religion, or sex, belong to humankind and are called to be kind to one another, treating one another as brothers and sisters. There is hardly a day in our lives in which we are not called to this.

via Daily Meditation: Becoming Kind.

Nothing can make our lives, or the lives of other people, more beautiful than perpetual kindness. – Leo Tolstoy in A Calendar of Wisdom

via Nothing can make our lives, or the lives of other… • literary jukebox.

when bad things happen …, What Gives 365:  From one of my favorite blogs …

I went to church this morning wanting to thank the universe for sparing us … but that assumes, of course, that the universe would have been punishing us had things turned out differently. And therein lies the shame and guilt when bad things happen. The truth is a terrible accident can happen to anyone, at any time, and often there is nobody to blame. But that reality is awfully terrifying to admit; we want our universe to make more sense than that and we want to feel as if our good intentions and conduct will spare us from tragedy.

via Up in smoke. | What Gives 365.

E.B. White, quotes, LOL:

source: Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership..

via 2.4.13 … Becoming Kind … | Dennard’s Clipping Service.

 

25
Apr
14

4.25.14 … “Work worth doing.” I like that …

Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, quotes, happiness,  The Happiness Project: “Work worth doing.” I like that.

Years ago, when I was a lawyer, I clerked for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor – which was one of those rare, amazing, once-in-a-lifetime work experiences. There are many reasons that I don’t regret law school and my years as a lawyer before becoming a writer, and the chance to work for Justice O’Connor is one of them.

The other day, I was on the phone with the Justice. We were talking about her terrific new site, iCivics, which teaches children about civics, and she’d also visited my website.

“I can tell you what I believe is the secret to a happy life,” she said.

“What’s that, Justice?” I asked. (Sidenote: when you speak directly to a Justice, you address him or her as “Justice” – e.g., “Justice, the cert petitions are here.” This, I always thought, must act as a frequent reminder to them about the value they are supposed to embody!) “What’s your secret?”

“Work worth doing,” she answered firmly.

via The Secret to Happiness, in Three Words, According to Justice Sandra Day O’Connor « The Happiness Project.

Justice John Paul Stevens, marijuana , gay marriage, The Two-Way : NPR, , Six Amendments:  A lot covered here … “he considers himself a conservative.” 

Stevens’ comments are perhaps not particularly surprising. Stevens was, after all, considered part of the court’s liberal wing.

But he was appointed by President Gerald Ford and he considers himself a conservative. Also, just years ago a pronouncement of this kind would have been a bombshell.

Just think back to 1987, when President Ronald Reagan nominated Judge Douglas H. Ginsburg to the high court.

Nine days later, after Ginsburg admitted that he had smoked marijuana, he asked Reagan to withdraw his nomination.

The 94-year-old Stevens has been making waves recently with a new book, Six Amendments, in which he proposes six changes to the U.S. Constitution.

Among them: the banishment of capital punishment, a limit on the amount of corporate money that can be pumped into elections and a curb on the individual right to bear arms.

Scott also asked Stevens about gay marriage. Stevens says that the dramatic shift in public opinion on that issue gives him confidence that “in due course when people actually think through the issues they’ll be willing to accept the merits of some of my arguments.”

Much more of Scott’s conversation with Stevens will air on Weekend Edition Saturday. Click here to find your NPR member station. We’ll add the as-aired interview to the top of this post on Saturday.

via Retired Justice John Paul Stevens: Marijuana Should Be Legal : The Two-Way : NPR.

“It’s certainly not easy to get the Constitution amended, and perhaps that’s one flaw in the Constitution that I don’t mention in the book,” he said during a wide-ranging interview with USA TODAY in his chambers at the court. Noting his book’s half dozen proposed amendments, he mused, “Maybe I should have had seven.”

Even at 94, he said, “it’s amazing how many interesting things there are to learn about the world.”

via Former justice Stevens wants to change Constitution.

Pangea, 250 Million-Year-Old Piece Of Africa Found In Southeastern US, Brunswick Magnetic Anomaly:

Scientists have known for some time of the presence of a strange band of magnetic rock that stretches from Alabama through Georgia and offshore to the North Carolina coast, but its origin has been debated. The ribbon of rock is buried about 9 to 12 miles below the surface. According to a new study published in the journal Geological Society of America, the fissure, known as the Brunswick Magnetic Anomaly, was created hundreds of millions of years ago when the crusts of Africa and North America were yanked apart like stitches in a piece of cloth.

“There was an attempt to rip away Florida and southern Georgia,” geologist Robert Hatcher, of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, told Discovery. “So you have a failed rift there … There are pieces of crust that started in Africa.”

Crustal rocks keep records of Earth’s magnetic field. The magnetism is stored by minerals, particularly strongly magnetic minerals like magnetite. Scientists can discover important information about plate tectonics, the large-scale motion of Earth’s outermost shell, by determining the source of distinct striped magnetic anomalies – kind of like studying the fingerprints left behind at a crime scene.

Scientists have attributed the Brunswick Magnetic Anomaly to a belt of 200 million-year-old volcanic rocks that were formed around the time the Atlantic Ocean was shaped. The location of the magnetic anomaly is thought to mark the point where North America separated from the rest of the supercontinent Pangaea.

via 250 Million-Year-Old Piece Of Africa Found In Southeastern US, Larger Portions May Still Be Discovered.

Beijing’s Subway Stops, Literally Translated,  China Real Time Report, WSJ, kith/kin, China Bike Trip 2007:  Our bike guides in China referred to one town where we stayed as “safety alarm town.” After reading this blog post and looking at the Beijing Subway map, I’m thinking “safety alarm town” was an accurate translation of the town’s name!

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Earlier this month, a map of Hong Kong’s MTR system with stations’ Chinese names literally translated into English made the rounds on the Internet, featuring such gems as “Permanent Security” (Heng On) and “Bamboo Basket Bay” (Shau Kei Wan).

That map got us at China Real Time wondering about the literal translations of Beijing’s subway station names. We couldn’t fit all 200+ stations, so we narrowed it down to some with the best translations.

It was hard to come up with a good methodology, but in the end we opted to essentially plug individual characters into Baidu translate and see what came out.

Many of the stations, particularly those on Line 2, are named after the capital’s old city gates. Qianmen is, literally, the Front Gate, while Andingmen is the Stability Gate and Tiananmen, which marked the entrance to the Forbidden City and now makes up two stops on Line 1 (east and west), is the Heavenly Peace Gate.

Others are named after the landmarks that dotted the city in its idyllic days before it was built up into endless ring roads of traffic: Dirt Bridge (Tuqiao on the Baotong line off Line 1), Peony Garden (Mudanyuan on Line 10), Cattail Yellow Elm (Puhuangyu on Line 5).

The origins of some other stations remain somewhat of a mystery to us at CRT: Puddle of Accumulated Water (Jishuitan on Line 2), Smooth Justice (Shunyi on Line 15) or Cholera Camp (Huoying on Line 8).

Readers, do you have any insight into how some of the more unique station names came about, or did we miss any notable literal translations? (See the actual Beijing subway map here.) Let us know in the comments.

via Beijing’s Subway Stops, Literally Translated – China Real Time Report – WSJ.

Charlotte Wine & Food Weekend 2014 Calendar of Events, “SEASONAL COOKING: SPRING’S BOUNTY”, CHEF CHRIS HALL of Local Three Kitchen & Bar in Atlanta, kith/kin, Warm Asparagus Salad, Seared Diver Scallop and Spring Pea Risotto, Mint Strawberry Rhubarb Soup:  What a treat!  And everything was divine!! And I have the recipes if you are feeling adventuresome.  Very good!!

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THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 2014

“SEASONAL COOKING: SPRING’S BOUNTY” COOKING DEMONSTRATION WITH CHEF CHRIS HALL of Local Three Kitchen & Bar in Atlanta, hosted by culinary expert, cooking instructor and food writer Heidi Billotto – Thursday, April 24, 10:00am at the Sub- Zero/Wolf Showroom at The Design Center, 127 West Worthington Avenue, Suite 180.

Join Chef Hall as he explores the bounty of spring with you and demonstrates the thinking behind and execution of a spring menu. Chef will be cooking: Warm Asparagus Salad; Frisee, Parmesan, Farm Egg, Sourdough, Bacon Vinaigrette; Seared Diver Scallop; Spring Pea Risotto, Roasted Mushrooms, Mint Strawberry Rhubarb Soup; and Vanilla Creme Fresh, Cornbread “Croutons”

via Charlotte Wine & Food Weekend 2014 Calendar of Events

Poem in Your Pocket Day 4.24, Shel Silverstein:  

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Today is Poem in Your Pocket Day . . . Celebrate with Shel Silverstein! Print this poem from WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS, carry it in your pocket, and share it with as many people as you can.

Buzz Aldrin, First EVA selfie:

@NASA I believe I get to claim the first EVA selfie from space during my Gemini 12 spacewalk orbiting Earth 17,000 mph. Best. Selfie. Ever.

via Buzz Aldrin’s photo “@NASA I believe I get to claim the first EVA selfie from space during my Gemini 12 spacewalk orbiti…” on WhoSay.

Dinah Fried, “Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature’s Most Memorable Meals”, Monkey See : NPR:

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Du Maurier’s feast is just one of 50 tableaux collected in Fried’s new book, Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature’s Most Memorable Meals. It’s full of photographs, all shot from above and each one of food — literary food, to be exact. From the watery gruel in Oliver Twist to a grilled mutton kidney in Ulysses to intricate “salads of harlequin designs” in The Great Gatsby, the book is a tribute to the tastes of authors and their readers.

via Interview: Dinah Fried, Author Of “Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature’s Most Memorable Meals” : Monkey See : NPR.

Netflix, real TV, Neflix own ‘cable channel’:

The offer is limited to those who are both a customer of the three cable companies and a subscriber to Netflix. In addition, the technology requires a cable-provided TiVo box. Although consumers can currently buy TiVos from retail stores that come with the Netflix app, until now cable-provided boxes lacked the Netflix functionality. In order to make the deal possible, Netflix said it had to negotiate with some of its content partners to allow streaming on cable boxes. All Americans with service from one of the three cable companies will be eligible for the offering beginning Monday, company officials said.

via Netflix to become real TV and get its own ‘cable channel’ next week.

The Sound of Music Live!: I’ve held back posting this because it was so bad, but I need a place to store the link in case I forget. What were they thinking. 😦  The Sound of Music Live!.

24
Mar
14

3.24.14 … Boo, Haman … Oh, and in case you missed it, ALL OF AMERICA IS ELIMINATED … First naked yoga … Now naked pilgrims …

Beth Hillel Congregation Bnai Emunah, Purim Carnival 2014, Wilmette Life: When I lived in Wilmette, a Jewish high school student came and taught Sunday School to elementary age students at our Presbyterian church. He taught on Purim.  It was a very fun day in Sunday School.

Explaining the costumes, games and obstacle courses of Purim Carnival 2014, Rabbi Michael Cohen described the celebration as “the Jewish version of Mardi Gras.”

“We’ve got all these kids dressing up, enjoying themselves, having a good time, it’s a wonderful thing,” said Cohen. “It fills up my heart with joy.”

Purim’s festive tone celebrates the events chronicled in the “Megillat Esther.”

Congregants typically read from the Biblical “Scroll of Esther,” which tells of a villain named Haman who tried to convince the king to kill the Jewish people. Fortunately, a noblewoman named Esther spoke up to save the day.

via Beth Hillel Congregation Bnai Emunah Purim Carnival 2014 | Wilmette Life.

Purim, The week’s best photojournalism – The Week:

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men wearing costumes celebrate the holiday of Purim in Jerusalem’s Mea Shearim neighborhood. (REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun)
via The week’s best photojournalism – The Week.

 

Modern Art Desserts UK-based, Gustav Klimt: Fun food!

After I wrote about Modern Art Desserts, UK-based Hungarian reader Gabriella Szucs sent me this photo of a brilliant Klimt cake she baked for a cupcake competition in Northampton.

More edible homages to modern art here.

via Explore – After I wrote about Modern Art Desserts, UK-based….

101 Things I Will Teach My Daughters, Thought Catalog:  Loved this!

28. Classy is a relative term.

29. Drink whiskey if you like whiskey.

30. Drink wine if you like wine.

31. Like what you like.

via 101 Things I Will Teach My Daughters | Thought Catalog.

Gus Mayopoulos, Charlotte native, Harvard’s student council: Charlotte Latin graduate Gus Mayopoulos got elected president of the undergraduate council, sort of like the student council, at Harvard … and it all started out as a joke.

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And while that may not sound all that funny – Mayopoulos, 21, the son of Amy Lefkof and Fannie Mae president Tim Mayopoulos, is the kind of well-educated young person who could be expected to hit a high bar for achievement. Still, how it happened is, actually, pretty funny.

First, it wasn’t supposed to happen at all. Mayopoulos ran as vice president on a two-man ticket with his roommate, Sam Clark. Their platform was a joke: A promise to get two-ply toilet paper in the dorms and more tomato basil ravioli soup in the campus dining halls.

“We were irreverent and we were making it distinctly not serious,” admits Mayopoulos, a junior who was home in Charlotte last week on spring break.

Goofing on serious things, he says, is Harvard tradition. After all, the Cambridge, Mass., school is the home of the Harvard Lampoon, and Hasty Pudding Theatricals. Mayopoulos writes for the campus publication Satire V (it spells “veritas” backward) and performs with a comedy troupe, On Thin Ice.

Clark and Mayopoulos, however, ran a well-organized joke campaign, even joining in a public debate.

Then the funny thing started to happen: Their campaign attracted support. It began to look like they might, improbably, win. So they talked it over and decided that if elected, they wouldn’t serve.

“ ‘We started it as a joke and we should end it as a joke,’ ” Mayopoulos says they agreed.

So what happened? They got elected. Clark stepped down. And Gus … well, Gus didn’t.

via Charlotte’s Gus Mayopoulos leads Harvard’s student council | CharlotteObserver.com.

Wall Poems, public art, Charlotte NC:  I noticed this “wall poem” today for the first time.   One thing I love about Charlotte is its public art.  This poem  by A.R. Ammons on the Dandelion Deli is the first of a series and was installed in 2013.  There are now two.  I wonder what poem will pop up next?

 

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The first wall poem, completed April 2013

via The Wall Poems of Charlotte – Home.

“The necessity for poetry is one of the most fundamental traits of the human race.”

– Amy Lowell

The Wall Poems of Charlotte are murals that bring poetry to the people, all of whom deserve access to it and to whom it belongs.

The project celebrates NC’s literary heritage: All poems are by North Carolina writers. And it heralds the creative career programs at Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), whose Advertising + Graphic Design students design the murals.

Over time, the wall poems will make up a walking tour based on the Leiden Walls in Holland, where 101 poems large and small grace city buildings for residents and tourists to discover and enjoy.

via About – The Wall Poems of Charlotte.

G7/G8, Putin, Ukraine/Crimea invasion:

The leaders are trying to isolate Russia politically and economically, but the suspension also aimed to bruise Putin’s ago. He cares about Russia’s prestige and standing on the world stage, administration officials said, so his exclusion from the group should sting.

via G-7 countries to skip Russian summit – Carrie Budoff Brown – POLITICO.com.

 Goethe, Psychology of Color and Emotion, Brain Pickings:

goethe_colorwheel

One of Goethe’s most radical points was a refutation of Newton’s ideas about the color spectrum, suggesting instead that darkness is an active ingredient rather than the mere passive absence of light.

…light and darkness, brightness and obscurity, or if a more general expression is preferred, light and its absence, are necessary to the production of colour… Colour itself is a degree of darkness.

But perhaps his most fascinating theories explore the psychological impact of different colors on mood and emotion — ideas derived by the poet’s intuition, which are part entertaining accounts bordering on superstition, part

prescient insights corroborated by hard science some two centuries later, and part purely

via Goethe on the Psychology of Color and Emotion | Brain Pickings.

recipes, artichokes: 11 Recipes for Artichokes, Both Fresh and Jarred

Naked Tourists,  Machu Picchu, News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com: First naked yoga … Now naked pilgrims!

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Peruvian officials are cracking down on naked tourism at Machu Picchu after three separate incidents this month. Four Americans were detained for stripping down and taking photos on March 14, and similar incidents occurred with both Canadian and Australian tourists earlier this month.
“There are places in the world that people can get naked, but not all places are for getting undressed,” Alfredo Atayupanqui, the director of archaeological resources for Peru’s Ministry of Culture, told CNN.
An Israeli man has taken naked tourism to new heights by creating a website called My Naked Trip, in which he shares his naked photos from around the world, including his visit to Machu Picchu.
In Peru, officials are not amused by the rise of nudity at the country’s premiere travel destination. Regulations are expected to tighten, according to the Peruvian Times.
via Naked Tourists Hit Machu Picchu | News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com.

2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament, Billion Buffett Perfect NCAA Bracket, March Madness: Did anyone think that no entry would survive the first (actually) second) round?

UPDATE: Memphis won. ALL OF AMERICA IS ELIMINATED.
via Billion Buffett Perfect NCAA Bracket: These 6 Entries Left | SportsGrid.

MLB Memes:

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March 21
How we ALL feel about our brackets right about now
from @rileybreck — with Terry Williams.

Girl Scout Cookies, Thin Mints, first world problems: It makes my life all the more difficult that thin mints freeze perfectly and taste even better frozen. So just when you least need them, they are there waiting in the perfect state. #firstworldproblems

easter eggs, easter tree, The week’s best photojournalism, The Week:

German pensioner Volker Kraft adds Easter eggs to his apple tree in the eastern German town of Saalfeld. Each year since 1965, Volker and his wife Christa have spent up to two weeks decorating the tree with their collection of 10,000 hand-painted eggs. (REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch)
via The week’s best photojournalism – The Week.

Lance Dodes,  ‘The Sober Truth’, NPR:

Since its founding in the 1930s, Alcoholics Anonymous has become part of the fabric of American society. AA and the many 12-step groups it inspired have become the country’s go-to solution for addiction in all of its forms. These recovery programs are mandated by drug courts, prescribed by doctors and widely praised by reformed addicts.

Dr. Lance Dodes sees a big problem with that. The psychiatrist has spent more than 20 years studying and treating addiction. His latest book on the subject is The Sober Truth: Debunking The Bad Science Behind 12-Step Programs And The Rehab Industry.

Dodes tells NPR’s Arun Rath that 12-step recovery simply doesn’t work, despite anecdotes about success.

“We hear from the people who do well; we don’t hear from the people who don’t do well,” he says.

via Author Interview: Lance Dodes, Author Of ‘The Sober Truth’ : NPR.

Fred Rogers, quotes, March 20: The Neighborhood is such a great place. And the sweater, just love the sweater.

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“Love isn’t a state of perfect caring. It is an active noun like struggle. To love someone is to strive to accept that person exactly the way he or she is, right here and now.” – Fred Rogers, born on this day in 1928.

Donna Leon, mystery series, Venice: I  just got a recommendation for this author from one of my mom’s friends at Lenbrook. Her mysteries are set in Venice. Any one read her books? The official site for author Donna Leon.




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